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1959 Maserati 3500 GT Spyder Prototype by Vignale

220 bhp, 3,485 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with triple Weber 42 DCOE carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 100 in. One of a believed three Vignale-bodied prototypes; arguably the most elaborate Delivered new to renowned sportsman Lindsey Hopkins Reported to have a matching-numbers drivetrain Subject of a nut-and-bolt restoration Documented by original Maserati factory delivery paperwork When it was introduced in March 1957 at the Geneva Motor Show, the Maserati 3500 GT Coupe was the marque’s big hope for the future. Maserati was primarily known through the 1950s for their competition successes and fielding some of the day’s most potent engine and chassis combinations, but it had spread itself thin, to the point of near insolvency, by the end of the decade, with entries in three different sports car classes as well as Formula One racing. A fundamental lack of financing badly hampered each of these pursuits, and despite the immense potential of racing sports cars, like the four-cylinder 250S and the V-8-equipped 450S, it was the six-cylinder 300S that became the marque’s most consistent competition performer, consequently absorbing most of the engineering team’s attention. With the cancellation of its major racing programs just over the horizon, Maserati needed a production car that could catapult the company to solvency, and it found its proven straight-six engine the most suitable for serial production. Although prior models like the A6GCS/53 and A6G2000 GT were beloved by the Modena faithful, their hand-built construction and low production volume undermined any potential for profit. The 3500 GT addressed these concerns with an extension of the competition inline six-cylinder motor, which was now reworked to displace 3.5 liters and was tuned with a modified camshaft, a design based on the 350S. With elegant coupe coachwork by Touring, the 3500 GT went on to be the company’s biggest commercial success to date, eventually producing an impressive quantity of almost 2,000 examples over eight years. THE VIGNALE SPYDERS From the inception of the 3500 GT, Maserati intended to create a spyder version, but as was often the case with Italy’s boutique automakers of the time, considerations of capacity and choice of carrozzeriere were always challenging issues. During 1957 and 1958, Frua and Touring individually bodied at least three of the early 3500 GT Spyders, but Maserati was clearly not convinced by any of these designs. By 1959, the marque selected for production was a variation on the three that had been posed by Vignale, which officially debuted at the Turin Motor Show later that year. The Vignale Spyders were constructed on a slightly shorter wheelbase than the coupes, and they soon became the premium open Italian sports cars of their day, rivaling Ferrari’s 250 GT Cabriolets as the most elegant and exclusive sporting convertibles on the road. Just 242 examples of the luxurious Vignale Spyder were eventually produced, adding a degree of rarity to their distinctive style. THE PROTOTYPE, CHASSIS NUMBER AM101.678 Chassis 101.678 is approximately the tenth open 3500 GT built, and it is one of as few as three prototypes built by Vignale as they searched for the perfect combination of styling cues. Physically, this car differs from the forthcoming production version in its side trim, principally with the angular semi-sweep-spear design that starts towards the front fender’s crest, carries through the door, and then commences with a mesh outlet similar to the front grille, which itself was uniquely extravagant, with its hint of Dual Ghia side grilles. This exquisite brightwork is among many features that serve to distinguish this prototype from the short center-placed vents later seen on the production Vignale Spyders. According to a copy of an original factory delivery note, this car was dispatched on February 15, 1960, to its first owner of record, Lindsey Hopkins. This was almost certainly the great investor and real estate magnate from North Carolina, who was known to be a respected sportsman in the post-war years. In addition to heavily investing in Bahamian real estate, which eventually helped fuel the Bahama Speed Week races, Mr. Hopkins sponsored his own race teams, which alternately appeared in venues as varied as the 12 Hours of Sebring and the Indianapolis 500. He also later partnered with racing team principal John Mecom to become the first owners of the New Orleans Saints NFL expansion franchise. As detailed by the original Maserati document, this Spyder was delivered in the care of Waco Motors in Miami, Florida (a city where Mr. Hopkins managed numerous business interests), prompting speculation that the car was ordered directly from the factory by the new owner. By the 1990s, chassis 101.678 had come into the care of Texas resident William Strange, who reportedly had begun a restoration but left the car in a disassembled state for a number of years. Following a bankruptcy proceeding, the car passed through dealer Garry Roberts, who sold it in 1996 to Kenneth Glynn, of Melbourne, Australia. Mr. Glynn’s partner in the deal, marque expert and racing participant Mario Lombardi, had been searching for good barnyard-find Maserati examples to restore, and he made a deal to acquire this car and two coupes, a 3500 GT and a 3500 GTi, under Mr. Strange’s care. Mr. Lombardi was delighted to discover such a unique prototype example of the Vignale Spyder, and he treated the car to a full nut-and-bolt refurbishment. In addition to a complete mechanical freshening, the interior was reupholstered with red Connolly leather-covered paneling and seats with grey piping and was trimmed with complementary blue carpeting, while the exterior was refinished in a deep coat of dark blue paint. A wrinkle finish was applied to the dashboard and taillight housings, and the trunk was lined with proper diamond-quilted leather, which was to become a Maserati signature. This sensationally restored 3500 GT Vignale Spyder Prototype was acquired more recently by the consignor, and to ensure that the car remains in good running condition and maintains its concours-quality presentation, it has been freshened in preparation for its current offering. It is a supremely sporty and elegant example, with its unique shortened-chassis proportions and muscular coachwork. It could easily be the crowning addition to any collection of one-off designs or early 1960s sports convertibles or an eye-catching and satisfying entrant for concours or vintage touring events. Addendum Please note that the 2.5% duty is not applicable to the hammer price of this lot contrary to what is stated in the catalog. This title is in transit. Chassis no. AM101.678

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1958 BMW 507 Roadster

155 hp 3,168 cc all-alloy overhead valve V-8, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with torsion bars and live rear axle with torsion bars, four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 97.6" - Offered from the Lyon Family Collection - Formerly owned by “Bond Girl” Ursula Andress - Believed to have been gifted to Andress by Elvis Presley - One of only 253 examples built BMW covered opposite ends of the automotive spectrum in the early ’50s. At the bottom were the R24 motorcycle and the motorcycle-engined Isetta bubble cars which put the average German citizen back on the roads with inexpensive basic transportation while creating jobs for BMW employees and income for the company. At the other end of the scale was the 501 and its successors, large and well-appointed sedans intended for the upper middle class. Introduced in 1950, the 501 was an all-new chassis, powered by the well-regarded prewar hemi-head inline two-liter six-cylinder engine from the iconic 328. Underpowered for its size, it was still well received when production finally began in late 1952. BMW neatly solved the power problem in 1954 with a 2.6-liter V-8 engine in a sharply trimmed sedan, the 502. The V-8 was a triumph of engineering and persistence in the face of daunting adversity. The block and heads were aluminum with wet cylinder liners. Parallel overhead valves were operated from a camshaft in the block’s vee. Producing 100 horsepower at 4,800 rpm through a single two-barrel Solex carburetor, the V-8-powered 502 measured up well against competition from Mercedes-Benz and Opel. It was shortly enlarged to 3.2 liters which boosted output to 120 horsepower. The best, however, was yet to come. At the 1955 Frankfurt show, BMW unveiled two sporty models. The first was a somewhat cumbersome sports version of the 502, the 503 with 140 horsepower from the 3.2-liter V-8 in both coupe and cabriolet form. The second offering was absolutely stunning: the 507 Roadster. Designed by Count Albrecht Goertz, an established industrial designer based in the US, with input from BMW’s US distributor Max Hoffman, the BMW 507 was, and remains today, one of the world’s landmarks in automotive design, a car that is a pleasure to behold from every aspect. With the 3.2-liter V-8 now tuned to 150 horsepower, the 507’s performance was on par with contemporary competition. The perimeter chassis frame was constructed from large rectangular tubes with torsion bar independent front suspension and a three-point positively located live rear axle with torsion bar springs. BMW mounted the 507’s ZF four-speed gearbox near the center of the wheelbase, driven by a short driveshaft from the engine-mounted clutch and with another short driveshaft back to the rear axle. Brakes were immense Alfin drums. Solidly built and lovingly assembled by BMW’s best technicians, it was expensive, costing 26,000 new Marks and $8,988 in the US, but established the image of BMW as a sophisticated and forward-thinking manufacturer which has persisted to the present day. Technically the 507 offered impressive specifications, but it was Albrecht Goertz’s body design that captured the imaginations of a generation of young sports car fans to whom BMW meant “motorcycles.” Goertz stressed simplicity in the 507’s design and handled the entire design project himself, integrating each and every element, from the grille to the deck-lid handle and the passengers’ cockpit in between, precisely and cleanly for maximum effect with minimum effort in close cooperation with BMW’s chief engineer, Fritz Fiedler. One of those young sports car fans was a US Army private stationed in Germany, Elvis Presley. Elvis, who is mostly associated with large Cadillacs, harbored a lower profile affection for fast, pretty sports cars. Undoubtedly the Army’s most famous draftee, after basic training he was assigned to the Third Armored Division in Germany in late 1958 where a BMW 507 caught his eye and was famously provided for his use by BMW. Upon his return to the United States, his entertainment career immediately resumed with even more enthusiasm than before the Army interlude. Elvis had demonstrated maturity and persistence, advancing to Sergeant during his time with the 3rd Armored. His popularity and the fascination with his years as a G.I. was such that his first endeavor after returning was a fictionalized account of his German experience, G.I. Blues, released in 1960 co-starring Juliet Prowse. More films followed including the 1963 production of Fun in Acapulco with co-star Ursula Andress. Ursula Andress and her 507 According to information provided by BMW Group Classic, this particular 507 was built on November 30, 1958 and was delivered new to the BMW importer in New York City. The car’s file contains a copy of a California title, which confirms that this is in fact the BMW 507 owned by famed “Bond Girl” Ursula Andress. Andress had burst on the movie scene when she stepped from the tropical waters of fictional Crab Key, during the James Bond film Dr. No, clad in a famous white bikini and a vicious-looking diving knife, thus becoming the first – and to many the most famous – of many “Bond Girls.” Andress won a Golden Globe for this performance and has enjoyed a successful career ever since. The Swiss actress co-starred with Frank Sinatra in 4 for Texas and also appeared in the satirical 007 film Casino Royale alongside Peter Sellers. It has always been widely believed, though not documented, that this BMW 507 was given to her as a gift by Elvis. She reportedly said later on that Elvis, as he did with many friends and acquaintances, offered her one of his Cadillac convertibles. She declined twice, eventually telling him if he wanted to give her a car, a BMW 507 would be her preference. After being acquired by Andress, it was maintained and mildly customized by George Barris during the actress’s fifteen years of ownership, including fitting a Ford 289 V-8 engine and transmission and such features as nerf bar bumpers (which remain with the car), lowered ride height and perhaps even different dash knobs. The car was eventually sold through Barris to Mark Smith, who found a correct BMW 507 engine and transmission for the car and returned it to its original stock appearance and white color, though the modified bumpers remain in place. It was acquired by Nick Harley from Smith, then sold to the Imperial Palace Collection where it remained on display until it was acquired by the Lyon family, where it has been carefully maintained in the family’s extensive collection since. It has been carefully restored over the years and while in the Lyon Collection has been driven with some frequency. It is described as a good driving car, handling especially well since recent attention to the torsion bar suspension. Finished in white livery with red leather upholstery, it rides on a set of rare and desirable Rudge centerlock wheels. BMW built only 253 507s in the model’s four-year production history, but they are widely and instantly recognized as milestones for their superbly integrated, subtle and refined Albrecht Goertz design, sophisticated overhead valve V-8 engine and comfortable, good-handling chassis and suspension. The design is so successful that it inspired BMW’s recent two-seater sports cars, the Z3 and particularly the magnificent V-8-powered Z8. This homage to the 507 is especially significant coming from a design-oriented organization like BMW. With a history that includes the first and most stunning of the Bond Girls, and likely even Elvis Presley, it is a unique example of a highly desirable limited-production German sports car that still inspires admiration and respect today. Chassis no. 70192

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-08-19
Hammer price
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2004 Maserati MC12

The First Example Imported into the United States and Less Than 500 Miles From New 5,998 cc. 630bhp, 481 ft.lbs. 65° vee twelve-cylinder, six-speed paddle-shift Maserati Cambiocorsa transmission, independent wishbone suspension front and rear, four-wheel cross drilled ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 110.2" The Trident has graced the face of some of the most venerated automobiles for race and road since the brothers Alfieri and Ettore Maserati built their first car in their small workshop in Bologna, Italy in 1926. Older than Ferrari and Lamborghini, Maserati for decades was the dominant force in international autoracing, feared and revered by all. However through mismanagement and unfortunate circumstances its place at the crown of Italian motorsports would eventually become a distant memory then simply a chapter in automotive history when in the early 1990s the under the ownership of Fiat, the company faded away. Ferrari acquired Maserati in 1997, determined to sharpen the Trident and rebuild the company’s image. To accomplish this, Maserati was in need of a halo car, a tangible symbol of the new Maserati, one that would pay homage to the cars that dominated race tracks around the world, cars like the 450s and the Tipo 60/61. The FIA GT Championship series was chosen to be the venue where Maserati would attempt to win its first victory in an international championship since the Cooper Maserati F1 car won the South Africa Grand Prix in 1967. Homologation rules required a run of 25 cars and Maserati planned to match that number both years of the 2004-05 production run. Using the Ferrari Enzo as the platform for the MC12, a halo car Maserati was guaranteed. American Frank Stephenson, Director of Concept Design and Development at Maserati, worked closely with wind tunnel engineers in forming the design of the car. The car’s general dimensions recall the Group C Le Mans cars of the 1980s, with the Enzo wheelbase lengthened half a foot and overall length increased 17.5 inches. Not only does this added length increase high-speed stability, much of it is transferred into the passenger compartment, making the car a better fit for taller drivers. Also borrowed from the Enzo is the naturally aspirated dual-overhead cam six-liter 12-cylinder engine, which aside from producing one of the most wonderful mechanical songs, develops 630 brake horsepower and 481 foot-pounds of torque at full tune. With a curb weight of 2,943 pounds the MC12 boasts a zero to 60 time of 3.8 seconds and a top speed in excess of 205 miles per hour. All the power is harnessed by Maserati’s own Cambiocorsa six-speed transmission. Fully computerized, the driver selects gears via paddles located behind the steering wheel. The car performs seamless upshifts and perfect double-clutch downshifts blipping the throttle automatically to match revs, in essence making a poor or miss-shift impossible. With either sport or race modes to select from, the MC12’s transmission is capable of lightning fast aggressive shifts on the track as well as delivering the road manners for which Maserati’s latest generation of road going cars are famous. Also, to assist with regular drivability, the front of the car can be raised at low speeds with the push of a button to clear moderate bumps and inclines. The 50 road versions of the MC12 produced over the two year production run were all made identically, finished in pearl white over blue as a tribute to the America Camoradi Scuderia which raced the famous Maserati Tipo 60-61 Birdcages in the very early 1960s with Stirling Moss as their lead driver. Throwing modesty out the door, the MC12’s ability to take one’s breath away was a prerequisite established by the Maserati brass. Like a great race car, this form following function purpose-built machine is intoxicating to the purist’s senses. However to fully accomplish its mission as the ultimate Maserati, certain signature elements were incorporated into the design to make the car both immediately recognizable and to secure its place in automotive history as one of the most beautiful cars. Viewed the front, the eye is immediately drawn to the bonnet, where just inboard of the wheel arches organically shaped ribs are tautly stretched across the functional apertures. However, the MC12 looks particularly striking when viewed from the rear three-quarters; the architectural half moon arch-like shape of the rear wing stands tall and wide, above the black engine louvers, the suggestive quad-exhausts and the enormous carbon-fiber diffusers. Perfect harmonizing race car and rolling sculpture the Maserati’s visual appeal is arresting. The body of the MC12 is constructed entirely of carbon fiber with the stressed chassis made of carbon fiber and Nomex sandwiched in a honeycomb configuration. The cabin of the Maserati has a removable top, which converts the supercar from coupe to spider. The interior was designed with the driver in mind with everything perfectly located making the driving experience intuitive, yet there is a meticulous care evident in the fit and finish, always reminding the occupants that they are in a Maserati. With clean tailored lines, materials of the finest quality and special attention paid to comfort, the MC12 perfectly marries luxury with racecar. The 50 Maserati MC12s made in 2004 and 2005 were essentially sold before being built. They each boasted a sticker price of $799,000 and were ushered out of the Modena factory into the stables of some of the most enviable sports car collections in the world. The example offered here, built in the first year of production, is the very first MC12 to be delivered to the United States and is essentially as it was when it rolled out of the factory two years ago with only 456 miles registered on the odometer. Not yet eligible for registration in California, the MC12 has not been properly emissions tested nor met the minimum mileage requirements. As for Maserati’s success in the FIA GT Championship series, MC12Rs have taken the checkered flag two of the three races thus far this season. Halo car? Absolutely. Chassis no. ZAMDF44B000012099

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-18
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1985 Ferrari 288 GTO by Scaglietti

400 bhp, 2,855 cc mid-mounted V-8 engine with dual overhead-camshafts, four valves per cylinder, twin IHI turbochargers, Behr intercoolers and Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual gearbox in rear transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm (96.4 in.) The spiritual successor to the 250 GTO; Ferrari’s original modern supercar Under 35,000 kilometres since new Ferrari Classiche certified Before the Enzo, and before the F40, there was the 288 GTO, Ferrari’s original smiling gift to its best customers and devoted connoisseurs. It was born from the FIA Group B race and rally homologation regulations introduced for 1984, meaning that, like so many great racing cars through time, it was built for the public largely so that racing versions could take to the track. The result was a supercar without compromises. Built on a sturdy tubular steel chassis, it boasted a wheelbase longer than the production 308 GTB, and it rode on four-wheel independent suspension. The new Tipo F114B mid-mounted V-8 was installed longitudinally, rather than transversely, and produced 400 horsepower through four valves per cylinder, Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, twin IHI turbochargers, and dual Behr intercoolers. The doors, boot, and bonnet were lightweight aluminium, whilst GRP and carbon compound formed the balance of the bodywork—a taste of the carbon fibre to come. The design itself may have superficially resembled the 308 GTB, but it boasted aggressive flared wheel arches to accommodate eight-inch front and 10-inch rear wheels. Larger spoilers were also fitted fore and aft, the result of extensive wind tunnel testing. The rear wings had three cooling slots behind the wheel, a fitting tribute to the original gran turismo omologato Ferrari, the 250 GTO. In the performance-starved 1980s, a top speed of 304 km/h (189 mph) made the 288 GTO a veritable rocket ship for the road. Yet, it was also quite comfortable, with leather-upholstered seats; optional air-conditioning, electric windows, and AM/FM radio/cassette; and a dashboard filled with a 10,000-rpm tachometer, a turbo boost gauge, oil temperature and pressure gauges, and a water temperature gauge, matching the 288 GTO’s level of technical sophistication. All of this made the 288 GTO a fiercely desirable commodity, sought after by virtually every man and woman who had ever rode a Prancing Horse, and dreamed of by everyone who hoped to someday have the opportunity. With only 270 built, it remains no less sought after today, by both the European enthusiasts who may have missed out on it originally and the American enthusiasts to whom it was not originally offered. The fine example offered here is pure performance, built with manual windows and no air conditioning, and it was originally delivered by noted French importers Charles Pozzi SA, of Paris, to the south of France, a serene location for a decidedly un-serene automobile. Original owner Jean-Jacques Maly, of Mondragon, retained the car for nine years before selling it to Jean Guikas, of Marceilles, with 27,300 kilometres showing. It was later displayed at the car museum in Mougins and at the Salon du Coupé et du Cabriolet & CIA Pantin in Paris in March 1997. Following mechanical work performed in 2003 and importation to Italy in 2005, it was acquired by its present French caretakers in August 2007, who have continued to have the car properly maintained and serviced. Now showing 34,960 kilometres from new, it has been Ferrari Classiche certified, a testament to its quality and excellence, and is proudly offered in its country of origin. Some of the world’s original “supercars” have had their lustre dulled by time. The 288 GTO, the Ferrari supercar from which all others after were born, is different. It has survived the passing years as something still as advanced and exciting as the day that it was built, and in doing so, it has truly captured the spirit of its thrilling racing forefather…as well as its speed. Chassis no. 54777 Body no. 92

