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1931 Duesenberg Model J Dual Windshield ‘Barrelside’ Phaeton by LeBaron

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine with Stromberg downdraft carburetor, three-speed manual transmission, beam-type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5 in. • From the collection of Ray Bowersox • Winner of the epic 1932 race at Lake Muroc • Single ownership since 1985 • One of only seven examples built According to Phil Berg, the original owner of the Duesenberg offered here and agent to numerous stars and producers of Hollywood, it all started like this, “Leila and I were at Al Jolson’s home on Sunset Boulevard one evening, playing bridge with a number of friends. Zeppo and Chico Marx arrived in a sleek SSK (sic) Mercedes, which they had purchased jointly. My Duesenberg was parked in front and soon enough the conversation turned to these powerful looking machines and which of them was the faster.” The story, which unfolded during interviews conducted by noted racing historian and author Griffith Borgeson with Berg and other witnesses, is the stuff of legend. The conversation recounted by Berg quickly developed from casual banter to a bet proposed by Chico Marx for “several thousand dollars.” Leila Berg should arguably be credited for the events that unfolded, because that evening, she put a stop to the race that the gentlemen intended to happen then and there—from Jolson’s home to the beach in Santa Monica. Due to Mrs. Berg’s aversion to a race at midnight, the stakes were entrusted to a friend while the competitors organized a proper race, resulting in what Borgeson described as “sort of an automotive gunfight at the O.K. Corral, a showdown between two of the biggest, baddest glamour wagons of all time.” Between that evening and the day of the race, the wager ballooned to 25,000 Depression-era dollars. It was the kind of money that the vast majority of Americans might only dream of amassing after a lifetime of work and which, at the time, was only possessed by those involved in the Hollywood film industry. To Berg, however, there was nothing wrong with a friendly wager and he didn’t consider it to be gambling because he thought he could win. A phone call to the Indianapolis Speedway referred Berg to a man right in his own backyard: Eddie Miller. Miller began an association with the Duesenberg Automobile & Motors Company, Inc., back in 1915, when he was a team driver and brilliant mechanic for Fred Duesenberg through 1922. He later set up a repair shop in Hollywood and serviced automobiles for many entertainment personalities. His shop became a hangout for his racing buddies when they were in town, and he later came to the attention of E.L. Cord, who arranged to harness Miller’s talents in the nascent field of engine tuning by creating a racing department in the renamed Duesenberg, Inc., and giving him a free hand to express his art and his genius. Miller accepted the offer and his subsequent association with Cord’s empire would bring him into contact with the dry surface Lake Muroc and head-to-head with the supercharged Mercedes many times before the bet made by Marx and Berg. As it so happened, Cord was also Phil Berg’s neighbor at the time and he gladly put him in touch with Miller, who agreed to participate in the race. A week before the race, a program of tuning and test driving was begun. The heavy LeBaron phaeton was stripped of any parts deemed unnecessary, including the fenders, bumpers, running boards, headlights, top, trunk, and windshield. Other preparations included last minute carburetor adjustments and staying up until 3 a.m. to whittle away the treads on a set of brand new tires to help improve gearing. What started out as a casual wager over a game of cards ended up surprisingly well organized, with a couple hundred invited guests bussed in and others who flew personal planes to the site. Among those in attendance were Clark Gable, Gary Cooper, Al Jolson, Carole Lombard, Mae West, and many others. Hollywood-based Mercedes specialist Joe Reindl was chosen to drive the Model S Mercedes. At 6:30 in the morning, the two cars lined up on a circular track at Muroc. The Mercedes took the shorter inside line and Miller gladly took the outside line, which he knew was firmer because it was raced on less. Rounding out the star-studded list of attendees was the official starter, legendary race car designer and builder Harry Miller. When the flag was dropped, the two cars took off. As Eddie Miller described, “We had the muffler off, of course, and you can believe that that thing roared. They must have heard it in Barstow.” As expected, Reindle had faster acceleration and pulled into an early lead. By the time the cars reached the three mile point, the cars were side-by-side and Miller knew that he could easily take the Mercedes in top speed. Miller overtook Reindl after the first lap, “pouring on the coal pretty hard.” He reported his speed to be 108 or 109 miles an hour, still holding some power in reserve in case the Mercedes caught up. “As I came by the pole, where the people were waving and cheering, I looked back but could see no sign of my competition, swallowed up somewhere in my dust cloud.” A number of photos documenting the race show the two incredible stripped-down brutes poised and ready to prove their mettle in the crucible of motorsport. Subsequent to Phil Berg’s ownership, the phaeton traveled through a succession of owners from California until passing to Herman Zalud, of North Platte, Nebraska. Later, it was with early collector and pioneer Tiny Gould, of Pennsylvania. An article published in Sports Illustrated on May 10, 1971 documents Gould’s rejection of an offer that would have shattered the previous $45,000 world record for an antique car, which was held by a T-head Mercer. So important was the car, and Gould’s faith in it, that he held on until finding the right home. J-299 was eventually acquired by The Craven Foundation in Canada before coming into the ownership of Mr. Bowersox in November 1985, where it was thoroughly restored. The restoration included a full engine and mechanical rebuild, which has been meticulously maintained since. It has been driven and enjoyed regularly for the last quarter century, aided by the high-speed rear end, and has participated in many tours and ACD meets. Finished in an attractive combination of sand beige with red fenders and accents, it is further amplified by a tan cloth top and side curtains by Al Prueit, and a sumptuous brown leather interior, which appears comfortable and worn in, like a favorite armchair. The interior is complemented by brown carpeting and accented by a Duesenberg eagle molded into the leather-upholstered panel behind the driver’s seat. Also highly attractive is the contrasting hood sweep, which starts at the peak of the radiator shell and spreads outward toward the cowl to the beginning of the complex belt molding; it then comes down the sides of the cowl and splits in front of the front door handle, continuing down the body until it joins back together behind the rear door handle and wraps around the rear of the body. Other features include the interesting windshield, which cants forward and then rakes back at 45 degrees, Pilot-Ray driving lights, wind wings, chrome wire wheels, dual side-mounts with pedestal mirrors, a brown leather trunk with Duesenberg script, and a rear folding windshield with wings. The folding windshield is a period accessory and it is notable because J-299 was the only one of the seven LeBaron ‘barrelsides’ built without a rear cowl. It is further equipped with dual rear taillights and modern driving lights and seat belts for safe touring. With the fading of memory and the passing of the legendary personalities that created the rolling sculptures so enthusiastically cherished today, so too have passed many great tales of automotive daring and folly. Collectors, historians, and enthusiasts are forever indebted to Borgeson for the many works he published documenting the early history of many automotive firms and pioneers. J-299 lives on as well, existing as a not-so-silent reminder of glory days passed. The car and the mythical race are superlatives in automotive lore and the well-crafted recounting is so aptly named: Madness at Muroc. Chassis no. 2318 Engine no. J-299 Body no. LB-4068

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-10-11
Hammer price
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1956 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

215 hp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, coil-spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. The 1956 Turin International Automobile Salon car Equipped from new with Rudge wheels A beautiful, recent restoration Mercedes-Benz’s 300 SL claimed 2nd in the Mille Miglia; 1-2-3 in the Berne, Switzerland, Sports Car Race; 1st and 2nd at Le Mans; 1-2-3-4 at the Nürburgring; and 1st and 2nd at La Carrera Panamericana. The company’s U.S. distributor, Max Hoffman, decided, from his Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Park Avenue showroom, that there was a market in America for a fast, sensual Mercedes-Benz coupe, and a production version of the racing 300 SL, complete with the fascinating gullwing doors, which were necessitated by the unusual frame design, would be it. Fuel injection replaced the race car’s carburetors, and the Bosch mechanical unit would be the first for a production car. After the 11 prototype W194s, including the so-called “Hobel,” were made in all-alloy, the new Karl Wilfert-designed body was largely made of steel; it also retained an aluminum hood, doors, and trunk lids, and it included bumpers (with over-riders for U.S.-spec cars, but optional for the rest of the world) and numerous creature comforts, including a tilt-wheel for ease of entry and a sumptuous interior, which is a requisite for road use. The SL (translated to English as “Sport Light”) moniker reflected the pioneering use of welded tubular-steel ultra-light frame construction, which made it only 182 pounds. The car also featured a fully independent suspension, in addition to its fuel-injected, 3.0-liter (2,996-cubic centimeter) OHC straight six with dry-sump lubrication; the motor was inclined to the side in order to reduce the height of the front end. The power, rated at 240 brake horsepower at 6,100 rpm (SAE) and 215 brake horsepower at 5,800 rpm (DIN) with the factory-optional or dealer-installed “sport” camshaft, was delivered through a four-speed manual gearbox. With a 161-mph top speed and a 0–60 acceleration of approximately eight seconds, depending on the rear-end ratio, which could be selected from five options, the 300 SL was the fastest production automobile of its time. It took practice to elegantly climb into a Gullwing, with its wide door sills and low-set seats, but once one was seated and the door swung down, all was right. The pedals are exactly where one’s feet wants to find them, the steering wheel and shifter are at a comfortable level, and the entire car seems to wrap around one’s body like a Savile Row suit. The result was a comfortable, snug place in which to carry oneself and a loved passenger to ridiculously high speeds while negotiating mountain passes, seaside highways, and the like. Long before other manufacturers advertised racing cars for the road, the 300 SL truly delivered it to those who could afford it. Appropriately, for an automobile that Max Hoffman had almost single-handedly willed into being, the production 300 SL made its debut in the United States, not in Germany, which was a Mercedes first. More than 1,000 of the 1,400 cars produced between 1954 and early 1957 where delivered through Hoffman, to whose showrooms the rich and famous flocked. The 300 SL was as much a status symbol in its time as it is today, as it has been favored by everyone, from Hollywood stars—Clark Gable took one on location for his films—to racing legends and genuine royalty; the kings of Jordan, Belgium, and Greece all became owners within the first year of production. Argentinean dictator Juan Peron had been a racing driver before finding his true course in politics, and he, too, owned a 300 SL. The 300 SL also raced, and it was piloted by such legends as John Fitch, Olivier Gendebien, Paul O’Shea, Prince Metternich, and, of course, Sir Stirling Moss. It all added to the romance of a car that seemed destined to become a legend the moment production began. It had all the right ingredients: it was incredibly expensive, incredibly exclusive, and incredibly fast, and any red-blooded human who had ever pushed a clutch pedal would’ve sold his or her soul for the feeling of 161 mph behind the wheel. “A thoroughbred in every sense of the word,” advertising boasted, “and a car which will be recognized by all enthusiasts as the ‘last word’ in sporting automobiles; a car which puts indescribable pleasure into driving!” CHASSIS NO. 198.040.6500052 The car offered here, chassis no. 198.040.6500052, is documented by noted 300 SL historians as having been built for display at the 1956 Turin International Automobile Salon. According to its Mercedes-Benz Classic Center data card, an English translation of which is in included in the file, it was originally displayed in Silver Grey Metallic (180), with a special-order red leather interior (1079) and arguably the most desirable factory option, Rudge wheels. In the late 1960s, the 300 SL was discovered in West Nyack, New York, by avid Mercedes-Benz enthusiast Jan Fraser. In a recent telephone conversation, Mr. Fraser happily recalled the car, stating that, when he found it, he was told that it had been raced in Italy, and, indeed, it still showed signs of its time in competition. It had been refinished in red with a light beige interior, but it retained a silver dashboard, which was a nod to its original livery. “You didn’t have to take your hat off to anyone in that baby,” Mr. Fraser recalled. “It was a wonderful automobile.” Mr. Fraser eventually sold his 300 SL to Dr. Leon Levine, who would keep it for decades. It was acquired from Dr. Levine by its present owner, a noted collector from the western United States, in whose care it has been body-on restored by California specialist Tom Drummond in its original, iconic Silver Grey Metallic shade, as it had been shown in Turin. Importantly, many components of the car, such as the silver dashboard, were in such good original condition that they were able to be preserved. The interior boasts comfortable 300 SL roadster-style seats that have been reupholstered, utilizing factory-correct materials and patterns, in blue leather, which is a more subtle accent to the sparking finish. The chassis underneath is covered by belly pans, and importantly, for the discerning enthusiast, the original Rudge knock-offs remain on the disc wheels. Every collector has to own and drive a 300 SL Gullwing once in his or her life. This example is an ideal opportunity to capture one of fine quality and one that has been preserved, enjoyed, and restored by great enthusiasts. It is finished in an iconic color, it bears original Rudge wheels, as it has since new, and, most importantly, it is perhaps the only original factory 300 SL auto salon car available for sale today. Jan Fraser describes his beloved 300 SL best: “It’s had a wild beginning, a mild middle, and it’s now ready for new excitement.” Please note that this car is offered with a set of fitted luggage, which has been added since photography. Chassis no. 198.040.6500052

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
Hammer price
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1960 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

One of the finest 300 SL roadsters available Immaculate, documented restoration by West Coast 300 SL experts Three-time concours Best in Class winner Original matching-numbers drivetrain Includes correct tool set, owner’s manual, and set of matching fitted luggage At the 1957 Geneva Motor Show, Mercedes-Benz introduced a new version of the celebrated 300 SL wearing open coachwork, the 300 SL roadster. In an early suggestion of the increasing focus the manufacturer would place on luxury cars over the ensuing decades, the new roadster was above all a more refined car than its gull-winged predecessor. There was no denying the 300 SL’s mechanical performance, which had decidedly improved in the roadster, with the updated six-cylinder engine receiving the competition camshaft used in the NSL racing Gullwings, good for a lift of 20 horsepower. Handling also benefited from a revised rear suspension with a lower axle pivot-point, minimizing the Gullwing’s tendency for oversteer. Despite the added weight of chassis reinforcement required by an open model, the roadster was every bit the performance car that the Gullwing had proven itself to be. The roadster’s overwhelmingly luxurious character, however, generally obscured its performance capabilities. With a reclining soft top, the model was never subject to the stuffy cabin issues that beguiled the Gullwing, and the roadster’s redesigned tube frame afforded lower door sills, facilitating far easier access than the Gullwing’s challenging ingress and egress. Interestingly, the Mercedes-Benz data card, which is on file, notes that this particular car was originally delivered on 18 July 1960, to the distributor in Panama! It was equipped to American specifications with English instruments, sealed-beam headlights, a removable hardtop, black soft top, and Becker Mexico radio with a Reims III adapter. Previous owners are noted in the Gull Wing Group’s Roadster Registry as Fred Di Girato, in 1974, and Ronald Kellogg of Whittier, California, in 1975. Later it was acquired by John Sorrell of Santa Barbara, then by the current owner nearly a decade ago. In its current tenure the car was fully restored by Classic European of Vista, California, with extensive mechanical work by longtime Gull Wing Group member Steve Marx of Costa Mesa, who rebuilt the brakes, valvetrain, cooling system, transmission, rear axle, and clutch. Cosmetic work was performed by the noted Hjeltness Restoration in Escondido, including a refitted top, panel gap adjustments, and new show-quality chrome. The body is finished in Medium Blue (DB 350), with a matching factory-correct hardtop and blue soft top, and a correct beige interior. Inspection of the numbers notes that gearbox and engine both match the Mercedes-Benz data card. “Euro” headlights, widely considered more attractive than the U.S.-specification versions, were fitted. Since completion of the restoration, the car has been very well maintained, with light driving about once a month to maintain it in good running order. A consummate showpiece, it has been exhibited three times, at the Palos Verdes Concours in 2013 and 2016, and the Los Angeles Concours d’Elegance in 2009, winning Best in Class at all three events. No expense was spared in making the car one of the best 300 SL roadsters in existence, and then to keep it that way. Further, the car is accompanied by thorough documentation of the restoration work, detailed down to receipts for many of the necessary parts. It is also complete with a correct tool set, owner’s manual, two catalogues, a tonneau cover, and a two-piece set of matching fitted luggage. An exceptional 300 SL roadster, this car is deserving of the most distinguished collection. Chassis no. 198.042.10.002607 Engine no. 198.980.10.002663 Body no. 198.042.10.00118

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1933 Chrysler CL Imperial Dual-Windshield Phaeton 'Ralph Roberts' by LeBaron

135 bhp, 384.8 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 146 in. The one-off personal car of LeBaron designer Ralph Roberts Believed to have been the final Imperial dual-windshield phaeton built Best in Class at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Known history from new; formerly of the Otis Chandler and Milhous collections Spectacularly restored in its original color scheme A Full Classic Chrysler of immense significance CHRYSLER’S “Y-JOB” Shortly after the formation of coachbuilder LeBaron by Raymond Dietrich and Thomas Hibbard in 1920, the pair took in recent Dartmouth graduate Ralph Roberts as a partner. LeBaron was soon supplying bodies for all of the great Classic Era chassis, supplied by New York dealers. Roberts and LeBaron prospered, and in 1927, Walter Briggs, of Detroit’s vast Briggs Body Company, approached Roberts with a generous buyout offer. Roberts wisely accepted, and LeBaron and its chief moved, lock, stock, and barrel, to Detroit. LeBaron became Briggs’ in-house design studio and its most prestigious nameplate, as Briggs was a major body supplier to the fledgling Chrysler Corporation, also Chrysler’s de facto “Art and Color Studio.” In an era when Ford had Bob Gregorie, drawing Edsel Ford special speedsters and the original Continental, and General Motors had Harley Earl, breaking the styling mold with the advanced Cadillac V-16 Aero-Dynamic Coupe and Buick Y-Job, Chrysler had Ralph Roberts. Roberts’ definitive design statement—his Continental, his Y-Job—was the car offered here. Based upon the last of 36 CL Imperial Dual-Windshield Phaetons built by LeBaron for Chrysler in 1933, it was drawn to Roberts’ own special design, with the intention of being a gift to his wife. As Chrysler’s design considerations were, frankly, not considered on this “one off,” Roberts was able to make his personal Imperial look as he wanted it to, as he told author Dennis Adler in a 1985 interview. There were a number of unusual or experimental ideas tried on this car. One was the extended fender skirt and fender skirts on the rear. The radiator was painted, instead of chromed, the headlights were also different from those on the standard CL series bodies, and instead of having the spare wheels in the fender well, I had them moved to the back of the car. It is worth expounding upon Roberts’ comments. The headlights were relocated much lower, between the crowns of the fenders and the radiator shell—a very modern position. The reworked fenders with the full “skirts” over the rear wheels clearly look toward the future Chrysler Airflow and Chrysler Airstream. A mounted bracket from an old Locomobile was used to mount the dual spares on the rear, clearing the fenders and increasing the clean visual length of the car. The result was a long, sleek greyhound of a car, accentuated by its unique Moon Glow Blue polychromatic finish. More than beautiful, it looked a decade ahead of its time and foretold future Chryslers, created both with and without Roberts’ influence. THE MODERN LIFE OF A GREAT IMPERIAL Mr. and Mrs. Roberts retained the unique phaeton until 1942, when they relocated from Detroit to California. Not willing to drive the car cross-country in the depths of gas rationing, they sold it in the Motor City. Ironically, however, the car then wound up in the Golden State, as it was purchased shortly thereafter by Bob Harrison of San Francisco, who would own it for the next 18 years. He thus ensured its survival and integrity, well into the era of the collector car. In 1960, the car was purchased from Harrison by Bob Burkholder, also of San Francisco, who performed its first, largely authentic restoration. It was next acquired by longtime California Chrysler Imperial enthusiast Douglas O’Connell, and then in 1969 by Jerry Lindler of Fresno, who maintained it until the early 1980s. Renowned enthusiast Otis Chandler was, at the time, building his esteemed collection of Full Classic automobiles, focusing on open phaetons of the finest quality. Naturally, when it came to selecting the right CL Imperial, the Roberts car fit the bill, and Mr. Chandler had soon picked it up from Mr. Lindler. It remained a feature of the Chandler Vintage Museum until the early 1990s and was then sold to Joe Morgan, the renowned Imperial expert in New Hampshire, who over the years has owned many of the surviving cars. The next owner, Neil Wynn of Hillsborough, Florida, commissioned a complete restoration by Curt Austin, including finish in the original and correct Moon Glow Blue, and great care taken to restore the original, Roberts-ordered features, including the skirts adorning the long fenders, and the wheel discs, which are complemented by B.F. Goodrich Silvertown whitewalls. The completed restoration was exhibited at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1997 and was judged Most Elegant Open Car. Shortly thereafter, the Imperial was added to Paul and Robert Milhous’ spectacular Florida collection, where it was the centerpiece for over a decade. Acquired from the Milhous brothers by its current owner, a respected East Coast collector, in 2012, it was subsequently consigned to RM Auto Restoration for sorting and detailing. This included making new metal covers for the dual rear-mounted spares, installing a new top and carpeting of a more complementary color, and extensive mechanical work, including new bearings in the powerful CL Imperial straight eight. Today, the restoration of this car appears as fresh and spectacular as ever, and the judges still adore it. It was judged Best in Class at the 2013 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance and the 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, and Most Elegant Open Pre-War Car at the 2016 Elegance at Hershey. Most prominently, it won Best of Show at the Concours d’Elegance of America at St. John’s in 2012, and at the Radnor Hunt Concours d’Elegance in 2014. Simply put, few, if any, Imperials have been such a showstopper in recent years, with many more chances for trophies available to a new owner. Further, the owner notes that the car is in superb mechanical condition, as well, having completed the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance. As that career on the show field demonstrates, the presence of this car, one of the most significant Chryslers of its era, is overwhelming. Such is only fitting for an automobile that demonstrated the future for its manufacturer as clearly as the Continental did for Ford and the Y-Job did for General Motors. With few other Classic Era designers’ personal automobiles remaining, and fewer still in private ownership, it can be safely counted as the most significant American Classic to have come to market in recent years. That would undoubtedly please Ralph Roberts, for whom this Chrysler, built by what he called “the right men in the right place at the right time,” was always more than just his wife’s car. Chassis no. CL 1357 Serial no. 7803657 Engine no. CL 1357 Body no. 172-50

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
Hammer price
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1952 FERRARI 225 SPORT SPYDER