  • CANCanada
  • 2013-05-25
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1971 Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spyder

A very rare European specification, FCA “Platinum” Award winning Engine # B1242 Design: Pininfarina Coachwork: Scaglietti Specifications: 352 bhp, 4,380 cc double overhead cam V-12 engine with six Weber 40DCN20 carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5 in.) American certificate of title Ferrari Classiche Certification Package. This lot has originated in the United States and is present at the sale under a temporary import bond which must be cancelled either by exporting the lot ouside of Italy on an approved bill of lading with supporting customs documentation or by paying the applicable VAT and import duties to land the lot in Italy. Beginning with the 166 Inter, the success of Ferrari’s road-going cars has been closely intertwined with the Scuderia’s achievements on the track. Racing not only provided a proving ground for continued testing of newer and better technologies but also garnered a formidable reputation for the prancing horses of Maranello. The mid-1960s were defined by a staunch prototype rivalry between Ferrari and Ford, who had entered the endurance racing scene with the extraordinary GT40. After being soundly defeated by Ford in 1966 at Le Mans, Ferrari struck back in 1967 with a 1-2-3 finish with its P4 and 412 P sports-racing cars at the Daytona Continental 24 Hours. The following year, Ferrari unveiled its replacement for the beautiful 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta at the auto salon in Paris. Nicknamed “Daytona” in honor of the Ferrari podium sweep the previous year, the new 365 GTB/4 was a more than worthy replacement for its predecessor, with which it shared a chassis, suspension, 2,400 mm-wheelbase, and much of its layout. As the latest front-engine Berlinetta, Pininfarina produced an attractive design that at once paid homage to the car’s heritage while providing clients with an exciting new look for Ferrari’s flagship model. The smooth, unbroken design was accented by a crease that ran the length of the body, just below the top of the wheel wells. In front, the small egg crate grille was complemented by rubber-tipped bumperettes. A matching set of bumperettes was fitted at the rear below four round taillights, a design feature that has persisted to this day. Constructed by Scaglietti, overall weight was reduced by utilizing aluminium for the doors, bonnet, and boot lid. For the powerplant, Ferrari resorted to its tried and true Colombo-designed V-12 engine. Now displacing 4.4 litres, the twelve-cylinder engine utilized four overhead camshafts (two per cylinder bank) and was fitted with six Weber 40DCN20 carburettors, producing 352 horsepower at 7,500 rpm. The top speed of 280 kilometres per hour claimed by Ferrari was tested by the daring drivers at Road & Track, who reached 278 kilometres per hour in their 365 GTB/4. From a standstill, 100 kilometres per hour came up in just 5.9 seconds and the 1,600-kilogram car could turn the quarter-mile in 13.8 seconds. What had initially been conceived as an interim model for the long-overdue 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer had not only become the costliest production Ferrari to date but also the fastest, most attractive, and quite possibly the most popular road going Ferrari to date. Ferrari also produced a small series of Spyder variants, or GTS/4s, which remain among the most sought-after and highly regarded Ferraris. Interestingly, those examples officially exported to the United States were identified as “365 GTB/4” on the maker’s plate and are therefore referred to as such. The first “Daytona Spyder” was presented at the 44th Annual IAA Motor Show in Frankfurt on 11 September 1969. The example shown was finished in yellow with the concave bodyline finished in black and featured Borrani wire wheels. The rear wings were squared-off on the top edges, losing some of the roundness of the Berlinetta and subtly altering the accent of the bodyline. The first Daytona Spyder was fitted with the Perspex covered headlights, although all further examples sported pop-up headlights. In all, Ferrari produced just 122 Daytona Spyders, including the prototype example. 96 units were destined for the U.S. market and just 25 [plus the prototype] were built to European and UK/RHD specifications. Clearly, the bulk of production was destined for Ferrari’s most important export market, the USA. The handsome Ferrari offered here, however, is one of the rare left-hand-drive spyder examples built to European specifications and as such, was assembled without seat belts and without air conditioning. While the serial number is the tenth in numerical sequence, according to the Ferrari Assembly Number, the car is in fact the third Daytona Spyder built. It was originally finished in Blu Dino (106-A-72) with a white stripe on the body flanks, a Nero interior, and with convertible top material reportedly supplied by the client. According to Ferrari records, the car was delivered in Italy to a Sara Scapula, then later to John Baus, an employee of Chinetti, before being exported from Cherbourg, France to the United States by Luigi Chinetti Motors. By 1975, the car was owned by Ed Lazzarin of Miami, Florida, and had since been repainted red. Subsequently, the car was damaged, and Lazzarin had the repairs completed by specialists Shelton Ferrari of Ft. Lauderdale. By the late 1980s, the car had accumulated approximately 50,000 kilometres and continued to remain under Lazzarin’s ownership before eventually being acquired by an individual in Japan in 1993. Offered for sale in Essen Germany by Erich Schulz at Top Cars, 14415 was sold the same year to enthusiast Christopher W. Cox of Chapel Hill, North Carolina. During a short stint of ownership with Mr. Jim Mathews, the car was restored, repainted black, and then acquired once more by Cox, who brought the car to the Ferrari Club of America Annual Concours in Leesburg, Virginia, where it received the Platinum award in class 5. In 1998 at the Cavallino Classic at The Breakers hotel in Palm Beach, the car was awarded the coveted “Gold” award. Advertised for sale by Symbolic Motor Car Company in La Jolla, California, the Daytona Spyder eventually came under Japanese ownership once again, but would remain in San Diego, California until November 2005, when it was sold to its current collector owner in Arizona who has driven it sparingly, shown it at several local car shows, and maintained its high-level condition. Virtually unchanged since its restoration with a tan leather interior and black inserts, it retains a tool roll and proper leather owner’s pouch. Powerful, sexy, and tremendously fast, the GTS/4 stands out as one of the finest sports cars ever produced by Ferrari and undoubtedly one of the most exciting to drive. The open Spyder configuration is a favorite among Ferraristi and a perpetually desirable model boasting a gorgeous Pininfarina design and remarkable V-12 performance. The example presented here further sets itself apart with a well-documented ownership history enhanced by its status as one of a very limited number of left-hand drive European GTS/4s. ITALIANTEXT Una rarissima vettura con specifiche europee vincitrice del Premio “Platinum” FCA Motore # B1242 Designo: Pininfarina Carrozzeria: Scaglietti Specifiche: Motore a 12 cilindri a V, cilindrata 4.380 cm3, potenza di 352 CV, doppio albero a camme in testa, sei carburatori Weber 40DCN20, cambio manuale a cinque marce, sospensioni indipendenti sulle quattro ruote e freni a disco con servofreno sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2.400 mm Titolo americano Certificazione Ferrari Classiche. Questo lotto é di origine americana ed é presentato all’asta sotto importazione temporanea, la quale deve essere cancellata o pagare le tasse dovute in Italia oppure esportare il lotto effettuando i documenti doganali necessari. Con il modello 166 Inter, il successo delle Ferrari stradali andava di pari passo con quello delle vetture da competizione. Le gare non soltanto offrivano un banco di prova per più nuove tecnologie, ma offrivano anche una formidabile reputazione alla Ferrari. La metà degli anni ’60 è stata caratterizzata da una forte rivalità fra i prototipi Ferrari e Ford, che era entrata sulla scena delle gare di endurance con la straordinaria GT 40. Dopo essere stata pesantemente sconfitta dalla Ford, la Ferrari tornò al vertice nel 1967, con un primo secondo e terzo posto alla 24 Ore di Daytona grazie alla P4 ed alla 412P . L’anno successivo la Ferrari svelò la vettura che sostituiva la splendida 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta al Salone dell’Auto di Parigi. Conosciuta da tutti come “Daytona”, in onore del trionfo Ferrari l’anno precedente, la nuova 365 GTB/4 era un più che degno sostituto del 275 precedente, con cui condivideva il telaio le sospensioni, il passo di 2.400 mm e la maggior parte della sua configurazione. Come per l’ultima berlinetta con motore anteriore, Pininfarina realizzò un design affascinante che al tempo stesso rendeva omaggio allo stile delle vetture precedenti. Il design lineare era accentuato da una linea filante. Anteriormente la piccola griglia ovale fu conglobata nel disegno d’insieme della parte anteriore, con piccoli paraurti con inserti di gomma. Il paraurti posteriore in due pezzi era fissato sotto i quattro fanali rotondi, una caratteristica tutt’oggi usata. Costruita da Scaglietti, il peso è stato ridotto utilizzando l'alluminio per le portiere, il cofano e il baule. Per quanto riguarda la meccanica, la Ferrari adottò il motore 12 cilindri progettato dall’ing. Colombo, già testato e ritenuto affidabile. Con una cilindrata di 4,4 litri e 12 cilindri con due valvole per cilindro, dotato di sei carburatori Weber 40DCN20, il motore sviluppava 352 CV a 7.500 giri. La velocità massima di 278 km/h orari dichiarati dalla Ferrari fu testata dagli impavidi piloti Road & Track, che raggiunsero 276,8 km/h con la loro 365 GTB/4. Partendo da ferma, venivano raggiunti 100 km/h in solo 5,9 secondi e l’auto, del peso di 1.600 kg, poteva correre 400 m da ferma in 13,8 secondi. Ciò che inizialmente era stato considerato un modello provvisorio in attesa del 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer era diventato non solo il modello più prestigioso Ferrari, ma anche il più veloce, il più affascinante, e probabilmente il più popolare modello Ferrari da corsa. La Ferrari inoltre produsse una piccola serie di spyder, dette GTS/4, che rimangono tra le Ferrari più belle e apprezzate. Curiosamente questi esemplari ufficialmente esportati negli Stati Uniti erano identificati come “365 GTB/4” sulla targhetta del costruttore, e sono quindi riportati a noi con tale denominazione. La prima “Daytona Spyder” fu presentata al 44° Motor Show di Francoforte, l’11 settembre del 1969. L’esemplare esposto era giallo con le linee laterali concave nere, con ruote a raggi Borrani. Le alette posteriori erano squadrate alle estremità posteriori, perdendo parte della morbidezza del modello Berlinetta, e modificando leggermente le linee della carrozzeria. La prima Daytona Spyder presentava fari coperti con plexiglas, ma tutte le successive sono state dotate di fari a scomparsa. Complessivamente la Ferrari produsse solo 122 Daytona Spyder, includendo anche il prototipo, 96 esemplari furono destinati al mercato americano e solo 25 (oltre al prototipo) furono costruite per il mercato europeo e inglese. E’ chiaro che la maggior parte della produzione era destinata al principale mercato della Ferrari: gli U.S.A. La splendida Ferrari qui offerta, è una delle poche spyder con guida a sinistra costruite per il mercato europeo, e fu prodotta senza cinture di sicurezza e senza aria condizionata. Mentre il numero di telaio è il 10° nella sequenza numerica, in accordo con il numero di assemblaggio Ferrari, l’auto è di fatto la terza Spyder Daytona costruita; originariamente verniciata in blu Dino (106-A-72) con una striscia bianca sulla fiancata, con l’interno nero. Secondo i Registri Ferrari l’auto fu consegnata in Italia a Sara Scapula, e in seguito a John Baus, un dipendente di Chinetti, prima di essere spedita da Cherbourg (Francia) negli Stati Uniti dall’importatore Luigi Chinetti Motors. Dal 1975 l’auto fu posseduta da Ed Lazzarin di Miami (Florida) e fu ridipinta in rosso. Successivamente l’auto fu danneggiata e Lazzarin affidò la riparazione agli specialisti Shelton Ferrari di Fort Lauderdale. Alla fine degli anni ’80 l’auto aveva percorso circa 50.000 km e continuava a rimanere di proprietà di Lazzarin, prima di essere venduta in Giappone nel 1993. Messa in vendita ad Essen (Germania) da Erich Schulz (Top Cars) la 14415 fu venduta lo stesso anno al collezionista Christopher W. Cox di Chapel Hill (North Carolina). Durante il breve periodo in cui Jim Mathews ne fu proprietario, venne riverniciata nera e nuovamente acquistata da Cox, che presentò l’auto al Concorso Annuale Americano del Club Ferrari a Leesburg, Virginia, dove ricevette il premio Platinum per la classe 5. Nel 1998 al Concorso Cavallino Classic tenutosi al Breakers Hotel a Palm Beach (Florida) l’auto fu insignita del prestigioso premio “Gold”. Messa in vendita dalla Symbolic Motor Car Company in La Jolla (California), la Daytona Spyder divenne nuovamente proprietà di un giapponese, pur rimanendo a San Diego (California) fino a quando nel novembre 2005 fu venduta al suo attuale proprietario e collezionista dell’Arizona che l’ha utilizzata con cura, e che l’ha esibita in numerosi manifestazioni automobilistiche locali, mantenendone le condizioni perfete. Immodificata dal suo restauro con interni in pelle beige con inserti neri, possiede ancora il suo rotolo di attrezzi e una borsa della stessa pelle. Potente, accattivante ed estremamente veloce, la GTS/4 rappresenta una delle migliori auto sportive prodotta dalla Ferrari e una delle più eccitanti da guidare. La configurazione aperta della spyder è molto gradita tra i Ferraristi, e il modello sfarzoso presentato da Pininfarina è sempre molto ambito; ed inoltre il motore a 12 cilindri offre notevoli prestazioni. Il modello qui presentato è corredato da una ben documentata storia dei proprietari, ed il suo valore è aumentato dall’essere una delle rare auto GTS/4 europee con guida a sinistra. Chassis no. 14415

  • ITAItaly
  • 2008-05-18
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2004 Ferrari Enzo

2004 Ferrari Enzo Titre de circulation britannique Châssis #137339 - La plus affutée des supercars Ferrari - Historique suivi - Cote encore en devenir - Une des 349 exemplaires construits, certification Ferrari "Le troisième millénaire a débuté pour Ferrari avec une incroyable période de compétitivité dans le monde des circuits, en fait jamais la Formule 1 n'avait offert à la compagnie un laboratoire aussi authentique de recherches avancées que ces dernières années. Pour créer une synergie entre nos succès et le rôle fondamental de la course, j'ai décidé que cette voiture qui représente le meilleur de notre technologie, devait être dédiée à notre fondateur, qui a toujours pensé que nos voitures de route devaient être fondées sur les enseignements de la compétition. Aussi cette voiture dont nous sommes très fiers, sera connue sous le nom d'Enzo Ferrari. " Luca di Montezemolo lors du lancement de l'Enzo Dans la lignée des séries limitées de Maranello, à la 288 GTO, la F40 et la F50, succède l'Enzo, dernière et très aboutie vitrine technologique de Ferrari. Plus encore que ses devancières l'Enzo apparaît comme le concept pur et dur d'une voiture de sport extrême, sans beaucoup de concessions et bénéficie d'un intense et continuel transfert de technologies de la compétition vers la voiture routière. Ainsi le thème stylistique développé par Pininfarina fut de créer une analogie visuelle évidente entre une Formule 1 et l'Enzo. C'était un pari risqué et osé et qui fut, à notre sens, gagné. En particulier l'avant, avec son nez caractéristique et ses entrées d'air de part et d'autre est une interprétation évidente du nez de la F1. De même les côtés de la voiture, avec une partie plus étroite, convexe, font immédiatement penser au ventre de la monoplace. Une étude aérodynamique très poussée a permis de se passer d'appendices tels que l'aileron arrière. Les portes papillon ont ouverture et fermeture assistées. Une utilisation intensive de matériaux composites pour le châssis / coque et la carrosserie ont permis de maintenir le poids dans des limites très acceptables et d'obtenir un rapport poids / puissance exceptionnel de 2.1 kg / ch. Beaucoup d'éléments sont réalisés en sandwich nid d'abeille en aluminium et fibre de carbone. A l'intérieur de la voiture, la fibre de carbone a été utilisée telle que, visible et fonctionnelle. La plupart des contrôles ont été groupés sur le volant comme sur la F1. Le cœur de l'Enzo est un fabuleux V12, descendant d'une lignée remontant jusqu'à la 125 F1 de 1947. Il a été complètement redessiné en tenant compte, là encore, des enseignements de la compétition, par exemple la forme en toit des chambres de combustion avec quatre soupapes par cylindre et le diagramme de distribution variable emprunté à la F1. La puissance de 660 ch de ce moteur est exceptionnelle, c'est une puissance au litre de plus de 110 ch, ce qui ne s'est jamais vu sur un moteur d'aussi forte cylindrée unitaire (près de 500 cm3). Le projet Enzo est le premier exemple d'une intégration complète de systèmes de contrôle d'un véhicule. Moteur, boîte de vitesse, suspension, ABS/ASR et caractéristiques aérodynamiques garantissent l'optimisation des performances de la voiture et la sécurité de sa conduite. La voiture est équipée d'un système mesurant la pression des pneumatiques).On est loin des pneumatiques des premières Lamborghini Miura qui n'étaient garantis que pour 1 minute à vitesse maximale, soit 280 km/heure. Que dire de la voiture présentée sinon qu'elle est dans un état quasi neuf, son compteur indiquant environ 16.050 km parcourus depuis sa sortie d'usine. Vendue neuve en Italie à son premier propriétaire de Bologne le 18 mai 2004, la voiture est immatriculée CP660 CJ. En octobre 2005, elle participe au premier rassemblement Enzo sur le Circuit du Mugello. En 2009, elle est cédée à son deuxième propriétaire. Le dernier collectionneur qui la possède la fait entièrement réviser par Ferrari Graypaul Center. Elle est présentée avec toute l'histoire de son entretien (carnets complets), sa certification Ferrari et sa housse d'origine. Il s'agit d'un magnifique exemplaire, prêt à prendre la route ou le circuit ! British registration Chassis # 137339 - The sharpest of all Ferrari supercars - History of the car properly recorded - Yet to appreciate in value - One of 349 cars made, with Ferrari certification "The new millennium began with Ferrari for an incredible period of competitiveness in the world of racing, in fact Formula 1 has really offered the company an authentic laboratory for advanced research in recent years. To create a synergy between our success and the key role of the race, I decided that this car would represent the best of our technologies, and that it should be dedicated to our founder, who always believed that our road cars should be based on what we learn from competition. We are very proud to announce the name of this new model as Ferrari Enzo," said Luca di Montezemolo at the launch of the Enzo. In line with the limited series of Maranello, the 288 GTO, the F40 and the F50, the Enzo, which cam as a successor to all the formers, was the showcase for the latest in Ferrari technology. Even more than its predecessors, Enzo appeared as pure concept, an extreme sports car without compromise, benefiting from a direct and contiguous transfer of technology from competition to road car. The stylistic theme developed by Pininfarina was to create a clear visual analogy between a Formula 1 car and the Enzo. It was a risky and daring bet and was, in our opinion, very successful. In particular the front, with its characteristic nose with air inlets on either side was a clear interpretation of the nose of the F1 car. Same at the side of the car, with a narrower portion, convex that one was immediately reminded of the belly of the car. A very thorough study in aerodynamics created appendages such as the rear spoiler. The gullwing doors opened and closed with assistance. Extensive use of composite materials for the body/chassis kept the weight to a very acceptable level and gave the car exceptional weight-to-power ratio of 2.1 kg/hp. Many elements were made from honeycomb sandwich aluminum and carbon fiber. Inside the car, carbon fiber was used both as a visible element as well as functional. Most controls were grouped together on the steering wheel as on the F1. The heart of the Enzo was a fabulous V12, a descendant of a lineage going back to the 125 F1 of 1947. It was completely redesigned taking into account again, the learnings from competition, such as the hemispherical roof of the combustion chamber with four valves per cylinder and variable valve timing borrowed from F1. The power of 660bhp was exceptional, with power per liter of more than 110bhp, which had never been seen on a project as large a displacement engine unit as that of the Enzo (about 5000cc) and was the first example of a fully integrated control systems for the vehicle. The engine, gearbox, suspension, ABS/ASR and aerodynamic characteristics guaranteed optimal performance and safety of use. The car was equipped by a system measuring the tyre pressure (it was far from the first Lamborghini Miura tyres that were only guaranteed for 1 minute at the maximum speed of 280 km/hour.) So what about this car except that it is presented in an almost new condition, the counter indicating approximately 16,050km traveled since leaving the factory. Sold new in Italy to its first owner in Bologna on May 18, 2004, the car is registered CP660 CJ. In October 2005, the car participated in the first Enzo gathering at the Mugello Circuit. In 2009 the car was sold to its second owner. The last collector who owned the car, has had a comprehensive service done entirely by Ferrari Graypaul Center. It is on offer with its entire history of maintenance (complete books), its Ferrari certification and its original cover. This is a beautiful example, ready to hit the road or the track! Estimation 830 000 - 960 000 € Sold for 962,480 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-07
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1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ coupé

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ coupé Titre de circulation italien Châssis n° AR750042 Moteur n° AR00511*00089 - Emblématique des succès d'Alfa Romeo - Technique brillante, esthétique sublime - Historique suivi - Exceptionnelles qualités routières - Restauration de haut niveau - Livrée neuve en France Le sport automobile faisant indissociablement partie des gènes d'Alfa Romeo, on pouvait s'attendre à ce que la nouvelle Giulietta, dévoilée en 1955, fasse assez rapidement l'objet de versions plus "pointues". La première Giulietta sortant de la norme est la Sprint Speciale (SS), dotée d'une forme originale dessinée par Franco Scaglione pour Bertone, inspirée des "BAT" et présentée en 1957. Mais, bien que montrant de réelles qualités sportives et une aérodynamique soignée, elle est encore trop lourde et elle est supplantée par la Giulietta Sprint Zagato (SZ), à la forme plus ramassée, plus légère et qui, à partir de 1960, après sa présentation au Salon de Genève, remportera de beaux succès en compétition. Sa production reste beaucoup plus limitée que celle de la SS, autour de 200 exemplaires. L'arrivée de la Giulia, en 1962, bouscule la donne et, si la SS adopte en 1963 le moteur 1600, son potentiel de développement est trop limité pour en faire un cheval de bataille en compétition. De son côté, la SZ se contente d'une évolution esthétique, l'arrière adoptant un pan coupé dit "coda tronca", selon les principes aérodynamiques de Wunibald Kamm. Pour donner une suite à la SZ, tout en profitant de la mécanique de la Giulia, Alfa Romeo prend une voie beaucoup plus radicale et, sous l'autorité de Giuseppe Busso, commence à partir de 1959 la conception d'une nouvelle machine de course. D'après Busso, l'inspiration vient de la "Tipo 750 Competizione" mise au point en 1955 mais dont la structure caissonnée manque de rigidité. C'est peut-être la raison qui incite Busso à adopter un châssis tubulaire complètement nouveau. Il reprend des éléments mécaniques de la Giulia, dont l'excellent moteur 1600 double arbre, mais adopte une suspension arrière à roues indépendantes. Pour la carrosserie, on fait appel en toute logique à Zagato : il dessine une berlinette qui représente un véritable aboutissement esthétique, un peu comme si la SZ Coda Tronca avait été le brouillon de ce futur chef-d'œuvre. Plus que jamais, la fonction crée la forme, dont l'exemplaire sobriété traduit l'efficacité, depuis la fine calandre jusqu'à l'arrière en pan coupé. Le mariage de son châssis tubulaire et de sa carrosserie Zagato donne son nom à cette automobile: TZ, pour Tubolare Zagato. A cette époque, concentrée sur le développement de ses voitures de tourisme, Alfa Romeo souhaite confier la gestion de ses machines de course à une entreprise extérieure et va trouver avec Autodelta un interlocuteur parfait. Créée en 1963 par Carlo Chiti et Ludovico Chizzola, Autodelta a pour vocation la préparation de voitures de compétition. Chiti et Chizzola apprenant le souhait d'Alfa Romeo d'externaliser son activité compétition, un accord est trouvé avec Orazio Satta pour mettre en place un partenariat. Celui-ci s'étend au fil des mois et, après une première prise de participation en 1964, Alfa Romeo devient en 1965 le seul actionnaire de l'entreprise. Autodelta est alors le bras armé d'Alfa Romeo dans le domaine du sport automobile, sous la direction de Carlo Chiti. C'est une bonne nouvelle pour l'avenir de la TZ : prise en charge par Autodelta qui supervise sa production, elle est mise au point et préparée pour la compétition avec compétence et soin. Légère (elle ne pèse environ 650 kg), elle dépasse largement 210 km/h, voire plus en fonction du degré de préparation du moteur 1600 qui peut dépasser 150 ch. Son châssis bien conçu lui procure une agilité qui fait merveille et qui lui permet de se bâtir un palmarès enviable tant sur circuit qu'en rallye. Ainsi, dès 1963, la TZ signe une victoire de catégorie à la Coppa FISA, à Monza, entre les mains de Lorenzo Bandini, suivie d'une autre victoire de catégorie aux 12 Heures de Sebring 1964. En plus d'une victoire au classement général à la Coupe des Alpes 1964 avec Jean Rolland et Gaby Augias, la TZ a remporté à plusieurs reprises sa catégorie, entre 1964 et 1967, dans les épreuves les plus difficiles et les plus prestigieuses comme les 24 Heures du Mans, la Targa Florio, les 1000 Km du Nürburgring, le Tour de France Auto ou les 12 Heures de Sebring. En 1964 commence l'étude d'une version encore plus radicale, la TZ2. Mais c'est une autre histoire... Dans sa première version, la TZ a été produite à 112 exemplaires. Sortie d'usine le 11 mars 1965, l'Alfa Romeo TZ que nous présentons est un rare exemplaire livré neuf en France, le 17 mars 1965, à la SoFAR qui était l'importateur de la marque, à Paris. C'est ce que confirment les archives Alfa Romeo qui précisent aussi que, à l'époque, la couleur extérieure était blanche avec intérieur noir. Fait exceptionnel, la copie de la première carte grise de la voiture de 1966, après que la voiture est été importée et passée au Mines par la Sofar, nous permet de remonter entièrement son historique. Elle fût commandée par Maurice Zadouroff (la carte grise indique Zadourofr), résidant à Bidart, et fût enregistrée 195 KK 1964. Ce dernier était un commerçant important du pays basque comme nous le confirme l'ancien concessionnaire du garage Alfa Romeo de Biarritz, Georges Debussy, qui courrait à l'époque en SZ puis en GTA et que nous avons pu joindre : "J'avais à l'époque un client amateur d'Alfa qui vient me rendre visite: je lui propose la Tubolare Zagato dont je n'avais que la carte postale en modèle et Mr Zadouroff me la commande immédiatement. J'appelle la S.O.F.A.R à Paris qui est l'importateur et le responsable M. de la Charrière me promet une voiture dès disponibilité. Un autre de mes bons clients me commande une Alfa 2600 Zagato toujours sur carte postale, car nous n'avions pas de brochures et je passe une 2ème commande : quelques mois plus tard les deux voitures arrivent par camion de la S.O.F.A.R et la TZ m'est livrée dans une magnifique couleur rouge Alfa. Mr Zadouroff ne veut pas de voiture rouge car on se fait trop remarquer me dit-il et me demande de repeindre la TZ en jaune et de lui greffer 2 ouïes sur les ailes arrières pour pouvoir fixer les cannes à pêche, passe temps favori de mon client qui se rend régulièrement à St Jean Pied de Port avec la voiture. Les années passent et un beau jour début 1970 M. Zadouroff surgit dans mon garage et m'annonce qu'il aimerait me vendre sa TZ qui affiche fièrement 27.000 km: " Tu me donnes 15.000frs et elle est à toi ". Comme je n'avais pas la somme et qu'il insistait, je lui propose un paiement en trois fois et l'affaire est faite. Elle restera longtemps dans le hall de mon garage sans être à vendre jusqu'au jour ou le concessionnaire Alfa Roméo de Carcassonne Roger Debien me supplie de la lui vendre le jour où je serai décidé. Fin 1970, début 1980, à court de trésorerie, je me décide à vendre la voiture et les propositions d'achat ne manquent pas, mais comme je l'avais promis à R.Debien, ce dernier en devient le propriétaire pour la somme de 200.000frs ce qui me permet de réinvestir dans un nouveau projet. Quelques temps plus tard alors que les affaires deviennent de plus en plus difficiles, que la concurrence est rude et que les Alfa se vendent mal, je suis invité à visiter la magnifique collection Alfa Roméo de René Mauriès à Albi (collection qui sera vendue par Maître Poulain à Paris par la suite). Je m'y rends dans ma vieille Alfa 6 Berline que je n'arrivais pas à vendre et M. Mauriès me prenant à part me dit que j'aurais dû garder ma TZ car Roger Debien venait de la vendre pour plus de 3 millions de Frs (environ 500.000Euros) à des étrangers. Le ciel me serait tombé sur la tête je n'aurais pas été plus secoué et le retour à Biarritz dans ma vieille Alfa Berline fut rude. Le lendemain, j'appelais R.Debien sans lui parler de ce fabuleux prix qu'il avait obtenu pour mon ex TZ mais je lui demandais de me dépanner en me rachetant ma vieille Alfa 6; il me proposa de me rappeler et j'attends toujours son coup de fil". Grace au témoignage de M. Debussy on sait donc que la voiture n'a connu que trois propriétaires jusqu'en 1990, qu'elle était très probablement rouge à l'origine et surtout on constate que les prises d'air qu'on retrouve sur les photos de la fin des années 1980 ont une raison pour le moins insolite ! En 1990 à Carcassonne, entre les mains de l'agent Alfa Romeo, le garage Roger Debien, la voiture est immatriculée 4034 MZ 11. En février 1990, elle est cédée à la famille Van der Velden, par l'intermédiaire de Guido Bartolomeo, grand connaisseur de la marque. L'année suivante, elle est vendue à un amateur et négociant suisse de la région de Lausanne (la voiture étant immatriculée dans le canton de Vaud VD) qui la fait restaurer et peindre en rouge et la vend à un collectionneur allemand avant de prendre la direction de l'Italie et de rejoindre le garage de notre collectionneur. Depuis, cette voiture a bénéficié d'une restauration de très haut niveau et a retrouvé l'état proche de ce qu'elle était à sa sortie d'usine, l'arrière a été revu et ne comporte plus de prises d'air. Elle est équipée de son moteur d'origine, impeccablement présenté dans sa structure tubulaire. L'habitacle affiche la sobriété d'une machine de course, avec ses sièges baquet taillés pour le sport, son gros compte-tours sous visière en face du pilote et son compteur de vitesses central, gradué jusqu'à 260 km/h. Dans un état superbe, cette TZ, à l'historique suivi, fait sans doute partie des plus beaux exemplaires disponibles existant. Cette sublime berlinette de compétition, taillée pour le succès, sera bienvenue aux événements historiques majeurs comme le Tour Auto ou Le Mans Classic. Emblématique de la marque au trèfle, représentative du talent des ingénieurs et dessinateurs qui l'ont conçue, elle offrira à son propriétaire un plaisir à la fois esthétique et historique, en plus de ses incomparables sensations de conduite. Les automobiles de cette collection sont présentées sans contrôle technique. La nouvelle législation nous empêche de faire passer un contrôle technique à un véhicule non immatriculé en France. Italian title Chassis n° AR750042 Engine n° AR00511*00089 - Emblem of Alfa Romeo's success - Outstanding engineering, sublime aesthetics - Continuous history - Exceptional driving qualities - Top-level restoration - Delivered new in France Motorsport is in Alfa Romeo's genes, and so it was no surprise that the new Giulietta, unveiled in 1955, would quickly become the subject of more highly developed versions. The first non-standard Giulietta was the Sprint Speciale (SS) presented in 1957, with an original form designed by Franco Scaglione for Bertone, and inspired by the " BAT " cars. However, although it demonstrated real sporting qualities and had good aerodynamics, it was heavy and was supplemented by the Giulietta Sprint Zagato (SZ), a lighter car with a tighter form that was presented at the Geneva Motor Show in 1960 and subsequently enjoyed great success in competition. This model was produced in smaller numbers than the SS, with around 200 examples built. The arrival of the Giulia in 1962 shook things up, but even though the SS adopted a 1600 engine in 1963, the potential for development was too limited for it to lead the way in competition. At the same time, development of the SZ was restricted in line with Wunibald Kamm's principles of aerodynamics. To produce a successor to the SZ that could benefit from the Giulia's engineering, Alfa Romeo took a radical new direction led by Giuseppe Busso, who had begun designing a new racing car in 1959. According to Busso, the inspiration came from the " Tipo 750 Competizione " developed in 1955, but whose box structure lacked rigidity. This is possibly what prompted Busso to adopt a completely new tubular chassis. He used the Giulia's engineering, including the excellent twin-cam 1600 engine, but with independent rear suspension. For the body, it made sense to turn to Zagato who produced a perfectly executed berlinetta design, almost as if the SZ Coda Tronca had been a draft and this was the masterpiece. More than ever before, the purpose dictated the form, its restrained styling communicating efficiency, from the petite grille at the front to the cut-off tail at the rear. The combination of its tubular chassis and its Zagato body gave the automobile its name : TZ for Tubolare Zagato. Focussed on the development of its touring cars at this time, Alfa Romeo looked to entrust the management of its racing cars to an external source, and found a perfect partner in Autodelta. Created in 1963 by Carlo Chiti and Ludovico Chizzola, Autodelta was a race-car preparer. Chiti and Chizzola learnt of Alfa Romeo's desire to outsource its racing activity, and an agreement was struck with Orazio Satta to set up a partnership. This continued for some months before Alfa took a share in the company in 1964, becoming the sole shareholder in 1965. And so for its motorsport activities, Autodelta, led by Carlo Chiti, became Alfa Romeo's armed wing. This was good news for the future of the TZ : with Autodelta in charge and supervising its production, the car was developed with care and competence. Being lightweight (weighing around 650 kg), the car reached speeds of over 210 km/h with ease, and higher speeds in cars where the 1600 engine had been tuned to produce over 150 bhp. The well-designed chassis gave the car great agility, and it worked wonders on both road and track, with an enviable record of success in competition. In 1963, the TZ won its class in the Coppa FISA at Monza, driven by Lorenzo Bandini. It won its class again in the 1964 Sebring 12 Hours. There was also an overall win in the 1964 Coupe des Alpes for Jean Rolland and Gaby Augias. Moreover, the TZ won its class several times between 1964 and 1967 in the most challenging and prestigious events, including Le Mans 24 Hours, the Targa Florio, the Nürburgring 1000km, the Tour de France Auto and the Sebring 12 Hours. In 1964, work began on an even more radical version, the TZ2. However, that's another story....In its first version, 112 examples of the TZ were produced. Leaving the factory on 11 March 1965, the Alfa Romeo TZ on offer was a rare example delivered new in France on 17 March 1965 to the marque importer SoFAR in Paris. This is confirmed in the Alfa Romeo archives that also record the car as being white with black interior. Remarkably, the copy of the first French title in 1966, after the car had been imported by SoFAR and homologated in France, allows us to trace its history. It was ordered by Maurice Zadouroff (the title records it as Zadourofr), living in Bidart, and the car was registered 195 KK 1964. Zadouroff was an important retailer from the Basque country, confirmed to us by Georges Debussy, the former dealer of the Alfa Romeo garage in Biarritz, who used to race in SZ and GTA models. He told us : " At that time I had an Alfa enthusiast client who came to pay me a visit : I offered him the Tubolare Zagato on the strength of a picture on a postcard, and Mr Zadouroff ordered one from me straight away. I called S.O.F.A.R, the importer in Paris, and the boss, M. de la Charrière promised me a car as soon as one became available. Another of my good clients ordered an Alfa 2600 Zagato from me, again from a postcard as we didn't have any brochures, and I put in a second order. Several months later the two cars arrived on a truck from S.O.F.A.R and the TZ was delivered to me in a magnificent Alfa red. Mr Zadouroff told me he didn't want a red car as it would stand out too much. He asked me to have it repainted yellow and to have two vents put in the rear wings to attach his fishing rods to. This was a favourite pastime of his, and he made regular trips to St Jean Pied de Port in the car. A few years went by and then one fine day at the start of 1970 M. Zadouroff showed up at my garage and announced that he would like to sell me his TZ which proudly displayed 27,000 km on the clock. " 15,000frs and it's yours ". I didn't have the money but as he insisted, I offered to pay him in three instalments, and the deal was done. It stayed in the lobby of my garage for a long time, not for sale, until the day when the Alfa Romeo dealer from Carcassone, Roger Debien, begged me to let him buy it when I decided to sell it. At the end of the 1970s or the start of the 1980s, when I was short of cash, I decided to sell the car. I was not short of offers, but as I had promised it to Debien, it was he who became the next owner for the sum of 200,000frs, which allowed me to invest in a new project. Some time later, when business was even tougher, with fierce competition and it was really hard to sell Alfas, I was invited to visit René Mauriès' fantastic Alfa Romeo collection in Albi (which would later be sold by Maître Poulain in Paris). I went there in my old Alfa 6 saloon that I hadn't managed to sell and Mauriès took me aside and told me I should have kept my TZ as Roger Debien had just sold it for over 3 million francs (around 500,000 euros) to a foreigner. I felt the sky fall in on me, I couldn't have been more shaken up, and the return journey to Biarritz in my old Alfa saloon was tough. The next day, I called Debien without talking to him of the fabulous price he had got for my ex-TZ, but I did ask if he could help me out by taking the old Alfa 6 of my hands ; he said he'd call me back and I'm still waiting for that call. " Thanks to Mr Debussy's account, we know that the car only had three owners before 1990, that it was probably red originally, and above all that the air vents seen in photos from the late 1980s were put in for a most unusual reason ! In Carcassone in 1990, in the hands of the Alfa Romeo dealer Roger Debien, the car was registered 4034 MZ 11. In February 1990 it was sold to the Van der Velden family, through the intermediary Guido Bartolomeo, a well-known connoisseur of the marque. The following year it was sold to an enthusiast and Swiss dealer from the Lausanne region (the car was registered in the Vaud VD district), who had the car restored and repainted red. The car was then sold to a German collector before heading to Italy to join the stable of our collector. Since that time, the car has been the subject of a high quality restoration project, emerging in almost the condition it was in the day it left the factory. The rear section has been corrected and no longer has the air vents. It has its original engine, impeccably presented in its tubular structure. The interior has the purposeful appearance of a racing car, with bucket seats in competition trim, large rev counter under a visor, facing the driver, and central speedometer, graduated to 260 km/h. In superb condition and with continuous history, this TZ is undoubtedly one of the most stunning examples available. A sublime racing berlinetta, built to win, it will be welcomed at all the major historic events such as Tour Auto and Le Mans Classic. An icon of the marque, and a witness to the talent of the engineers and designers who built it, it has the aesthetics and the history, in addition to unrivalled driving qualities, to bestow on its new owner. The cars in this collection are all offered without contôle technique (MOT). New legislation prevents us from obtaining an MOT for a vehicle that is not registered in France. Estimation 750 000 - 1 000 000 € Sold for 955,440 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-07
Hammer price
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1938 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet B