The ex-Scuderia Ferrari and Roberto Bonomi 1952 FERRARI 225 SPORT SPYDER COACHWORK BY VIGNALE Chassis No. 0160ED Engine No. 0160ED Dark red with tan leather interior Engine: V12, 2,715cc, 210bhp; Gearbox: five speed manual; Suspension: independent, double wishbone, transverse lower leaf spring front suspension, live axle, double semi-elliptical longitudinal leaf spring rear suspension; Brakes: four wheel hydraulic drum. Right hand drive. To this day, few vehicles entice more excitement and passion than that of Ferrari's mid-50s, big engined sports racers. Developed during a period of triumph and passion, they personify every aspect of Ferrari's road racing legend. Often designed and built with a single purpose in mind, Ferrari churned out arguably the finest cars of the day, a position maintained today in both racing and street cars. Christie's is very pleased to offer 0160ED which began life on January 10, 1952 with a special Tipo 340 Tuboscocca chassis (internal #37 A) rear axle. It featured a newly introduced 'limited slip' design and had a 9 x 42 inch, or 4.66:1 final drive ratio. Further, records indicate that this was the only such designed 225 Sport with double parallel springs fixed to the rear axle. Most likely this was a function to compensate for the Tipo 340 rear axle and the nearly 40 gallon fuel tank, the largest used in the 1950s. Very quickly, a testament to the speed at which the Ferrari factory moved, the chassis was completed on February 2nd, and two weeks later the engine was assembled by mechanics Storchi and Leopardi supervised by Foreman Franchini. Meanwhile the gearbox, noted to be a Tipo 212 Export (internal #156 E) was completed by mechanic Beltrami and fitted to 0160ED. Days later the car was returned to the Vignale body shop where work was completed and on March 2, 1952 the engine was first dyno tested. The following day the car was subjected to the factory road test and then on March 9, 0160ED was race ready and entered in the XII Tour of Sicily by Piero Taruffi and co-driver Mario Vandelli on behalf of Scuderia Ferrari wearing race number 443 which it proudly displays today. While posting the fastest overall time a blown head gasket sidelined 0160ED with a DNF. Records then indicated the car was sold by the factory to Count Bruno Sterzi of Milan who raced the car in the XIV Aosta-Gran San Bernardo Hillclimb to a result still unknown. Later wearing #78 it was raced on September 28th at the Gran Premio di Bari and then tested at Imola on October 19th by Alberto Ascari and motorcycle champion Umberto Masetti. By the end of 1952 it was sold to Mrs. Piano of Buenos Aires who in turn sold it to Roberto Bonomi also of Buenos Aires. Shortly thereafter on February 1st 1953, sporting light blue paint Bonomi placed 1st overall at the Gran Premio Ciudad de Buenos Aires. This was to be the first in a number of successful outings by Bonomi with 0160ED in South America. Notable success include 3rd overall at the 1953 Premio Verano at Mar del Plata, a 4th at the 1953 Grand Prix Governardor Carlos Evans at Mendoza (driven by Adolfo Schwelm Cruz), and the 1954 Mil Kilometros de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires by Bonomi and Carlos Menditeguy. Sporting a color change to red in late 1954 it was prepared once again for the Mil Kilometros driven this time by Alcaro Piano, Miguel Schroder and Carlos Alcorta finishing 18th. From here the trail of 0160ED goes dark until 1971 when it was sold to Lucio M. Bollaert of Buenos Aires and then repainted medium blue. Then passing to Kerry Manolas of Point Piper, Australia in 1982 it was treated to a complete restoration and repainted to red. After work was completed, 0160ED began its show career including the 1984 Ferrari Concours in Carmel and the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. Later it was sold to noted Ferrari collector Mr. Anthony Wang of Long Island, New York who kept the car in his impressive stable until 1989 when it was sold to Mr. Len Immke of Columbus, Ohio. Mr Immke, a high ranking officer with Wendy's Hamburger's as well as a noted Ferrari and vintage sports car collector, owned the car when it was featured in Cars & Parts magazine by Lee Beck in January 1992. By 1995 the car had traded to another noted Ferrari collector Mr. Chris Cox of North Carolina who immediately presented the car at the Cavallino Classic. 0160ED was then passed to the collection of Mr. Skeets Dunn of Rancho Santa Fe, California who eventually sold the car to Mr. John Sullivan of Palm Beach, Florida. It is under the care of Mr. Sullivan that 0160ED was again restored by Motion Products in Neenah, Wisconsin to the immaculate condition as it appears today. Repainted in burgundy with tan interior and wearing it's original Scuderia Ferrari number of 443, the car won the 1997 Judges Cup at the Cavallino Classic and a visit to Meadowbrook Hall in August of the same year. 0160ED was purchased in 2001 by Michael Yedor of Bel Air, California who in turn sold it to the current gentleman owner. Having now spent two years in a cherished environment being exercised routinely and surrounded by equally sporting cars (and most recently accepted as an entry to the 2006 Mille Miglia), the time has come for 0160ED to find another home. By all accounts this is the most complete, original, correct and verifiable 225 sport spyder in existence. Accompanying the car are an impressive set of binders cataloguing its complete history as well as the ever sought after tools. This is an opportunity not to be missed. Christie's would like to thank Marcel Massini for his invaluable assistance in the research of 0160ED.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-17
Hammer price
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1938 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet 'A' Chassis no. 169396

1938 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet 'A' Coachwork by Sindelfingen Chassis no. 169396 • 5.4-liter supercharged inline eight-cylinder • Four-speed manual transmission • Servo-assisted hydraulic brakes • Delightful patina • Two long-term owners • One of 83 540K Cabriolet 'A' built Together with its predecessor the 500K, the magnificent Mercedes-Benz 540K was arguably the most noteworthy production model offered by the Stuttgart firm during the 1930s. A development of the 500K, whose independently suspended chassis it shared, the 540K was powered by a 5.4-liter supercharged straight-eight engine. The 540K was one of the first models developed under Mercedes' new chief engineer, ex-racing driver Max Sailer, successor to Hans Nibel, who had died in November 1934 at only 54 years old. It featured the company's famous Roots-type supercharger system in which pressing the accelerator pedal to the end of its travel would simultaneously engage the compressor and close off the alternative atmospheric intake to the carburetor. This system had been thoroughly proven on the preceding series of Dr Porsche-conceived S-Type cars, and in effect the 540K was the last supercharged production Mercedes until relatively recent times. Launched at the Paris Salon in October 1936, the 540K had an engine that developed 115bhp un-supercharged or 180bhp with the compressor engaged. The gearbox was a four-speed, but with a direct top gear rather than the overdrive ratio used on the earlier 500K. With the supercharger engaged, the 540K's blown straight-eight gave it a top speed approaching 110mph (177km/h) matched by servo-assisted hydraulic braking. Its performance potential was such that Mercedes-Benz in the UK retained racing driver Goffredo 'Freddy' Zehender as technical adviser and demonstration driver, since the supercharged Mercedes was one of the few genuine 100mph road cars available in the 1930s. Tested by Britain's Motor magazine, the 540K was deemed to have lighter steering and handling than its 500K predecessor, plus an even more comfortable ride, even though the same all-round independent suspension layout with parallel links and coil springs at the front and swing axles at the rear was retained. The Motor's test car returned 102mph over the timed quarter-mile with the supercharger engaged and 85mph with it disengaged. Such performance was achieved at the cost of 11mpg petrol consumption, but the servo-assisted brakes came in for fulsome praise, the blower was found to be relatively quiet, and the steering and handling also compared favorably with the 500K. In May 1938, the 540K was tested by Motor's rival magazine Autocar and achieved the highest maximum speed of any road-test car up to that date: carrying three passengers, the car reached 104.65 mph (168.5km/h) on the race circuit at Brooklands, Surrey. "One's foot goes hard down, and an almost demoniacal howl comes in," reported test driver H. S. Linfield. "The rev counter and speedometer needles leap round their dials: there is perhaps no other car noise in the world so distinctive as that produced by the Mercedes supercharger." Late in 1938, a revised 540K made its appearance, with oval-section chassis tubes instead of channel frame members, while the adoption of sodium-cooled valves followed the company's highly successful racing practice. Although the 500K/540K chassis attracted the attention of many of the better quality bespoke coachbuilders of the day, Mercedes' own Sindelfingen coachwork left little room for improvement. The cabriolet came in a variety of styles. This example has the Cabriolet 'A' option with two-door, 2+1 seater coachwork and is outstandingly handsome, boasting wire wheels, twin side-mounted spares, exposed landau irons, twin horns and a center spotlight. The work of the gifted Hermann Ahrens, design chief at Sindelfingen, the Cabriolet 'A' offered elegant all weather touring allied to breathtaking performance. Daimler-Benz's order number 262498 was supplied with this car, chassis number 169396. It was one of at least two cars in this series delivered to Mercedes-Benz of Paris at that time, the next consecutive chassis 169397 (sold by Bonhams in 2005) also being delivered new through this agency. According to copies of the factory records, it was completed early in 1938 and transferred to Paris on March 20, 1938. We are not aware of records of its original purchaser at this time, but it is understood that like its sister car, shortly after the war the 540 was brought to the U.S. by an Army officer, Colonel William H. Kendall of Sarasota, Florida. Col. Kendall kept the car until 1970, when it passed to a friend of his, arch car sleuth Paul Karassik, the person credited with extracting two Auto Union Grand Prix cars from the Ukraine in the late 1980s. Karassik would keep the Mercedes for more than 40 years, the custodianship by these two long-term keepers therefore account for the vast majority of its life. Early in this second period of U.S. custody the Mercedes was refurbished with new paint in the deep burgundy tone that it still wears to this day, at the same time its original leather was re-dyed, rather than replaced, and a new top was fitted. This remains the sum total of the work carried out on the car in the course of his ownership and with limited attention since, it remains in extremely original and authentic order. Correct period features include a rare round faced Becker Radio, fabric radiator cover to assist running in cold temperatures and a fold away luggage rack, among others. Looking forward, the car may be considered as a solid driver quality car or alternatively a sound basis for a Concours style refurbishment. The manufacturing record of the 540K revealed its exclusive nature: 97 being produced in 1936, 145 in 1937, 95 in 1938 and 69 in 1939 before the war ended series production (though three more were built up to July 1942). Of a total of just over 400 produced, Cabriolet A derivatives are thought to account for 83 examples, with a survival rates a little over half of that number. Not surprisingly, in recent decades, the rarity, style and performance of these big supercharged Mercedes have made them one of the most sought-after of all classic cars on the rare occasions they have come to the open market. Bonhams has the very fine tradition and honor of offering the world's greatest supercharged Mercedes; this Cabriolet 'A', in its late model specification, represented the very best that money could buy in the late 1930s, and still does. Refer to Department

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-01-17
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1955 LANCIA AURELIA B24S SPIDER AMERICA

1955 LANCIA AURELIA B24S SPIDER AMERICA Coachwork by Pinin Farina Chassis no. B24S-1094 Engine no. 1116 2,451cc OHV All-Alloy V6 Engine Single Dual-Throat Weber Carburetor 118bhp at 5,300rpm 4-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Drum Brakes – Inboard at the Rear *Exquisitely restored example of the legendary Spider America *Just five private owners and less than 63,000 miles from new *Displayed and awarded at numerous regional concours d'elegance *An outstanding Lancia ready for top events such as the Mille Miglia Storica The Lancia Spider America Race developed V6 engine, superlative handling and sensational Pinin Farina styling: these are the ingredients of a sports car classic and the Lancia Aurelia B24S Spider America has them all. Lancia's classic Aurelia, the first car ever to employ a V6 engine, was launched at the 1950 Turin Motor Show. An advanced unitary construction design, the 1.7-liter Aurelia featured all-independent suspension and a combined gearbox/rear transaxle on which were mounted the inboard brakes. The sedan was joined the following year by the Pinin Farina-styled B20 Coupé, a fastback '2+2' on a shortened wheelbase which, with its combination of sports car performance and sedan-like practicality, can be said to have introduced the Gran Turismo concept to the world. Introduced in 1953, the 3rd and subsequent series B20s were powered by a 2,451cc, 118bhp version of the OHV V6, and this was adopted for the B24 Spider, also called the 'America', launched in 1954. Acknowledged as one of Pinin Farina's masterpieces, the Aurelia B24 Spider combined sporting characteristics with an elegance that presaged another of the Torinese carrozzeria's great works, the Alfa Romeo Giulietta Spider of 1955. For the B24 Spider the Aurelia B20 chassis was further shortened and came with a floor-mounted gear-change as standard. Its performance equaled that of the B20 Coupe, top speed being in the region of 115mph (185km/h). Unusually clean lines enabled the Spider to achieve what was an exceptional performance for an open car of the period, being unencumbered by external door handles (there were internal pull-cords) and benefiting from a gracefully curved wraparound windscreen, and the model's signature styling feature, split bumpers front and rear. Only 240 B24 Spiders were manufactured during 1954/55, and today the model is one of the most sought-after of post-war Lancias. The Motorcar Offered Chassis no. B24S-1094 claims a minimal chain of just five owners throughout the course of its life, less than 63,000 miles from new, and a comprehensive restoration. Also boasting a high degree of authenticity, this mid-production Spider America showcases the beautiful design and advanced mechanicals that made the open Lancia so captivating. This Aurelia was originally finished in pale green pastel paint and upholstered in dark green vinyl, initially taking delivery to a physician in Duchess County, New York. In 1971 the car passed to his mechanic, whose garage was across the street from a camping trailer dealer. The mechanic then traded the Spider to the dealer as a partial deposit on a camper, and the dealership offered the car for sale. The B24S was soon discovered and purchased by James Steerman, an ardent Lancia enthusiast and college professor who founded the film studies program at Vassar College in nearby Poughkeepsie, New York. Prof. Steerman and his son, James, would eventually become some of the foremost Spider America enthusiasts in the nation, owning at least one more example, as well as several other Lancias. While Steerman frequently used the Spider in his short bouts around the Vassar campus, he also meticulously maintained the car, keeping it jacked up in a rented garage where he changed the oil and spark plugs regularly, and routinely greased the axles. He estimates accruing roughly 1,000 miles per year, as he sometimes drove the car to American Lancia Club meets around the northeast. Steerman maintains it was "a moment of weakness" when he sold the B24S in 1980 to Walter Eisenstark and Richard Klein of Yorktown Heights, New York. Even though the Aurelia still presented well and displayed an overwhelming state of originality, the new owners nevertheless opted for a full restoration, which they entrusted to the Wills Garage in Oakdale, Pennsylvania. A majority of the photo-documented refurbishment was performed by the late Walt Spak, one of the most respected Aurelia experts in the niche (who solidified his expertise as a longtime employee of the American Lancia Parts Consortium in Pittsburgh). His refurbishment most notably featured a refinish of the exterior in a handsome shade of rosso scuro. Following completion of the restoration, Mr. Eisenstark presented the Spider at several regional events, including the 2002 Concours-Italian Style in Dearborn, Michigan, and the 2005 Greenwich Concours d'Elegance, where the car won the Best Italian Sports/Touring Car of 1956-57. Later in 2005, the Spider America was acquired by the consignor, a collector in Southern California who undertook some further measures to heighten the restoration's authenticity. This work included re-chroming and straightening the brightwork, color-sanding the paint, and installing new wire wheels sourced from Borrani. A correct rearview mirror was custom-fabricated, a proper wraparound windshield was ordered from Finland, and the interior was reupholstered in blue, with proper black rubber floor mats, and original carpeting over the gas tank. Since the freshening, B24S-1094 has been presented at numerous events on the West Coast, including the Palos Verdes and the Los Angeles Concours d'Elegance, with best-in-class awards routinely bestowed. At the Newport Beach Concours d'Elegance, the car also won special awards for color design, finish, and styling. Accompanied by its original manuals (including a rare factory parts catalog) and a full set of tools, this outstanding B24S has been registered with the Aurelia Club of Italy. It claims an airtight chain of ownership extending to 1971, when it was reportedly sold by its first owner. It also boasts strong authenticity thanks to the recent freshening, and is believed to feature its original Aurelia motor, the groundbreaking powerplant that is generally regarded as the world's first production V-6. Documented with some restoration invoices and photographs, this intoxicating Spider America is among the finest examples offered, and would beautifully complement any collection of Italian coachbuilt sports cars. With details like the delicately curved one-piece windscreen, the artfully pounded coachwork from Pinin Farina, and the revolutionary chassis design, this car exemplifies the finest in 1950s sports car design, and would constitute an ideal entrant for events such as the Colorado Grand and the Mille Miglia Storica.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-20
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1937 BUGATTI TYPE 57S TWO-SEAT CABRIOLET

FORMERLY THE PROPERTY OF CHARLES CHAYNE 1937 BUGATTI TYPE 57S TWO-SEAT CABRIOLET COACHWORK BY CARROSSERIE BUGATTI, ATALANTE TWO-SEAT CABRIOLET Chassis No. 57482 Engine No. see text Blue with red leather interior and white hood Engine: Buick V8, see text; Gearbox: hydraulic three speed, see text; Suspension: articulated front axle beam with semi-elliptic springs, live rear axle with reversed quarter-elliptic springs, de Ram shock absorbers; Brakes: powered hydraulic drums. Right hand drive. The Type 57S (S for Sport) Bugatti together with the preceding Type 55 model represent the two ultimate and most sought after sporting Bugattis of the thirties, with only about forty examples of each having been built. However, while the Type 55 was closely related to the concurrent Type 51 Grand Prix car and so suffered from the concomitant maintenance drawbacks of the racing car's roller bearing crankshaft and supercharger, the Type 57S, being developed from the already well established and proven Type 57 touring model, was to prove itself a far more civilized, yet equally high-performance, road-going sports car. Yet it differed fundamentally in so many respects from the standard touring version upon which it was based that English Type 57S authority, the late Ronnie Symondson, always maintained that it really should have been allocated its own discrete Type number. The Type 57 Bugatti had been introduced for the 1934 season and was replaced by an improved Series II version complemented by the new Type 57S sports model at the Paris Salon in October 1936. The latter featured a lower and shorter chassis frame fitted with a remarkably low distinctive V-shaped radiator and a higher-powered dry-sump version of the standard model's 3.3-litre straight eight twin overhead camshafts engine. Both the compression ratio and power were raised on the Type 57 engines, increasing the power to 170bhp (as opposed to 135bhp for the T57) and the Type 57SC was even greater, at an impressive 200bhp - substantially more than the 8C 2.9 Alfas of the time. The popular press of the day exclaimed the virtues of the superb roadholding and powerful brakes coupled to 110mph-plus performance. The Type 57 was not intended for competition, but the popularity of sports car racing persuaded Bugatti to build four 'tank shaped' cars with T57 engines. These cars were highly successful in competition and had outright success at the 1,000km French Grand Prix in 1936 and won both the 1937 and 1939 Le Mans 24 Hour races. In 1937 Motor Sport magazine commented, When we tested the 1934 model, 105mph was reached on the road, the flying kilometre was clocked at 100mph.....the 57S has a truly astonishing performance being capable of 115mph, which is remarkably good for an unblown sports-car. Sir Malcolm Campbell noted at the same time, the 57S was an absolute joy to handle, and although designed for fast touring it is amazingly practical in London traffic, which is unusual for a car of this type. With a price almost twice that of the standard model, sales were inevitably modest in number and continued only until early 1938 by which time just forty-two examples had been produced. Far and away the most popular coachwork fitted to these chassis was the attractive Atalante offered in both open and closed form and built either in-house by the Bugatti factory itself or, in a few cases, by local Alsatian coachbuilders Gangloff of Colmar. This particular example, chassis number 57482, is fitted with original factory-built cabriolet coachwork. Fitted with engine number 13S, it was invoiced by the factory on 14th May 1937 for delivery directly to its first owner who, according to the factory records, was named Halphen. Presumably the car remained in his ownership until the outbreak of the war a mere two years later and remained unused throughout the period of hostilities, but unfortunately nothing more specific is known of its early history. However, circa 1955 or possibly earlier it can be concluded that the car had arrived in the U.S.A. as it was owned for over twenty years by Charles Chayne of Michigan, the Engineering Vice-President of General Motors and a great Bugatti enthusiast. He also owned the Bugatti T41 Royale, chassis number 41121. He had GM update and restore many of his cars, including the Royale which was fitted with hydraulic brakes and more efficient manifolding, and his 50hp Simplex. Thus the T57 formed the basis of a research project by General Motors who utilized it as a test bed for a prototype alloy-blocked V8 engine which, together with an automatic transmission, replaced the original Bugatti engine and gearbox. The control lever for the automatic transmission was ingeniously coupled to the original advance-retard lever on the dashboard. This new engine was destined to enter full-scale production as a Buick and was subsequently licensed to Rover who, over thirty years later, are still offering developments of it in their current model range. Many other changes were made to the car at the same time including the fitment of power steering, novel single-leaf front springs and hydraulic brakes. As befits a research project undertaken by the world's largest motor manufacturer, all these modifications were carried out to the highest engineering standards and furthermore in such a manner that the car's appearance remained unchanged. The car's original engine number 13S must have subsequently been sold by General Motors because it is recorded as surviving in the South of France fitted to a Type 57S Bugatti which has been constructed upon a replica chassis frame. Then in about 1975 it was bought by O.A. 'Bunny' Phillips, the doyen of American Bugattistes, as a Christmas present for his wife Lucille. The car has had little use since Lucille died in 1979, and it is now offered by Bunny's estate. The late Hugh Conway described the car as, A beautiful, almost perfectly done job, if not exactly a Bugatti, but interesting in its own right; the performance is to match, well over 120mph, and startling acceleration. Very appropriate to California! South African Clive Wooley attended a private party given by Bunny Phillips in August 1980 to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of his Bugatti maintenance shop in California, and during his visit he was allowed to drive the car. Recording his experiences in Bugantics, the quarterly journal of the Bugatti Owners' Club, he observed, Most fascinating is a full set of engineering drawings done by G.M., including three full scale drawings of the entire chassis and suspension. This spectacular 57S Drophead must rank as one of the finest unrestored pre-war sports cars. As previously mentioned, the original engine still exists in a car in France. However, it is presented here with spare 57/57SC engine parts including the original numbered upper crankcase for 57561 (an SC unit), a T57C blower and various standard T57 pieces. It is one of the genuine 57S and SC cars in existence today (9 of which are a part of the National Musee in Mulhouse). This important Bugatti is eligible for all the major long distance touring events and once properly restored, would be a major contender for top international concours prizes.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-08-29
Hammer price
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1938/40 DUESENBERG MODEL SJ LONG WHEELBASE CONVERTIBLE

THE BAUER SJ DUESENBERG 1938/40 DUESENBERG MODEL SJ LONG WHEELBASE CONVERTIBLE COACHWORK BY ROLLSON Chassis No. 2405 Engine No. J-397 Black with violet leather interior Engine: Straight eight with twin overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder with centrifugal supercharger, 420 cu. in., 320bhp at 4,750 rpm; Gearbox: three-speed; Suspension: beam axle to front, live axle to rear, half elliptic leaf springs all round; Brakes: servo assisted, hydraulically operated drums on all wheels. Left hand drive. After many trial-trips with cars like the Mercedes-Benz, Austro-Daimler, Maybach, Horch, Rolls-Royce, Bugatti, Isotta Fraschini, Hispano-Suiza, Cadillac, Packard, Lincoln, and after a driving competition in a Duesenberg with a Mercedes SS-Kompressor at the Avus in 1936, I finally chose Duesenberg and placed early in 1937 an order for a supercharger-chassis, which materialized with some delay because of the scarcity of superchargers, one year later, Rudolph Bauer, November 2, 1948. The Bauer SJ, named after its creator and first owner, is regarded as one of the grandest and most original of all the Duesenbergs. Frederick Samuel Duesenberg was a visionary engineer and an outstanding craftsman who earned his reputation as a racing car designer, making history when one of his cars won the 1921 French Grand Prix. His eight-cylinder racers went on to win at Indianapolis in 1924, 1925 and 1927 and set records at tracks across the USA. In 1921 he introduced the road-going Model A Duesenberg, built without compromise - the first production car made in the USA to have a straight eight engine and hydraulic brakes. Despite its undoubted merits, sales were sluggish and in 1926 the company passed into the control of E. L. Cord. He decreed that a new Duesenberg should be created - more powerful, faster and more glamorous than any competitor. The result was the breathtaking Model J that was unveiled late in 1928 at the New York Salon, the aristocrat of motor shows. With 265bhp available and a claimed 116mph maximum, it was engineered to the highest standards and was clad with coachwork of lavish ostentation. The new Duesenberg was, and still is, to many observers the crowning achievement of a brilliant era in automotive design. But it was not well timed. Within twelve months, Wall Street crashed and the market for costly automobiles dwindled. Determined to survive, the great motor car manufacturers launched ever more splendid designs. In 1932 Fred Duesenberg's response was the SJ, a supercharged version of the Model J that produced a remarkable 320bhp at 4,750rpm from its great-hearted engine. It was installed in a massive chassis that offered superb handling, stability and braking power. Upon demonstration, a factory production SJ four-passenger phaeton could reach 104mph in second gear, and an astonishing 129mph in top! Unfortunately, by August 1937, Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg, were unable to survive the depths of the Great Depression. In 1937, in the closing months of the company's life, a German artist of varied talents, Rudolph Bauer, ordered a Long Wheelbase SJ chassis to be supplied to the Berlin coachbuilders, Erdmann and Rossi, so he could equip it with a body of his own wild design. This set in motion a process that would not be completed until 1940. Honoring its commitment, the factory set aside enough parts to build the chassis, possibly using the frame from an unsold long chassis demonstrator. It was duly completed in Chicago during 1938 by a few devoted Duesenberg employees under the supervision of Augie Duesenberg, who inspected and approved their work. This last of all Duesenberg chassis' was then wrapped in burlap and cosmoline to await shipment to Berlin. Final shipping instructions did not arrive due to the onset of World War II and to Bauer's problems in Germany. Rudolph Bauer was a painter born in Lindenwald, Germany in 1889. Bauer was raised in Berlin and initially made his reputation as a caricaturist, subsequently exploring a series of artistic disciplines including Impressionism, Cubism and Expressionism. In 1912, at the exhibition in the Galerie Der Sturm, Bauer first came into contact with the works of Kandinsky. He was clearly moved by the abstract expressionist paintings and they influenced him to further develop his style into what he called futuristic art of non-objectivity. Bauer was soon to become recognized for this style and his paintings were shown alongside masters such as Kandinsky and Klee. By the 1920s, Rudolph Bauer had achieved international recognition and his paintings were displayed in the U.S. where they attracted the attention of Solomon R. Guggenheim. Guggenheim was so taken by Bauer's work that he purchased a number of his paintings and quickly became Bauer's most generous patron. The paintings of Kandinsky and Bauer would form the basis of Guggenheim's famous non-objective art collection now housed in the Guggenheim Museum in New York. While still living in Berlin, Bauer was under increasing scrutiny by the Nazis who considered his abstract art criminal and degenerate. During one of the Third Reich military parades, Bauer hung an American flag outside of his window. Shortly thereafter he was confined to a concentration camp. Guggenheim, who had already bought freedom from the Nazis for such icons as Chagall and Klee, decided to rescue Bauer. Substantial sums changed hands and Bauer relocated to a mansion in New Jersey close to Guggenheim's estate. After his arrival in the U.S., Bauer seemed far less interested in two dimensional art and became fixated by art on wheels. His long standing friend, critic and fellow artist, Hila Rebbay, felt that his obsession with Duesenbergs compromised his paintings and wrote to him in a letter, one who throws the best paintings away for motor cars, as you have done, should be on his knees if someone else succeeded in spite of such foolishness. Undetered, Bauer finally retrieved his Duesenberg chassis from storage in Chicago and through the advice of Donn. P. Hogan, the head of the company's Chicago operation, commissioned the services of Rollson Coachworks to build a body of his own design. Rollson Coachbuilders, previously named Rollston, was regarded as one of the leading coachbuilders of the day. Bauer decided that they were aptly qualified to carry out his creation and submitted his drawings, but kept a close eye on their progress. The outrageous design accentuated the car's overall enormous length of 20 ft. 7 in. The striking streamlined grille is unique to this car and is followed by a huge multi-louvered hood that sweeps back well past the engine and finishes at the V-windscreen. As if the length of the hood is not enough to indicate the robustness of what lies underneath, the four chromed external exhaust pipes are ever-present and uninterrupted by the fenders. The narrow, torpedo-like body is racy, yet when painted black and adorned with huge landau bars, appears quite formal. Published copies of Bauer's drawings, which include his notations in German, illustrate his concern for detail. There is mention that the car should be fitted with Vogue 750 x 19 in. double side white wall tires, the same set of six that the car retains today - 58 years later. Unique triple-bladed bumpers dominate the car's front and rear and are surmounted at each end by unusual facetted repeater lights. At the rear is the leather trunk, fully trimmed inside and fitted with a custom-made matching set of suitcases including one long enough to take unfolded trousers and dresses. A final flourish to the rear of this imposing motor car is the elegant twin mounted spare wheels. Bauer supervised the construction of the coachwork and saw to it that there were many special touches inside: door-handles, switches and above all, breathtaking violet leatherwork that is still pristine today. Intended to be chauffeur-driven, the car has a division with wind-down glass and a microphone together with a radio. The headlamps are not quite what they appear: mounted within familiar shells are Marchal reflectors and there are enigmatic Waldorf Astoria plates at the top of each. The 'Duesenbird' mascot is also a special item, made much larger than was customary. The result is totally unique, different in proportion, line and detail than any other Duesenberg ever built. It is huge but sleek, sporting yet elegant. Invoiced to Bauer on April 25, 1940 with a price over $20,000, the car at that time cost a king's ransom. It remained in Bauer's keeping until his death in 1954 and had covered a mere 9,884 miles. Bill Pettit has recalled his discovery of the car, Mother was seated in the back of our 1938 Packard Rollston at the Grand Classic in New Brunswick. The year was 1954. Somebody said, 'I know where there is a Duesenberg with a Rollston body and there is a Dual Cowl Phaeton Duesenberg on either side of it'. Needless to say I inquired further. That evening they dined with Rudolph Bauer's widow in Asbury Park. The next morning they toured the Asbury Park mansion before being guided to the outside. The suspense leading up to the opening of the garage doors was torture. The first sight of the cars was such an event the like of which I have never experienced before or since. A year later the deal was struck and the car was driven 300 miles to Virginia where it has remained since. It has covered a little over 1,000 miles in the last 43 years. Mr. Pettit reports that, unlike the other Duesenbergs that he has owned, "Rudolph" drives and feels like a new car. While all SJ Duesenbergs are exceptionally important motor cars, the Bauer SJ is a superlative example of art on wheels and has been aptly dubbed by authority J.L. Elbert in his definitive book on the marque, the fitting last scion of a proud lineage. Coincidentally, J-397 is being sold exactly 58 years, to the day, from the date of the original invoice. Today, beautifully preserved, it remains quite probably the most original Duesenberg in the world and is one of the pinnacle examples of this grand marque.