115/180 bhp, 5,401 cc overhead-valve inline eight-cylinder engine with a driver-activated and gear-driven Roots-type supercharger with twin updraft pressurised carburettors, four-speed manual transmission, independent wishbone coil front suspension, independent swing arm rear suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 3,290 mm In 1934, Mercedes-Benz introduced the 500 K, with the “K” standing for kompressor, or supercharger. In all, 342 cars had been built before the introduction of the penultimate 5.4-litre 540 K in 1936. Although similar in many respects to the 500 K, the new model offered even more power, with 115 brake horsepower when naturally aspirated or an impressive 180 brake horsepower with the blower engaged. Notably, a 12-inch increase in wheelbase, with the end result being 128 inches, improved ride quality and gave the master coachbuilders at Sindelfingen more room to create even longer and more graceful lines. The hood was lengthened and combined with a vee-shaped radiator and external exhaust pipes, endowing the car with an undeniable presence. Long sweeping wings increased the visual length of the car, whilst chrome accents highlighted the lines and added a sparkling elegance. But it is with the spirited depression of the accelerator pedal that the 540 K exposes its true heart. The sudden shriek of the kompressor’s 7-psi boost pressure unmasks the dragon within the engine compartment, adding 65 horsepower at 3,400 rpm. Mercedes-Benz chose to pressurise the carburettor on its supercharged cars, so the howl of gears, the blower itself, and the scream of air being squeezed is un-muffled, creating a siren’s roar that clears the 540 K’s path with authority. According to Jan Melin’s Mercedes-Benz, The Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s, a mere four-hundred and nineteen 540 K chassis were built before production ended in 1940. A total of 11 catalogued body styles were created for the 540 K by Sindelfingen, with each one being a masterpiece of the coachbuilder’s art. The handsome example here is a version of the Cabriolet B by Sindelfingen. According to the accompanying copy of the original kommission sheet, chassis 169367 was ordered new by the Kores Company, A.G., on 2 February 1938. Due to unknown reasons, this order was cancelled on 3 March. On 4 March, the car was either ordered or reassigned to a construction company located on Joachimstall Street in Berlin. Since the car was shown as being ordered by the company, it can be easily assumed that the order was placed by an owner or similarly important individual associated with the organisation. Today, this elegant 540 K is finished in a lovely combination of black with grey body sides. The top is black cloth, and the chromed wire wheels, including side-mounted spares, are shod with blackwall tyres and are further ornamented by the black detailing on the Mercedes-Benz hubcaps. Contrasting with the Teutonic exterior is the lovely, inviting green leather interior, which is further softened by the burled dash with mother of pearl inlay and the burled wood trim. It is exquisite and unworn, and it features other details that further separate this car as a luxury conveyance, including the grey-smoked Plexiglas sun visor and the charcoal grey headliner. Close inspection of the gauges reveals a bit of patina, and the mileage showing is 906, which is presumably correct since restoration. The rear of the body is fitted with an integral trunk, which includes a fine set of bespoke fitted luggage and also contains a black cloth top boot. Opening the engine bay reveals the tidily presented and massive supercharged, 5.4-litre eight. Interestingly, the data plate is clearly original, whilst inspection of the machined pad on the side of the engine block appears to have only the internal engine prefix number and is without the six digit serial number, which indicates that the engine was possibly replaced at some point in its life. The underside of the body is extremely clean, and the chassis number of 169367 can be seen on the driver’s side frame rail, with the number 12/39 seen stamped on the passenger side rail. Along with a copy of the kommission papers, an instruction manual for the model is included in the file. The Mercedes-Benz 540 K will always be legendary in the minds of collectors around the world. With its exquisite presentation and breath-taking performance, this car is ready to hit the road or the show field, with the Bosch headlamps lighting the way. Chassis no. 169367

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-09-08
Hammer price
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1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spyder

Specifications: 352bhp 4,380 cc double overhead cam V-12 engine with six 40DCN20 Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400mm (94.5") Alongside the 365 GTB/4 Berlinetta, Ferrari also produced a small series of 365 GTB/4 Spyders. These are among the most sought after open Ferraris and have always been held in high regard. It was a worthy successor to the previous 275 GTB/4 and was quickly nicknamed ‘Daytona’ in recognition of Ferrari’s one-two-three win at the 24-hour race the previous year. Road & Track magazine summed up the Daytona’s attributes succinctly, subheading their October 1970 Road Test, “The fastest, and best, GT is not necessarily the most exotic.” It was still a front-engined, rear wheel drive berlinetta but what a sublime, powerful and highly developed berlinetta it was. The V12 engine was barely recognizable as being derived from Gioacchino Colombo’s twenty-year old design. It was lengthened to accommodate the 81mm bore needed to achieve nearly 4.4 liters of displacement, it was fitted with twin cam cylinder heads for high rpm and breathed freely through a sextet of Weber 40 DCN 20 carburetors. And yet, with power brakes, air conditioning, and leather interior, it was also a high speed "gentleman’s express." One of the last hand-built Ferraris, the Daytona is also one of the most iconic Ferraris of all time. The first “Daytona Spyder” was presented at the 44th Annual IAA Motor Show in Frankfurt on September 11, 1969. The example shown was finished in yellow with the concave bodyline finished in black, and featured Borrani wire wheels. The rear wings were squared-off on the top edges, losing some of the roundness of the Berlinetta and subtly altering the accent of the bodyline. The first 365 GTB/4 Spyder was fitted with the Perspex covered headlights, although all further Daytona Spyders were fitted with the pop-up headlights. In all, Ferrari produced just 121 Daytona Spyders plus the prototype. 96 units were destined for the U.S. market and only 25 were built to European specifications (seven of which were right hand drive). Clearly, the bulk of production was destined for Ferrari’s most important export market, the USA. This particular example, chassis number 17045, is one such rare and enormously desirable Spyder variant. Of the 122 Spyders produced, this is the 108th; that is to say, it was the fourteenth to last to be completed late in 1973. It was, however, not sold new until 1974 to John von Neumann of California who received shipment of the Rosso Dino Ferrari with tan leather interior, one of only two finished in those colors. By June of 1996 it had accumulated less than 10,000 miles and by 2001 had been owned by three more dedicated Ferrari owner-enthusiasts. The Daytona Spyder completed its professional restoration within the last 12 months, which included being repainted in black and the installation of an all black leather interior. Most notably, 17045 has only accumulated 10,778 miles from new and, as such, behaves like a fit low mileage Ferrari should, and having very recently finished its cosmetic restoration, remains in outstanding visual condition. The quality of the brightwork and chrome is impressive, right down to the wire wheels. The same can be said for the interior, where black leather upholstery abounds throughout, highlighted by the three-spoke steering wheel and distinctive slotted Ferrari shifter. Additional features present on the Daytona Spyder include air conditioning, a factory original tool roll, the owner’s and service manual, and the warranty books for both the Daytona and the Becker radio of Becker Autoradiowerk GmbH. Many enthusiasts consider the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 to be the definitive front-engined sports car. It is the ultimate example of the traditional grand tourer, and undoubtedly a classic design. The open Spyder configuration is a favorite among the world’s Ferraristi; it is often mentioned as one of the cars most would like to own, and for very good reason, as Daytona Spyders have for many years been the world’s fastest convertibles. The combination of Ferrari’s superb engineering and Pininfarina’s design is hard to beat because this is a fabulous Ferrari, whether stationary or on the move. There are cars that look great but drive badly, and others that drive well but are not beautiful, but in the ownership of a Daytona Spyder can be had the best of both worlds. Chassis no. 17045

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-08-17
Hammer price
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1930 Cadillac V16 All Weather Phaeton by Murphy

Specifications: Model 452-A, 165hp, 452 cu. in.45-degree overhead valve V16 engine, three-speed manual transmission with reverse, front and rear semi-elliptic leaf with hydraulic dampers, internal mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 148" Describing the American auto industry in 1930, one could easily quote the opening lines from the Charles Dickens classic “Tale of Two Cities” by saying, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” On the upside, new technological breakthroughs with improved metallurgy, manufacturing techniques and a better understanding of mechanics was giving the motoring public the power and speed they wanted, while at the same time some of the most talented designers and coachbuilders to ever be involved in the creation of rolling works of art were at their zenith. On the downside, the stock market crash and growing Great Depression that had started in the fall of 1929 was showing no signs of recovery, with smaller car companies and many other manufacturing concerns closing their doors on almost a daily basis. Particularly hard hit were those who produced goods aimed at affluent customers, and for Cadillac, a major portion of their clientele was directly affected. Already in the engineering and planning stages well before “Black Friday” was a development that Cadillac Motor Car Company President Larry Fisher hoped would be the mechanical coup of the new decade - a V16 engine. In a letter sent to dealers on December 27, 1929, he revealed this secret new sales weapon, and one week later at the New York Auto Show the public got their first viewing of this ultra-luxurious machine. Power was the king in the sales race, so one can only imagine what the public, accustomed to fours, sixes and an occasional 8-cylinder engine, must have thought when this magical power plant was unveiled. Rather than creating a larger bore V8 type engine whose bigger torque impulses would also require beefin up the drive-line components, Cadillac decided that the smoother torque delivery of a multi-cylinder engine would allow the use of proven assemblies such as clutches and transmissions. With a 3” bore coupled with a 4” stroke, the new engine displaced 452 cubic inches. The cylinders were set in a 45-degree “V” design, and effectively the engine was a pair of straight eights with each bank of cylinders using their own intake and exhaust manifolds, all connected to a common crankshaft. This engine also featured an unusual overhead valve train – and it was the first automotive powerplant that had its physical appearance actually “styled”. Legend has it that Harley Earl himself claimed that if he was to be in charge of creating beautiful coachwork for these cars, the engines had to present the same clean modern look. As a result nearly all wiring, tubing, many linkages were concealed under streamlined fashion panels and covers. Credit for the design of the engine bay went to a talented young design engineer named Owen Nacker. Development and testing of the Cadillac V16 had been conducted since late 1926 in total secrecy. Suppliers who were instrumental in providing prototype parts were often misled and given orders through a GM commercial vehicle account or told that their provided parts were for experimental engines to be built and used by one of the lower-priced marques within the company. By the time it went into production the new Model 452 had already been proven to deliver plenty of power – a class leading 165 hp. Of course, there were those both in the public and within General Motors who couldn’t see the need for an engine with more than eight cylinders. Over the years, multi-cylinder cars had come and gone, with the last domestic multi-cylinder car having been the Packard Twin-Six, which was discontinued in the early 1920s. To counter these arguments and present the marque’s position, a paper titled “Reasons for the V-16 Cadillac Type Engine” was published by William Strickland in the SAE Journal. In his presentation, he cited that modern cars were bigger and heavier than before, often carrying a larger passenger load, and that these owners were demanding new automobiles that “must accelerate in traffic or ahead of the jams, must take all roads over hills or mountains with ease and at the highest permissible speeds, and maintain high speed on the new superhighways multiplying rapidly all over the country.” It would be shown that Cadillac’s new V16 would do everything prescribed - and do it with grace and beauty. Unlike other luxury car makers of the day, Cadillac did not commonly allow the sales of bare chassis to coachbuilders. As a result, custom-built bodies on the V16 chassis were extremely rare, with Cadillac records showing only five such orders released from the factory. Consequently, if a customer wanted the power and elegance of a Cadillac V16, but a custom body to his own taste, his only choice was to order a complete car, and of course, the choice was almost always the rumble seat roadster, which was the least expensive model in the line. Once delivered the factory body would be removed and discarded or sold off, and the coachbuilder would then install the new coachwork. The example offered here is one of these cars. It was shipped on April 17th, 1930 as a standard Fleetwood roadster, for delivery to San Francisco for a special project by one of the most noteworthy figures in the early history of the automobile on the west coast, Charles S. Howard. Although Howard is best known in popular culture as the owner of Triple Crown winner “Sea Biscuit”, he was also the California distributor for Buick – which no doubt influenced his choice of the Cadillac V16, GM’s flagship car. Howard was also known to Murphy, having commissioned at least one other car from this well regarded Pasadena coachbuilder. In their employ was a talented young designer named Franklin Q. Hershey, who at the age of 23, already had six years of experience designing some of the most beautiful automobiles of the classic era. Having come to Murphy at the age of 17, he had been given a very unique opportunity to prove his skills. Hershey had demonstrated that he had the ability to put himself inside his client’s mind and bring out what would be some of the most beautifully styled classic automobiles of the day. Hailed as rolling works of art, Hershey’s designs are highly sought after by collectors today. For this one-off phaeton Hershey gave it the “California” look – a largely open car, with thin pillars and a light appearance. One of the most notable features of the car is the swept-back rake of the windscreen. Rather than using the industry norm of a nearly up-right flat windshield, Hershey’s design featured a rearward slope at nearly 22 degrees, giving the car the appearance of speed even when standing still. Perhaps the most attractive feature of the car is its dual purpose character. Although fully enclosed as a convertible sedan, it was cleverly designed such that the windows could be lowered (at which point they would disappear under flush chrome covers), the center posts removed, and the rear windscreen raised, giving the look and feel of a true open car. While others have tried to achieve the same dual purpose design, none were more successful than Franklin Hershey’s design for Charles Howard. Details of this car’s immediate ownership after Mr. Howard’s tenure (if any) are not known, but by 1961 Norman Taunton of Galt, California heard a rumor about the existence of the car. He was on his honeymoon, driving his Model A Ford, when he tracked down the car in the San Francisco area. He had been looking for a sporty open classic, and made a deal almost immediately. Unfortunately, as Taunton relates in a 1962 letter published in the Cadillac LaSalle Self Starter magazine, on the way home with the car, he was struck by a taxi driver, damaging the car in the right rear. He decided to take the car apart and restore it, and in the process he stripped the original dark green paint off the car, but never got around to finishing it. In the meantime, he had gotten to know Jimmy Brucker, whose father owned “Movieland, Cars of the Stars”. Brucker tried for ten years to buy the car before he was finally successful in closing the deal in the late 1960s. According to Brucker, the car was in amazing condition, and so solid that the doors could be closed and latched with one finger. Although Brucker would keep the car for about ten years, he still hadn’t gotten around to starting the restoration when he sold it to another California enthusiast, Don Westerdale, in the late 1970s. Westerdale completed the restoration over the next four or five years, showing it a number of times. The finished car was featured in Automobile Quarterly, Volume 22, No. 4, published in late 1984. Not long afterward, Westerdale sold it to noted California collector John Mozart - in about 1985. John maintained the car and made small improvements during the nearly ten years he owned it before selling it to well known collector Jim King of Berkely, MA in September of 1991. King sold the car to John McMullen in September of 1994 where it was treated to a thorough upgrade to return the car to concours condition, including a top quality repaint, changing the car from two tones of red to its current combination of dark maroon and a deep high gloss black. The interior is fitted in plush maroon leather, with the rear passenger compartment fitted with its own roll-up center window as well as a clock and remote speedometer mounted to the back of the front seat in a handsome wooden casing. The steering wheel, dash, and gauges have all been restored to as new condition. It is well equipped, including its original Cadillac Goddess mascot, dual covered side mount spares with rear view mirrors, a permanently mounted rear storage trunk, and stainless steel wire wheels with wide whitewall tires. From 1996 to 2004, the car has been shown at only a handful of events where it has always been rewarded with top honors. One of the highlights of John McMullen’s ownership of this Murphy Phaeton came at the 1997 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, when the car was judged best in class. On hand was Franklin Hershey, who was reunited with his masterpiece. Sadly, it would be the last concours this talented stylist would be able to attend, as he passed away at the age of 90 just a couple of months later. In more recent years this car has been invited to be exhibited as such prestigious venues as Amelia Island, Bay Harbor, Meadow Brook, and the Glenmore Gathering, where it has consistently been selected as Best in Class and often Best in Show. It has also gained top honors with the Classic Car Club of America, being awarded National Junior, Senior and Premier awards. One would expect that with an original restoration nearing 25 years of age – even one as well cared for as this – a certain amount of upgrading would be required. It is a testimonial to the quality of the workmanship to date that even the most particular collector is unlikely to find more than a few areas needing attention to return the car to front rank concours quality. Any sixteen cylinder Cadillac is an important car, but the McMullen collection Murphy bodied example is one of the most significant V16s extant. A true one-off, designed by one of the most legendary figures of the classic era, it will offer its next caretaker the opportunity to enjoy its beauty for years to come. It seems fitting that it find its next long term owner in this, the 100th anniversary of the birth of its creator, Franklin Q. Hershey. Award History 1996 Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance First in Class 1997 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance First in Class 1998 Grand Experience CCCA Best of Show 1998 Bumpers for Babies Best of Show 1998 Cars on Campus Concours People’s Choice & Best of Show 1999 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance Most Elegant Cadillac 2002 Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance Most Elegant Car, John Dodge Award & Best Featured Cadillac 2003 Bay Harbor Best of Show 2004 Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance Most Significant GM Product 2004 Glenmore Gathering Award of Distinction CCCA Grand National Junior, Senior and Premiere Chassis no. 700991

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-09
Hammer price
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1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L 'Lusso' by Scaglietti