  • USAUSA
  • 1998-04-25
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1990 Ferrari F40

478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC V-8 engine with twin turbochargers and Weber-Marelli fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent double-wishbone suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in. All original, including factory exhaust; just 2,400 kilometers (1,490 miles) from new Desirable European-specification model Fresh full service after 16 years of private enthusiast ownership Original manual in folio and service booklet FORTY YEARS OF FERRARI In 1987, not only was Ferrari approaching its 40th anniversary, but it was also engaged in a supercar war with rivals Lamborghini and Porsche. Lamborghini’s Countach took the world by storm with its radical styling and incredible performance, making it the poster-child of a generation. Adding fuel to the fire, Porsche introduced the 959 in 1986. The car was laden with many technological firsts for the automotive industry, and it was also capable of a blistering 197 mph, making it the world’s fastest road car. Of course, Ferrari would not let this stand; it needed something to silence the naysayers and put itself back atop of the record books. Ferrari’s F40, developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione, punched through an automotive barrier that had remained untouched, as it not only bested the 959’s top speed, but it also broke 200 mph in the process, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. Unlike the 959, the F40 went about achieving 200 mph in a completely different fashion. Instead of using cutting-edge technology and loading the car down with modern-day conveniences, Ferrari, as per usual, turned to its Formula One team for inspiration and stuck with the tried-and-true formula of “less is more” in order to make the F40 as lightweight as possible. In terms of the F40’s chassis, the track dimension of the 288 GTO’s chassis was widened and a fresh steel-tube frame was reinforced with an extensive use of carbon fiber, making the platform significantly lighter than its predecessor. When stripped out for racing, Ferrari was able to save a few further precious grams. The F40 had no carpet, utilized door pulls instead of traditional handles, and could be ordered with roll-up or fixed windows (installing power-operated windows was simply out of the question). As a result of these fanatical weight-saving measures, the F40 tipped the scales at a feather-weight 2,400 pounds, paving the way for a powerful engine to rocket it into the annals of automotive history. The F40’s engine was based on the 288 GTO’s twin-turbocharged V-8, but it was bored to displace nearly three liters. Following some additional tuning, the engine could produce 478 brake horsepower, making it the most powerful road-going Ferrari to date. This engine, combined with its lightweight nature, made the F40’s performance figures just as incredible as its top speed. A sprint from 0–60 could take just 3.8 seconds, and the car could be powered onwards to a quarter-mile time in 11.8 seconds. Braking was equally impressive, and the F40 could bring itself to a stop from 60 mph in just 119 feet, if necessary. Production of the F40 was originally planned for just 400 units, and even with a list price of roughly $400,000, which was an astronomical price for a car at that time, many traded hands for much more than that when new. As a result of the car’s desirability, massive demand pushed total production numbers to 1,311, all of which would be in left-hand drive and liveried in classic Rossa Corsa paint. Of those examples, only 213 were delivered new to the United States, making Ferrari’s ultimate road-going machine even rarer in its largest market. Adding to its overall historical importance, the F40 was the last car to receive the blessing of Enzo “Il Commendatore” Ferrari before his passing. Enzo had envisioned the car as an ideal way for the company to celebrate its 40th anniversary, as it would both promote all it had accomplished in its short history as well as highlight its plans for making the next 40 years just as exciting as its last. As such, the F40 signaled the end of an era for one of the most iconic marques in automotive history. THIS F40 The F40 offered here, chassis number 87123, is identified by its serial number and metric odometer as being a European-specification model, though equipped with catalytic converters, and was originally finished as it is today in Rossa Corsa with red cloth seats. Interestingly, though shipped new to Italy, it was offered for sale in the Los Angeles Times as a brand new car, priced at $560,000 with the seller scheduled to take delivery next week, during the height of “F40 mania” in December 1990. Apparently effort had been made to entice a United States buyer into bringing the new car to that country at a higher price. The car instead remained overseas, passing into British ownership later in the 1990s. In 1998 it was acquired by Tony Raftis of Australia, who sold it a year later to Bernhard Dransmann of Osnabrück, Germany, without ever taking it out of England. Subsequently, it was sold in 2000 to a Japanese collector in whose ownership it remained until recently. The car has service records and registration documents back to 2006, which help to confirm its 2,400 kilometers (1,490 miles) from new. Reportedly well-serviced over the past 10 years, it recently completed a fresh service at Formula Automobile (Ferrari of Denmark), including installation of new fuel tanks, a belt service, replacement of the spark plugs, and all fluids; receipts will be on file for this work by the time of sale. Aside from this work, the F40 remains exceptionally well-preserved and original, down to its factory exhaust, and even includes the original service booklet and original owner’s manual in its leather folio. Even the paint is original, as can be seen by the carbon weaving visible through the factory coat. The F40 remains today one of the hottest supercars on the market, and among the most desirable of all modern Ferraris. The example offered here will certainly not disappoint, with both its well-maintained original condition and its fierce performance. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions, this vehicle must be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. Also note that this title is in transit. Chassis no. ZFFGJ34B000087123 Engine no. 24573

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

215 hp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, coil-spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Full concours-quality restoration by marque specialists Scott Grundfor and Kienle Decades of well-known ownership history Desirable upgrades of NSL camshaft, fitted luggage, and Rudge-style wheels Accompanied by restoration and service documentation and a copy of the factory build sheet A fine example of an iconic Mercedes-Benz THE LEGENDARY GULLWING Mercedes-Benz’s 300 SL claimed 2nd in the Mille Miglia, 1-2-3 in the Sports Car Race in Berne, Switzerland, 1st and 2nd at Le Mans, 1-2-3-4 at the Nürburgring, and 1st and 2nd at La Carrera Panamericana. Yet more was to be desired. From his Frank Lloyd Wright¬–designed Park Avenue showroom, the company’s U.S. distributor, Max Hoffman, said that there was a market in America for a fast, sensual Mercedes-Benz coupe; a production version of the racing 300 SL would be it, complete with the fascinating and now legendary “gullwing” doors necessitated by the unusual, tall “birdcage” frame design. The “SL” moniker (translated to English as Sport Light) reflected the pioneering use of a welded, tubular-steel, ultra-light frame construction that weighed only 182 pounds. The car also featured fully independent suspension in addition to its fuel-injected, 3.0-liter (2,996–cubic centimeter), overhead-cam straight-six with dry-sump lubrication, and the motor was inclined to the side in order to reduce the height of the front end. Rated at 240 brake horsepower at 6,100 rpm (SAE) and 215 brake horsepower at 5,800 rpm (DIN), with the factory-optional or dealer-installed “sport” camshaft, the power was delivered through a four-speed manual gearbox. A 161-mph top speed and 0–60 acceleration of approximately eight seconds, depending on the rear-end ratio selected from five options, made the 300 SL the fastest production automobile of its time. Appropriate for an automobile that Max Hoffman had almost single-handedly willed into being, the production 300 SL made its debut in the United States, not in Germany, which was a Mercedes first. More than 1,000 of the 1,400 cars produced between 1954 and early 1957 were delivered through Hoffman, to whose showrooms the rich and famous flocked. The 300 SL was as much a status symbol in its time as it is today, as it was favored by everyone from Hollywood stars to racing legends to genuine royalty. The 300 SL was also raced and piloted by the top drivers of the day, such as John Fitch, Olivier Gendebien, Paul O’Shea, Prince Metternich, and of course Sir Stirling Moss, who holds the “forever” course record for his famous Mille Miglia finish in 1955. It all added to the romance of a car that seemed destined to become a legend the moment production began. It had all of the right ingredients: incredible exclusivity, incredible speed, and an incredible price. “A thoroughbred in every sense of the word,” advertising boasted, “and a car which will be recognized by all enthusiasts as the ‘last word’ in sporting automobiles; a car which puts indescribable pleasure into driving!” CHASSIS NUMBER 198.040.5500397 The 300 SL Gullwing offered here, chassis 5500397, is recorded in the Gull Wing Group Register as having been originally delivered by special order through Max Hoffman’s New York salesroom, finished in Black with a Light Grey interior. Its earliest known owners were in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, including William Charles Young of Chevy Chase, Maryland, followed by Laurence R. Langfeldt of the District of Columbia. In 1974, the car was bought by Earl J. Broyles, a well-known businessman and antique automobile collector from Fredericksburg, Virginia. Mr. Broyles is known to have owned the 300 SL for several years. Subsequently, it was acquired by Frank E. Gump of Summit, New Jersey, a Gull Wing Group member, for whom it was regularly maintained by the well-known East Coast facility Paul Russell & Co. of Essex, Massachusetts. In 2007, the 300 SL’s ownership was taken over by Tom Horan of Denver, Colorado, the well-known enthusiast currently serving as Chairman of the Colorado Grand. While in Mr. Horan’s ownership, it was fully restored to concours quality by another well-known expert, Scott Grundfor of California, one of the country’s foremost specialists. More recently, in 2011, the car has undergone further mechanical restoration and service by the noted German firm Kienle, with receipts on file for work totaling some €64.000. The car’s body is finished in White (actually closer to an attractive cream) with proper Red upholstery in the correct leather; the bodywork was correctly media-blasted and prepped prior to painting, and the brightwork both inside and out is correct and fresh, with triple-plated chrome used for the exterior. As part of the Grundfor restoration, the engine was upgraded for improved power with the desirable NSL camshaft, as was used in the competition Alloy Gullwings, and stainless-steel exhaust was installed. The chassis still has the original front belly pan, while the wheels have been changed out for correct Rudge-style knock-offs, a popular factory option in the period. Within the dashboard is the original Becker Mexico automatic signal-seeking radio, with a new automatic Hirschmann antenna. The interior boasts a proper wool headliner and German square-weave wool carpeting, with a set of correct reproduction luggage fitted to the trunk. Inspection reports on file from previous owners indicate that the car retains its original bodywork and correct number stampings and plates throughout, as well as the original engine; the transmission is also of the correct type. Exhaustive effort was obviously made to keep the car as authentic as possible and ensure the best presentation from top to bottom. In addition to the aforementioned luggage, this Gullwing is equipped with a small roll of reproduction tools; a jack; its original set of wheels; a collection of receipts, documents, and photographs from previous ownerships covering much of the car’s maintenance and restoration work from the past three owners; and both a copy of its original Mercedes-Benz data card and a fascinating inspection sheet from the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center that details its numbers throughout. A superb Gullwing in every respect and benefiting from care and restoration by all the most respected craftsmen and facilities, this is an excellent 300 SL deserving of the best collection. Chassis no. 198.040.5500397 Engine no. 198.980.5500396 Body no. 198.040.5500381

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-03-12
Hammer price
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1958 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-cam inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension and coil-spring single-point swing-axle rear suspension, and servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Recently restored by renowned marque specialists Rudi & Company Desirable and beautiful color combination; includes matching luggage Original matching-numbers engine An exquisitely presented 300 SL Roadster To say that the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL was ahead of its time would be an understatement. The 300 SL heralded a new era for Mercedes-Benz road cars; it utilized an innovative space-frame chassis coupled with a race-bred, fuel-injected engine, the first of its kind fitted to a production car, and was clothed in breathtaking bodywork. It was conceived by American Mercedes-Benz importer Max Hoffman, who believed that a road-legal version of the successful W194 racer would be profitable in the United States and that the power and styling of such a car would appeal to the American market. Mercedes-Benz took Hoffman up on his idea, and it was only natural that the new 300 SL would premiere at the New York Auto Show in 1954. The 300 SL coupe quickly earned the nickname “Gullwing” for its distinctive roof-hinged doors, and the public fell in love with the car, not only for its breathtaking design but also for its earth-shattering performance. Of course, the best way to keep customers coming back to Mercedes-Benz was to create a drop-top version of the 300 SL. A prototype model of a convertible 300 SL was first spotted by the German magazine Auto, Motor und Sport in 1956, and the production version would first be shown at the Geneva Motor Show one year later. By the end of 1957, the final Gullwings had left the production line, and production began on the 300 SL Roadster. The roadster offered a host of improvements over its gull-winged predecessor. In an effort to improve entrance and egress, Mercedes-Benz lowered the central section of its space-frame, crafted smaller sills, and fitted larger doors to the car. Strength was maintained, nonetheless, with the addition of diagonal struts, which braced the lowered side sections to the rear tubular members. Engineers also revised the suspension to create a more comfortable ride and improve handling. At the rear, the spare tire was repositioned below the trunk floor, necessitating a smaller fuel tank but also maintaining reasonable luggage space. These revisions to the roadster added some 250 pounds to the total weight of the car, mostly due to the convertible top. However, the car remained quite quick nevertheless and boasted a factory-claimed top speed of 137 mph. Following the lead of the coupe, the 300 SL roadster proved to be just as popular with the well-to-do as its predecessor. Ownership of a 300 SL implied an exquisite taste in engineering and aesthetics, and it was the ultimate automotive statement. Naturally, many found homes in the garages of celebrities, racing drivers, and other successful individuals with an appreciation for fine automobiles. At an $11,000 list price, it was worth every penny. CHASSIS NUMBER 198.042.8500154 According to its Mercedes-Benz build sheet, a copy of which is on file, chassis number 198.042.8500154 was originally ordered through the U.K. distributor in London, England, finished in a dramatic combination of Light Blue (DB 334) with Red leather interior. Owned in the U.K. as late as 1981, it later made its way to the United States, where it was acquired by Arizona resident John Wenaas and subsequently by communications entrepreneur and renowned collector Jim Rogers of Las Vegas, Nevada. Mr. Rogers had the car re-trimmed in white leather with whitewall tires, and it became known among roadster cognoscenti as “Liberace,” for obvious reasons! It remained a favorite within the Rogers Collection for several years. In 2013, the car underwent mechanical work by the famed Richardson Restoration and Machine Werks in Phoenix, Arizona. Engine work included a new gasket valve over, intake and exhaust guides, and new cam bearings. More recently, the car received a sympathetic cosmetic restoration by the famed West Coast 300 SL restoration facility Rudi & Company of British Columbia. As part of the complete restoration, its color scheme was changed to the more subtle Anthracite with Grey interior, which is a rare combination and very desirable in 300 SL roadster circles, and it received all-new chrome and glass in addition to its new interior and bare-metal repaint. The car retains its original U.S.-specification sealed-beam headlights, windshield washers, and Becker Mexico radio with automatic antenna and dual speakers, all of which are mentioned on the build sheet, as well as an optional Talbot mirror on the driver’s side. An attractive and elegant 300 SL roadster, with interesting history and in one of the best imaginable liveries, this car would take pride of place in any collection of modern sports cars. It is certain to be as thrilling to drive as it is to look at! Chassis no. 198.042.8500154 Engine no. 198.980.8500131 Body no. 198.042.8500153

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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1990 Ferrari F40

478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC twin-turbocharged V-8 engine with Weber-Marelli fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear double-wishbone suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in. Ferrari Classiche certified Recently serviced by Ferrari of Woodland Hills Just over 5,300 miles from new Complete with all factory books and tools CELEBRATING FERRARI’S 40TH WITH 200 MILES PER HOUR In 1987, not only was Ferrari approaching its 40th birthday, but it was also engaged in a supercar war with rivals Lamborghini and Porsche. Lamborghini’s Countach took the world by storm with its radical styling and incredible performance, making it the poster-child of a generation. Adding fuel to the fire, Porsche introduced the 959 in 1986. The car was laden with many technological firsts for the automotive industry, and it was also capable of a blistering 197 mph, making it the world’s fastest road car. Of course, Ferrari would not let this stand; they needed something to silence the naysayers and write itself back into the record books. Ferrari’s F40, developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione, punched through an automotive barrier that had remained untouched, as it not only bested the 959’s top speed, but it also broke 200 mph in the process, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph. Unlike the 959, the F40 went about achieving 200 mph in a completely different fashion. Instead of using cutting-edge technology and loading the car down with modern-day conveniences, Ferrari, as per usual, turned to their Formula One team for inspiration and stuck with the tried-and-true formula of “less is more” in order to make the F40 as lightweight as possible. In terms of the F40’s chassis, the track dimension of the 288 GTO’s chassis was widened and a fresh steel-tube frame was reinforced with an extensive use of carbon fiber, making the platform significantly lighter than its predecessor. When stripped out for racing, Ferrari was able to save a few further precious grams. The F40 had no carpet, utilized door pulls instead of traditional handles, and could be ordered with roll-up or fixed windows (installing power-operated windows was simply out of the question). As a result of these fanatical weight-saving measures, the F40 tipped the scales at a feather-light 2,400 pounds, paving the way for a powerful engine to rocket it into the annals of automotive history. The F40’s engine was based on the 288 GTO’s twin-turbocharged V-8, but it was bored to displace nearly three liters. Following some additional tuning, the engine could produce 478 brake horsepower, making it the most powerful road going Ferrari to date. This engine, combined with its lightweight nature, made the F40’s performance figures just as incredible as its top speed. A sprint from 0 to 60 could take just 3.8 seconds, and the car could be powered onwards to a quarter-mile time in 11.8 seconds. Braking was equally impressive, and the F40 could bring itself to a stop from 60 mph in just 119 feet, if necessary. Production of the F40 was originally planned for just 400 units, and even with a list price of roughly $400,000, which was an astronomical price for a car at that time, many traded hands for much more than that when new. As a result of the car’s desirability, massive demand pushed total production numbers to 1,311, all of which would be in left-hand drive and bathed in classic Rossa Corsa paint. Of those examples, only 213 were delivered new to the United States, making Ferrari’s ultimate road going machine even rarer in their largest market. Adding to its overall historical importance, the F40 was the last car to receive the blessing of Enzo “Il Commendatore” Ferrari before his passing. Enzo had envisioned the car as an ideal way for the company to celebrate its 40th anniversary, as it would both promote all it had accomplished in its short history as well as highlight its plans for making the next 40 years just as exciting as its last. As such, the F40 signaled the end of an era for one of the most iconic marques in automotive history. THIS F40 This particular F40, chassis 86954, was produced in 1990 and delivered new to its first owner by Shelton Ferrari of Florida on January 2, 1991. Since then, it has been very well cared for in the custody of a handful of owners, receiving service only through authorized Ferrari dealerships. It is currently residing with a collector based in Southern California, and it is in absolutely superb condition, showing just over 5,300 miles from new. Furthermore, it has been recently upgraded with a desirable Tubi exhaust system. This F40 also bears Ferrari Classiche certification, which confirms its incredible level of factory correctness. The Classiche certification binder, along with all books, tools, a car cover, and a battery tender, is included with the sale of the car. Prior to the sale, the car was fully serviced by The Auto Gallery to ensure that it in in running order, and receipts from this work are included with the sale. The F40 is a back-to-basics supercar, and it is without a doubt one of the most visceral experiences one can have on four wheels. This car is surely not for the faint of heart, as it is the perfect automobile for someone looking to experience a car that demands 100 percent of the driver’s attention, 100 percent of the time. Over 25 years after it was first produced, it can still easily hold its own against modern performance cars on a race track, highlighting just how incredible a car it was when it was introduced. The F40 is a car worthy of any collection, and one that begs to be cherished and driven as its creators intended. This particular example, highlighted by its low mileage, Classiche certification, and impeccable condition, is nothing short of superb, and it will certainly please the most discerning of collectors. Addendum This title is in transit. Chassis no. ZFFMN34A7L0086954

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

An icon of modern design Rare and beautiful original color scheme While the design for some of the most beautiful cars begins on a drawing board, or a sketch pad, or even a napkin, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL was born on the race track. That it turned out so beautifully, with epic curves that came to define the European sports car to a generation of enthusiasts, was happenstance. Its design was pure mechanical genius; it was derived from racing experience with the original 300 SL racing car, which had claimed 2nd in the Mille Miglia long-distance road race in Northern Italy, 1st and 2nd at the 24 Hours of Le Mans race, and an astonishing 1-2-3-4 victory at the Nürburgring in Germany, among other successes. It was smooth and sleek, with a flowing snout and handsomely rounded tail. Under the hood was a powerful overhead-cam straight six that was inclined to the side to lower the lines of the front of the car, and below that, there was fully independent suspension. Most important to the design, however, was a welded, tubular-steel, space-frame chassis, which master engineer Rudolf Uhlenhaut had created to both save weight and strengthen the car. There was one small problem: in order to function properly, the chassis rails passed through where the doors would ordinarily be. Then again, that was no problem for Daimler-Benz’s talented engineers, who simply hinged the doors at the roofline, to have them open upward. It was an idea, as one historian would later point out, that only worked once, and only because it occurred on the 300 SL was it an idea that was meant to happen. Like Gordon Buehrig punching holes through the Cord 810’s hubcaps to ventilate the brakes, the 300 SL’s “gullwing” doors were born of necessity. They just happen to be eye-catching and beautiful. Raising a 300 SL’s wing revealed an interior with two full, snug seats behind a tilt steering wheel, with the options of a radio and a set of fitted luggage aft. Not just beautiful in design, the Gullwing was capable of an incredible 161 mph. It was so far ahead of its time that it would take a decade for any other manufacturer to build anything that could equal it. The 300 SL is, without argument, the most important Mercedes-Benz ever built. The car offered here was originally delivered through the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed showrooms of Max Hoffman, here in New York City. It was Hoffman who had cajoled Daimler-Benz into building a production 300 SL in the first place, and he happily dealt the cars to a satisfied clientele from coast to coast, ministering to the faithful who had begged for performance and luxury in equal measure. More than 1,000 of the 1,400 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Coupes built were delivered from Park Avenue, with this car being sold to William D. Brown, of Tarzana, California. Special-ordered by Mr. Brown, the car is one of 19 ordered in this striking shade, Light Green Metallic, and it was likely one of still fewer with full red leather upholstery. The paint color is unusual, but more importantly, it is beautiful, and it has a way of shifting in the light that is entrancing; depending on the light, it appears white, pale green, or silver. Standard wheels were specified, along with U.S.-specification instruments, sealed-beam headlamps, bumper guards, and a windshield washer. Since that time, the car passed through only three known owners before joining the prominent private collection from which it is now presented. In more recent care, it was professionally refinished in the original Light Green Metallic, and new red leather upholstery, in the original pattern and grain as in 1955, was installed. Comforts and conveniences within include a radio, a full set of factory-style fitted luggage, and a tool kit. Importantly, the 300 SL has never been fully taken apart mechanically, because it has never required it. Instead, it has been lovingly maintained for virtually its entire life, as documented by a collection of original service records that accompany the car, along with its original owner’s instruction manual, parts catalogue, service booklet, and yellow California license plate. Mileage since new is still around 65,000. The original chassis pans are still intact and in excellent condition. The current owner reports that the car runs and drives well, with dialed-in suspension, excellent performance, and the ability to run straight and true down the highway. There has never been a sports car quite like the 300 SL—an understated, overqualified, unparalleled experience for two very lucky people. The offering of this outstanding example in Manhattan, a stone’s throw from where it was first sold, is particularly poignant and important. Chassis no. 198.040.5500695 Engine no. 198.980.5500722 Body no. 198.040.5500675

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
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1969 Lamborghini Miura P400 S by Bertone

370 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC transverse mid-mounted alloy V-12 engine with four Weber 40 IDL-3C carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension with A-arms, coil springs, tubular shock absorbers, and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in. A desirable early P400 S in wonderful colors Restored by marque specialists Numerous upgrades for modern driving The Lamborghini Miura, named after Don Eduardo Miura Fernández, the legendary breeder of fierce Spanish fighting bulls, was the very embodiment of the “supercar” moniker. Prior to the arrival of the Miura in 1967, many sports cars certainly offered high levels of performance and handling. The Miura, however, was the first to be built around the criteria that defined our modern concept of the supercar: tremendous speed and jaw-dropping design coupled with technical innovation, resulting in a wallet-wilting price tag to which only the wealthiest could aspire. By 1967, the latest version of the Lamborghini V-12 engine, which by now had been enlarged to four liters, was used for the entirely new and radical Miura. This Miura was first shown to a stunned public in March 1966 at the Geneva Salon, and its sinuous body was penned by Bertone designer Marcello Gandini, who was at the young age of 22 at the time. The Miura development team also included two brilliant engineers who would gain fame in their own rights, Gian Paulo Dallara and Paolo Stanzini. Under the guidance of New Zealander Bob Wallace, the Miura’s chassis was carefully tuned to deliver the handling levels needed to contain and exploit the prodigious amounts of available power. With a double-wishbone suspension at each corner, in the best racing tradition, the Miura’s technical specifications were very advanced for a road going car. The mid-mounted engine was fitted transversely to allow for a more compact overall layout. The Miura’s original design sketches also called for a glass engine cover and a three-seat layout, with the driver in the middle and one passenger on either side. Although this latter feature never made it to the production Miura, it did reemerge on future supercars, most notably on the McLaren F1 of the 1990s. While the glass engine cover was never used, the rear window louvers that did appear on production models were an industry first. As the engine was no longer front-mounted, but rather posteriore, the first generation of Miuras were accordingly named P400. This turned out to be a sensational, trendsetting decision. Almost immediately, the young Lamborghini marque leapfrogged to the head of the class, well ahead of both Ferrari and Maserati, with this innovative mid-engine configuration. The Miura’s technical specifications remain impressive even today, as it has a lightweight frame, fully independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and power provided by that well-proven, symphonic V-12 engine. The Miura, which breathed deeply through four triple-choke Weber carburetors, could initially offer 350 brake horsepower on tap and was capable of going over 175 mph. In the hands of the brave, it was more than a match for any other road going production car of the era. A steady process of evolution and improvement was maintained throughout the production cycle of the Miura, and in 1968, the “S,” or spinto (tuned), version appeared, boasting 370 brake horsepower, updated brakes, and numerous other enhancements. The S version of the Miura was faster, more luxuriously appointed, and more stable with better braking, and it represented a large step forward from its already magnificent predecessor. The Miura S was capable of reaching 60 mph in just 5.5 seconds and 140 mph in fewer than 30 seconds and achieving a top speed of 177 mph. In April 1970, Road & Track called it “an exercise in automotive art.” CHASSIS NUMBER 3982 According to the International Lamborghini Registry, Miura S chassis number 3982 was the 346th Miura built, and it was completed on March 12, 1969. The factory chassis list, published in Joe Sackey’s The Lamborghini Miura Bible, confirms that the present engine, number 2898, is the original to this chassis. The car was originally finished in Giallo Fly with a beige and black interior, and it was sent to Milanese dealer Gerini Maiocchi to be sold to its original owner. Well-regarded marque specialists at DEW Motorcars in Sterling, Virginia, were entrusted to restore the Miura S to original condition. The car was subtly upgraded throughout to incorporate the best changes developed for Miuras over the years. The desirable split-sump lubrication system used on some later SVs was installed, along with a rear suspension built to a competition design, which was developed by the legendary Lamborghini test driver Bob Wallace. New original stock front and rear springs were sought out and installed, along with an electronic ignition, a Kevlar clutch, tuned Weber carburetors, cam oilers, an aluminum fuel tank, and a recored radiator. Most importantly of all, the original engine was reportedly fully rebuilt, detailed, and blueprinted, with thorough dynamometer testing and tuning, ensuring that it would perform beautifully. In all, this Miura involved four years of painstaking work to bring it to completion, with the restoration fully documented in photographs and receipts. The current owner recently took an RM specialist on a test drive along Mulholland Drive in the early morning hours of a Friday. The car performed beautifully at high speeds, with a thrilling exhaust note, and it felt tight and well controlled. It was, as the specialist recalls, “an exciting way to wake up in the morning—much better than a cup of coffee.” It is being offered today with two sets of rear wheels, one of which is the SV-styled set currently mounted and the other is the correct S-style wheel set. Today, chassis 3982 displays around 30,000 miles, and it has been proudly owned by enthusiasts who enjoy driving their cars, thus making it ideal for the Miura connoisseur who prefers to enjoy his or her car as Ferruccio Lamborghini intended. The owner has supplied RM Auctions with a large number of invoices from DEW Motors when the car was in previous ownership, as well as receipts for a recent extensive servicing by renowned West Coast specialist Gary Bobileff, which took place under the current owner’s own care. For road going thrills, one cannot beat a properly set-up Miura. Addendum Please note the history of this Lamborghini Miura is unrelated to the car owned by Dr. Saleh in Iran. In fact, the careers of Dr. Saleh and his father were printed inaccurately as well. On a different note however, this car has recently been fully inspected by Gary Bobileff and his positive written report is on file in our auction office. Chassis no. 3982 Engine no. 2898

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing

215 hp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, coil-spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. From a private Southern California collection Three documented enthusiast owners from new Under 18,000 actual miles Painted by Junior’s House of Color Perfectly detailed, correct, and immaculate To put the 300SL in context to its time, consider this: Its 182.8-cubic inch engine was smaller than any standard engine (barring the Austin-engined Metropolitan) in any car produced in the United States, “about half the size of a Cadillac, Chrysler, or Lincoln engine,” as famed writer Floyd Clymer pointed out. Yet, its 240 horsepower was competitive with any of the 330-plus-cubic inch V-8s of those American cars. And none of them could even dream about its advertised 161 mph top speed (achieved with an optional competition cam and one of many available rear axle ratios). Most people today have only ever seen the 300SL at a concours, or maybe on a vintage rally. But underneath the ageless contours is perhaps the most competent all-around machine of the 1950s. So it’s no surprise that most Americans didn’t really know what to make of this car that performed like a race car but was trimmed for luxury. A few did get it though, and they found a true dual-purpose car that could be used for touring in difficult conditions and even daily driving. On a weekend, one could drive with little preparation to the track, in any conditions, to a win, and afterwards drive back home. In fact, when Bruce Kessler won at the Torrey Pines races in a 300SL, one of the most striking things about the car’s performance was how quietly it ran with stock mufflers in place. Mercedes-Benz sold 11 cars on the West Coast the following week. “It’s really two cars in one,” 300SL owner Lance Reventlow told Sports Cars Illustrated in 1956. “One is a lamb and the other is a raging lion. And you can turn them off and on with a touch on the throttle. You can putter around town for a year and never call on the fierce side of the car’s dual personality. But the instant you want that real wild performance, it’s there.” Lance’s car was not only a race winner, but it was a concours winner as well. Yet for all of its on-track success, the 300SL is not a high-strung machine. “You just drive the car,” said a mechanic in the 1950s. “It takes terrific abuse and gives no trouble.” Much as Duesenberg had done before the war, Mercedes-Benz made sure the engine was broken-in before it was delivered. They tested each one for 24 hours on a dynamometer, including six hours at the 6,100 rpm power peak. That was followed by a complete teardown and reassembly, then another eight hours of breaking-in, which was the equivalent of about 2,500 miles of pre-sale testing for each engine. Each one had the compression ratio of that specific engine stamped on the block. It was 8.28 in this case, which was typical. Chassis number 5500693 was completed on September 1, 1955. It was shipped the following day and eventually delivered in DB353 Light Blue Metallic with 1079 red leather to Hollywood Mercedes-Benz. Its first owner was Knox Ferrand, an attorney and past president of the Automobile Club of Southern California. For almost the next 20 years, Mr. Farrand maintained the car in his Hancock Park garage in central Los Angeles, accumulating a mere 12,000 miles. In 1974, it came to the attention of a name almost synonymous with Southern California car collecting for more than 40 years, Mr. Bruce Meyer. Mr. Meyer was still in the early years of his collecting then, and negotiations for the car were protracted. The two parties eventually agreed on what might then have been a world record $15,000 price, but only if Mr. Ferrand threw in an unused set of factory luggage he’d acquired, which is still with the car. Despite the staggering price, Mr. Meyer wasn’t in any way done spending money on his Gullwing, and he chose to have it repainted. Naturally, this wasn’t a back alley job; this was the very best that Junior’s House of Color could do in 1979, which was $25,000 of DB534 fire engine red. Red over red didn’t work, so an interior change was also in order, which included a new set of Code 1068 factory tan leather Mercedes-Benz hides installed by Thomas Interiors. The car was reassembled by 300SL expert Jerry Hjeltness, and then it hit the show circuit. If this 300SL ever took Second Place at a Southern California car show, it’s not recorded—it was probably the finest car of its type. Not long before parting with it, Mr. Meyer even bought it some jewelry, the finest set of Rudge-style disc knockoff wheels he could find. Getting it away from Bruce Meyer wasn’t any easier than it had been getting it away from Knox Farrand. With his reputation added to the car, it was a tempting prize for many collectors, but none managed to entice him to sell. After many unsuccessful attempts, it took one of the world’s foremost collectors to do so, and in 2001, it joined the collection of the consignor, the third owner of this car. A recent inspection reveals an immaculately and fully restored car that is perfectly detailed inside, outside, and underneath. The 17,765 miles showing are confirmed by Mr. Meyer as being correct; given the engine and transmission’s strength, there’s never been a reason for the major driveline components to be separated and lost. The car’s sheet metal, paint, and brightwork are in excellent condition, and importantly, the gaps and operation of the gullwing doors are perfect. As one enthusiast said when he saw it recently, “It’s just a joy, this car. Somebody will love it.” Among the many fabulous cars that Bruce Meyer has owned, he considers this to be the only “one that got away.” It’s difficult to think of any car from any era still welcomed and competitive at La Carerra Panamericana as well as at any major concours, but the Gullwing 300SL has always been at home just about everywhere. This car, in wonderful condition and with great provenance, will probably find another long-term owner. But, without question, it will be accepted in any company, whether on a lawn or dirt road, as 300SLs always have. Chassis no. 198.040.5500693 Engine no. 198.980.5500736 Body no. 198.040.5500672