240 bhp, 2,953 cc single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine with triple Weber carburettors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, parallel trailing arms, and Watt Bar, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm One of today’s most desirable gran turismos Interesting U.S. and Swiss history Full matching-numbers example Documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini Ferrari’s breath-taking 250 GT/L, more commonly known as the Lusso, is widely celebrated to be one of the most exquisitely proportioned Ferraris ever designed by Pininfarina. Ferrari wanted their newest offering to enter the market in between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, believing this new car should combine the best aspects of both cars at either end of the 250 series spectrum. When new, hundreds of enthusiasts wanted one to call their own. Celebrity petrol heads like Steve McQueen and Eric Clapton owned Lussos, only adding to its allure. However, Ferraris like this were not meant to be handed out to everyone who wanted one. Demand outweighed supply, resulting in even more Lusso-mania. With a total of 350 produced by the end of the second and final year of production in 1964, this was a car clearly destined to become a future classic. First seen by the public at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1962, many enthusiasts simply fell head over heels for the beautiful body and Kamm tail that adorned the newest 250. Fortunately, all this beauty did not sacrifice aerodynamics, as these flowing lines helped to direct airflow towards the car’s rear spoiler. As per usual for the 250 series, the design was penned by Pininfarina and bodies were constructed by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. Of course, Lusso translated into English means luxury, and from one look into the cabin, there is no doubt that luxury is the perfect word to describe the ambiance. Passengers were lavished with the finest materials in terms of leather, chrome trim, and Ferrari’s now trademark Nardi wood-rimmed steering wheel. Perhaps the most exquisite part of the interior was the rear luggage shelf, which was quilted in fine Italian leather. It wouldn’t be surprising to learn that most owners tried to squeeze their luggage into the boot in order to just catch a glimpse of that leatherwork whilst looking in their rearview mirror. The beauty of the Lusso didn’t just extend to its body and interior. Under the aluminium bonnet was Ferrari’s 3.0-litre, Colombo-designed V-12, which was topped with three Weber carburettors. Accelerating from 0 to 60 mph took eight seconds, and the car would continue to accelerate until it reached a speed of 150 mph. A number of its components were shared with other Ferraris on sale at the time. Borrowing its short wheelbase and rudimentary chassis design from the 250 SWB and 250 GTO, it was graced with the fantastic handling that was associated with those two models. As the final automobile in the 250 line, the Lusso would become the last Ferrari to utilise the 3.0-litre Colombo V-12, effectively closing the door on one of the most spectacular engines in automotive history. Whilst only a handful of owners brought their Lussos to the track, it excelled as a gran turismo in the finest sense of the word. Cruising along at high speed was no problem, and the car was intended to not only cross states and provinces, but to cross whole countries and continents as well. Utilising thin A and B pillars, the interior had fantastic outward visibility, making it a much more relaxing place to be on long trips. The Lusso is not only a car that begs to be admired at all angles, but it is also a car that begs to be driven and thoroughly enjoyed. On driving the example once owned by Steve McQueen, McQueen’s son, Chad, remarked in a March 2006 article in Motor Trend that “it makes a fantastic noise, and once you get some speed, the steering lightens up. It’s warm inside, and it sure smells good”. All these aspects, topped with the smell of fine Italian leather, make for the most pleasurable of driving experiences. According to Marcel Massini, this Lusso was the 276th produced when it left the factory in 1964. It is believed to be originally painted in Oro Chiaro (19410M Italver), a rare Ferrari colour most easily described as a light gold metallic, over a black leather (VM8500) interior. After production, it travelled to California, where it enjoyed no less than two caretakers. By 1990, it had travelled across the Atlantic Ocean once more to Switzerland, where it was owned by a Hans Dürst, of Switzerland, wearing red paint with a beige leather interior. Dürst consigned the car to auction in 1997. Purchased by its current owner in the early 2000s, this car has remained stationary for most of his ownership, and it could use minor reserving to make it function as it should. Whilst the interior remains in good condition, the Lusso’s exterior shows some signs of wear, and it could benefit from some minor paintwork and re-chroming. As a matching-numbers example, this Lusso would be a prime candidate for a restoration, as it can easily be restored to the condition it left the factory in. There is no doubt that the Lusso is one of the greatest road going Ferraris of all time. Not only is it one of the most beautiful Ferraris ever built, but it is also arguably one of the most beautiful post-war sports cars in the world. With a gorgeous Pininfarina body on Ferrari’s most legendary chassis, its timeless design pulled at the heartstrings of many an enthusiast, and as a result, Lusso ownership has become a necessity for many collectors. The Lusso offered today presents a fantastic opportunity to slide behind the wheel of one of Ferrari’s greatest road cars of all time, as it is a car that truly epitomises what Ferrari’s are all about: beautiful designs, incredible engines, and fantastic performance, all paired with Italian luxury. Addendum Please note that this vehicle will be sold on a Bill of Sale with cancelled registration documents. It is not EU taxes paid but is eligible for import into the UK at a reduced rate of 5%. Chassis no. 5541 Engine no. 5541

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-09-08
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1958 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

225 bhp (DIN), 240 bhp (SAE), 2,996 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with upper and lower A-arms and coil springs, independent rear suspension with coil springs and swing axles, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm Matching-numbers example Stunning colour combination Matching rare factory removable hardtop There was no doubt that Mercedes-Benz had a hit on their hands with their spectacular 300 SL Gullwing, as it would become known. The car’s looks, performance, and brilliant engineering captivated the automotive world, and it proved to be a runaway success for Mercedes-Benz. As production was soon coming to an end for the iconic 300 SL Coupé, the marque grew more eager to add a convertible version to its line-up. A prototype of this new model was first spotted by German magazine Auto, Motor und Sport at Stuttgart in the summer of 1956, and the production model would later debut at the 1957 Geneva Motor Show. By the end of that year, the final 70 of the 1,400 Coupés and the first 618 of the Roadsters were assembled. Along with a convertible top, the 300 SL brought a host of advancements to the already state-of-the-art platform. The central section of the 300 SL’s space-frame chassis was lowered, and smaller sills and enlarged doors were added to improve entrance and egress. Its strength was maintained, nonetheless, with the addition of diagonal struts bracing the lowered side sections to the rear tubular members. The suspension was also revised to allow for a more comfortable ride and improved handling. At the rear, the spare tyre was repositioned below the boot floor, necessitating a smaller fuel tank but also maintaining reasonable luggage space. Even though these revisions added some 250 pounds, the majority of which were associated with the convertible top and its mechanisms, the car remained an excellent performer, with a factory-claimed 137-mph top speed. Just like the 300 SL Gullwing, the Roadster proved to be the vehicle of choice for those with brilliant taste in aesthetics and cutting-edge engineering. As such, many wound up in the garages of celebrities, racing drivers, and other financially successful individuals. With a list price of $11,000, ownership of a 300 SL was a dream to most when the car was new, and to those with the funds to spare, the car was worth every penny. To those looking to make a statement with the purchase of a new car, there was simply no better option. The dramatic Roadster offered here, chassis number 198.042.8500091, is believed to have been originally delivered to the United States, as noted by its U.S.-style sealed-beam headlights, and it was then subsequently brought to the United Kingdom in the mid-1980s. It has been a resident of the UK for the majority of its life and was registered with license plates 660 EXD. In more recent ownership, the car was refinished in Anthracite Metallic (DB 172) with black leather, and it is still equipped with its correct sealed-beam head- and tail-lights, as well as U.S.-specification instrumentation. According to a previous owner, it has been well-maintained and improved on with regular servicing and maintenance, which has been carried out by such specialists as O’Keefe Restorations and Gordon Dale. The owner also noted that the rear axle, injection pump, and injectors were rebuilt; the gearbox was rebuilt with new bearings; and a new high-capacity aluminium radiator was installed. The car is still fitted with an original hardtop, which is painted to match the stunning body colour. This car is an excellent 300 SL to drive and enjoy. It is in handsome overall order, and it benefits from one of the best possible colour combinations, as well as long-term UK ownership. As such, it will be spectacular either on display or on the road. 225 cv DIN, 240 cv SAE, motore sei cilindri in lina da 2.996 cc con singolo albero a camme in testa e iniezione meccanica Bosch, cambio manuale a quattro velocità, sospensioni indipendenti a doppi triangoli deformabili e molle elicoidali e posteriori a bracci oscillanti trasversali con molle elicoidali e barre antirollio e freni a tamburo a comando idraulico su tutte e quattro le ruote. Passo: 2.400 mm • Esemplare matching numbers • Bellissima combinazione di colori • Hardtop orginale Nessuno dubitò che la Mercedes avesse in mano un successo garantito con la spettacolare 300 SL Ali di Gabbiano, nome con cui diverrà famosa. Il suo design, le sue prestazioni e la tecnica eccezionale catturarono l'immaginazione del mondo automotive, rivelando il successo immediato per la Mercedes-Benz. Quando la produzione dell'iconica 300 SL Coupé si avviava al termine, il Costruttore volle aggiungere alla gamma una versione convertibile. Un prototipo di questo nuovo modello fu presentato per la prima volta dal giornale tedesco Auto, Motor und Sport nei paraggi di Stoccarda nell'estate 1956 e il modello pronto per la produzione fu presentato al Salone di Ginevra del 1957. Alla fine di quell'anno furono prodotte le ultime 70 delle 1.400 coupé e le prime 618 della versione roadster. Oltre ad essere una convertibile, la 300 SL fu caratterizzata da diversi aggiornamenti sulla sua già eccezionale piattaforma. La sezione centrale del telaio tubolare fu abbassata, mentre un battitacco più piccolo fu montato così come delle portiere più larghe per migliorare l'ingresso e l'uscita dall'abitacolo. Nonostante ciò, si riuscì a mantenere la robustezza complessiva della struttura, grazie all'adozione di traverse diagonali che rinforzavano la parte bassa laterale fino al complesso tubolare posteriore. Le sospensioni furono riviste per garantire maggiore comfort e tenuta di strada. Nel baule la ruota di scorta fu riposizionata al di sotto del piano di carico, per cui si dovette installare un serbatoio più piccolo per mantenere uno spazio adeguato per i bagagli. Anche se tutte queste modifiche aggiunsero circa 113 kg, la maggior parte dei quali dovuta al tetto pieghevole ed ai relativi meccanismi, la macchina mantenne le sue straordinarie prestazioni e la capacità di raggiungere una velocità di punta di 220 km/h, stando alle dichiarazioni del Costruttore. Proprio come la 300 SL Ali di Gabbiano, la Roadster si rivelò essere l'auto preferita da chi possedeva un certo gusto per l'estetica e l'ingegneria di alto livello. Per questo motivo, molte finirono nei garage di celebrità, piloti ed altri individui di successo. Con un prezzo di listino di 11.000$, entrare in possesso di una 300 SL nuova era un sogno di molti e per tutti coloro che potevano permettersela era una spesa che valeva ogni centesimo. Per quelli che volevano dire la loro acquistando una nuova auto, non c'era semplicemente opzione migliore. Questa spettacolare roadster qui offerta, con numero di telaio 198.042.8500091, si ritiene sia stata originariamente consegnata negli Stati Uniti per via della presenza dei fari anteriori specifici montati sulle auto vendute oltreoceano. Successivamente l'auto fu portata nel Regno Unito a metà anni 80, ove li rimase per la maggior parte della sua vita, immatricolata con targa inglese 660 EXD. Sotto una recente proprietà, l'auto è stata rifinita in Antracite Metallizzata (DB 172) con interni in pelle nera ed ha mantenuto la carenatura sui suoi fari anteriori e posteriori, così come la strumentazione originale americana. Stando alle dichiarazioni di un precedente proprietario, l'auto è stata ben mantenuta e migliorata durante i suoi cicli di manutenzione, eseguiti da specialisti come O'Keefe Restorations e Gordon Dale. L'attuale proprietario ha inoltre fatto presente che i semiassi posteriori, la pompa dell'iniezione e gli iniettori furono ricostruiti, così come la trasmissione, la quale ricevette nuovi cuscinetti. Fu anche montato un nuovo radiatore più grande e in alluminio. La macchina è ancora fornita del suo tetto rigido originale, verniciato nello stesso bellissimo colore della carrozzeria. Questa macchina è un'eccezionale 300 SL da guidare e godere appieno. Si presenta funzionante, in bellissimo stato e beneficia di una delle più belle combinazioni cromatiche disponibili e di una permanenza a lungo termine presso stesso proprietario in Inghilterra. Come tale quest'auto è spettacolare sia da ferma che sulla strada. Chassis no. 198.042.8500091 Engine no. 198.980.7500716 Body no. 198.042.7500647

  • CANCanada
  • 2015-05-23
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1959 FERRARI 250 GT LONG WHEELBASE CALIFORNIA SPYDER

The ex-Jo Siffert 1959 FERRARI 250 GT LONG WHEELBASE CALIFORNIA SPYDER COACHWORK BY SCAGLIETTI Chassis No. 1217 GT Engine No. 1217 GT (Type 128D) Black with red leather interior Engine: V12, single overhead camshaft per bank, 2,953cc, 250bhp at 7,000rpm; Gearbox: four-speed manual; Suspension: front, independent with coil springs, rear, semi-elliptic leaf springs; Brakes: four wheel disc. Left hand drive. Convincing Enzo Ferrari to produce an open version of the highly successful competition 250 Berlinetta was an effort credited to the famous American Ferrari importer and driver, Luigi Chinetti. The resultant 'Spyder California' was clearly aimed at the American market, and the first prototype was completed in December 1957. Its mechanical specification was very similar to the 250GT Tour de France. The incredible Pininfarina design was built by Scaglietti and provided an elegant two-seater sports car that has to this day lost none of its appeal. Following the initial series of cars, a revised second series was produced, of which only 27 examples were built, with an engine and chassis that were more akin to the 250 SWB Berlinetta. The second series cars were fitted with the improved type 128D motor with reinforced connecting rods, and improved crankshaft and twin distributors. Some minor bodywork changes were evident such as a new profile to the rear wheel arches, and few cars received the uncovered open headlight arrangement. Some vehicles were also uprated with competition specification engines and a few rare examples were fully bodied in lightweight aluminum for racing purposes. Success on the racing circuits included 8th overall and first in the GT class at the 12 Hours of Sebring for Richie Ginther and Howard Hively in 1959. Perhaps even more impressive than this result later the same year was the 5th place finish in the 24 Hours of Le Mans by Fernand Tavano and Bob Grossman in the NART-entered Competition Spyder. After being delivered to the Officine Navali Campanella port in Genoa, Italy, chassis number 1217 was first purchased by Swiss racing great Jo Siffert. It was under Mr. Siffert's ownership that the original drum brake configuration was converted to the more effective and desirable disc brake set up. As seen in the accompanying archival photograph from the Stanley Nowak book, Ferrari On The Road, the car was originally delivered with a factory hardtop (now no longer with the car). Also noticed in the archival images, is the rare passenger hand brace, which still exists today. Changing ownership through Rob de la Rive Box of Lenzburg, Switzerland, the car then came to the United States under the ownership of Mr. Richard Merritt, the well-respected Ferrari collector and historian. At the time, Mr. Merritt noticed that the car was delivered to him fitted with engine No. 2057 (from a 250 GTE). The correct engine was now in a 1958 Boano, No. 0815, and it was under its next owner, Mr. George Heiser of Seattle, Washington, that chassis No. 1217 GT was reunited with its original engine in 1979. After an extensive search, Mr. Heiser was able to locate the Boano, purchase the car and perform the exchange. The Spyder California remained in Mr. Heiser's collection until 1987, when it returned to Europe for the next 6 years. In 1993, prominent California collector John Mozart acquired 1217 GT. It remained with him for a year, before it was purchased by the current owner, also a noted California collector. Under his ownership, 1217 underwent an extensive engine restoration in 1994. Performed by noted marque specialist Phil Reilly & Co., this work included new pistons, bearings, valves, etc. Along with the engine work, any additional concerns were addressed as well, such as installing a new canvas top, fitting the correct steering wheel, and fine-tuning the suspension. All receipts acknowledging this work, amounting to over $46,000 accompany the car. Ferrari historian Antoine Prunet has summed up the California Spyder: "Its limited production (106 examples) has not stopped the 250 GT Spyder California from being among the most desirable Ferraris ever produced." 1217 GT is certainly one of the best long wheelbase examples owing to its overall originality, superb mechanical and cosmetic condition, and a well-documented history of ownership. Along with being an ideal entry for many of the great touring and rally events, 1217 GT has been off the concours circuit for many years, and would be a welcome addition worldwide.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-08-12
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1937 MERCEDES-BENZ 540K SUPERCHARGED SPORT CABRIOLET A

Formerly the property of Dr. E. Beeh, President of the German Mercedes-Benz Supercharged Club +1937 MERCEDES-BENZ 540K SUPERCHARGED SPORT CABRIOLET A COACHWORK BY DAIMLER-BENZ SINDELFINGEN Chassis No. 154084 Engine No. 154084 Sandbeige with tan leather interior and black soft top Engine: straight eight, in-line, overhead valve, 5,401cc., 115bhp or 180bhp with supercharger engaged at 3,400rpm; Gearbox: four-speed manual; Suspension: independent coil spring suspension front and rear; Brakes: four wheel drum. Left hand drive. At the end of the 1920s, the magnificent old Mercedes S, SS and SSK models still enjoyed enormous success both as road and racing cars, notably at the German Grand Prix and the European Hillclimb Championship which went to Rudolf Carraciola's SSK in 1930. But plainly something was needed to revive the regular German motor industry, where the eighty-six different firms in 1924 had dropped to seventeen in 1928. Mercedes-Benz responded by transferring production from the old Benz factory to Stuttgart-Untertürkheim and developing new smaller models, of which the 170 and rear engined 130 are best known. The large luxury cars were now selling in very small numbers, but prestige demanded that both these and a racing program should not be ignored. The redoubtable Silver Arrows were the result of the commitment to racing, while the eight cylinder 500 which appeared in 1933 was the first of a new breed of exotic grand touring and formal motor cars. A supercharged version of the 500 soon arrived, but even so sales were extremely limited and in 1935 accounted for only 190 cars. Top speed was 160 km/h and new chief engineer Gustav Rohr, well known for the advanced Rohr cars of the era, progressively improved the car. He was also involved with the awesome Mercedes-Benz racing cars of the time, which saw Hermann Lang, Manfred von Brauchitsch and Rudolf Caracciola sweep virtually all before them. An enlarged 5.4-liter version was developed in 1934/5 and made its first appearance at the Paris Salon in October 1936. Daimler-Benz was without doubt very proud of their latest achievement and their publicity material sums up the aura of the model: The name conjures up visions of breath-taking exploits of racing cars and drivers of international fame, but also of superlative comfort and coachwork of exquisite beauty, fine paintwork, brightly polished metal, the finest hardwoods and leather - massive and yet outstandingly attractive bodies - in short: the car for the connoisseur. The eight cylinder 540K engine developed 115bhp, or 180bhp with the supercharger engaged, giving the car a top speed of approximately 170km/h. Other improvements over the 500K included chassis refinements, uprated suspension and a better braking system. Factory records indicate that some 419 examples of the 540K were produced between 1936 and 1939. However, only 32 of this particular Sports Cabriolet A version were produced in 1936 and 1937 and only 12 are known to survive. Chassis number 154084 is a quite magnificent Sports Cabriolet A that was ordered early in 1937 with internal order number 1390882. Its bodywork was finished at the Mercedes-Benz Sindelfingen factory on April 9th, 1937. On the same day that the body was completed, it was transported from the Sindelfingen coachwork department to Untertürkheim where it was joined to the chassis. On July 24th, 1937 its proud new owner, Dr. William Walter Birge, collected the finished car from Untertürkheim and drove it home to Paris. Following the Second World War, 154084 was bought by an American enthusiast in Baltimore who had a large collection of important European classics. In 1980 the car returned from the US to Europe via a well known classic car dealer and went to the Mercedes-Benz Supercharged Club President, Dr. E. Beeh in Stuttgart, Germany. Dr. Beeh, who has been the President of the Supercharged Club since it was founded, enthusiastically used his 540K on many European events such as the Monte Carlo, Tour des Alpes, Berta-Benz and MVC (Mercedo Veteranen Club) to name but a few. In total he put about 60,000 pleasurable kilometers on the car over a period of twenty-one years before he decided to undertake a full nut and bolt restoration. This meticulous two year restoration that began in 1997 was carried out to the highest German standards by Rolf Wagner, hugely respected for his restoration work on supercharged Mercedes-Benz. The bodywork was removed from the wooden frame (documented with photographs) and restored where necessary. Nothing was overlooked on the mechanical side and the engine, gearbox, axles, brakes, suspension and starter were all fully rebuilt. Cosmetically no details were left untouched and the car received a new top, upholstery and interior, the instruments were rebuilt, new glass was fitted and all chrome parts were redone. The cost of the restoration was at least $400,000 and the result is truly stunning. Since the restoration only a further 5,600km have been driven. This superb Sport Cabriolet A retains all of its original major components: chassis, engine and bodywork. The radiator on this example is positioned back behind the front axle, there are extremely long front fenders and the twin spare wheels are mounted at the rear. These features are also found on the 540K Special Roadsters, thus these two body styles are among the most sought after of all the factory coachwork. With such striking bodylines these cars had a far more sporting appearance than the more common production cars. These highly sought after supercharged Mercedes-Benz were among the ultimate cars that money could buy in the late 1930s. The beautiful proportions exude both power and grace. Appreciation of such fine machinery can really only be done in person and we thoroughly recommend that prospective buyers take the opportunity to view the car. This is undoubtedly the finest restored 540K that Christie's has had the pleasure of offering and it is the first time for many, many years that a 540 Sport Cabriolet A has been available at auction. This hugely desirable body style is also one of just twelve known to exist.