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
Show price

1937 Bentley 4 1/4 Liter Fixed Head Coupe

The One-Off, ex-Claude Lang, Vesters & Neirinck Derby Bentley Renowned as the All Time Master Work of Belgian Coachbuilding With Single Ownership From New For More Than 40 Years Coachwork by Vesters & Neirinck of Brussels 125 bhp 4,257cc in line six-cylinder overhead valve engine with twin SU carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, leaf spring and solid axle front suspension, leaf spring and live axle rear suspension, and four wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 126" Chassis: B156KT Engine no. E9BHReg. no. B3044 Please note a 2.5% import duty is payable on the hammer price of this motor car should the buyer be a resident of the United States. •Ordered by the official Rolls-Royce/Bentley dealer, Etablishments Pisart, for M. Claude Lang of Brussels with the following special features: steering column in the lowest possible position, knock-off style hubcaps, French registration plate, no standard mascot, step irons or head lamps specified by client, also included were locks for the bonnet and petrol tank and wiring and brackets suitable for Continental type headlamps. •Delivered by Vesters & Neirinck with the following special amenities as a Low Roof Sports Coupe: large sunroof, hidden luggage compartment, interior hidden tool compartment, exterior chrome luggage rack, Grand Luxe equipment for illumination provided by Villocq and Bottin of Brussels (front and rear), unique rear-mounted spare tire cover, specially engraved original owner’s monogram on the side chrome faring, teardrop shaped wings with no running boards, tool compartments, fully trimmed upholstery with the finest Connolly leather interior. •Body Type: Low Roof Fixed Head Sunroof Coupe with two-place seating and light aluminum coachwork with steel front wings. •Finished in black lacquer paintwork with saddle leather interior, both of which remain mostly original today. •First registration no. 3044 (pictured here with postwar registration no. B3044) •Displayed at the September 1939 Vichy Concours d’Elegance where B156KT was awarded the prestigious “Country Club Award”. •Hidden and secured throughout WWII with owner implemented security measures. •Postwar refurbishment in 1946 by Etablishments Pisart to M. Claude Lang’s specifications. •Sold by M. Claude Lang in 1977 to Monsieur J. (private owner) who retained ownership until 1989, now in the care of only its third private owner from new and showing what is believed to be less than 35,100 kms from new. •Offered for sale at the 2006 Monterey Sports and Classic Car Auction marking the Bentley Fixed Head Coupe’s first visit outside of continental Europe in its entire history from new. The hallmarks of the Derby Bentleys are performance and refinement, and these were indeed the goals of the new series, introduced in 1933 in 31/2 litre form. The idea was to blend the longstanding sporting reputation earned by the legendary 3, 41/2, and 61/2 litre models, with the recognition of the reality that better roads were rapidly increasing the demand for comfortable, long-legged touring cars. The story begins, as so many do, with the closing of another. The receivership of Bentley in 1931 was said to be the result of simply being too good – the cars had outpaced the market. Regardless of the reason, the laws of commerce cannot be repealed, even for Bentley, and the result was that the assets of the company were reluctantly offered for sale. Although other suitors expressed interest, after some delay, Rolls-Royce came to the table with a suitable offer, and two great marques were joined together. The first order of business was to develop a new product to revitalize Bentley. Initially, consideration was given to a new engine design that would incorporate supercharging, in a nod to the legendary Blower Bentleys of the W.O. era. Difficulties in development left the company looking for alternatives as the months passed by. Finally, the excellent Rolls-Royce 20/25 engine was suggested, and initial tests were so promising that the earlier plans for a supercharged engine were abandoned. In part, the difficulty with supercharging was that such devices were inherently noisy, and the brawny engines on which they were based suffered from coarseness and a distinct lack of refinement. At the same time, the market was evolving. During W.O.’s era, maintaining performance in the face of ever increasing body weights led to massive increases in displacement, and consequently weight - the enemy of nimble handling. Bentley’s engineering talents managed to overcome the inherent disadvantages of size and weight, giving us first the legendary 41/2 litre cars, and ultimately the magnificent 61/2 and briefly, the 8 litre chassis. The price to be paid was in refinement and sophistication. These were big brutes, capable of great feats – not the least of which their legendary wins at LeMans - but they were also noisy, heavy, and stiffly sprung. At Bentley, a particularly insightful decision was made: to build a car that was at once quiet, smooth, and refined, but at the same time, offered class-leading performance, handling, and agility. Thus was the legend “The Silent Sports Car” born. Beginning with the standard 20/25 engine, the engineering effort was focused on improving performance in ways that would not sacrifice refinement. Twin S.U. carburetors were fitted, along with carefully revised manifolding that dramatically improved breathing, and raised power output to 110 bhp. At the same time, an entirely new four-speed transmission was developed that offered unprecedented smoothness in shifting, including advanced synchromesh units on third and top that allowed two finger shifting, a delightful and unique capability. The original engine displaced 31/2 litres and more than achieved the objectives set out for it. The only criticism that could be leveled at it was that its small displacement limited its output when compared to the contemporary competition. The decision was made to increase the displacement to 41/2 litres, and though the 31/2 continued on the books, the new engine proved superior in every way, and quickly accounted for the vast majority of sales. It is interesting to compare the 41/4 litre Bentley with its competition in the late 1930s. The Lagonda, with its 41/2 liter Meadows engine was certainly sporting, and cheaper too, but its refinement could not compare with the Bentley. The Alvis Speed Six was more refined than the Lagonda, but underpowered by comparison with the Bentley. Even the vaunted Bugatti Type 57, a marvel of engineering, was neither as silent nor as smooth running as the Bentley – and consequently was outsold by the Derby product by more than 50%. Another point of record included the pricing of both cars as the chassis of the world renowned Bugatti T57S, which was 1300 pounds Sterling in 1936, was deflated to 860 in 1937 due to the weakness of the French Franc. Conversely, the Bentley chassis, which was also extremely sophisticated in its original configuration, cost 1200 pounds Sterling during the same time period. Though one might question the comparison between the Bugatti and the Bentley, history indicates that a few Bugatti T57 Sport owners would also go on to purchase a Derby Bentley. This was largely on account of the fact that the Bentley combined both performance and reliability while not sacrificing elegance or individuality. The Bugatti on the other hand, proved to be a troublesome motor car that many wealthy owners tired of in lieu of the repairs needed. As an example, we learned through the excellent book of P. Y. Laugier, Bugatti 57 Sport that Mr. Robert Eonnet, who owned Bugatti chassis number 57511S, would subsequently purchase a Derby Bentley (chassis no. B80KT) as well as Madame Lucy Vogt, who owned Bugatti T57 chassis number 57472S, had purchased a Derby Bentley as well (chassis no. B132LS). There were no more demanding clients in the prewar automotive world than those with the means and desire to commission coachbuilt automobiles. They were accustomed to privilege and comfort, they demanded luxury and sophistication, and they would tolerate no failings in engineering or performance. For these demanding clients, the coachbuilders of the day normally chose the largest and most expensive chassis – names like Rolls-Royce, Hispano-Suiza, or Daimler. They would be assured of a level of quality and comfort that would please almost anyone. But what about the younger, more affluent buyer who valued performance and agility more highly than size and comfort, who wanted sophistication and refinement to match? The logical choice was the new 41/4 litre Bentley: The Silent Sports Car. Claude Raoul Benoit Lang was the only heir of a well-to-do grain trader family from Antwerp living in a townhouse at 203 Avenue Moliere in Brussels (one of the most exclusive areas in Brussels at the time). Born on August 9th, 1908 to Lucy Fecher and Paul Lang, we understand that the Lang family were true motoring enthusiasts, as his parents were chauffeur driven in an Isotta Fraschini, which was a formidable bespoke car of luxury and wealth at the time. With offices in Brussels, France and New York the family was able to enjoy many of the finest pleasures the world had to offer. Though Claude was involved in the family business it was his love for motor cars that was truly his driving passion in life. Claude Lang lived in a certain way; he dined in the finest restaurants, stayed in the most luxurious hotels and only drove the very best of motor cars. The Vesters & Neirinck Bentley, and its unique one-off coachwork reflected his way of life exceptionally. As Claude matured, so did his taste in motor cars and following his marriage, he and his brother-in-laws found themselves in competition for the possession of the finest motor cars of the period. Records indicate that in July of 1936 Jean Levy, (one of Claude’s brother-in-laws), purchased a Bugatti T57S Atalante with chassis number 57551S. Shortly thereafter in 1937 Phillip Levy, (his other brother-in-law), bought a Gangloff-bodied Bugatti T57S with chassis number 57563S. Notably, this particular example is part of the exceptional collection of Mr. Ralph Lauren. While Claude Lang could have easily afforded a T57S, he opted to match his brother-in-law’s choice with another type of breed. Ultimately, Lang’s desire for the finest led him to select the Bentley as his car of choice; it was purposeful, elegant, reliable and represented status and wealth in a classic manner. In his search for the best, Lang would once again rely on Belgium premiere coachbuilder Vesters & Neirinck to execute the design to his exact specifications. The result would be the defining motor car of his life, a master work which surely impressed both of his brother-in-laws, and he would keep the Bentley in his personal collection for almost four decades to come. Mr. Lang commissioned two important one-off Bentleys in the late 1930s. His first commission for Vesters & Neirinck was in 1935, when he was only 27 years old, and was an elegant coupe (a four-place, fixed head high roof coupe) on the 31/2 litre Bentley, chassis B114DG. His second car was delivered less than three years later, on September 8th, 1937 – the singularly beautiful two-place low roof sport coupe on chassis B156KT that we have the pleasure of offering here. Lang would keep both cars in the family stable with the 3.5 liter Fixed Head Coupe then becoming the preferred car for his wife’s use until they chose to sell it in the 1950s. According to his family, Claude was heavily involved with the design of the car as he knew he wanted a low roof sleek yet purposeful design. For his new Bentley, M. Lang specified a two-seat low roof sport coupe with sunroof. The design he approved was clearly Vesters & Neirinck’s finest efforts, reflecting an expert blend of the English preference for razor-edged coachwork with unmistakable continental touches, including the lack of running boards, custom headlamps, the French influence in the fender lines, the unique rear spare, and the wheel discs mounted on center lock Rudge wheels. It was Claude’s desire in life to have the finest and given the opportunity he displayed this by selecting the firm of Vesters & Neirinck rather than a body by Figoni et Falaschi other than a Teardrop Coupe. While we do not know the name of the artist from whose pen this design flowed, likely with a young Claude by his side, his mastery of shape and form is clear. It is a timeless design, looking as elegant and contemporary today as it has every day since it was delivered to M. Lang. Most cars of the period were drafted in profile, and as a result seem awkward when viewed from an angle. The brilliance of B156KT is that its sculptor created shapes and lines that – while they change continually as one walks around the car – never fail to delight the eyes as each new perspective is unveiled. Vesters & Neirinck The origins of the highly skilled firm seem likely to be with Brussels’ coachbuilder Vesters, Inc., which was first recorded in the press about 1914. About ten years later, in 1923, the firm of Vesters & Neirinck was listed as an exhibitor at the Belgian Auto Salon of that year. They would subsequently maintain a stand at shows throughout Europe for the decades to come, highlighting their specialized coachbuilt designs for potential discriminating customers. Never a high volume coachbuilder by choice, they produced stylish designs for a discriminating clientele on many different types of chassis’, including Minerva, Rolls-Royce, Delage, Delahaye, and even a Graham. This supremely talented Belgian coachbuilder clearly recognized the appeal of the 41/4 Bentley. With an array of sophisticated continental marques from which to choose, they chose instead to build some of the most stunning coachwork of the late prewar period on the Derby chassis – including B114DG, M. Lang’s other Bentley, and B24LS, a remarkable four place dual windshield torpedo phaeton, both of which survive today. The first of the Claude Lang bodied Vesters & Neirinck four seater Bentleys largely resembled a design study of what would later become the Low Roof Sport Coupe offered here. The first example, B114DG exhibited some similar characteristics, however it lacked much of the sporting appearance and features as seen on the two-passenger Fixed Head Sport Coupe. Vesters & Nierinck solidified there place in coachbuilding’s history with design and construction of the Lang Fixed Head Coupe. It is entirely unique among its peers and can be widely likened to other coachbuilt Bentleys such as the Embiricos Bentley in its uniqueness. Records indicate that Vesters & Nierinck built approximately 11 unique bodies for special order on Derby Bentleys with their penultimate work offered here on chassis B156KT as the most impressive of all their creations. Singular Ownership of B156KT Too often comfort is sacrificed on the altar of style, and it is here that we see further evidence of the skilled hand of the designer. M. Lang’s lovely Sport Coupe is perhaps the ultimate grand touring car for two, with a supremely comfortable cabin, a hidden luggage compartment, and a spaciousness that is accentuated by the large sunroof – while still appearing to be low, compact, and extremely elegant. A minor point, but delightful, is the insertion of M. Lang’s monogram, cast into the graceful sweep spear. Equally noticeable are the headlamps by Villocq and Bottin of Brussels, which are smaller than those Lucas headlamps used on most Derby built examples. As the lights are smaller in diameter and mounted lower they considerably modify the look of the car and give the Bentley a similar appearance to a European influenced coachbuilt Duesenberg of the same period. Over the years, more than one knowledgeable observer has, upon viewing B156KT, exclaimed that it must certainly be the most beautiful of all the Derby Bentleys. In referring to the Vesters & Neirinck Bentley noted enthusiasts and marque specialists John Adams and Ray Roberts put it best in their book The Pride of Bentley, 1982 by saying: “Once in a while someone comes up with a truly exotic and beautiful body on a motor car. This could happen more frequently on a Bentley chassis if it were not for the more conservative outlook of those who buy cars in this class. Claude Lang of Brussels is an exception: he obviously allowed coachbuilders Vesters & Neirinck of Brussels to have their head – and what a beautiful result has been achieved with this two-seater coupe with sliding roof on the 41/4 liter chassis delivered in September 1937.” Further distinction is added with the comments offered by none other than Paul Frère. Frère, former LeMans winner, race car driver and in many ways the European gentleman racer equivalent of American World Champion Mr. Phil Hill, remembers this particular Bentley with absolute fondness and admiration in an article he wrote as part of a regular column known as ‘The Continental Diary’ for The Motor magazine in 1971 stating that the car was: “The most beautiful Rolls-Bentley of all time.” These words must have come as a sincere delight to then long-term owner M. Claude Lang especially when coming from someone as knowledgeable and experienced as M. Frère, who spent many years not only piloting factory Ferraris and Aston Martins to victory but as an automotive engineer as well. Certainly there was agreement on that point and even more so when the Bentley was new. On August 7th, 1939, when it was shown at the exclusive Vichy Concours d’Elegance it was awarded a top honor, The Country Club award. Lang and his wife would continue to enjoy the Bentley and when the onset of WWII was imminent, like any great love, M. Lang went to great lengths to keep her safe. Continuing from John Adams and Ray Roberts’ description of the Vesters & Neirinck Bentley: “Claude Lang has owned this car from new and fortunately it survived the war undamaged. M. Lang left his car in this garage in May 1940 and his house in Brussels was occupied by the Germans while he was in the Belgian Army in the UK. Before leaving he had removed and hidden the wheels. In addition the car was fitted with a secret main switch which meant the Germans were unable to use it; all they did was remove the battery and the two horns. At the end of the war M. Lang treated his car to a complete overhaul by the Rolls-Royce agents in Brussels.” After the work was completed M. Lang was eager to use his great love and planned his upcoming time in the car accordingly. Remarkably, records still exist at the legendary Gstaad Palace Hotel in Switzerland, indicating that for several years following the war, M. and Mme. Lang would arrive on July 15th for a two-week stay, along with their chauffeur, M. Angel. The Chauffeur would drive one of Lang’s other cars, a Lancia mostly, which was often sent ahead to deliver his luggage prior to their arrival. Lang lived a gentleman’s life indeed as he clearly had choices beyond those of many at the time. Almost as remarkable as the car is its singular ownership history. M. Claude Lang so loved his Bentley that he could not bear to part with it for more than 37 years, selling it only when he pronounced himself no longer able to properly care for his English beauty. In an interview for a 1972 Bentley Drivers Club Review M. Claude Lang related: “Concerning performance and mechanical condition, they are as they were when the car was born. For several years I have not used the car but the engine is started once a week and regular maintenance is carried out. The reason why I do not use the car is not that the car is too old but that I am getting old and find it tiring to drive in the present traffic… Provided new tyres were fitted, my car would take me anywhere in full touring conditions.” (1972) Throughout his life, Claude Lang remained faithful to the Bentley marque, becoming one of the first clients for the now legendary Continental R Fastback, taking delivery of BC 9A in 1952. He is recorded as having been a member of the BDC for over 30 years and he left quite a permanent mark in the legendary motor car company’s history by having, caring and preserving what is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful Bentleys ever built. It is noteworthy that when the time came in the early 1960s to buy a new car, it was the Continental he chose to replace and not his prized Vesters & Neirinck Fixed Head Coupe. The Perfection of Originality Like the Embiricos Bentley, there are only a handful of the very best Derby Bentleys built in existence today and the Vesters & Neirinck Low Roof Fixed Head Sport Coupe is one such example. It is no surprise that when M. Lang finally made the difficult decision to part with his beloved Bentley in 1977, he sold it to a friend who had long admired the car, Monsieur J. who reportedly paid a substantial sum for it at the time. Although he could not hope to match M. Lang’s 37 year term as caretaker, he did treasure the Bentley as long as he could, selling it 12 years later as he reluctantly retired from collecting in the dispersal of his entire collection of important cars at auction in Paris, with the Bentley as the centerpiece of the collection. Not surprisingly, the Bentley achieved a world record price for a Derby built example and the new owner was a prominent continental collector who proceeded to keep the car locked in his garage. He used it only sparingly, never showing the car openly, but continued in its essential upkeep and maintenance having it serviced properly by marque specialists routinely. B156KT has remained in long time private ownership for the duration of its life and it has rarely, if ever, been seen in public in decades. Accordingly, it gained a reputation among enthusiasts and collectors as a hidden treasure awaiting a public unveiling of sorts. While marque specialists knew of its existence, its availability to be seen has long been guarded until now, when the opportunity to inspect and consider such an example presents itself for the first time in many years. Remarkably, the Bentley will be making its first appearance in the Unites States – indeed, leaving Europe for the first time in its entire history – here at Monterey. For many knowledgeable collectors, the greatest prize is to own one of the last members of a vanishing breed – beautifully preserved and utterly unrestored original cars. B156KT is one of the finest such cars RM has ever had the privilege of offering, remaining as it does in absolute timewarp condition, and showing just over 35,000 kms from new. The Vesters & Neirinck Bentley represents the most beautiful example of its kind. It is like nothing else and much to its credit and that of its owner’s, its condition represents a unique opportunity to return the Bentley to the life it began, on the greens of only the most prestigious concours fields, now almost 70 years later. It offers an amazing combination of incredibly well thought design, engineering and individuality. M. Claude Lang’s imprint on the future of this car will always be felt as if it were not for him, the Vesters & Neirinck Low Roof Sport Coupe would never have been built, especially to the specifications in which it has remained from new. Offering a delicately thin, yet shapely design that is a true one-off it is, without question, peerless in every respect and from any angle. Like Paul Frère or Claude Lang and all of its subsequent owners, the current caretaker exudes passion in his feelings for this Bentley as it is not just a beautifully coachbuilt car, but a true work of art. It is representative of the very finest in life now as much as it was then; with seating for two, a solid dependable chassis and drivetrain, and unparalleled design, one cannot help but share in the genuine sincerity for the love of this particular car. Learned men have often explained that ownership of any work of art carries with it equal parts of enjoyment and obligation. Without question there can be few automobiles, of any kind, that will offer the joy that M. Lang’s Bentley can. It is also true that the next owner will be only the fourth long-term caretaker of the car, entrusted with an irreplaceable provenance. The Vesters & Neirinck Bentley is an exceptional motor car which has been seen by only a privileged few, it is the very definition of a one-off and work of art, it is the unquestionable master work of the very best Belgian coachbuilder and it represents an immediate entry into the most competitive concours d’elegance events around the world. With such magnificent presence and provenance this is, without question a car destined for the winner’s circle of Pebble Beach, just as M. Claude Lang would have intended. Singular Ownership of B156KT Too often comfort is sacrificed on the altar of style, and it is here that we see further evidence of the skilled hand of the designer. M. Lang’s lovely Sport Coupe is perhaps the ultimate grand touring car for two, with a supremely comfortable cabin, a hidden luggage compartment, and a spaciousness that is accentuated by the large sunroof – while still appearing to be low, compact, and extremely elegant. A minor point, but delightful, is the insertion of M. Lang’s monogram, cast into the graceful sweep spear. Equally noticeable are the headlamps by Villocq and Bottin of Brussels, which are smaller than those Lucas headlamps used on most Derby built examples. As the lights are smaller in diameter and mounted lower they considerably modify the look of the car and give the Bentley a similar appearance to a European influenced coachbuilt Duesenberg of the same period. Over the years, more than one knowledgeable observer has, upon viewing B156KT, exclaimed that it must certainly be the most beautiful of all the Derby Bentleys. In referring to the Vesters & Neirinck Bentley noted enthusiasts and marque specialists John Adams and Ray Roberts put it best in their book The Pride of Bentley, 1982 by saying: “Once in a while someone comes up with a truly exotic and beautiful body on a motor car. This could happen more frequently on a Bentley chassis if it were not for the more conservative outlook of those who buy cars in this class. Claude Lang of Brussels is an exception: he obviously allowed coachbuilders Vesters & Neirinck of Brussels to have their head – and what a beautiful result has been achieved with this two-seater coupe with sliding roof on the 41/4 liter chassis delivered in September 1937.” Further distinction is added with the comments offered by none other than Paul Frère. Frère, former LeMans winner, race car driver and in many ways the European gentleman racer equivalent of American World Champion Mr. Phil Hill, remembers this particular Bentley with absolute fondness and admiration in an article he wrote as part of a regular column known as ‘The Continental Diary’ for The Motor magazine in 1971 stating that the car was: “The most beautiful Rolls-Bentley of all time.” These words must have come as a sincere delight to then long-term owner M. Claude Lang especially when coming from someone as knowledgeable and experienced as M. Frère, who spent many years not only piloting factory Ferraris and Aston Martins to victory but as an automotive engineer as well. Certainly there was agreement on that point and even more so when the Bentley was new. On August 7th, 1939, when it was shown at the exclusive Vichy Concours d’Elegance it was awarded a top honor, The Country Club award. Lang and his wife would continue to enjoy the Bentley and when the onset of WWII was imminent, like any great love, M. Lang went to great lengths to keep her safe. Continuing from John Adams and Ray Roberts’ description of the Vesters & Neirinck Bentley: “Claude Lang has owned this car from new and fortunately it survived the war undamaged. M. Lang left his car in this garage in May 1940 and his house in Brussels was occupied by the Germans while he was in the Belgian Army in the UK. Before leaving he had removed and hidden the wheels. In addition the car was fitted with a secret main switch which meant the Germans were unable to use it; all they did was remove the battery and the two horns. At the end of the war M. Lang treated his car to a complete overhaul by the Rolls-Royce agents in Brussels.” After the work was completed M. Lang was eager to use his great love and planned his upcoming time in the car accordingly. Remarkably, records still exist at the legendary Gstaad Palace Hotel in Switzerland, indicating that for several years following the war, M. and Mme. Lang would arrive on July 15th for a two-week stay, along with their chauffeur, M. Angel. The Chauffeur would drive one of Lang’s other cars, a Lancia mostly, which was often sent ahead to deliver his luggage prior to their arrival. Lang lived a gentleman’s life indeed as he clearly had choices beyond those of many at the time. Almost as remarkable as the car is its singular ownership history. M. Claude Lang so loved his Bentley that he could not bear to part with it for more than 37 years, selling it only when he pronounced himself no longer able to properly care for his English beauty. In an interview for a 1972 Bentley Drivers Club Review M. Claude Lang related: “Concerning performance and mechanical condition, they are as they were when the car was born. For several years I have not used the car but the engine is started once a week and regular maintenance is carried out. The reason why I do not use the car is not that the car is too old but that I am getting old and find it tiring to drive in the present traffic… Provided new tyres were fitted, my car would take me anywhere in full touring conditions.” (1972) Throughout his life, Claude Lang remained faithful to the Bentley marque, becoming one of the first clients for the now legendary Continental R Fastback, taking delivery of BC 9A in 1952. He is recorded as having been a member of the BDC for over 30 years and he left quite a permanent mark in the legendary motor car company’s history by having, caring and preserving what is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful Bentleys ever built. It is noteworthy that when the time came in the early 1960s to buy a new car, it was the Continental he chose to replace and not his prized Vesters & Neirinck Fixed Head Coupe. The Perfection of Originality Like the Embiricos Bentley, there are only a handful of the very best Derby Bentleys built in existence today and the Vesters & Neirinck Low Roof Fixed Head Sport Coupe is one such example. It is no surprise that when M. Lang finally made the difficult decision to part with his beloved Bentley in 1977, he sold it to a friend who had long admired the car, Monsieur J. who reportedly paid a substantial sum for it at the time. Although he could not hope to match M. Lang’s 37 year term as caretaker, he did treasure the Bentley as long as he could, selling it 12 years later as he reluctantly retired from collecting in the dispersal of his entire collection of important cars at auction in Paris, with the Bentley as the centerpiece of the collection. Not surprisingly, the Bentley achieved a world record price for a Derby built example and the new owner was a prominent continental collector who proceeded to keep the car locked in his garage. He used it only sparingly, never showing the car openly, but continued in its essential upkeep and maintenance having it serviced properly by marque specialists routinely. B156KT has remained in long time private ownership for the duration of its life and it has rarely, if ever, been seen in public in decades. Accor Chassis no. B156KT

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-18
Hammer price
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1963 Aston Martin DB4 GT

Built to Factory Lightweight Specifications, 0175/L is the Last GT to be Dispatched from Aston Martin’s Newport Pagnell Works 300 bhp at 6,000 rpm 3,670 cc twin plug, dual overhead camshaft alloy engine with two distributors and three Weber 45 DCOE carburetors, four-speed synchromesh alloy-cased, close ratio gearbox, monocoque steel “punt-type” chassis with four-wheel coil-spring suspension, independent to the front, solid axle rear with trailing arms and Watt’s linkage lateral location, four-wheel Girling disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95" The Aston Martin DB4 was unveiled at the 1958 Paris Salon. A totally new car, the introduction of the DB4 was a significant achievement for a small British manufacturer. The specification included a completely new steel platform chassis with disc brakes all around, and a freshly developed alloy twin-cam 3.7 liter straight six engine, all clothed in an elegantly-proportioned fastback aluminum body designed by Touring of Milan. Overall, the DB4 was state-of-the art for its time, a masterpiece of robust British engineering in combination with exquisite Italian styling. Of all the postwar Aston Martins, Sir David Brown’s gracefully sleek DB4 is certainly one of the most admired. The chassis was engineered under the watchful eye of Harold Beech and features independent front suspension, and a live rear axle well-located by trailing arms and a Watt’s linkage. The body construction utilizes the vaunted Touring Superleggera process, which consists of a skeleton made up from small diameter steel tubing covered by hand-formed aluminum alloy body panels. The coachwork was constructed by Aston Martin under license from Touring at its newly deployed facility in Newport Pagnell. Effortlessly modern and breezily international, the DB4 hit the sweet spot between the Continent and the Crown. The competition variant of the Aston Martin DB4, the DB4 GT, was formally introduced in September, 1959 at the London Motor Show. The new competition car was based on the race winning prototype SP199/1, and that same year Astons took the World Sportscar Championship title. The GT prototype won its first outing at Silverstone in May 1959 on the Bank Holiday weekend in the hands of Stirling Moss, and was one of the first cars away at LeMans that June, in the same colors as the victorious Aston DBR1 Sports Racing Car. The GT was developed for increased performance by making it shorter, lighter and more powerful. In order to save weight, the wheelbase was reduced by 13 cm (approx. 5 inches). Altogether, weight was reduced by 91 kg (200 lbs). The engine was extensively modified, featuring a higher compression (9:1) twin plug cylinder head and breathing through triple dual-throat Weber 45 DCOE carburetors. Power output was outstanding: 302 bhp at 6000 rpm, a useful increase from the claimed 240 bhp of the standard car, and qualifying the GT as the most powerful British car of its era. Maximum speed was 153 mph with a 0 to 60 time of 6.1 seconds. It was also one of the first cars that could go from standstill to 100 mph and then brake to a dead stop in under 20 seconds – a tribute in part, to its upgraded Girling braking system, as used on Aston’s competition sports racers of the era. Outwardly, the GT is distinguished by fared-in headlamps, a feature which was later made standard for the DB5 model. The rear screen and quarter windows were made of plexi-glass on many examples, bumper overriders were deleted and the roll-down windows were frameless within the doors. Twin, competition-style, quick-release “Monza” fuel fillers were added atop each of the rear wings, leading to a high-capacity fuel tank mounted in the boot. The immense performance and excellent roadholding of the DB4 GT renders it an ideal car for the fast, long distance driver. The sheer sensation of unlimited “urge” under perfect control is one of motoring’s greatest pleasures. Unlike the Aston’s Italian arch-rival, the SWB 250 Berlinetta which had a rudimentary “race car” interior look, the DB4 GT’s cockpit was luxuriously appointed to Aston Martin road car specifications including Connolly hides and Wilton wool carpeting. The dash binnacle on the GT cars benefited from the addition of an oil temperature gauge in addition to the standard array of instruments, which included an 8,000 RPM tachometer. DB4 GTs represented a strong challenge to the dominance of Ferrari in GT racing and enjoyed considerable success, raced from 1959 by both the Works team as well as John Ogier’s Essex Racing Stable. Driven by the likes of Roy Salvadori, Stirling Moss, Jim Clark and Innes Ireland, these rare lightweight GTs earned their stripes on the racing circuits of the world. Despite their rarity, the GT is still a popular entrant at major historic racing events such as the Goodwood Revival and the numerous Aston Martin Owners Club Championship race meetings. The DB4 GT has proven grand for touring in many of the long distance events which have become popular in recent years, such as the Colorado Grand, Tour de France and Tour D’Espagna. Produced between 1959 and 1963, Aston Martin built a mere 75 DB4 GTs (plus another 19 of the Zagato bodied variants). Of the 75 examples, 45 were supplied in right hand drive and 30 were left hand drive. Amongst the most beloved of all Astons, the DB4 GT remains unmatched for its unique combination of performance and roadability. THE DB4 GT LIGHTWEIGHTS/GENERAL Of the 75 “standard” DB4 GTs, only six are known to have full Factory Lightweight construction details. The Lightweight concept came about when certain Aston dealers and major racing teams requested GTs which could be competitive with Ferrari’s SWB 250 Berlinettas in international Grand Touring racing. The half-dozen Lightweights are divided into two sub-species. We can describe the first of these as “BUILD SHEET GTs” since they were originally ordered with this specification and are so described on the factory build sheets and in the Aston Martin Owners Club (AMOC) Registry. The other lightweight type is the “BESPOKE” or Service Department created GTs. Ex-Aston Martin Chief Engineer and Head of Racing, Ted Cutting wrote to this author on November 11, 1994 with a clarification of the two types: “The cars ordered and built as lightweights from the start were so described on their buildsheets and completed by the Competition Department or in some cases by the Service Department, depending on the work load of each group at that time. The “Bespoke” GT chassis were modified to lightweight spec after build completion, but before their final assembly by the service shop.” The following is a listing of the known two types of standard-bodied racing DB4 GTs: “BUILD SHEET” DB4 GTs CHASSIS# ORIGINAL OWNER ORIGINAL UK REG # # 0124/R Tommy Sopwith # 587 GJB # 0125/R Ogier/Essex Racing # 18 TVX # 0167/L Factory Road Test Car # 40 MT # 0168/L Inskip/NY Dealer N/A “BESPOKE” DB4 LIGHTWEIGHT GTs CHASSIS # ORIGINAL OWNER ORIGINAL UK REG # # 0151/R Ogier/Essex Racing # 17 TVX # 0175/L A.G. Medawar # 934 GT As outlined above, AML Service Department modified GTs like 0175/L, the example presented here, are not listed as a Lightweight on its Build Sheet but a close examination of all the Factory features of this car leaves little doubt as to its origins. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF DB4 GT LIGHTWEIGHTS The chassis weight was reduced by aluminum replacement of the standard car’s steel parts, by “hole-cutting” and by the total elimination of certain other items. Alloy Replacement of Steel Items: Door, bonnet & boot framing Wheel arches Engine compartment side panels Upper half of firewall All cockpit floor sections (4) Rear parcel shelf and rear riser panels Battery & tool box lids Rear boot pan Front kick panels Drive shaft tunnel Chassis hole cutting Front cross-member Front side rails Rear Watts Linkage brackets Brake line brackets Weight reduction by elimination Radio, speakers & heater Glovebox lid One of two bonnet stay rods Clock Windshield washer bottle, pump & fittings Bumpers & over-riders * NOTE: Most, if not all of these listed weight-reduction aspects are documented as existing on our DB4 GT # 0175/L. FURTHER MODIFICATIONS FOR CURRENT VINTAGE RACING OF GT # 0175/L During the total restoration carried out by a previous owner in the 1994-1995 period, the following performance and safety aspects were added: “Blueprinting” of original engine to FIA specs. HD suspension components. Competition brake pads. Dunlop Racing Tyres on Dayton wire wheels with forged steel hubs. Enlarged alloy front-oil cooler & brake cooling ducts. Safety 4-pt bolt-in roll bar with seat harness brackets. Bonnet air-intake cover & rear air exit venting. Driver’s side bonnet bug-deflector in alloy bracket. Front & rear tow hooks. Large racing oil cooler. Custom alloy oil & water overflow tank Weber carburetor cold-air box with front facing air duct tubing. “ATL” racing fuel tank, bladder & foam. Conservative front & rear fender widening to accommodate 6 X 16” road wheels and racing tyres (6.00-16”). Five pound fire extinguisher. “Cibie” 5” driving lamps. Racing master electric cut-off switch in rear quarter-window. HISTORY OF ASTON MARTIN DB4 GT # 0175/L (Left Hand Drive) The GT we have the pleasure of offering here was actually the last DB4 GT built and sold by Aston’s Newport Pagnell Factory. (All the chassis numbers after # 0175, beginning with # 0176 were assigned to the 19 Zagato-bodied DB4 GTs.) The factory build sheet, which accompanies the sale of the car, shows that after receiving the UK Registration plate “934 CGT”, it was shipped to first owner A.G. Medawar of Switzerland via agent Joseph Saouda. Sometime in the late 1960s it was sold to an R.S. Simpson with the address P.O. Box 7210, Beirut, Lebanon. Simpson, thought to be a petroleum engineer, later shipped our GT back to Holland. Simpson sold the car to Aston Dealer and ex-Chairman of the Club, Charlie Turner of Atlanta, Georgia in 1976. Turner loved his GTs, buying, owning and selling many examples during a three decade period beginning in the mid-1960s. Turner was awarded a third place trophy in the 1976 Aston Martin Owners Club Concours held at Lime Rock Park, CT before selling this GT to Lt. Col. Boone Crowe of California. Crowe campaigned 0175/L in West Coast vintage racing, including several Monterey Historic events in the 1980s. During Crow’s last visit to Laguna Seca he managed to excessively prang the nose of the car, after which it was laid up. When Boone Crowe passed on, his widow Kim eventually gave our GT to a shop in Utah for repairs and restoration work which was never completed. In the spring of 1994, California Aston broker and parts dealer Ken Boyd brokered a sale of the now partially disassembled GT from Kim Crowe to the then AMOC Competition Director and Vintage Racer, Jack Boxstrom. A total “A-to-Z” restoration and race preparation was carried out on his behalf by the father and son team of Robert & Jon Clerk of Performance Tuning & Restoration in Pompano Beach, FL. The quality of the work was well-proven as Boxstrom scored multiple first places at Lime Rock, Road Atlanta, Watkins Glen and Laguna Seca over the next two racing seasons. In the fall of 1997, fellow AMOC board member Richard Sirota talked Boxstrom out of the GT, a decision “he has regretted to this day”, according to a recent interview. After several road rallies with Sirota, including the Colorado Grand and the New England 1000, it was sold to the present California-based owner in 1999. Further West Coast tours ensued, including the Copperstate and the California Mille. With only about 4,000 miles clocked since the restoration, 0175/L still runs, handles and stops like the true thoroughbred that it is. It also looks wonderful as a result of a major detail work order recently completed at the shop of RM Restorations. If you like the concept of a rare alloy-bodied Grand Touring Coupe that looks sensational, goes 150 mph, handles like a race car, spoils you with its Connolly hides and Wilton wool carpeting AND is eligible for the world’s best driving events, you must consider the acquisition of this Aston Martin DB4 GT. Chassis no. DB4GT0175L