  • USAUSA
  • 2001-08-19
Hammer price
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1997 MERCEDES-BENZ CLK-GTR WORKS SPORTS RACING CAR

The ex-Alessandro Nannini/Marcel Tiemann FIA GT1 Endurance Racing Factory Team Car 1997 MERCEDES-BENZ CLK-GTR WORKS SPORTS RACING CAR Chassis No. 0006 Mercedes racing silver with blue mirrors and Warsteiner D2 livery, black cockpit Engine:V12, dohc, four valves per cylinder, electronic fuel injection, 5,987cc, 600bhp (see text) at 7,000rpm, 770lb-ft at 3700rpm (with FIA air restrictors); Chassis: carbon-fiber monococque with integrated steel roll cage, carbon-fiber composite body; Gearbox: straight toothed six-speed manual sequential shift; Suspension: front and rear, double wishbone with adjustable shock absorbers, adjustable stabilizers and spring retainers, pull-rod actuated springs; Brakes: six-plunger aluminum fixed calipers, internally ventilated discs with carbon-fiber linings. Rack-and-pinion power steering. Left hand drive. Late in 1996 the German DTM (Deutches Touring Meisterschaft) series, then the most technically advanced and expensive racing series in the world, broke down after most of its manufacturer/entrants withdrew. Mercedes-Benz was faced with a decision: do we apply the budget allocated to the DTM to more 4-color advertisements for our production cars or risk it on a crash program to build a competitive racer for the increasingly attractive, but Porsche/BMW-dominated, FIA GT series? For most manufacturers that decision would be, in MBA-speak, a 'no brainer'. Advertising moves units and builds quarterly revenue and profit; racing only builds an image, takes years to pay off and doesn't help our performance bonuses or stock options' values. So Mercedes-Benz committed its massive DTM budget to the CLK-GTR. Mercedes chose its performance partner AMG to build the new car. AMG was formed in 1967 by Hans Werner Aufrecht and Erhard Melcher in Grossaspach (thus A-M-G) as a tuner of Mercedes-Benz cars perhaps still best known for the 'Hammer' built in 1988, the year AMG became M-B's sedan racing team. A formal cooperation agreement with M-B followed in 1990 making AMG the specialist branch of Merecedes, building the C36, E50, C43 and E55 with production of 5,000 examples in 1999, the year AMG became a subsidiary of DaimlerChrysler AG. The first FIA GT race was at Hockenheim in April 1997. That gave AMG only a few months to conceive, design, build, test and prepare a three-car team with one spare. Intended to promote the soon-to-be-launched CLK coupe and convertible, AMG grabbed as much DTM technology as it could for the rules-constrained FIA GT series, looked at BMW's success with the V12-powered McLaren F1 GTR and chose the S-class 600-series 6-liter V12 engines. AMG laid out a conventional mid-engine rear-drive chassis with ground effects bodywork that slightly resembled the CLK and began bagging, vacuuming and cooking carbon fiber in a well-organized frenzy. The AMG Mercedes-Benz team was ready for Hockenheim on April 13, 1997, but barely, having completed the cars only the day before practice, 128 days after the go ahead. Drivers were 1995 DTM champion Bernd Schneider, 1994 DTM Champion Klaus Ludwig, Alexander Wurz, Alessandro Nannini and Marcel Tiemann, later joined at times by Roberto Moreno, Bernd Maylaender, Ralf Schumacher, Aguri Suzuki and Greg Moore. They lined up against factory teams from Porsche, BMW and Panoz, with strong private Porsche and BMW entries. The CLK-GTR's competition had seasons of experience and equally deep pockets. High stakes in the Drivers' and Teams' Championships dictated team tactics be employed from the beginning of the season, especially as AMG Mercedes would be starting much lower on the FIA GT learning curve, always sure to cause early-season dnfs. The team's lead drivers, DTM veterans Schneider, Ludwig and Nannini, started on an even footing but points accumulated would determine who would be favored if a chance for the Drivers' Championship developed. The AMG Mercedes team's accomplishment fully justified Mercedes-Benz's decision to fund the FIA GT effort. The cars showed their speed early, with Schneider taking pole at the season opening Hockenheim race. AMG Mercedes quickly overcame the expected early season teething discomfort and the CLK-GTRs bit soundly into the race results, Schneider/Wurz barely losing the second round at Silverstone when torrential rains red-flagged the 4-hour race in 3 hours 20 minutes, costing Schneider the lap on which he passed the Kox/Ravaglia McLaren-BMW F1 GTR for the lead! Nannini then qualified 2nd in Helsinki but finished 16th after a gearbox change during the race while Schneider/Wurz recovered from a crash with a McLaren to regain 8th at the checker. At this point in the season, JJ Lehto and Steve Soper led the best placed AMG Mercedes drivers in the Drivers' Championship by 18 points while Team BMW led AMG Mercedes by 28 points, a huge deficit for a first year car and team. At the Nürburgring on June 29 the CLK-GTR really showed its form as Bernd Schneider swept pole, fastest race lap and the race win, barely a minute ahead of teammates Nannini and Tiemann. During the race, after an accident slowed the third CLK-GTR, AMG Mercedes moved Klaus Ludwig into Schneider's car, giving him equal race points to Schneider and keeping all three AMG team leaders in contention for the Drivers' Championship. At Spa-Francorchamps on July 20 the Ardennes circuit's characteristic intermittent rain interrupted the CLK-GTR's progress after Nannini, who qualified 2nd to JJ Lehto's factory McLaren F1 GTR, led early before retiring and Schneider was unable to catch Lehto's McLaren. The Ludwig/Ralf Schumacher CLK-GTR finished 5th, 2 laps down. At Zeltweg in Austria a week later Ludwig returned the driver-swap favor, giving Schneider a turn in his leading, and eventually winning, CLK-GTR. The consistent and quick Nannini/Tiemann pairing finished a close 2nd even without second gear in the race's closing stages, building up their Drivers' Championship points without team tactics. Another driver-sharing deal at Suzuka on August 24 put Schneider into the winning Nannini/Tiemann car during the race. The Ludwig/Maylaender CLK-GTR took the pole. Back in Great Britain on September 14 Schneider again swept pole, fastest lap and the race win partnered by Wurz, a result necessitated by the officials' decision to stop mid-race car swapping, less than a minute ahead of the other front row qualifier, the Nannini/Tiemann CLK-GTR. AMG Mercedes domination was challenged by JJ Lehto's win in the McLaren 1 minute 24 seconds ahead of Nannini/Tiemann's CLK-GTR at Mugello on September 28, even though the three CLK-GTRs swept the top three qualifying positions. Schneider/Wurz were caught up in an incident involving other cars; Ludwig/Maylaender finished 9th after mechanical problems. Three weeks later the FIA GT series made its way to the US for the final two races. At Sebring, Nannini crashed, but Schneider and Ludwig, now sharing the #11 Mercedes, overcame rain to win the race. This result put the Drivers' Championship on the line among Schneider and McLaren drivers JJ Lehto and Steve Soper at the season finale at Laguna Seca on October 26. The race win by Schneider/Ludwig's CLK-GTR capped the season, taking both the Drivers' and Teams' Championships for the AMG Mercedes team. Ludwig finished fourth in the Drivers' Classification with the consistent, and frequently brilliant, Nannini and Tiemann in a tie for 5th. In retrospect, 1997 was a vintage year in GT racing. The caliber of the cars (Mercedes CLK-GTR, Porsche 911 GT1, McLaren F1 GTR and Panoz), teams (AMG, Porsche, BMW, Gulf-Davidoff, Konrad, Roock, Schnitzer, Dams and David Price), drivers and venues (on three Continents) is unmatched in recent history. Three major manufacturers faced off with factory teams, and no secrets were made of their involvement, intentions or the extent of the resources that would be deployed in their campaigns to win. Yet the cars are, because of the FIA GT rules applied this season, largely the result of artful construction with minimal exotic technology. The season, often with only 7 days between races, and 4-hour races required strong, simple and reliable cars. The many cars which recovered from racing accidents to achieve strong results demonstrates that the designers and constructors succeeded in achieving these goals. Through it all, one car on the AMG Mercedes team showed its combination of performance and reliability with consistent speed and finishes: the Nannini/Tiemann #10. Its record speaks for itself. Presented here, 0006 is in perfect race-ready condition in its 'Silver Arrow' color scheme with Warsteiner-D2 livery and blue door mirrors. It is one of only four such V12-powered CLK-GTRs built. At 2400 pounds, its 680bhp (officially, FIA regulations stipulated only 600bhp!) V12 gives 3.5 pounds/horsepower. It should be noted that during the entire 1997 season not one CLK-GTR failed to finish a race because of engine problems. Sources estimate these factory team cars cost nearly $3 million each to build (not including amortization of development costs). The 21 'street' CLK-GTRs which had to be built to homologate the four race cars sold for a factory price of DM3.2 million each, a price capped by FIA GT regulations and bearing no relation at all to their true cost. Offered here today at a small fraction of its original cost, the potential saving on this factory team CLK-GTR could buy a barn full of S-class Mercedes. The car is offered complete with a factory set of wheels, spare front hose and rear body section; these items can be collected from the vendor in England. Mercedes-Benz factory prepared Works cars are rarely ever available and now that AMG is a wholly-owned subsidiary of DaimlerChrysler, it can be expected that the remaining CLK-GTRs, in long-standing tradition, will be retained by the factory. This is one of just four factory-built V12 CLK-GTRs and the first ever to be publicly offered for sale at auction. It is a proven winning modern 'Silver Arrow'.

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-08-20
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1933 Delage D8 S cabriolet Pourtout

1933 Delage D8 S cabriolet Pourtout Carte grise française Châssis n° 38237 Moteur n° 124 - Provenant de la collection Albert Prost - Modèle exceptionnellement prestigieux et rare - Ligne d'une sublime élégance - Provenance de qualité - Superbe état de présentation "Delage, la belle voiture française" : ce slogan résume une partie de la personnalité de la marque Delage. L'autre aspect est plus sportif et se retrouve dans les publicités clamant par exemple "Seules les performances prouvent la qualité". Ce double visage marque l'histoire de Delage, sous-tendue par une recherche de qualité. Ainsi, on se rappelle des performances exceptionnelles de la Delage 1500 Grand Prix, dont le moteur sophistiqué lui a permis de remporter le Championnat du Monde 1927. Elle a son équivalent dans le domaine du luxe et du prestige, avec la D8 présentée au Salon de Paris 1929. Sur un châssis que les carrossiers vont s'approprier pour produire parmi les plus belles réalisations de cette époque, la D8 est équipée d'un huit-cylindres en ligne 4 litres à soupapes en tête. La D8 remporte les concours d'élégance, mais se distingue aussi par quelques belles performances comme une boucle de 7 000 km en huit jours entre les capitales européennes, entre les mains de Robert Sénéchal, et plusieurs records établis à Montlhéry, en 1931-1933. Même les Anglais s'entichent de cette belle française, le très sérieux Oxford Times affirmant : "La Delage D8 ne pourrait être plus justement décrite que par le titre de "Rolls-Royce des voitures françaises", car sa mécanique, son confort, sa finition sont insurpassables." La gamme 1933 s'enrichit de la D8 S, version un peu plus puissante et qui reste à ce jour la Delage de tourisme la plus emblématique jamais produite. Le nombre d'exemplaires fabriqués s'élèverait à 145 unités. On dit parfois que la qualité d'une œuvre s'estime aussi à sa provenance et à ceux qui l'ont possédée. Dans le cas de la Delage que nous présentons, elle a appartenu à un des collectionneurs de Delage les plus réputés, André Surmain. Celui-ci (chef étoilé, connu aussi comme créateur du restaurant Le Lutèce, à New York, en 1961) faisait partie des collectionneurs "pionniers" et a eu notamment entre les mains le très beau roadster D8 S à ailes profilées du Paris-Saint-Raphaël 1932. Il a fait l'acquisition de la présente automobile le 19 août 1966, auprès de Dax Auto, concessionnaire Peugeot de Dax. La voiture devait être depuis un certain temps en Gironde car la copie d'une ancienne carte grise nous apprend qu'elle était auparavant immatriculée 9947 GA 7, ce qui correspond à ce même département dans le système d'immatriculation en vigueur jusqu'en 1950. Quoiqu'il en soit, lorsqu'André Surmain achète cette Delage en 1966, elle est immatriculée 385 DS 40, numéro qui apparaît sur une ancienne photo d'elle prise sur les Champs Élysées, devant l'Arc de Triomphe. C'est le 26 juin 1978 que Surmain cède cette belle Delage à Albert Prost. La mascotte de "Faucon" Lalique, que l'on distingue sur certaines photos anciennes, n'a probablement pas fait partie de la transaction car elle n'apparaît plus sur la voiture, par la suite. Dans les années 1960/1970, la voiture a bénéficié de travaux mécaniques, avec dépose et réfection du moteur et de la boîte de vitesses, comme en témoignent plusieurs photos jointes au dossier, et le radiateur a été refait chez Chausson en 1985. Albert Prost a utilisé cette voiture à l'époque et il a notamment remporté, dans les années 1970, le concours d'élégance de Mougins organisé dans le cadre du second rassemblement international Delage. Une photo le montre en compagnie de son épouse, au côté de cette belle voiture, devant le Relais à Mougins, restaurant qui avait été ouvert lui aussi par André Surmain. Aujourd'hui, cette Delage D8 est dans un remarquable état de présentation et affiche une patine très subtile. La forme sublime de la carrosserie réalisée par Pourtout descend élégamment vers l'arrière pour éviter que la capote repliée ne forme un volume trop imposant, laissant le coffre terminer l'arrière avec légèreté. La calandre à volets thermostatiques, encadrée par deux gros phares Marchal, impose sa présence alors que la teinte jaune à ailes noires souligne la pureté du dessin. Le pare-brise bas, repliable et les ailes élancées apportent un séduisant cachet sportif à l'ensemble. A l'intérieur, la sellerie en cuir noir est à peine usée, et le compteur kilométrique affiche 21 240 km. Cette voiture est un merveilleux témoin de l'état d'esprit de la fin des "années folles", où un châssis de plus de 4 m de long pouvait se contenter d'accueillir deux personnes. Elle est accompagnée de la clé permettant de démonter les jantes Rudge. Il est extrêmement rare qu'une voiture de cette qualité soit proposée sur le marché. Modèle le plus prestigieux de Delage, présentant une ligne à couper le souffle, affichant une provenance impeccable et seulement deux propriétaires en 48 ans, c'est une occasion inestimable qui saura séduire les collectionneurs les plus avisés. Photos d'archives: Collection famille Prost Merci de noter que ce véhicule est vendu sans contrôle technique. French title Chassis n° 38237 Engine n° 124 - From the Albert Prost collection - Exceptionally rare and prestigious model - Sublime, elegant styling - Excellent provenance - Presented in superb condition "Delage, la belle voiture française" : this slogan described one side of the marque's personality. The other side was more sporting, publicized in adverts that claimed " Only the performance proves the quality ". This double focus marked the history of Delage, underpinned by high quality research. Thus, we recall the exceptional performances of the Delage 1500 Grand Prix with its sophisticated engine that won the 1927 World Championship. This car had its equivalent in the luxury sector, in the D8 presented in 1929 at the Paris Motor Show. On a chassis seized upon by coachbuilders who used it to build some of the finest and most beautiful cars of the day, the D8 was equipped with a 4-litre in-line engine featuring 8 cylinders and overhead valves. The D8 not only won concours d'élégances but also distinguished itself with some outstanding performances including a 7,000 km round trip between European capitals in eight days, driven by Robert Sénéchal, and several records at Montlhéry between 1931 and 1933. The English also took a shine to this beautiful French car, with the highbrow Oxford Times declaring " The Delage D8 could not be more aptly described than as the " Rolls-Royce of French cars " as its engineering, comfort and finishing are second to none. " The 1933 range was expanded to include the D8 S, a slightly more powerful version that remains today the most iconic Delage tourer produced. The number of examples built amounted to 145. It can be said that the quality of a work of art also relates to provenance and ownership. This particular Delage belonged to one of the most distinguished Delage collectors, André Surmain. Award-winning chef known for his restaurant Le Lutèce that opened in New York in 1961, Surmain was one of the " pioneer " collectors who owned the superb 1932 Paris-Saint-Raphaël D8 S roadster with streamlined wings. He acquired the automobile on offer on 19 August 1966, from Dax Auto, the Peugeot dealer from Dax. The car must have spent some time in Gironde as a copy of the old French title shows that it had been registered 9947 GA 7, corresponding to the registration for this department until 1950. However, when Surmain bought the car in 1966, it was registered 385 DS 40, the number showing on an old photo taken in front of the Arc de Triomphe on the Champs Élysées. Surmain sold this wonderful Delage to Albert Prost on 26 June 1978. The Lalique " Falcon " mascot that can be seen in certain old photographs was probably not part of this transaction as it was subsequently not seen on the car. During the 1960s and 1970s, mechanical work was carried out, including an engine and gearbox re-build, as documented in several photos in the file, and the radiator was renewed by Chausson in 1985. Albert Prost drove this car during this period and during the 1970s he won the Mougins concours d'élégance, at the second international Delage meeting. A photo shows him with his wife, standing next to the car, in front of Le Relais in Mougins, another restaurant opened by André Surmain. The Delage D8 is presented today in remarkably well-preserved condition, displaying the faintest of patinas. The sublime shape of the body built by Pourtout slopes elegantly down at the back so that the hood, when folded down, isn't too dominant, allowing the boot to complete the rear styling with a light touch. The radiator with thermostatic radiator shutters, framed by two large Marchal lights is imposing and the yellow livery with black wings accentuates its pure design. The low, fold-down windscreen and graceful wings add an attractive sporting touch. Inside, the black leather upholstery shows little sign of wear and the odometer records 21,240 km. This car is a wonderful testimony to the spirit of the " Roaring Twenties " when a chassis of over 4m could happily be used to accommodate two people. The car comes with a key for the Rudge wheels. It is extremely rare for a car of this quality to appear on the market. The most prestigious model offered by Delage that has breathtaking styling, an impeccable provenance and just two owners in 48 years - here is a priceless opportunity that will attract the most discerning collectors. Archives pictures : Prost Family collection Please note that this car will be sold without technical inspection. Estimation 1 000 000 - 1 200 000 € Sold for 949,720 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-07
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Believed to be the Martini/Gulf Racing 917LH that placed second overrall at the 1970 Le Mans