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-01-19
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1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Lightweight

Type 964. 381 bhp, 3,299 cc SOHC air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with Motronic 2.1 management, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with lower control arms, MacPherson struts with combined coil springs and dampers, and an anti-roll bar; independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms, combined coil springs and dampers, and an anti-roll bar; and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,272 mm Offered from a private collection of exceptional Porsches One of only 86 Turbo Lightweights built Only two owners since new; 6,303 kilometres Original matching-numbers drivetrain Includes original books and owner’s manual Porsche Certificate of Authenticity Based on the Type 964 Turbo, which had been campaigned successfully in the International Motor Sports Association (IMSA) Supercar Series in the United States, Porsche presented the 911 Turbo Lightweight as a design study at the Geneva Auto Show in March 1992. Positive response spurred Porsche to proceed with a limited run of this special production version. The model was officially called the 911 Turbo S and was built in Zuffenhausen’s Exclusive Department. The Turbo S was based on the standard production Turbo II, but with extensive tuning work on the 3.3-litre turbocharged engine to increase its power output by nearly 20 percent. With an incredible 381 brake horsepower (compared to the Turbo’s 320), the upgraded engine also developed an impressive 36 foot-pounds of torque at 4,800 rpm. The prodigious power could launch the Turbo S from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in just 4.7 seconds and to a top speed of 290 km/h (180 mph). Much like its normally aspirated counterpart, the Carrera RS, weight reduction measurements included the removal of comfort-oriented equipment and trim, such as the power windows, power locks, air-conditioning, and power-adjustable seats. Furthermore, lightweight fiberglass-reinforced carbon composite body panels were used for the front boot lid, both doors, and the rear spoiler. Special thin-gauge glass was also used in the rear and side windows. The interior features lightweight bucket seats, removal of the rear seats, elimination of undercoating material, as well as limited use of sound insulation throughout. At just 1,290 kilograms, the Turbo S weighs in at 180 kilograms less than the production Turbo II. Exceptionally rare, this lightweight Type 964 Turbo S was purchased by its original owner in September 1992 (a copy of the original invoice is on file). While options were limited, it was ordered in the buyer’s colour of choice, fittingly, Speed Yellow. The interior sports black leather bucket seats that were also ordered to match with grey and yellow inserts, along with matching “turbo S” stitching behind the seats and in the front storage compartment. Finally, the car was optioned with an air bag on the driver’s side, which includes a matching yellow steering wheel centre. Five years later, the Turbo S was acquired by the current owner with only 1,750 kilometres showing at the time. It has since been meticulously cared for in his collection of outstanding modern Porsches, as noted by the routine service work performed by Porsche Zentrum Flughafen Stutgart. Showing just 6,300 kilometres at the time of cataloguing, this rare Speed Yellow Turbo S includes its original owners’ manuals and service booklet in their leather pouch. As one of the rarest and most powerful models of the vaunted 964 platform, this limited-production lightweight Turbo S is undoubtedly one of the most exciting air-cooled 911s. This particular example, boasting just two owners from new and under fastidious care and with regular servicing and maintenance, is surely one of the best, and it remains ready to wow its next owner with its incredible driving dynamics. Chassis no. WP0ZZZ96ZPS479031 Engine no. 61N01552

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2016-09-07
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The ex-Rt Hon. Lord O'Neill – Prime Minister of Northern Ireland1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Coupe

The ex-Rt Hon. Lord O'Neill – Prime Minister of Northern Ireland 1955 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL GULLWING COUPE Chassis no. 198.040.5500545 Engine no. 198.980.5500542 2,996cc SOHC Inline 6-Cylinder Engine Bosch Mechanical Fuel Injection 240bhp at 6,100rpm 4-Speed Manual Transmission 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Drum Brakes *UK delivery Gullwing owned when new by the Prime Minister of Northern Ireland *Professionally restored by Scott Grundfor Company and serviced by Rene Lutheraan *Matching numbers example finished in its factory delivered livery *Beautiful example of Mercedes-Benz's legendary 300SL Gullwing *Offered with MB Classic Zertifikat, copies of build sheets, books, tools and belly pans THE MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL GULLWING Instantly recognizable not only by automobile buffs, but virtually anyone on the planet, the immortal 300SL (for Sports Leicht) Gullwing coupe arguably competes for the title of "Greatest Sports Car of the 1950s", and surely qualifies for anyone's Top 10 list of the greatest automobiles of all time. A period favorite of wealthy celebrities, it ranks today among the most valued and collectable sports cars ever produced. The 300SL coupe was the direct descendant of Mercedes Benz' Le Mans W194 competition coupe, conceived in 1952 and aimed at wresting the World Sportscar Championship from Alfa Romeo, Ferrari, and Lancia, which were dominating post-war endurance racing. Mercedes Benz historian W. Robert Nitzke writes that company management wanted to jump back into Grand Prix racing, where it had been so successful before the war, but lacked the time necessary to design, build, and develop a new single-seater for the 1954 season. Instead, Chief Engineer Fritz Nallinger suggested that the company build a new two-seat sports car utilizing the strong in-line SOHC six-cylinder engine from its luxurious 300 series. Because the engine and drivetrain were relatively heavy, the chassis would have to be very light. Test Department manager Rudolf Uhlenhaut, having some experience with tubular chassis design, sat down with construction engineer Joseph Müller and laid out an extremely light (154 pounds) and rigid lattice-work chassis capable of accommodating the big in-line six. One major problem soon presented itself: There was no way to mount conventional doors without compromising the rigidity of the chassis. The solution was to raise the entry so that the doors cut into the roof, but that meant hinging them from the top, thus giving birth to this car's timeless signature design feature. The 300SL's first racing trial was the 1952 Mille Miglia, where Kling finished second to Giovanni Bracco's open Ferrari, while Rudolf Caracciola was fourth, the two Gullwings being split by a Lancia. The third coupe had gone off the road early in the grueling contest. Next came the Grand Prix of Berne, where a quartet of 300SLs took the start and swept the top three positions, Caracciola having crashed in what would prove to be his last race. Then came Le Mans, where Uhlenhaut struck fear into the competition by bringing an SL coupe fitted with a hand-operated air brake mounted on the roof. While that particular car was not raced, Mercedes would tuck the idea in its pocket for future use. After the grueling 24 hour epic, a pair of 300SLs had finished in the top two positions...and were then driven back to the factory! Mercedes Benz sat out the 1953 and 1954 sports car seasons, concentrating instead on developing its new Grand Prix car, but the SLs weren't done; they reappeared in 1955 as the airbrake-equipped 300SLR, utilizing that feature and a great many more of the advancements successfully tested on the company's Formula One racing cars. The year would bring triumph and tragedy; 300SLRs winning at Buenos Aires, the incredibly difficult Mille Miglia – where Stirling Moss and Denis Jenkinson won at a record average speed of just under a hundred miles an hour - the Nurburgring, Spa, Zandvoort, Aintree, Kristianstad, Monza, Dundrod, and Sicily's Targa Florio. The only setback, and one that would have devastating consequences, occurred at Le Mans, where team driver Pierre Levegh and more than 80 spectators died in one of racing's worst accidents, prompting Mercedes Benz to withdraw from racing for many years. New York imported auto entrepreneur Max Hoffman is credited with urging Mercedes Benz to build a production sports car based on the 300SL racing car. The 300SL Gullwing in final form was unveiled at the New York International Motor Sports Show in early February, 1954, and actual production began that fall. The new coupe was slightly changed in appearance from the racing coupes and featured Bosch direct fuel injection. It was, claimed the factory, "the fastest German production sports car". Between 1954 and 1957, a total of 1,400 Gullwings were delivered to eager purchasers, and in 1957, the elegant and improved 300SL Roadster appeared, proving even more successful from a sales standpoint, with 1,858 units produced. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED Completed at the Mercedes-Benz works in July of 1955, this exceptional Gullwing was finished exactly as it appears today. Painted in the sporting color of DB 534 Feuerwehrrot, or Fire Brigade Red, the flashy 300SL's interior was completed in the fawn MB-Tex, with seats trimmed in fawn bolsters and fitted with smart L2 Gabardine checked-pattern red plaid cushions. Unlike most 300SLs, this car was not destined for the US market, but for Great Britain and the UK Mercedes-Benz agency in London. The Gullwing was equipped as a special order car, with instruments in English, a 3.42:1 rear axle ratio and fitted with export license plates. All of these dates and records are neatly documented on the copies of the factory build sheets and the Mercedes-Benz Classic Zertifikat assembled in the car's history file. Soon after arriving in the UK, the exceptional new Gullwing was delivered to its first owner, The Right Honourable Lord Terence O'Neill, Baron O'Neill of the Maine. Born in 1914, Lord O'Neill grew up in London, went to the finest schools, and went on to serve for the British Army in the Irish Guards during WWII. At the end of 1945, O'Neill and his family went to live in Northern Ireland, where he served in a series of political positions. Around the time he acquired the Gullwing, O'Neill was elevated to cabinet level, until his appointment as Prime Minister of Northern Ireland in 1963. Lord O'Neill remained in office until 1969. Lord O'Neill later sold the red Gullwing to a Mr. Lee, also residing in the UK, who eventually sold the car to a Mr. Handel. The Gullwing made its way to the US in sometime in the 1970s, where Los Angeles resident Mr. Max Spitznagel is believed to have been the next owner, before it was purchased by Downey, California, enthusiast Mr. Friedrich H. Wegener. At this point the Gullwing was still in remarkably original and unrestored condition, still painted red and with the old interior intact, but surely in need of re-commissioning. Mr. Wegener would keep the car in dry storage, surely intending to freshen the car and use it at a later date, however never got around to it. In 2005, the aging yet original Gullwing became known to renowned 300SL restorer and historian Scott Grundfor. Mr. Grundfor was able to purchase the car from Mr. Wegener on behalf of the current owner, and soon after a full restoration was begun. Photos taken prior the restoration work are present in the car's history file, and clearly show just how original and complete the Gullwing was. Over the next two and a half years, Mr. Grundfor went through the Gullwing from stem to stern, addressing all mechanical and cosmetic aspects, and finishing it in the factory delivered livery. The finished car is nothing short of breathtaking, and is finished to a level of accuracy seen among only the best 300SL restorers. The 300SL's original drivetrain, including the matching numbers engine, was naturally all retained, and since the car was in such remarkably original condition to begin with, it was not necessary to remove the body from the chassis frame, thereby not disturbing the integrity of the coachwork. In addition to the correct L2 Gabardine checked-pattern red plaid seat cushions, a second set of seat cushions was made in fawn MB Tex, and can easily be swapped as desired. A set of period correct luggage was sourced from Taris Charysin, and is neatly strapped down on the rear luggage tray, and books, history file, tools and the original belly pans accompany the sale of the car. Having resided for the past decade in the carefully curated collection of a single and devoted Malibu, California based connoisseur of the finest collector cars, this stunning Gullwing is one of the finest examples we have ever had the pleasure to offer for public sale. Service and maintenance work has been performed by Rene Luteraan's Van Nuys Sports Cars, and thanks to his efforts, on a recent test drive a Bonhams specialist had the distinct pleasure of experiencing just how well a good 300SL drives. A wonderful example of the legendary Gullwing, this car has a prominent history boasting noble ownership, an exciting color combination, and will undoubtedly receive invitations to many of the world's most prestigious vintage motoring events.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1960 Ferrari 250GT Cabriolet Series II Chassis no. 1869GT Engine no. 1869GT

1960 Ferrari 250GT Cabriolet Series II Coachwork by Pinin Farina Chassis no. 1869GT Engine no. 1869GT 2,953cc SOHC V-12 engine Triple Weber Dual-Choke Carburetors 240bhp and 7,000rpm 4-Speed Manual Transmission with Overdrive Independent Front Suspension - Live Rear Axle 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *Documented from new by Marcel Massini *Ex-Skeets Dunn *Fitted with the extremely rare and desirable hardtop from new *Very well restored example *The vehicle of choice for playboys and aristocrats alike The Ferrari 250GT Cabriolet Series II By the early 1960s, road car production had ceased to be a sideline for Ferrari and was seen as vitally important to the company's ongoing stability. Thus the 250, Ferrari's first volume-produced model, was of critical importance, though production of the first of the line - the 250 Europa, built from 1953 to '54 - amounted to fewer than twenty cars (see lot 160). The Europa was superseded by the 250GT in 1954, the latter featuring a lighter and more-compact Colombo-designed 3-liter V12 in place of its predecessor's bulkier Lampredi unit. Power output of the single-overhead-camshaft all-aluminium engine was 220bhp at 7,000rpm. Shorter in the wheelbase (by 200mm) than the Europa, the 250GT chassis followed Ferrari's established practice, being a multi-tubular frame tied together by oval main tubes, though the independent front suspension now employed coil springs instead of the previous transverse leaf type. A four-speed, all-synchromesh gearbox transmitted power to the live rear axle, while hydraulic drums all round looked after braking. Four-wheel disc brakes arrived late in 1959 and a four-speed-plus-overdrive gearbox the following year. Multiple carrozzerie offered different body styles on the 250GT chassis, with Scaglietti and Pininfarina producing elegant open-top spyder and cabriolet models. Exhibited at the 1957 Geneva Salon, the latter's first 250GT Cabriolet was snapped up by Ferrari works driver Peter Collins, who later had the car converted to disc brakes. After a handful of alternative versions had been built, series production began in July 1957, around 40 Series I Pininfarina Cabriolets being completed before the introduction of the Series II in 1959. Effectively an open-top version of the Pininfarina-built 250GT Coupé, whose chassis and mechanics it shared, the Series II Cabriolet was built alongside its closed cousin until 1962. Overall design followed that of the Coupé, with short nose and long rear overhang, while a more-vertical windscreen provided greater headroom in the generously sized cockpit. As well as the aforementioned improvements to brakes and transmission, the Series II cars benefited from the latest, 240bhp V12 with outside sparkplugs, coil valve springs and twelve-port cylinder heads. The 250GT was the most successful Ferrari of its time, production of all types exceeding 900 units, of which 200 were Series II Cabriolets. The Motorcar Offered 1869GT rolled off the production floor in Maranello on March 24th, 1960 and was sent to Pinin Farina's works in Torino for the fitment of its sleek Cabriolet body. Completed in two months , on May 24th, this Rosso Rubino over Leather Naturale Cabriolet , the 31st of 200 Series II Cabriolets built, was sold new with the optional hardtop to Rome, Italy. Remaining in its homeland briefly, the Cabriolet found its way to the US through Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, Connecticut, before entering the garage of Richard Sotras in Glendale, California. Sotras kept the car for several years before selling it in 1967 to Los Angeleno Edwin Niles who eventually sold it in 1969 to Joseph Schwan of Pheonix, Arizona. Schwan would keep the car for just over a decade before selling it to prolific Rancho Santa Fe Ferrari collector C.A. "Skeets" Dunn in 1980. In the mid-1980s, Skeets commissioned a complete restoration of the car to his usual high standards, finishing the car in Pozzi Blue over tan hides. After a decade of enjoyment, Skeets sold his Cabriolet to an important collection in Japan in 1990. The car reappeared in the States at the end of 2002. Two years later, John Bagioli at Forza Motors executed a complete engine build prior to a successful running of the car in the California Mille. After trading hands again in August of 2004, a further $10,446.40 in receipts were accumulated at Randy Reid's Antique Auto Restorations just prior to 2010. This work included significant electrical sorting, restoring the fuel tank, installing new axle seals and bearings, fitting new shock links and bushings, body adjustments and new seals, and adjusting the carburetors and valves. In 2010, the car was sold to Christopher Thomsen of Denmark, husband of the billionaire LEGO heiress Sofie Kirk Kristiansen and friend of the Danish royal family. Brought back to the United States by its current owner, the car was commissioned to Black Horse Garage in Connecticut for a concours-quality restoration. Led by the owners of Black Horse—well-known Ferrari restorer Frank Buonanno (who worked with Luigi Chinetti's top mechanic Alberto Pedretti) and his son John—the car has just undergone a respray of its rich Pozzi blue exterior along with installation of new Connolly leather and carpeting. The engine and drivetrain have been fully detailed by Black Horse and the car has just had a full mechanical service and tune. Its history from new fully documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, 1869GT still shows very well today, a testament to the high quality of the restoration undertaken in the 1980s combined with the gentle use and careful, meticulous maintenance that the car has received through its life. The elegant and understated color scheme it now wears amplifies the refinement of one of Ferrari's finest Gran Turismos. Turning the key brings the throaty Colombo V12 to life and a drive reveals the Ferrari to be well-suited to high-speed sweeping corners or blasting down the Autostrada. Mashing the throttle presses you into the padded leather bucket seats while the disc brakes at all four corners are effective in bringing things back back under control. Period-correct Michelin X tires shroud the chrome Borrani wire wheels, allowing for a smile-inducing performance in the curves; just enough grip, not too much! The choice of open air motoring or a quieter buttoned up interior thanks to the optional hardtop make it a true dual-purpose motorcar. With its ample trunk space, luxurious interior, long-legged V12 mated to an overdrive transmission, and the exceptionally rare and desirable optional hardtop, there are few more comfortable and stylish conveniences with which to melt away the miles. Redolent of the dolce vita era, Ferrari's first production convertible was a natural choice for playboys and aristocrats, a silver example serving as David Niven's personal conveyance in the original Pink Panther film and Dominican bon viveur and sometime racing driver Porfirio Rubirosa also choosing one as his personal transport. The chance to join this exclusive club is a rare one; 1869GT is certainly one of the most stylish ways to do so.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-17
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1936 Lagonda LG45R Rapide Sports-Racing Two-Seater Chassis no. 12111 Engine no. 12111

Ex-the Hon. Brian Lewis/John Hindmarsh/Charles Brackenbury/C.E.C.Martin/Marcel Lehoux - 1936 Grand Prix de L’ACF, 1936 and 1937 RAC Tourist Trophy,1936 BRDC Brooklands 500-Mile Race, 1937 Le Mans, 1952 Goodwood Nine Hours entry and Alan Hess Sports Car record breaking, Fox & Nicholl Team Car 'EPE 97' 1936 Lagonda LG45R Rapide Sports-Racing Two-Seater Coachwork by Fox & Nicholl Registration no. EPE 97 Chassis no. 12111 Engine no. 12111 The Lithe Lagondas American-born Wilbur Gunn founded the Lagonda Motor Company of Staines, Middlesex, England, in 1906. He adopted the attractive-sounding name from Lagonda Creek, Louisiana. In 1925 chief engineer Arthur Davidson had designed a 2-liter overhead-valve engined model which established Lagonda as a sporting marque. At the 1933 London Motor Show two important new models were unveiled; the 1104cc Rapier with twin-overhead camshaft engine and the 4½-liter M45 which employed an overhead-valve six-cylinder proprietary engine, manufactured by Meadows. Here at last was a Lagonda sports car which was capable of genuinely high performance, not only by the standards of the time, but enduringly so – even today. For 1935, two additional Lagonda models were then introduced. They both shared the same shorter, lighter chassis frame and were entitled the 4½-liter Rapide, and the 3 ½-liter. Unfortunately, this multiplicity of models added to the company’s post-Depression financial problems, and even notable victory in the 1935 Le Mans 24-Hour race came too late to save them from collapse. It looked as if Lagonda was about to absorbed by Rolls-Royce – as had Bentley Motors – but that summer saw it rescued by entrepreneur Alan Good, and he appointed the revered W. O. Bentley himself as new chief designer. ‘W.O.’ then took Lagonda straight into the luxury car market in 1936 with the new LG45 model. It featured longer springs and Luvax dampers, while retaining the successful and well-proven M45-model Meadows six-cylinder engine and chassis. Bentley meanwhile directed his attention to improving the proprietary engine, and his modifications emerged in the ‘Sanction III’ power units introduced at the 1936 London Motor Show. Fox and Nicholl It was against this background that special competition variants of the LG45 had been tailor-made at Staines Bridge for the Lagonda company’s experienced and battle-hardened quasi-works racing team, Fox & Nicholl Limited, of Tolworth, Surrey. Arthur Fox and Bob Nicholl were Lagonda specialists, whose sizable business in Tolworth, Surrey, had been preparing and racing Lagonda cars since as early as 1927. Arthur Fox had persuaded the Lagonda company to support his team’s competition activities and in 1929 he and Nicholl ran a flotilla of four 2-liter cars in both the Irish Grand Prix and RAC Tourist Trophy races. Fox rapidly established himself as a meticulous preparer of competition Lagondas, and he was never slow in improving upon the factory specification if he perceived any possible advantage. Just as Enzo Ferrari's private Scuderia ran the quasi-works Alfa Romeo team cars from 1932-37, so Fox & Nicholl's highly-effective organization became selected by the Lagonda company to represent their vital interests in International motor racing. One might in effect, for 'Fox & Nicholl' read 'Britain's Scuderia Ferrari'. ‘EPE 97’ For 1936 the manufacturers’ production department at Staines Bridge built four competition cars specifically for Fox and Nicholl. This quartet comprised two four-seaters, bodied to comply with Le Mans 24-Hour regulation requirements, and two two-seaters, this superb surviving example offered here being one of the latter. It was completed in May 1936 and was first UK registered ‘EPE 97’ that August. Its sister two-seater was ‘HLL 534’ which also survives (incidently sold by the Bonhams team - when known as Brooks – on behalf of the then owner Lord Dunleath in 1995) while the fate of the sister four-seaters remains obscure. Fox & Nicholls’ as yet officially un-registered new car, chassis ‘12111’, made its racing debut – apparently painted French blue instead of Fox & Nicholls’ normal racing red livery – in the experienced hands of Algerian-born French driver Marcel Lehoux in the sports car Grand Prix de l’ACF at Montlhéry, outside Paris, France on June 28, 1936. While sister car ‘HLL 534’ won its class (in what appears to have been its only race), Lehoux was forced to retire. This car next appeared – as ‘EPE 97’ and finished in Fox & Nicholl’s dark shade of red - in the RAC Tourist Trophy race over the fabulous Ards public road circuit outside Belfast, Ulster, in August 1936. It was driven there by the very capable aristocrat, the Honorable Brian Lewis – later Lord Essendon. The car carried race number ‘1’ and was running in a strong second place after two hours before sliding off the road and striking a bank. Brian Lewis rejoined and recovered to run a close third behind Eddie Hall’s famous Derby Bentley in what proved to be an epic duel. Lewis’s fastest lap of the Ards circuit during his fight back through the field was achieved at a shattering 83.20mph, compared to Hall’s fastest of 81.07mph. If you imagine maintaining such an average speed around a narrow, undulating, winding loop of Ulster roads, through villages, a town center and out around rolling farmland, and you will form an accurate impression of the remarkable performance of these imposing-looking mid-1930s British sports-racing cars. Sadly, ‘EPE 97’ here began losing oil through a hole left by a broken engine timing cover stud, and after four hours of front-running – and recovery after his incident – Brian Lewis was reduced to touring round to nurse his car to the finish, finally coming home in 14th place at an average speed of 76.12mph. Fox & Nicholl then entered the car for its third major race – in this case the British Racing Drivers’ Club 500-Miles classic on the high-speed Outer Circuit of the legendary Brooklands Motor Course near Weybridge, Surrey. The car was fitted with a 3:1 back axle ratio, 7.00 x 21 rear tires and a fairing over the passenger seat. For this high-speed track race, without any tight corners whatsoever, its superfluous front brakes were removed to save weight and tire wear. It finished third in the 500-Miles at the average speed of 113.02mph, winning a green marble-block trophy which is today awarded annually by the British Vintage Sports Car Club for the Fox & Nicholl road-equipped sports car race at Silverstone. Fox & Nicholl retained ‘EPE 97’ for another season’s racing in 1937. June that year saw it competing in nothing less than the Le Mans 24-Hour race, co-driven by Charles Brackenbury and by Fox & Nicholls’ 1935 Le Mans-winning star – Hawker Aircraft test pilot-cum-racing driver John Hindmarsh. They were forced to retire at 10pm on the Saturday evening, due to unspecified mechanical trouble. Sadly, this proved to be Johnny Hindmarsh’s last race, as he was killed soon afterwards when his early-model Hawker Hurricane single-seat fighter aircraft crashed on St George’s Hill golf course, alongside the Brooklands Motor Course and its infield aerodrome. That year’s RAC Tourist Trophy race was run at Donington Park in Derbyshire, and ‘EPE 97’ reappeared, now with tiny regulation doors fitted. It was co-driven by Charlie Brackenbury/C.E.C. ‘Charlie’ Martin and the latter crashed it at Melbourne Hairpin due to breakage of its near-side front stub axle. While this was the car’s last major race it was then loaned to Alan Hess – Editor of the contemporary magazine, Speed – who set a new sports car record of 104.4 miles covered within one hour from a standing start (with passenger!). The car survived the Second World War and in 1952 was acquired by enthusiastic racer and subsequent VSCC stalwart Joe Goodhew. He lowered the entire body 10 inches and fitted the car with an ENV pre-selector gearbox. He and Bob Freeman-Wright – the Managing Director of Kodak – then co-drove the old car in that year’s major international British endurance race – the inaugural Goodwood Nine Hours. Despite being 16 years old, the Lagonda finished 14th amongst the 18 finishers and averaged 72mph around the charismatic 2.4-mile Sussex circuit, in comparison to the victorious works C-Type Jaguar’s 81mph. Colonel L.S. Michael then acquired ‘EPE 97’. He was the contemporary leading authority on tuning Meadows engines, and he constantly developed the car through a busy club racing program until as late as 1960. He achieved an astonishing record over 120 placings with the car, including victory in the VSCC Pomeroy Trophy event in 1959, and then setting a long – and possibly still – unbroken record for the marque in the Firle hill-climb. In his hands ‘EPE 97’ offered here covered the standing-start quarter-mile in 16.83 seconds, and the flying-start quarter-mile in 10.2 – 88.24mph – after a very brief run-up. This fabulously versatile and drivable post-Vintage Thoroughbred car then lay fallow until 1974, when it was acquired by David Dunn, who rebuilt it to its original Fox & Nicholl specification, restoring the bodyshell to its original height by fitting bonnet (hood) side panels but otherwise simply welding 10-inches of aluminum sheet back along the bottom where Goodhew had cut away the original. Both engine and gearbox were rebuilt during this extensive restoration, and had been little used by the contemporary owner before the car was offered for sale by auction in 1987. The buyer then was entrepreneur and car dealer Terry Cohn. Mindful of the wealth of events for which the car was eligible, Mr. Cohn commissioned Coldwell Engineering thoroughly overhaul EPE again to prepare it for ‘hard road and race driving’. At this point a contemporary engine was acquired and built to its correct race specification and sensibly what may well have been the original was crated and is retained with the car to this day. Over the course of the next decade 'EPE' perpetuated its active racing career, it was regularly seen at many events either with Terry himself at the wheel or on occasions ace driver Martin Stretton. It was certainly one of his most prized cars, and was retained until his untimely death at which point it was acquired from his estate by its current custodian. Throughout this ownership, 'EPE' has continued to be cherished, and actively campaigned completing no less than each Mille Miglia retrospective since 2002. All the while it has been meticulously maintained, work being carried out with only two criteria in mind the first that no expense should be spared or corners cut and the second that whatever was undertaken it should not detract from its now nicely aged appearance. An example of this can be found with the leather seats, the originals for the car still being with it, but when they appeared to be deteriorating too badly, they were removed sent to a leather conservation expert and then stored while exact copies where made and are in the car today. Virtually all of this work has been completed by the universally acknowledged experts for Meadows engined cars and the marque, Cedar Classic Cars of Hartley Wintney, under the auspices of Derek Green and later Sue Wilkinson. Extensive bills for this work together with various spares removed from previous rebuilds accompany the car. This is an enormously charismatic classical British sports-racing car which is extremely easy and rewarding to drive. It is capable of terrific open road performance by the standards of the time, and still surprises many drivers of modern motor cars today as it is absolutely capable not only of sailing past them, but of maintaining extraordinarily satisfying average speeds on all kinds of road. It drips with history, having been handled in period by so many prominent personalities of British and European motor racing lore. It has tremendous presence. It is good looking with its distinctively streamlined tail, and it has been much-loved and well maintained in its recent ownerships. And it began life as a carefully tailored Fox & Nicholl team car. Today, its role call of major events places ‘EPE’ in that much lusted after category of not only being eligible by model for many of the world’s most prestigious events, but having competed there in period, putting it at the top of the pile. Attesting to this history and assisting future competitive use, the car was one of the earliest cars (36th) to recently be granted an FIA Heritage certificate, which it holds in addition to FIVA and FIA certificates. If you seek impeccable history, genuine pedigree and a car to live with and love – this Lagonda LG45R has it all.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-16
Hammer price
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THE EX MIKE HAWTHORN 1953 WORKS FERRARI 625TF

THE EX MIKE HAWTHORN 1953 WORKS FERRARI 625TF COACHWORK BY VIGNALE Chassis No. 0304 TF Red with tan leatherette interior. Engine: Four cylinders, in-line, double overhead camshafts, 2 valves per cylinder, twin magneto ignition, 2 twin choke Weber 50DC03 carburettors, 2500cc, 240bhp at 7,000rpm; Gearbox: four-speed manual; Chassis: tubular with independent transverse leaf spring front suspension and semi-elliptic springs and a live rear axle; Brakes: finned drums all round. Right-hand drive. The designation Ferrari 625 usually conjures up visions of the 4- cylinder 2½ litre Grand Prix car designed in 1951, the number 625 indicating the capacity of one cylinder. The victorious 12-cylinder Formula 1 and Formula 2 cars had by then begun to lose their competitive edge and Lampredi had joined Ferrari as Chief Engineer to replace Colombo who deserted to Maserati. It was Lampredi's conviction that a 4-cylinder engine would not only be lighter, but also more efficient and reliable, with less mechanical friction and far fewer moving parts. Initally the intention was for Lampredi's engine to be of two litres and that it should replace the 12 cylinder 2 litre for Formula 2, which it did very successfully, eventually winning World Championship titles for Alberto Ascari in 1952 and 53. However the power output of the new engine and its torque was such that Ferrari, who foresaw the likelihood of a future Formula 1 being limited to 2½ litre unsupercharged, decided on a 2½ litre version of the engine as well. When the 2½ litre unsupercharged Formula 1 duly came into force in 1954, Ferrari was clearly well placed. Ferrari was of course not only active on the Grand Prix front and fitted the same 2½ litre GP engine into a sports racing barchetta. This became the 625 TF, for "Tipo Formula". Three examples were built, all three bodied by Vignale who had become a major coachwork supplier to Ferrari, superseding Touring. The first one was a coupe, which no longer exists. The other two were barchetta's, of which the one we are pleased to offer is the sole known survivor. This model is thus the first 4-cylinder sports racing car built and raced by Ferrari, leading the way to the 500 Mondial in 1954, the 750 in 1955 and finally the 860 Monza which contributed to Ferrari's victory in the 1956 World Sports Car Championship. The historical significance of the 625TF speaks for itself. In those days, chassis numbers were not recorded but period photographs provide precious help when the history of a particular car needs to be traced and we thank Jean-Jacques Frei for having put his important photographic archive at our disposal to research 0304TF. Vignale unvoluntarily assisted, as he built in a few small differences in the body (mostly air outlets on the lower part of the body, behind the front wheels) still present today, which enable to differentiate it from the sister car and to follow it through its racing career. 0304TF made its first outing as a works entry in the 6th Gran Premio dell'Autodromo at Monza on 29 June 1953, driven by Mike Hawthorn, who was to become World Champion with Ferrari in 1958. It was one of a dozen Ferraris lined up at the start, to compete against the three official 3 litre Lancia's driven by Bonetto, Gonzales and Manzon, as well as a few Gordinis. Luigi Villoresi won, driving a works 250 MM, beating Bonetto's Lancia and Farina's V12. Hawthorn, in the "little" Ferrari, finished 4th, followed by eight other V12s. This was a significant result. The car was then entered in the Coppa d'Oro Dolomiti where it finished 3rd with Umberto Maglioli. At the end of that year, the car was shipped to South America and led an active life for almost ten years. After some appearances in Brzel with local ace Chico Landi, 0304 TF went to Argentin where it was to be raced until 1962, participating no less than four times in the World Championship event, the Buenos Aires 1000 Kilometer Race, between 1954 and 1958 coming 5th and 8th in the first two events. Luis Milan, Alvaro Piano, Nestor Salerno, Cesar Reyes and Cesar Rivero with consistent results in the top five. 0304 TF was later discovered by a knowledgeable Italian collector who re-imported it into Italy where it was rebuilt by the mechanics of the reputed workshop of Gianni Diena in Modena. The body was probably resprayed at the same time. It was occasionally seen in a few historic events like the 1000 Miglia. Today, this apparently sole surviving 625 TF is still in very original condition. The Vignale body, crafted in aluminium, is well preserved. The engine bites in an absolutely ferocious way and the car is a pure delight to drive, being so small, light and powerful. It will be a welcome entry in all major historic events and has already been extended an invitation by Ferrari to participate in the festivities for the commemoration of the marque's 50th anniversary later this year. This is an unrepeatable opportunity to acquire a significant Ferrari with Works history. The car is presently not road registered but comes with EEC documents.

  • CHESwitzerland
  • 1997-05-22
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1966 Ford GT40

Estimate: €1,176,000 - €1,470,000 Estimate: $1,620,000 - $2,025,000 Engine No. SGT 27 Specifications: 380bhp, 4,728cc (289 cu. in.) overhead valve V-8 engine, five-speed ZF gearbox, independent front suspension via double wishbones with coil springs, independent rear suspension via trailing links, lower wishbones, and coil springs, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95in. (2,413mm). Ford announced its intention to officially re-enter motor racing in the summer of 1962. Initially the company chose to compete in stock car and drag racing, forms of the sport that they felt best fitted their racing background. In 1963, seeking greater exposure, Ford decided to attack America’s greatest race – the Indianapolis 500. The rear-engined Lotus-Fords completely shocked the established US teams in their front-engined roadsters. Jim Clark surely would have won the race at the team’s first attempt challenging Parnelli Jones’s Watson-Offy roadster in the closing stages, if Jones’s car had not been leaking oil, ruining Clark’s chances of taking the win; the clerk of the course was not prepared to black-flag the local hero after intense lobbying by his team boss J. C. Agajanian. The near-win and, more importantly, the failed acquisition of Ferrari, encouraged Ford along another path and it decided to extend its participation in racing to the GT category. There was very little interest in this form of racing in America, but Ford was prepared to gamble that European wins, and Le Mans in particular, would capture the country’s imagination – they were right. After the Ferrari debacle Henry Ford II declared that he ‘wanted to win Le Mans in 1966’. Ford’s Lee Iacocca and Leo Beebe were given the job of forming Ford Advanced Vehicles. Ford’s idea was to develop a car that could be built around the 1963 Indianapolis 4.2 litre pushrod engine. The mid-engined coupé that the company had in mind was to be the very cutting edge of modern GT car design with careful attention paid to aerodynamics. A model of the initial design was made and tested at the University of Maryland wind tunnel, and subsequently a full-size fibreglass model was made and tested at Ford’s wind tunnel at Dearborn, Michigan. Ford realized that many of their plans were echoed in the Lola GT, designed and built by Eric Broadly at his workshop at Bromley in England. Broadly, too, had seen the potential of the Ford V-8 as a GT racing engine, and incorporated a stock 4,262cc version in his car, first exhibited at the London Racing Car Show in January 1963. As it happened, the Lola GT was 40 inches high. The Ford GT would also be this height, and it is for this reason that the car was christened GT40. By the summer of 1963 Ford and Broadly had joined forces and very quickly two evaluations of the Lola were completed by Ford, one at the Goodwood circuit and another at the Ford headquarters at Dearborn. Progress was quick, as Ford hired John Wyer, General Manager of Aston Martin, to manage the programme in England, and new facilities were set up at Slough. In charge of the whole project was Roy Lunn, formerly of Jowett, Aston Martin, and Ford UK. The first two prototype Ford GT40s were launched in April 1964 and the GT40’s first race was the 1,000 kilometre at the Nürburgring on 31 May. Phil Hill qualified the blue and white coupé second to John Surtees’s Ferrari 275P, and although the car retired with a broken suspension bracket, the GT40 had shown its potential. Le Mans was next with a three-car entry; the drivers were again Hill/McLaren, Attwood/Schlesser, and Ginther/Gregory. The new cars performed amazingly well and, although none finished, Ginther led at the start of the race and Hill set a new race lap record of 3:49.4 (131.7 mph). The final major event of 1964 was at Rheims on 5 July. All three cars entered, showing blinding promise, but in spite of running first and second and setting new lap records all three cars eventually retired with gearbox problems. In 1965, when the project was handed over to the Shelby-American team of Cobra fame, a total of ten cars had been built. By the end of February 1965 a number of significant changes had been made to the car under the direction of Carroll Shelby, his chief engineer Phil Remington, and Ken Miles, Shelby’s test driver. The 4.2-litre dry sump Indianapolis engine was replaced with the famous wet sump 4.7-litre 289 cubic inch V-8 that powered Shelby’s Cobras and developed 385 brake horsepower. Transaxle troubles were attacked by replacing the Colotti straight-cut gears with Ford helical gears. The drive shaft, fuel feed system, and clutch were improved, wider cast alloy wheels were utilized, and attention was paid to better ducting, improved cooling, and slicker aerodynamics. The first race the re-worked car was entered in was the 2,000 kilometre Daytona Continental Race on 28 February 1965. The car, driven by Lloyd Ruby and Ken Miles, won the race with Bob Bondurant and Richie Ginther in a second car finishing third. Suddenly, the GT40 was on the map, a force to be reckoned with. Le Mans of that year was again a disappointment with no cars finishing, but again Phil Hill broke the lap record, both in qualifying and in the race. In mid-1965, Ford decided that the GT40 had reached a sufficiently advanced state of design to manufacture the car in greater numbers. 50 cars were planned to be produced in order to qualify them for the Production Sports Car category. Among them were the cars that would win the World Championship for Production Sports Cars in 1966. With the GT40 now fully developed, Roy Lunn was given the job of overseeing production of a Mark II version of the car. Work on two new cars began in the spring of 1965 at a new Ford racing subsidiary, Kar Kraft, in Detroit. The GT40 Mark II was fitted with Ford’s mighty 7.0-litre V-8. The engine may have been considered an odd choice but it was extremely reliable, developing maximum power at only 6,200 rpm. The engine had tremendous torque and a wide power band, and had been very successful racing in other formats. Other than the engine, the new cars were relatively unchanged. The seating position was modified as were the rear bulkhead members, and the gearbox was based on that used in the Ford Galaxie saloon. The Mark IIs were immediately quick, finishing first, second, and third in the 1966 Daytona 24-Hour race; this was followed by victory at the 12-Hours of Sebring and the famous clean sweep at Le Mans, where Ford GT40s once again crossed the line first, second, and third. Ford’s gamble had paid off and the GT40 would dominate sports car racing, making it one of the most successful road/competition cars ever built. The road version of the Ford GT40 was announced in January 1966. It was, the company proclaimed, ‘the most expensive Ford ever’; and at £7,253 it cost 15 times as much as the cheapest Ford Anglia then available. Only 31 road-going cars were manufactured. Chassis number 1065 was sent to the Ford Merchandising Department in Dearborn but was not delivered to its first owner, Charles Hill of Dallas, Texas, until 1967. Andy Harman from Mississippi owned the car for a short while during 1969 before it was sold to English collector Nicholas Shrigley-Fiegl in 1970. A two-year restoration was undertaken in 1980-1982, and when completed the car only showed 2,035 recorded miles. Later, in 1984, William Loughran bought 1065. GT40 chassis number 1065 has a well-documented history with a continuous chain of ownership. When Christies inspected the car in 1998 it still only showed 2,540 miles. In early 2000 the GT40 was sold to John McCaw and returned to America. Before purchase the car received a detailed inspection and the mileage showed 2,596. GT40 s/n 1065 has been re-liveried twice over the years but is now back to its original colour of Azure blue with the complementary original black upholstery. Built to nearly the same specifications as the racing version, this example is nonetheless fitted with a fully trimmed interior, which is original and in superb condition. The car has its original engine (number SGT 27) and ZF gearbox (number NR 243). The original Borrani wire wheels have been replaced with the later Halibrands. Other updated items include 38mm Weber down draft carburettors, and the fuel pump, pressure regulator, coil and oil and fuel lines have all been updated. Ford GT40 chassis number 1065 is a beautiful example of a GT 40 MKI and is certainly one of the most original GT40s in existence. The recorded mileage of just 4,500 miles may well make this car unique. Whilst any GT40 is a rare beast with around 103 built in total and just 31 road cars, the opportunity to own one of these legendary cars doesn’t arise often. They are simply one of the most desirable sports cars in history. Denis Jenkinson, the fabled motoring journalist, wrote this in Motor Sport in 1966: ‘If you have the money to buy a new conception in road motoring, you will not be disappointed; if a Jaguar, Ferrari or Aston Martin satisfies you, then the unbelievable qualities of a Ford GT40 will probably be beyond your appreciation.’ Chassis no. 1065

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2007-10-31
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1934 Hispano Suiza J12 Type 68 berline Vanvooren

1934 Hispano Suiza J12 Type 68 berline Vanvooren Carte grise française Châssis n° 14035 Moteur n° 321097 - Provenant de la collection Albert Prost - Chef-d'œuvre de Marc Birkigt - Deux propriétaires en 74 ans - Superbe état - Modèle très rare - V12 de 9,5 litres et 220 ch Dans les années 1920, Hispano-Suiza est synonyme de perfection mécanique et de grand prestige. Les H6 B et H6C sont parmi les voitures les plus rapides de leur temps mais, à la veille de la Grande Dépression, les constructeurs se livrent une véritable surenchère dans le domaine du luxe. A côté de la Bugatti Royale, des marques comme Mercedes, Isotta-Fraschini, Rolls-Royce, Duesenberg ou Cadillac proposent des modèles de très haut de gamme. Pour tenir son rang, Hispano doit réagir. Marc Birkigt opte alors pour un V12 de grosse cylindrée, pour lequel il s'inspire des moteurs d'avion dont la marque équipe depuis de longues années les meilleurs appareils. D'une cylindrée de 9,5 litres, ce monument mécanique à soupapes en tête développe 220 ch et emmène la voiture à plus de 170 km/h, une vitesse époustouflante pour l'époque. Le châssis de la J12 Type 68 est à la hauteur, avec ses servofreins et ses amortisseurs réglables depuis l'habitacle. Merveille de performances, d'équilibre et de fiabilité, cette voiture est adaptée à chacun de ses clients et carrossée à l'extérieur. Présentée en 1931, la J12 sera produite à 120 exemplaires environ et restera sept ans en production, une belle longévité pour une voiture de ce prix ! L'exemplaire que nous proposons est né en 1934, et l'on connaît sa chaîne de propriétaires dès 1939, année où l'achète Nicolas Henri, transitaire dans le Vaucluse. La voitures est immatriculée à son nom le 26 mai 1939 avec le numéro 5915 ZA 4, comme l'atteste une déclaration de propriété datant de 1941. Un document à en-tête de la société Nicolas Frères indique que la voiture a été exposée au musée de Montlhéry en 1958, puis au Salon de l'Auto de Paris en 1964 et, enfin, au musée du Mans de 1964 à juillet 1965. Visiblement très attaché à cette voiture, Nicolas Henri ne s'en sépare qu'en 1969 et la cède à Albert Prost, très précisément le 8 janvier. La voiture prend alors l'immatriculation 95 QD 92. En septembre 1969, la voiture est repeinte et des travaux portant sur la mécanique et l'électricité sont effectués. D'ailleurs, une facture de réfection de la pompe à eau montre que, à cette époque, le compteur kilométrique affiche 7 313 km. L'ensemble des chromes sont remis à neuf en 1970, et le radiateur est confié en 1971 à Chausson pour remise en état. Ensuite, les magnétos sont refaites en 2002. Outre le fait qu'elle soit apparue en photo dans un article publié en 1983 dans le Fanauto n°182 sous la plume de l'historien Jacques Rousseau, un des derniers faits de gloire de cette voiture est d'être exposée au Salon de Genève 2006. Albert Prost prend part de son côté à plusieurs rassemblements de voitures anciennes, comme le concours d'élégance de la rétrospective Lyon-Roanne-Vichy, en Juin 1971, ou encore le Rallye Torpédo reliant St-Etienne à Chalmazel. Selon ses filles, il s'agissait d'une de ses voitures préférée : "Elle atteignait 190 km/h avec la douceur et le confort d'une Rolls, c'était le temps béni où il n'y avait pas de radar," disait-il. D'après ce qu'il leur avait raconté, cette voiture aurait appartenu à André Dubonnet, petit-fils et héritier de Joseph Dubonnet, fondateur de la célèbre marque d'apéritif, et aurait parcouru le trajet Paris-Nice pour établir un record, ce qui expliquerait la présence du volumineux avertisseur monté à l'avant de la voiture, pour prévenir les piétons du passage du bolide. Aujourd'hui, le compteur kilométrique affiche 12 702 km et la voiture se présente sous la forme d'une belle restauration ancienne bien conservée. La carrosserie est superbe, avec son allure de coach et ses portes ouvrant en vis-à-vis, dégageant bien l'accès à l'habitacle. A l'intérieur, elle présente une sellerie en drap beige en bon état, l'impressionnant tableau de bord à sept instruments propre à ce modèle, des garnitures en bois bien préservées et un étonnant poste de radio d'époque à lampes. Le compartiment moteur, d'une étonnante sobriété pour une telle mécanique, est de présentation impeccable. N'ayant connu que deux propriétaires en 74 ans, cette voitures est une pièce exceptionnelle par son état de préservation. Il s'agit de plus d'un véritable chef-d'œuvre de Marc Birkigt pour Hispano-Suiza qui, contrairement à certaines de ses concurrentes, offre les performances hors du commun correspondant à sa mécanique, grâce en partie à la compétence d'Hispano-Suiza en matière d'aviation. Cette voiture est un sésame pour tous les événements classiques ou concours d'élégance de la planète, en plus du plaisir incomparable qu'apportera à son nouveau propriétaire sa mécanique puissante et raffinée alliée à son incomparable prestige. Photos d'archives: Collection famille Prost Merci de noter que ce véhicule est vendu sans contrôle technique. French title Chassis n° 14035 Engine n° 321097 - From the Albert Prost collection - Masterpiece by Marc Birkigt - Two owners in 74 years - Superb condition - Very rare model - V12 of 9.5 litres and 220 bhp During the 1920s, Hispano-Suiza was synonymous with mechanical perfection and grand prestige. The H6B and H6C were amongst the fastest cars of their generation but, on the eve of the Great Depression, other manufacturers were trying to outdo each other in the level of luxury they provided. Alongside the Bugatti Royale, marques such as Mercedes, Isotta-Fraschini, Rolls-Royce, Duesenberg and Cadillac all had deluxe models in their range. To hold its own, Hispano needed to respond. Marc Birkigt opted for a large V12 engine, inspired by aircraft engines the marque had long supplied. The monumental 9.5-litre engine with overhead valves developed 220 bhp and powered the car to over 170 km/h - an astonishing speed for that time. The J12 Type 68 chassis was of the highest quality, with servo-assisted brakes and dampers that could be adjusted from the cockpit. A balanced, reliable and high-performance marvel, the car was tailored to individual clients and bodied elsewhere. Presented in 1931, approximately 120 examples of the J12 were produced over a seven-year period. This was a long career for such a high-priced automobile! The example on offer is from 1934, and its owners are known from 1939, when it was bought by Nicolas Henri, who was at that time living in Vaucluse. The car was registered in his name on 26 May 1939 with the number 5915 ZA 4, as confirmed by an ownership declaration dating from 1941. A document from the Nicolas Frères company indicates that the car was exhibited at the Montlhéry museum in 1958, the Paris Motor Show in 1964 and finally in the museum at Le Mans from 1964 to July 1965. Henri was clearly very attached to the car and didn't part with it until 1969, selling it to Albert Prost on 8 January. The car was then registered 95 QD 92. In September 1969, the car was re-painted and work was carried out on the engine and electrics. An invoice for repairing the water pump shows that the odometer read 7,313 km at this time. The chromework was refurbished in 1970 and the radiator was sent to Chausson in 1971 to be renovated. The magnetos were overhauled in 2002. As well as appearing in a photo for an article written by historian Jacques Rousseau, published in Fanauto n°182 in 1983, the car's most recent moment of glory was in 2006 when it was exhibited at the Geneva Motor Show. Albert Prost took part in many classic car events, including the concours d'élégance at the Lyon-Roanne-Vichy retrospective in June 1971, and the Rallye Torpédo from St-Etienne to Chalmazel. According to his daughters, this was one of his favourite cars : " It could travel at 190 km/h with the smoothness and comfort of a Rolls, in the good old days before speed cameras, " he used to say. He told his daughters that this car is thought to have belonged to André Dubonnet, grand-son and heir of Joseph Dubonnet, founder of the well-known brand of aperitif, and would have taken part in the Paris-Nice to establish a record, explaining the presence of the enormous horn mounted at the front of the car, to warn pedestrians to stay well clear. Today, the odometer records 12,702 km and the car is presented in a well-conserved condition following an earlier high quality restoration. The coachwork is superb, with doors opening outwards to provide good access to the passenger compartment. Inside, the beige fabric upholstery is in good condition, the impressive dashboard displays the seven dials correct for this model, the wood trim is well preserved and there is a wonderful old valve radio. The remarkably straightforward engine compartment is presented in impeccable condition. Having had just two owners in the last 74 years, the preserved condition of this car makes it an exceptional example. This Hispano-Suiza masterpiece by Marc Birkigt stood out from its rivals for its outstanding performance, provided by engineering that drew on the marque's experience in building aircraft engines. The car is a passport to all classic car and concours d'élégance events around the world, and it will offer its new owner power, sophistication and prestige, guaranteeing an enjoyment that is second to none. Archives pictures : Prost Family collection Please note that this car will be sold without technical inspection. Estimation 550 000 - 650 000 € Sold for 1,127,040 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-07
Hammer price
Show price