Believed to be the Martini/Gulf Racing 917LH that placed second overrall at the 1970 Le Mans THE EX-WORKS 1970 PORSCHE 917LH Chassis No. LH-044 Engine No. 015 Violet and light green with maroon cloth interior Engine: Flat 12-cylinder, dual overhead camshafts, Bosch mechanical fuel injection, 4999cc, 630bhp at 8,400rpm, 434lb-ft at 6,500rpm; Gearbox: 5-speed Porsche transaxle; Suspension: front, independent by unequal control arms with coil springs over tubular shocks, rear, independent by unequal control arms and radius rods with coil springs over tubular shocks; Brakes: four wheel disc. Right hand drive. Porsche built the 917 with one underlying goal: to win its first overall victory in the 24 Heures du Mans. A 1968 change in the FIA Group 4 sports car regulations to a 5 litre limit (effectively closing the door on American V8s) prompted Porsche's decision. Under the leadership of Ferdinand Piech and Design Director Hans Mezger, twenty-five 917s were conceived, designed and built in only ten months to meet the FIA production minimum. Those first 25 examples incorporated remarkable technology: Porsche's first 12-cylinder engine, an aluminum tube space frame chassis, myriad components from titanium, magnesium and exotic alloys, even suspension springs made from titanium wire. Over the next three years the Porsche 917 was to become an enduring symbol of modern road racing technology, an effect far greater than would be expected from only the 37 examples built. Porsche raced the 917 itself in its first season, 1969, but for 1970 and 1971 contracted with private teams: J.W. Automotive Engineering (led by John Wyer, who had so successfully run the Ford GT40 racing program), Porsche-Salzburg and the Martini International Racing Team of Hans-Dieter Dechent. The race cars were owned by Porsche who supplied them to these teams prepared specifically for each race. From the beginning, Porsche went to great lengths to develop cars with low aerodynamic drag for the Mulsanne Straight, which at that time was as yet unmarred by chicanes. They succeeded admirably, but on the track the slippery shape proved to be seriously unstable. At a late '69 test session which included the first prototype Can-Am 917, they realized the Can-Am car's chunky high downforce design solved the 917's stability problems and thenceforth ran two versions of the 917, the 917KH (kurzheck, or short tail) and the 917LH (langheck). The low drag LH was tried at various times on the fastest circuits where Porsche believed its higher top speed would offset lower cornering speeds but was raced only at Le Mans. Although the first 25 Porsche 917's were built with add-on extended tails, by 1970 Porsche used distinct LH cars. Only six 917LHs, of which this is one, were built, specifically to achieve Porsche's ultimate goal, overall victory in the 24 Heures du Mans. Martini Racing was supplied with one 917LH for the 1970 Le Mans classic, Martini's first race with the 917, identified in race records as chassis 043. The Martini 917 began a tradition of exotic livery for selected Porsche team cars as Porsche's then-new styling studio chief, Tony Lapine, gave the Martini 917 elaborate whorls and swoops of light green on a violet background. It earned the instant nickname The Hippie Car from the team and media. Martini drivers Gerard Larousse and Willi Kauhsen (both later to field their own successful racing teams) performed perfectly, surviving electrical problems caused by the driving rain to finish second to Porsche's first overall Le Mans winner, Hans Hermann and Dickie Atwood in the Porsche-Salzburg 917KH. The Martini 917LH won the Index of Thermal Efficiency, averaging an impressive 9.1 miles per gallon against the winner's 7.4mpg, attesting to the aerodynamic efficiency of the langheck body. Le Mans 1970 was an unqualified success for Porsche: 24 of 50 starters were Porsches as were five of the seven classified finishers. In 1971, the 917LH assigned to J.W.'s Gulf-Porsche team for Pedro Rodriguez and Jackie Oliver was identified in race records as the same chassis number as 1970's Martini car, 043. In Porsche's ongoing search for better balance between aerodynamic drag and stability, the 1971 LHs had revised bodywork owing much to the French SARD design group headed by Charles Deutsch (famous for his Deutsch-Bonnet race cars and many Index of Performance trophies at Le Mans) with a shorter nose, semi-enclosed rear wheels and a full-width rear wing between the fins. Oliver set the pace in the April test session, with a lap of 3ft 13.6in. In the race, Oliver and the brilliant Rodriguez led for the first eleven hours, Oliver posting the fastest race lap at 3ft 18.4in (151.854mph), before losing 22 minutes in the twelfth hour while replacing the rear wheel bearings and retiring an hour later when an oil cooler line burst. The third Gulf-Porsche, a 917KH, finished second to the winning Martini 917KH, driven by Helmut Marko and Gijs van Lennep, which set a Le Mans 24 hour distance record that still stands, 5335km; 33 of 49 starters were Porsches, as were 10 of the 13 classified finishers. Porsche had accomplished not only its goal of overall victory, it had established overall dominance, in less than three years from the 917's conception. 1971 was the last year for the 5 litre sports car regulations in international racing. However the Porsche 917's reputation continued to grow with the Can-Am version, particularly Roger Penske's turbocharged 917/30 driven by Mark Donohue and George Follmer which obliterated its competition in 1972 and 1973, and in the European Interseric. After the 1971 season the Martini hippie car - Oliver/Rodriguez 917LH dropped from view; its probable history was re-established only in the last few months. It came about like this. In 1975 Vasek Polak, with his unique connections, bought the car offered here from the factory, the only complete 917LH ever sold by Porsche. It was sold to Polak as a new car built up from a development chassis that after little use had been wrecked during testing for Le Mans in 1970 and never raced. During its 23 years as part of the Polak collection it was largely unused apart from infrequent display appearances. When the present owner purchased it, the Polak Foundation undertook a complete rebuild under the supervision of Carl Thompson, Polak's long-time Director of Racing, to ready the car for historic racing. To do the work Thompson brought from the Porsche factory a group of technicians and mechanics who had worked on the 917s when they were built and raced, with firsthand contemporary knowledge of all the cars and their construction details. When these technicians stripped the car they quickly brought to Thompson's attention that it did not fit the stated description of the chassis' history. First, it was clear that the aluminum tube frame chassis had never been wrecked or even damaged, in fact, it was exactly the same as they had built it, almost three decades before. Second, it showed clear and extensive evidence of the working stress that could only be the result of being raced, long and hard. It was apparent the car in Redondo Beach was not the reportedly unraced 917LH that was wrecked at the Le Mans test session that had been identified as chassis 044. The Porsche factory chassis records, while sometimes confusing, were clear in one respect: 040 and 041 had been heavily damaged in racing accidents and were recorded by the factory as being scrapped and 044 had absolutely no racing history. In fact, 044 had no history at all except for the representation made by Porsche to Polak when sold that it had been damaged (seriously enough that it had never subsequently been raced) in that testing accident before Le Mans. That left only three 917LH chassis that had racing history...and two of them still belonged to Porsche (042, the '70 Elford/Ahrens cars in the Porsche Museum, and 045, the '71 Siffert/Bell car on loan to the Le Mans Museum). There is no reference in the factory records to the Martini-Gulf/Porsche 917LH raced as 043 ever having been wrecked or damaged, perfectly fitting the physical evidence of the chassis' condition. Also worth considering is an incident documented by Karl Ludvigsen in his exhaustive history, Porsche, Excellence was Expected. In 1970 Kurt Ahrens crashed a 917LH heavily at VW's test track just two days before it had to leave Stuttgart for the Le Mans test weekend. Miraculously, it was repaired and at Le Mans in time for the test session. Or was its chassis number substituted to an undamaged 917LH? It is a well known fact that many race teams frequently swapped chassis plates to satisy the needs of customs documentation and race entry forms. This paperwork had to be submitted well in advance of the races. Often, the designated cars had crashed or were not prepared in time for the race, necessitating the substitution of another works car now possessing a chassis plate that matched the submitted documents. Could it be that 044 is the famous Martini racing hippie car of 1970 and the Rodriguez/Oliver Gulf-Porsche of 1971? Presented in the famous psychedelic violet and light green 1970 Le Mans livery and correct 1970-style body, this unique 917LH as offered is race ready with fresh 5.0 litre engine producing 630hp and the versatile 5-speed all sychromesh Porsche transmission. The recent preparation was done under the supervision of Carl Thompson, Vasek Polak's Director of Racing, by the Porsche factory technicians who built and prepared the 917s during their racing careers and thus is both correct and to the highest, typically Porsche, standards. This is a singular opportunity to acquire the only Porsche 917 langheck in private hands, that raced in the only race where 917LHs competed. It is instantly recognizable in its 'hippie' livery. The 917LH comes with 5 complete gear sets of separate ratios, a spare set of wheels and mounted tires, a copy of a 917 owner's manual, 2 N.O.S. head light covers, 1 N.O.S. plexiglass rear window and 1 N.O.S. plexiglass side window (all N.O.S. items have the correct Porsche part numbers). Additional documentation for the true Porsche Racing enthusiast offered with this lot is a 1971 J.W. Automotive Engineering track diagram. It shows a lap driven by Derek Bell in the sister car, chassis no. 045LH, and details the gears used, maximum revs used and braking points. The track is Le Mans...the car may be yours. ESTIMATE ON REQUEST

  • USAUSA
  • 1998-08-16
Hammer price
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1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

215 bhp (DIN), 240 bhp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, coil-spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Offered from the Jim Hall Collection Originally delivered to renowned racing team sponsor George Tilp Desirable set of original Rudge knock-off wheels Two owners from new; single ownership since 1956 OWNED BY RACERS SINCE NEW Jim Hall’s tale of 300 SL ownership is a fascinating look back at one of the few remaining men who owned and knew these cars when they were new, and who experienced them first-hand as “drivers.” “My experience was that I always fascinated by it,” he recently told RM Sotheby’s. “It was probably one of the original cars that got me excited about how cars were made and the technology that was involved. It was impressive to me and was one of my inspirations as a young engineer, along with the D-Type Jaguar, so when I had an opportunity to get one, I jumped at it.” The car that he jumped at, chassis number 198.040.4500120, is a very early Gullwing, produced early in the 1954 model year, the first of 300 SL production. Completed on 10 December 1954, it was shipped on 20 December by special order to Max Hoffman’s showroom in New York City, finished in Light Blue Metallic (DB 353) with the standard light blue vinyl and blue plaid cloth interior. According to Jim Hall, the car’s original owner was George Tilp; Mr. Hall knows this authoritatively, having bought the car directly from Mr. Tilp in 1956, when it was only two years old. The Tilp name will be immediately familiar to any enthusiast of American sports car racing from the 1950s: second-generation proprietor of the United States’ foremost metal stamping business, Mr. Tilp had a passion for sports cars and actively sponsored many of the great young racers of this era in driving cars that he purchased. He was the first team owner to employ the renowned Phil Hill. Mr. Hall recounts that the 300 SL had been registered to Adam Stamping, one of the Tilp companies, and that it had reportedly been driven by the Tilp team in several events in 1955 and 1956, including at Elkhart Lake by the famed driver Paul O’Shea. Unfortunately, despite the best efforts of Mr. Hall and RM Sotheby’s Research & Editorial staff, this was unable to be definitively confirmed. If it had been raced, it was well-maintained, as Mr. Hall remembers it as being a solid car that had no evidence of accidents when he acquired it. Mr. Hall drove the car back to Texas, where he had it refinished in metallic candy apple red with a tan vinyl interior. It wears the very same finishes today. For reasons that anyone who has driven a Gullwing in a Texas summer will understand, he also had an air conditioning system professionally installed. Unlike many Gullwing A/C installations, which are clunky aftermarket boxes, the installation in the Hall car is smooth, unobtrusive, and looks right at home, with controls in a fabric-covered nacelle below the dash. The car is in what can only be described as evocative condition; its paint is heavily patinated, its tan interior carries its age, and both would be a shame to refinish. The period air conditioning is still installed, as are a pair of Heuer rally timers. Only the paint tag on the firewall is a replacement; all of the others are original and correct, including both the stampings and plates for the chassis and engine numbers, all of which are in their expected locations and appear never to have been removed from the car! The Gullwing still carries its four original Rudge knock-off wheels and the full-sized spare in the trunk alongside the jack and knock-off hammer. It is accompanied by a partial original tool roll, a wrench set, as well as a set of vintage Champion spark plugs, and charming items such as the road map that has been in the car since 1956. In preparation for auction, the car has been serviced and returned to running and driving order, but will benefit from further maintenance prior to extended driving use. The 300 SL Gullwing has always been a desirable automobile, and there are frequently several examples on the market and available for sale, often described as “once in a lifetime” occasions. The car offered here, however, can genuinely be called special, as it marks the nearest chance most modern buyers will have to doing exactly what Jim Hall did in 1956: buy a car from the man who knew it when it was new, and who knew those who raced them in anger. It is a wonderful 300 SL that speaks of a different time and carries it poignantly into the modern day. Chassis no. 198.040.4500120 Engine no. 198.980.4500134 Body no. 198.040.4500120

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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1970 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta U.S. Prototype by Scaglietti

352 bhp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension with unequal-length wishbones and coil springs over telescopic shock absorbers with anti-roll bars, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.48 in. Featured on the cover of the October 1970 issue of Road & Track magazine The prototype U.S.-specification Daytona Originally delivered to legendary Ferrari enthusiast Bill Harrah The first example delivered to Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors Recently completed full restoration to original Plexiglas-headlight specifications Undergoing Ferrari Classiche certification THE FERRARI 365 GTB/4 “DAYTONA” Ferrari first pulled the cover off the new 365 GTB/4 Berlinetta at the Paris Salon in 1968 to great acclaim. Equipped with an all-new 4.4-liter V-12 engine that was capable of producing 352 horsepower and 315 foot-pounds of torque at 7,500 rpm, the 365 GTB/4 was capable of a top speed of 174 mph, making it the fastest production car the world had ever seen. After its introduction, the car quickly gained the nickname “Daytona” from Ferrari’s incredible 1-2-3 finish at the 1967 24 Hours of Daytona the year before. In terms of styling, the Daytona was a drastic step forward from the 275 GTB/4. Gone were the voluptuous curves of the car’s Pininfarina design for Ferrari in the 1950s and 1960s. Leonardo Fioravanti’s design for the Daytona was much more angular and aggressive than the car it replaced, yet it still resonated with Ferrari’s existing customers and proved to be an instant hit. While Daytonas were becoming more frequently seen out and about in Europe toward the beginning of the 1970s, American enthusiasts were still waiting for their chance to own Ferrari’s next great V-12 grand tourer, and it wasn’t until the spring of 1970 that the Daytona would finally make its way to the new world. BILL HARRAH’S OWN DAYTONA Ferrari cognoscenti will be quick to note that chassis number 13361 is a very early chassis number in the overall scheme of U.S.-specification Daytona production. That is because the very car pictured here was the U.S.-specification prototype. As such, it was the second Daytona imported into the United States (following chassis number 13205). It was completed by the factory on April 20, 1970, finished in Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) over a Nero (VM 8500) leather interior. As such, it is also important to note that it was fitted with Plexiglas-covered headlamps and without the requisite emissions or safety equipment fitted to later Daytonas sold new in the U.S. While chassis number 13205 was delivered to Chinetti Motors on the East Coast, chassis 13361 would head further west to Bill Harrah’s West Coast distributorship, Modern Classic Motors in Reno, Nevada. Of course, as a major car collector himself, it was only natural that Harrah opted to keep the first Daytona that arrived at his dealership for himself. It is believed that Harrah used this Daytona as his personal car for a period of time. Not only did chassis number 13361 capture Harrah’s heart, but it also undoubtedly wowed enthusiasts all over the United States when it was featured on the cover of Road & Track magazine in October 1970. In the magazine, it is seen fitted with Harrah’s personal Nevada -2- license plate, and the magazine notes its Harrah ownership. After leaving Harrah’s ownership, the car was retrofitted with the later and more desirable flip-up headlamps, and it is believed that it then remained on the West Coast for its entire life. In the early 1990s, the car was purchased by Ferrari collector William H. Tilley, of Los Angeles, California. The car was occasionally used on the road by Tilley and was maintained by Fast Cars Ltd., of Redondo Beach. Following Tilley’s passing in November 2012, the car was sold the following year to its current owner, who opted to fully restore the car to its original, historic, as-delivered configuration. Most importantly, its later hidden headlamps were replaced with correct Plexiglas headlight coverings. Refinished in its original color combination of Rosso Chiaro over a Nero leather interior, the car is accompanied by a complete set of books and tools, as well as a full restoration file complete with receipts and photographs of the restoration process. Furthermore, it is a matching-numbers example and has been submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification. Simply put, chassis number 13361 is truly one of the most important and special Daytonas in existence, due to its status as the U.S.-specification prototype, provenance with renowned American tifosi Bill Harrah, and appearance on the cover of Road & Track. Boasting a recently completed concours-level restoration that brought the car back to its original standards, it is undoubtedly one of the very best Daytonas that money can buy—as impressive today as when it crossed the Nevada deserts and appeared on newsstands nationwide. Chassis no. 13361 Engine no. B362 Body no. 159 Gearbox no. 166

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1934 Packard Twelve Individual Custom Convertible Sedan by Dietrich