1948 Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport Cabriolet by Franay

Unique salon and concours history in period Original one-off convertible coachwork by Franay Extremely rare and desirable SWB GP-derived chassis Verified by Talbot-Lago and Saoutchik authority Peter M. Larsen Exceptional concours-quality restoration The short-wheelbase, 2,650-millimetre, GP-derived Grand Sport chassis, with independent front suspension by transverse leaf, was developed by Anthony Lago during World War II. It was the direct descendant of the legendary pre-war T150-C SS model and virtually identical, except for considerably more power derived from its new twin-cam 4.5-litre T26 engine. The result was the T26 Grand Sport, an automobile destined for the serious sportsman and chic Parisian society in equal measure. It was a grand gesture and the final flowering in France of the great tradition of the truly custom motor car. The chassis was built to carry coachwork that was the latest in grand style and luxury. The concept was outrageously exclusive and something for the very few – not just because of its price, which was stratospheric, or its limited practicality, which was irrelevant. This was a car that was chic, ritzy, aristocratic, and sharp as a knife all at once. The Grand Sport remained very rare. A maximum of 29 were built on the short wheelbase; 26 cars exist today, all with individually coachbuilt bodies. Chassis 110121 was first shown at the Paris Salon in October 1949, where it won the 1er Grand Prix. A fascinating picture taken at the Salon shows Marlene Dietrich descending elegantly from the car, the crowd surrounding it completely mesmerized – a very rare instance of the occupant upstaging a Grand Sport! The cabriolet was first white and also carried its first grille treatment at the show. The very luxurious interior and fitted luggage, both by Hermés, was bright red leather with white piping. In June 1950, it was shown at the Concours d’Enghien, where it won the 1er Grand Prix d’Honneur. In the winter of 1950, 110121 was back with Franay, where it was repainted black and given a new grille to a simpler design. The car was shown on the Talbot stand at the Brussels Auto Show in January of 1951, and again in the Concours de la Grande Cascade in the Bois de Boulogne that summer. After two years of show and concours duties, chassis 110121 was sold by Franay to its first owner, a man who manufactured hard candies, but whose name is unknown. The car was brought back to Franay a year later, and it was decided to update the grille in the style of the Ferrari 212 Inter, chassis 0177 E, the first Ferrari bodied by Pininfarina that had been built for George Filipinetti. That car had been shown at the Paris Salon in October 1951, and it is highly likely that Marius Franay simply saw the car there and felt inspired. The stands were a few feet apart. Immediately after its completion, 110121 was shown again at the June 1952 Concours d’Enghien, fittingly enhanced by a gorgeous Dior model wearing his latest New Look creation. The car’s final appearance in period was on the Franay stand at the 1953 Paris Salon, where it sold to a butcher from Versailles. In the spring of 1960, the Grand Sport was bought for $800 from a certain M. Barone, who ran a Talbot garage, by Jim Bandy, an American military officer stationed in France. In 1963, Bandy brought the car with him to Baltimore, Maryland. A few years later, he sold it to Tom Owens of Grafton, West Virginia, who also owned a Grand Sport Saoutchik coupé, chassis 110101. Owens performed an engine swap on the two cars, taking the engine from 110121, putting it in 110101, and vice versa. The latter car survives in the Mullin Automotive Museum. Sometime in the 1970s, 110121 was acquired from Owens by the well-known Milwaukee collector David Uihlein, who kept the car for a number of years. In 1992, 110121 was advertised for sale in Hemmings Motor News. By then, the car was partially dismantled. It was bought by the highly regarded Austrian restorer Egon Zweimüller. Some years later, Zweimüller embarked upon a decade-long mechanical and cosmetic restoration to the highest concours standards, including the original Hermés interior and luggage, which has been expertly restored. The work was completed in 2010. Any Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport is a very rare and exciting sports car. In addition, chassis 110121 by Franay is a unique one-off cabriolet of great and tasteful beauty, as evidenced by its unparalleled period history at the Paris Salons and French concours. It is a compelling and unprecedented combination. • Una storia unica, fatta di Saloni e Concorsi • Esemplare unico di vettura aperta, con carrozzeria di Franay • Telaio a passo corto, derivato da quello GP, estremamente raro e ricercato • Verificato dall'autorità riconosciuta per le Talbot-Lago e le Saoutchik, Peter M. Larsen • Eccezionale restauro, presentata in condizioni da concorso Il telaio Grand Sport a passo corto, da 2.650 millimetri,derivato da quello GP, con sospensioni anteriori indipendenti con balestra trasversale, è stato sviluppato da Anthony Lago durante la seconda guerra mondiale. Era il discendente diretto del leggendario modello anteguerra T150-C SS e, praticamente identico tranne che per il notevole incremento di potenza derivante dal nuovo motore T26 bialbero da 4,5 litri. Il risultato è stata la T26 Grand Sport, un'automobile destinata in egual misura allo sportivo puro ed alla raffinata società parigina. E' stato un grande mezzo ed il canto del cigno della grande tradizione dell’automobile Francese totalmente personalizzata. Il telaio era pensato per ospitare carrozzerie all’ultimo grido in termini di stile e lusso. Il concetto era di un auto scandalosamente esclusiva, riservata a pochissimi - non solo a causa del suo prezzo, che era stratosferico, o la sua limitata praticità, che era un dettaglio irrilevante. Questa è stata una macchina elegante, lussuosa, aristocratica e furba tutto in una volta. La Grand Sport è rimasta molto rara; sul telaio a passo corto ne sono state costruite al massimo 29 unità e 26 sono quelle sopravvissute sino ad oggi, tutte con carrozzerie uniche. La vettura con telaio numero 110121 è stato esposta al Salone di Parigi dell'Ottobre del 1949, dove ha vinto il 1°Grand Prix. Un’affascinante fotografia scattata al Salone, mostra Marlene Dietrich che, elegantemente, scende dalla macchina mentre la folla la circonda, completamente ipnotizzata, in un raro caso in cui il passeggero fa ombra ad una Grand Sport! La carrozzeria cabriolet esposta al Salone è stata inizialmente verniciata di bianco e, inoltre, mostrava un primo tipo di calandra anteriore. Il lussuosissimo interno, così come il set valigie, entrambi realizzatii da Hermés, erano di pelle colore rosso accesso con piping bianco. Nel mese di Giugno del 1950, è stato presentata anche al Concours d'Enghien, dove ha vinto il 1° Grand Prix d'Honneur. Nell'inverno del 1950, la macchina 110121 torna presso la carrozzeria Franay, dove viene riverniciata di colore nero e le viene montata una nuova calandra anteriore, dal disegno più semplice. La vettura viene quindi esposta allo stand della Talbot al Salone dell’Auto di Bruxelles del Gennaio del 1951, e, di nuovo, al Concours de la Grande Cascade presso il Bois de Boulogne che si tiene durante l'estate. Dopo due anni di esposizioni e di concorsi, la vettura 110121, viene venduta da Franay al suo primo proprietario, un uomo che ha un’azienda per la produzione di caramelle, ma di cui oggi non si conosce il nome. La vettura viene riportata da Franay un anno dopo, quando si decide di aggiornare la calandra anteriore nello stile della Ferrari 212 Inter, telaio 0177 E, la prima Ferrari carrozzata da Pininfarina, costruita per George Filipinetti. Quella macchina era stata esposta al Salone di Parigi del mese di Ottobre del 1951, ed è altamente probabile che Marius Franay l’abbia vista, i rispettivi stand erano a pochi metri di distanza, e che, semplicemente, se ne sia sentito ispirato. Immediatamente dopo aver ricevuto questi ultimi aggiornamenti, la Talbot 110121 viene presentata ancora una volta al Concorso d'Enghien, nel Giugno del 1952, ulteriormente arricchita nella sua bellezza da una splendida modella di Dior che indossa l’ultima creazione dello stilista, nello stile New Look. L’ultima apparizione dell’epoca della vettura è nello stand della carrozzeria Franay al Salone di Parigi del 1953, dove viene venduta ad un macellaio di Versailles. Nella primavera del 1960 la Grand Sport, divenuta proprietà di un certo M. Barone, che gestiva un garage Talbot, viene acquistata, per $ 800, da Jim Bandy, un ufficiale americano di stanza in Francia. Nel 1963, Bandy porta la macchina con lui a Baltimora, nel Maryland. Pochi anni dopo la vende a Tom Owens di Grafton, West Virginia, che possedeva anche una coupé Grand Sport Saoutchik, telaio 110101. Owens scambia i motori delle due vetture, prendendo il motore della 110121 mettendolo nella 110101, e viceversa. Anche quest'ultima auto è sopravvissuta e oggi si trova nel Mullin Automotive Museum. Negli anni ’70 la Talbot 110121 viene ceduta da Owens, venduta al noto collezionista di Milwaukee, David Uihlein che la terrà per un certo numero di anni. Nel 1992, 110121, ormai parzialmente smantellata, viene inserzionata nella rivista Hemmings Motor News e viene acquistata dal rinomato restauratore austriaco Egon Zweimüller. Alcuni anni più tardi, Zweimüller intraprende un restauro completo ad altissimo livello, che durerà circa 10 anni e terminerà nel 2010, sia della meccanica sia delle parti estetiche, riportando la vettura agli antichi splendori, completa dell’interno e dei bagagli originali di Hermés. Qualsiasi Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport è una vettura sportiva estremamente rara ed emozionante. Il telaio 110121 allestito da Franay con una carrozzeria cabriolet dal disegno unico aggiunge, inoltre, una grande bellezza e tanto buon gusto, come dimostra la sua impareggiabile storia dell’epoca con la partecipane ai saloni dell’auto Parigini ed ai concorsi d’eleganza francesi. Si tratta di una combinazione vincente e senza uguali. Chassis no. 110121 Engine no. 102

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-05-27
Hammer price
Show price

1953 Fiat 8V Cabriolet by Vignale

115 bhp, 1,996 cc OHV V-8 engine, five-speed Alfa Romeo manual transmission, four-wheel coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm The only 8V Vignale Cabriolet A stunning Michelotti design Documented early history Of all the famed Italian automakers, Fiat is not normally recognised as a builder of lavish coachbuilt grand touring cars. The Italian automaker’s first engines were four-cylinder units, often of gargantuan proportions. Fiat produced its first six-cylinder engine in 1907 and even a V-12 from 1921 to 1922. However, it was not until 1952 that Fiat would produce an engine with eight cylinders, and the chassis and bodies it resided in were just as special as the engine. This 8V model, or Otto Vu in Italian, was built for two years only, in 114 examples, and it remains one of the marque’s most legendary motor cars to this day. It was the star of the Geneva Salon in March 1952, and it goes without saying that this new Fiat got lots of attention from the motoring press. Road & Track called it “the biggest surprise of the year”, and The Motor remarked that “the last thing which had been expected from Italy’s largest car factory was a truly streamlined 2-seater saloon”. With its potent new powerplant, which was clothed by bodies designed by the world’s finest coachbuilders, everyone knew that this was truly a special automobile in every sense of the word. CHASSIS NUMBER 000050 According to Tony Adriaensens’s book Otto Vu, 8V chassis number 000050 was exported as a chassis on 8 July 1953 to the renowned Italian coachbuilder Alfredo Vignale. Adriaesens notes that Vignale would work with his stylist, the talented Giovanni Michelotti, to discuss potential designs, and then the two would work together to evolve and “flesh out” a final automobile. This process resulted in Vignale bodying ten 8V chassis, all to Michelotti designs, of which the car offered here, number 000050, is the only cabriolet and one of very few open bodies produced for the 8V by any coachbuilder. The drawing for the cabriolet notes that it was an exclusive design created for a Sig. Leone. It bears a remarkable resemblance to a similar coupé built by Vignale on another 8V chassis, but it has the breezy nonchalance that only a convertible top can offer. Whatever became of the mysterious Sig. Leone is unknown, but the car is believed to have actually been delivered new in the United States, where photographs were taken of it in Florida in late 1954. It is believed that its original owner was Sunshine State resident John Harrigan, who took delivery of it in September of that year. Photographs show that the car was originally fitted with larger, heavier bumpers, a different dashboard arrangement, and painted wire wheels. In the early 1990s, the attractive 8V was discovered in the Utah desert by well-known enthusiast Don Williams. Mr Williams was very involved in the 8V market at the time, and he did not hesitate to purchase the car and have it restored in its present livery: a classic Italian racing red with a tan leather interior and chrome wire wheels. In a recent telephone conversation, he noted that the car, as-purchased, had no engine, which was typical of 8Vs sold in America, where service for the complex V-8s was not readily available. He acquired another engine, number 000184, which is believed to have been a factory replacement engine from another chassis, and he installed it in the car. It is important to note that, according to Mr Williams, when found, the car had its present delicate competition-style “bumperettes” and redesigned dashboard arrangement, indicating that these modifications were performed by an early American owner. A five-speed Alfa Romeo manual transmission was also fitted, and it is still installed today, as it is a desirable and suitable replacement for the fragile and finicky original Fiat four-speed unit. This car, which has recently been serviced and is offered for sale today from a prominent European collection, is amongst the most striking, sensual, dramatic, and certainly desirable of all 8Vs, as it is a rare open-top variant by one of Italy’s premier coachbuilders. Now, as then, it is just at home in sunny Florida as it is in the hills of Italia. 115 cv, motore 8 cilindri a V da 1.996 cc e singola albero a camme in testa, trasmissione Alfa Romeo manuale a cinque marcie, sospensioni a molle elicoidali su tutte e quattro le ruote e quattro freni a tamburo a comando idraulico. Passo: 2.400 mm • L'unica Fiat 8V Cabriolet Vignale • Un bellissimo disegno di Michelotto • Auto documentata Di tutti i costruttori di auto italiane, la Fiat non è normalmente associata a sontuose auto da gran turismo costruite su misura. I primi motori costruiti da questa Azienda erano costituiti da quattro cilindri in linea spesso di proporzioni gigantesche. La Fiat ha prodotto il suo primo sei cilindri in linea nel 1907 e persino un V-12 tra il 1921 e il 1922. Nonostante ciò, si dovette aspettare il 1952 per vedere il suo primo motore ad otto cilindri, che andò ad equipaggiare telai speciali tanto quanto questo motore. Il modello 8V, normalmente chiamato Otto Vu in lingua italiana, fu in listino per due anni soltanto, fu prodotto in soli 114 esemplari e rimane tutt'ora una delle auto più leggendarie costruite della fabbrica. Quando fu presentata al Salone di Ginevra, nel marzo del 1952, fu oggetto di numerose attenzioni da parte della stampa specializzata. La rivista Road & Track la definì come "la più grande sorpresa dell'anno" e The Motor dichiarò che "l'ultima cosa che ci aspettavamo dal più grande costruttore di auto italiano era un'aerodinamica berlinetta 2 posti". Con la sua inedita motorizzazione, coperta dalle carrozzerie lastrate dai migliori stilisti di automobili al mondo, la fiat Otto Vu era un'automobile speciale sotto ogni aspetto. IL NUMERO DI TELAIO 000050 Secondo il libro di Tody Adriansens's Otto Vu, lo chassis numero 000050 fu consegnato presso il rinomato carrozziere italiano Alfredo Vignale l' 8 luglio del 1953. Adriansens indica come Vignale discusse con il suo stilista, il talentuoso Giovanni Michelotti, i disegni potenziali che sarebbero poi stati sviluppati da entrambi per sviluppare e scolpire la forma finale dell'automobile. Questo fatto portò Vignale a carrozzare dieci telai 8V, tutti basati sui disegni di Michelotti, tra cui lo chassis numero 000050, la sua unica versione cabriolet ed una delle poche prodotte su questa base da qualsiasi altro carrozziere. Il disegno di questa cabriolet fu realizzato esclusivamente per un certo Sig. Leone ed ha una straordinaria somiglianza ad un coupé allestito da Vignale su un altro telaio 8V. La differenza tra le due sta nella nonchalance e nel piacere di guida che solo una cabriolet può offrire. Chi fosse questo misterioso Sig. Leone non si è mai saputo, ma si pensa che quest'auto fu consegnata nuova negli Stati Uniti, dove le furono scattate diverse fotografie in Florida nel tardo 1954. Si ritiene che il primo proprietario fu il residente dello Sunshine State John Harrigan, che prese in consegna l'auto nel settembre di quell'anno. Le fotografie dimostrano come la macchina era equipaggiata con paraurti più ampi e pesanti, con un cruscotto diverso e cerchi a raggi verniciati. Nei primi anni '90, questa attraente 8V fu ritrovata negli Utah dal noto appassionato Don Williams. Costui era grandemento coinvolto nel mercato delle 8V e non esitò ad acquistare la macchina per riportarla successivamente nello stato in cui la vediamo oggi: un classico rosso corsa italiano con interni in pelle beige con ruote a raggi cromati. Durante una conversazione al telefono, il Sig.Williams indicò che al momento dell'acquisto non aveva il motore, una caratteristica tipica delle 8V vendute in America, dove ancora non era disponibile una rete di manutenzione per il complesso V-8. Dichiarò quindi che acquistò un altro motore, numero 000184, che si ritiene essere stato un'unità sostitutiva per un altro chassis, e lo montò sulla macchina. E'importante notare che, stando alle dichiarazioni del Sig.Williams, quando fu ritrovata la macchina, essa presentava dei delicati mini paraurti da competizione e un cruscotto diverso. Tutto questo indicava che queste modifiche erano state fatte da uno dei primi proprietari americani. Inoltre la macchina fu dotata di una trasmissione Alfa Romeo a cinque velocità, una modifica presente ancora oggi, che costituisce un ideale rimpiazzo per la delicata trasmissione originale Fiat a quattro velocità. Quest'auto, che ha appena subito un completo intervento di manutenzione ed è oggi offerta in vendita da un prominente collezionista europeo, è una delle 8V più emozionanti, sensuali, drammatiche e desiderabili ed è anche una rara variante cabriolet di uno dei migliori carrozzieri d'Italia. Oggi come allora, è a casa sua sia nella Florida baciata dal sole che nelle colline d'Italia. Chassis no. 106.000050 Engine no. 104.000 000184

  • CANCanada
  • 2015-05-23
Hammer price
Show price

1965 Ferrari 275 GTB by Scaglietti

280 bhp, 3,286 cc overhead-cam V-12 engine, triple Weber 40DCZ6 carburettors, rear-mounted five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil spring independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5 in.) The 1965 Frankfurt International Motor Show car Original short-nose, left-hand drive configuration Matching numbers, with Ferrari Classiche certification Completely restored and in exceptional condition By the mid-1960s, it seemed Ferrari could do no wrong, winning on all fronts, from sports car racing to Grand Prix. Ferrari’s dual purpose cars seemed equally unstoppable, as the legendary 250 GT LWB “Tour de France” gave way to the marvellous 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, and ultimately, it led to the awe-inspiring 250 GTO in 1962. Introduced at the Paris Salon in 1964, the new 275 GTB gave Ferrari a chance to incorporate all the best characteristics of this fabled bloodline. Many consider the resulting car to be the finest production Ferrari ever built, combining the thoroughbred mechanical pedigree of its road racing forebears with sufficient creature comforts to make the 275 GTB a superlative grand touring automobile. Under the skin, the 275 GTB incorporated the best Ferrari chassis design, starting with the oval section tube backbone chassis. Front suspension was the traditional upper and lower wishbone design, but the rear incorporated a brand new fully independent suspension with a rear-mounted transaxle, which was a leading edge design, even for Ferrari. The engine was based on Ferrari’s race-proven Colombo overhead cam V-12, but a bore increase to 77 millimetres lifted horsepower to 280 with the standard three-carb Weber setup. Torque was improved too, giving the car better acceleration from a standing start. The coachwork was all new, a stunning Pininfarina design that evoked the graceful lines of the legendary 250 GTO. A long hood combined with a fastback rear body created a striking profile, whilst vents in the front wings gave the car a muscular edge. Vents in the sail panels added to the effect and paid tribute to the 250 GT “Tour de France” Berlinettas. A smoothly integrated rear spoiler, also clearly borrowed from the GTO, helped give the car a strong visual identity. Although the 275 GTB was a car of many firsts, it was also the last car that could be considered a true coachbuilt road/race berlinetta in the great Ferrari tradition. Although most lived their lives on the streets, many led a dual life, winning on road courses and hill climbs on the weekend, whilst also providing stylish and exciting transportation during the week. For this reason, demand from the public was strong, and Ferrari importers worldwide were readily eager to get their hands on as many examples as could be made available to them. After a handshake agreement between Il Commendatore Enzo Ferrari and Wilhelm Becker, Auto Becker, of Düsseldorf, officially became the Ferrari importer for Germany in 1957. After having been destined originally for Zurich, Switzerland, the car on offer was sent to Auto Becker and was used for their display at the 42nd Frankfurt International Motor Show of 1965. It was delivered in short-nose configuration and was finished in Azzurro (blue) with a Nero (black) interior. Sometime following the September show, 07743 was sent overseas to the United States, where it eventually wound up on the West Coast of California. Whilst there, the front was modified to long-nose configuration. As was the case with many of these early versions, modifications were often made to lengthen the nose, which was intended to improve aerodynamics at very high speeds. Despite this, many modern enthusiasts prefer the original Pininfarina short-nose design. The next known owner of this car was George A. Shukov, who kept it from 1976 until finally selling it back to German buyer Armin Fuchs in 1979. Fuchs resided in a small town called Montabaur, located between Frankfurt and Düsseldorf, and in 1980, he had the car imported back to Germany. He kept 07743 for the better part of a decade, and in 1990, Mr Holberg bought the car and brought it to the neighbouring town of Wuppertal, only about 100 kilometres away. He used the car regularly, but he decided to sell it three years later, through Modena Motorsport, to Peter M. Fandel. At this time, they began a complete restoration on behalf of Mr Fandel. Following completion, the car was registered on custom German license plates, BIT F 275! Chassis 07743 passed through several other hands, and in 1999, it was sold to well-known collector and Polish railway baron Jaroslaw Pawluk. He used the car sparingly for several years, and in 2008, he commissioned Dutch-based restoration firm Hietbrink Coachbuilding to completely restore the car back to the original specifications, including the short-nose configuration and original paint scheme. The 275 GTB remains in spectacular condition and has been used very little since its restoration in 2008. With slight hints of metallic flake and a light blue hue, the paint scheme that this car was originally delivered with is considered by many to be one of the prettiest and certainly most tasteful colours for these early 275 models. Coupled with correct black leather seats, a centre console, dash, and door sills, the complementary dark-grey carpets give this car an absolutely stunning overall appearance. Having just been freshly rebuilt, 07743 comes complete with its matching engine, and it is fitted with three correct 40 Weber DCZ6 carburettors and correct Borrani wire wheels. A restoration file is included with the sale of this car, which attests to its high level of restoration. A ful