Series 1108. Body Style 4070. 160 bhp, 445.5 cu. in. modified L-head V-12 engine, three-speed selective synchromesh manual transmission, vacuum-assisted clutch, shaft drive with a hypoid rear axle, front and rear leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 147 in. Never before offered for public sale Best in Class winner at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Exquisitely restored by a marque specialist An exceptional example A competitor is said to have famously described Raymond Dietrich as “a man that the gods smiled upon.” Indeed, before striking out on his own in 1925, the redheaded young designer built an enviable résumé that included some of America’s most prestigious custom coachbuilders. He was an apprentice draftsman at Brewster, where he met Thomas Hibbard, with whom he would co-found LeBaron in New York City. Hibbard eventually went to Paris and decided to stay, while Dietrich was lured to Detroit by the Murray Body Corporation, through Edsel Ford’s influence. There, he took 50 percent ownership of a new firm, Dietrich Inc., which initially worked largely on Lincoln chassis, no doubt to the enthusiasm of the intellectual Mr. Ford. However, Dietrich’s lasting glory would come as the result of the custom bodies that he produced for several Packard agencies. One of these agencies took three custom show cars that he bodied on a nationwide tour in 1926. At tour’s end, Dietrich received a shocking 150 orders. This was a number that did not escape Packard President Alvan Macauley’s notice. Macauley ordered another 175 bodies, beginning a long association with Detroit and Packard, which resulted in hundreds of custom and semi-custom bodies being ordered for the cars of East Grand Boulevard. The most prestigious of these were the so-called Individual Customs, which were produced on Super Eight and Twelve chassis from 1932 to 1934. These cars were built largely to individual tastes, as true “factory customs” are. Their striking bodies were known for their lithe and sporty lines, which were created by the vee’d windshields, a beltline that curved away from the windshield, and an extraordinarily long hood line, and they were assembled on massive 147.5-inch wheelbase chassis. They were tremendously expensive, particularly in 12-cylinder form, and with a modified L-head V-12 that could displace 445.5 cubic centimeters and develop 160 brake horsepower, the Dietrich Packard had power to match its style. It was a masterpiece of form and function. VEHICLE NUMBER 1108-26 The Eleventh Series Twelve Convertible Sedan is one of the most famous, prestigious, and desirable of all Dietrich Individual Customs, especially for this model year, when it was the only open four-door body style offered by Dietrich. Examples of this style can be found in the prestigious Nethercutt Collection, whose Orello is world-famous, as well as in numerous esteemed private stables worldwide. Yet, with only between 10 and 12 known to have persisted, survivors are extraordinarily rare. The car offered here, vehicle number 1108-26, was owned by Felix Carpenter, of Florida and New Hampshire, until his passing in the early 1980s. In his ownership, it was recorded by its “theft-proof” firewall, number 184678, in Edward J. Blend’s The Magnificent Packard Twelve of Nineteen Thirty-Four. It is not known how long Mr. Carpenter owned the car, but it was likely a long-term acquisition. Eventually, it was acquired from Carpenter’s estate by Arthur Smith, of Connecticut, and after some three decades in Smith’s collection, it was purchased for the Andrews Collection. Steve Babinsky, whose respected Lebanon, New Jersey, facility would restore the Packard, recorded the numbers off the car when it was purchased; the Dietrich body number of 6626 is stamped on the windshield, and it matches the number that was found on the original body wood. He further noted that the car had been sold new by the famous Earle C. Anthony dealership in Los Angeles. “It had never been taken apart,” he states, “with the body never off the chassis, and the engine and chassis numbers are very close together, which indicates that both are original.” A new vehicle number plate was installed, with the empty delivery location and date typical of an Individual Custom. Much of the wood, including in the door sills, required replacement, but the shop was able to use all of the original sheet metal, which was expertly refinished in an extremely dark auburn. The fenders had never been off the car, and they still have their original welting around the edges. It was only missing the windows in the doors, but Mr. Babinsky was able to borrow the windows from another car and copy them exactly. The original top was good for patterns, as was the interior, both of which Mr. Babinsky and his team were able to reproduce to exacting original specifications, in light brown leather and tan canvas, respectively. The car has been tremendously successful in national competition. It was awarded Best in Class in the notorious and fiercely competitive American Classic Open class at the 2010 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it also received the Classic Car Club of America Trophy. In 2011, the car received an Amelia Award at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, and in 2012, it went on to become a CCCA Senior award winner, being awarded badge number 2981S. As this Packard is still exhaustively finished and thoroughly accurate in all of its details, with nearly perfect panel gaps, it presents as a concours-finished automobile in all regards, and it is set to continue making successful show appearances with a new owner. It is beautiful from virtually any angle. Chassis no. 902670 Engine no. 901752 Vehicle no. 1108-26

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1932 Packard Deluxe Eight Individual Custom Sport Phaeton by Dietrich

Series 904. 120 bhp, 385 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid front axle with leaf springs, live rear axle with leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanically actuated drum brakes. Wheelbase: 147 in. A genuine Dietrich Individual Custom Packard One of two known examples on the 904 Deluxe Eight chassis Formerly owned by Otis Chandler and the Lyon family Exceptional, meticulously maintained concours restoration A superior Full Classic for the connoisseur One of the strategies quickly employed by Packard to deal with the Great Depression was to consolidate as much as possible of its body construction and trimmings in its own facilities, filling the space that was becoming under-used as production dropped. One custom coachbuilding relationship that was preserved as long as possible, however, was that with Murray Corporation’s affiliate, Dietrich Inc. Raymond Dietrich’s reputation was beyond compare among stylists of the late 1920s and early 1930s, and his designs were important sources of fresh ideas and concepts for Packard’s own coachwork. That Dietrich had been forced out of his namesake firm by early 1932 was no matter, as his talent had manifested into the many custom and semi-custom bodies that continued to bear the Dietrich name and to grace Packards for decades to come. In particular, the Individual Custom by Dietrich bodies, which were tailored for the most expensive senior Packard chassis in 1932, 1933, and 1934, still bore the master’s touch in their subtle detail and handsome balance. They were hugely expensive—the most expensive Packards one could buy through a Packard dealer—but they were essentially custom coachbuilt cars, with each crafted in the colors and trim chosen by its original owner. In many ways, they were the last true “custom Dietrichs,” as opposed to later production Packard bodies that simply wore the Dietrich name and borrowed some of his styling cues from the earlier Individual Customs. The car offered here, chassis number 193614, is one of what historians believe to be only a dozen Dietrich Individual Custom Sport Phaetons built between 1932 and 1933, as the style was not offered on the 1934 Eleventh Series chassis. In addition to its superb proportions and delicate features, the outstanding feature of this particular design was a rear windshield with two beautiful arched wind wings, which can be affixed to the doors and swing in and out when the door is opened, via a hidden track. For storage, the wings can be easily detached from the doors and fold down with the whole windshield assembly. When stowed, the track is concealed underneath a sprung chrome latch, so the top of the door looks sharp and complete. This is just one example of the design talent employed by Dietrich Inc. Of the twelve Sport Phaetons built, only seven are known to remain, with two being built on the 1933 Deluxe Eight chassis, two on the 1932 Twin Six chassis, and three on the 1933 Twelve chassis. All of the survivors are held in long-term private collections and have only rarely emerged for sale over the past several decades. As the old line goes, this particular car has quite a tale to tell, if only one knew what it was. In the 1970s, it was purchased by the late, renowned enthusiast and publisher of the Los Angeles Times, Otis Chandler, from its home in a hangar at the Santa Monica airport. Apparently, the car had been put away in the hangar many years earlier after having been turned into a ditch by its owner. The damage was relatively light, limited to the driver’s side cowl, door, and windshield post, and it was certainly not to dissuade Mr. Chandler from restoring what he knew to be a rare treasure. Before restoration could be completed, Mr. Chandler moved away from his original collection of classics and into muscle cars, and the disassembled Packard was sold to Ralph Englestad, of the Imperial Palace. Mr. Englestad commissioned Scott Veazie to perform the restoration, which took place in earnest in the late 1980s and early 1990s. According to Mr. Veazie, his shop fully restored the car’s rolling chassis and braking system, repaired the bodywork and restored it to original condition, and applied the paint. Bob Mosier, still active as a well-known restorer in California, rebuilt the engine and transmission. The product of the restoration remains magnificent, with the Individual Custom body finished in Packard Blue and the car featuring dark blue leather upholstery, a tan cloth top, and light grey carpeting. As would be expected from a senior Packard of this era, it is replete with original accessories and options, including chrome wire wheels shod in wide whitewalls, dual side-mounted spares wrapped in polished metal enclosures, a trunk rack, and dual Pilot-Ray driving lights. The car’s chassis, engine, and vehicle numbers have all been verified as authentic by RM Auctions. When Mr. Englestad’s health necessitated the sale of the Imperial Palace’s vast car collection in 1998, the restored and concours-ready Packard joined the extraordinary collection of General William Lyon's in Southern California. It was maintained to the highest of standards by General Lyon’s curators during an 11-year period in the famous stable, which is a tradition that has been upheld by the current collector, a well-known and passionate enthusiast and Pebble Beach Concours prize winner in his own right. This outstanding Packard is more than just a spectacular restoration of an authentic car; it marks an opportunity to either add to a superb collection or join the ranks of the connoisseurs who have treasured the other remaining Individual Custom Sport Phaetons for decades. It is a moment that may not yet come again—it is as fleeting as a dark blue Packard sweeping by under the Santa Monica sunset on its way to parts unknown. Addendum Please note that the chassis number for this car was initially misread and should be listed as 193614. As such, this further confirms that its engine, number 193622, is the original unit. Chassis no. 193614 Engine no. 193622 Vehicle no. 904-52

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1988 Porsche 959 'Komfort'

450 bhp, 2,849 cc rear-mounted, air- and liquid-cooled, horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin two-stage turbochargers and intercooling, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel drive, independent double-wishbone front and rear suspension with electronically adjustable ride height and shock-absorber control, and four-wheel hydraulically ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 89.4 in. Recently serviced, with just 21,000 kilometers and three owners from new Incredibly well preserved and maintained in rare and desirable Graphite Grey The most technologically advanced car of its era PORSCHE’S TECHNOLOGICAL MARVEL Fifteen years into the 21st century, when a manufacturer builds a car capable of achieving speeds near the fabled 200-mph mark, people tend to take notice. In just over 100 years of automotive design and innovation, automakers are just beginning to crack this barrier, showcasing how far automotive technology has come in a relatively short amount of time. When Porsche released a car that could reach a top speed of 197 mph at the Frankfurt Auto Show in 1985, it goes without saying that the general public was left aghast at what they had witnessed. But while speed was at the forefront of most spectators’ minds, the real beauty of the 959 was in its details. The car was laden with technology the likes of which the automotive industry had never seen before. Unlike its competitor that would be released a few years later, the Ferrari F40, the 959 was a supercar built with an entirely different mindset. Looking past its incredible performance figures, it introduced a number of features that would become industry standards in the future. Adjustable suspension, an intelligent four-wheel-drive system, tire pressure sensors, and super-lightweight hollow-spoke magnesium wheels made it nothing short of a game changer. Even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on every single one as a result of the extraordinary costs of construction, research, and development. While the silhouette and interior might have resembled that of a 911 produced at the time, there was no doubt that this was an entirely different animal, one that proved that Porsche could continue to mold a classic shape into something that pushed the barriers of both automotive performance and technology. Just 283 examples were constructed, and they were all destined for Porsche’s favorite customers. However, most of these cars went to Europe, as they were not specified to be compliant with federal DOT and emissions standards in the United States. However, that didn’t stop a few well-heeled Americans from bringing a handful stateside under the newly created Show and Display Law of 1999. The law was championed by 959 owners Bill Gates and Paul Allen, and it’s clear why the 959 appealed to them, as the innovations encapsulated within the 959 were just as incredible as what was being developed at Microsoft at the time. While many 959s have made the United States their new home thanks to the Show and Display law, they are still an incredibly rare sight both on the road and in private collections. THIS 959 This particular 1988 959 Komfort model was finished in the rare shade of Graphite Grey metallic, with a Dark Grey leather interior with Silver inserts and Grey carpeting, and it featured the optional heated sports seats with electric height adjustment and seat inserts done in silver metallic. The car was originally delivered new to Italy, and its first owner was a Porsche executive who retained the car for personal use. Naturally, the 959 was only subject to the best possible service and care by authorized Porsche specialists who had the requisite experience and training to service Porsche’s most technologically advanced supercar. Under the stewardship of its second owner, an American Porsche collector, the 959 was properly imported into the United States, registered for use on the road, and fully serviced to further ensure its readiness for frequent use. While in the possession of its third and current owner, a Southern California-based collector, this 959 received another service, to the tune of $12,500, which was performed by GMG, Porsche specialists based in Santa Ana, California. The purpose of this work was to further dial-in the car both mechanically and cosmetically for road use, and as a result, no stone was left unturned in the pursuit of making this one of the finest 959s in the country. Its odometer shows just 21,000 kilometers from new, and the car is certainly ready to return to the open road, as Porsche would have intended. Additionally, it is accompanied by all of its original books, tools, and keys, as well as a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. The 959 is quickly approaching its 30th anniversary of its unveiling, and it still remains just as important to the automotive industry as the day it was first shown to the public. Whereas the F40 was a race car that could be driven on the road, the 959 was a road car that would exceed even the most capable driver’s expectations on the track. Graced with all-wheel drive and all the amenities one would expect of a car with a $300,000 price tag when new, the 959 was not only the world’s fastest production car, it was also versatile enough to be used as a daily driver. The wonderfully maintained example presented here needs nothing and would be the centerpiece of any Porsche enthusiast’s collection, not only for its place in the history of the marque but also for its all-around usability. As it has been lovingly cared for by enthusiasts since day one, its condition is truly striking in every regard, and it goes without saying that an opportunity to purchase such an incredible automobile is not a daily occurrence. Perhaps Porsche’s motto sums up the car best: when it comes to the 959, there is indeed no substitute. Addendum This title is in transit. Chassis no. WP0ZZZ95ZHS900149

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1967 Toyota 2000GT

150 bhp, 2,000 cc Yamaha aluminum DOHC hemi-head inline six-cylinder engine, triple Solex twin-choke side-draft carburetors, five-speed fully synchromesh manual transmission with overdrive, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel power-assisted Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 91.7 in. Beautifully restored to original specifications One of just two 2000GTs delivered new to Mozambique “Toyota’s E-Type,” the greatest Japanese car of all time The mid-1960s was a great time to be in the market for a two-seater sports coupe. There were a number of fantastic cars available for purchase at either end of the market. From the small and affordable MGB GT Hatchback to Ford’s new Mustang to the incredible Ferrari 275 GTB, America, Germany, Italy, and Great Britain all had multiple models at different price points to enter into the fray. At the 1965 Tokyo Motor Show, Japan introduced its first entry into this heated competition, the 2000GT. This vehicle was originally convened by Yamaha, who was known at that time for producing motorcycles, and then it was marketed to Nissan as a world-beating sports car, but they decided not to take on the project. Yamaha pitched the car next to Toyota, which immediately saw the sports car as an opportunity to shed its reputation of producing rather conservatively designed automobiles. Many thought this to be a costly gamble for the company, but Toyota believed that the potential benefits would outweigh the costs, as it would allow the firm to compete with much more established and renowned companies. The 2000GT was powered by an inline six-cylinder engine that was based on the one found in the Toyota Crown but was adopted by Yamaha with new double overhead camshafts. It could produce 150 horsepower, to move 2,400 pounds of car, which, along with its 49/51 weight distribution, resulted in an automobile that was light on its feet and handled like a dream. James Crowe, who tested the car for Road & Track magazine, praised it as being “highly refined in handling and driving, and one of the most exciting cars we have ever driven…an impressive car in which to sit or ride, or simply admire.” In an article written by a Toyota designer in the fall 1967 issue of Automobile Quarterly, it is evident that much thought was given to the overall design language of the 2000GT. Many believed that the most striking aspect of the car was its exterior design. The long bonnet and short rear deck echoed Jaguar’s E-Type Coupe, yet it was distinctively Japanese at the same time. As for the interior design, the Toyota designer believed that the interior should be as much about comfort as it was about fashion. “As a Grand Touring car, it should have the equipment and layout to respond to a high degree of driving skill. Unlike the usual concept of a sports car, which presupposes a certain amount of discomfort and austerity, it should possess an air of comfort and affluence. It should be the kind of car in which its owner can enjoy a leisurely drive in town or a fast zip through the countryside.” By the time production had come to an end in 1970, only 351 examples had left the factory, far fewer than its main competitors. The 2000GT was priced at over $7,000 in 1967 and was considered by many to be an expensive proposition for a car they had never heard of. This was $1,000 more expensive than both the Jaguar E-Type and the Porsche 911 and over $2,500 more expensive than a Chevrolet Corvette, the car’s main competitors. For many buyers, especially in the United States, it was hard to justify spending that much money on a sports car that had an unproven reputation. Even though the majority of right-hand-drive 2000GTs stayed in their home market of Japan, the Solar Red 1967 example offered here, chassis MF10-10128, is one of just two sold new to Mozambique. It was acquired and subsequently exported from Mozambique by Roger Holstead, a South African sports car enthusiast, in the late 1970s. Holstead owned three 2000GTs in total, including the other Mozambican 2000GT. Holstead kept this particular car until 1986, when it was sold to 2000GT specialists Peter Starr and Robert Tkacik, of Maine Line Exotics in Biddleford, Maine. That same year, the car was purchased by Javier Quiros, who was the Toyota importer for Costa Rica, the fourth oldest Toyota distributorship worldwide. Quiros had the car shipped immediately to his native Costa Rica, where he frequently drove the car on spirited drives throughout the country on the weekends and on vintage rallies. Starting in September 2013, this 2000GT was painstakingly fully restored to its original specifications by Restauraciones Clásicas, Costa Rica’s premier restoration facility, under the stewardship of its current owners and with assistance from Quiros. Originality was given paramount importance, and Quiros had unparalleled access to Toyota in order to restore his car to precise factory standards, as he had been Akio Toyota’s roommate and close friend while both of them were earning MBAs at Babson College in Wellesley, Massachusetts! Through Toyota, he was introduced to the late Hiromu Naruse, who was both the chief engineer and test driver for Toyota and played an integral part in developing not only the 2000GT but also the Toyota 7, Celica, and Supra and the Lexus LFA. From consulting with Naruse, Quiros was able to ascertain even the most minute details in order to restore this 2000GT as accurately as possible. Both the body and engine were removed from the chassis so they could be completely restored and brought back to as-new condition. The 2000GT then received a repaint in its original shade of Solar Red, as confirmed to be its correct and original color by Starr and Tkacik. After over 4,000 man-hours of labor, the restoration was completed in late May 2014, and the results simply speak for themselves. Following the completion of its restoration in June 2014, the car and its restoration were featured in a handful of publications, including one published by Toyota. There is no question that the 2000GT holds a very important place in automotive history. Although it didn’t see instant success when new, it was clear that this Toyota made a huge impact far away from its home country and it put the established European and North American automotive manufacturers on notice. Following a complete and expensive restoration to original specifications, this 2000GT is in spectacular condition, and considering its fascinating history, this example would surely be a great conversation starter wherever it travels. Addendum This title is in transit. Chassis no. MF10-10128 Engine no. 10189

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta

300 hp, 3,286 cc DOHC V12 engine, six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension by coil springs and wishbones, four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5" - Superb, low mileage example with known history - First four-cam, dry-sump V12 engine fitted to a Ferrari street car - Designed by Pininfarina, built by Scaglietti - 0-60 in 5.9 seconds; ¼ mile in 14.5 seconds at 100 mph; top speed 165 mph Perhaps the most handsome street-going Ferrari ever built, the Ferrari 275 GTB coupe maintained an iconic family silhouette through its four-year production. But Enzo rang in changes thick and fast throughout the cycle, and the final 275 GTB/4 – for four cams – is the one to find. With 0-60 in 5.9 seconds, a 14.5-second quarter mile at 100 mph and top speed of 165 mph, performance is mind-boggling even by today’s standards. Designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti, it was clear that fresh thinking was evident at the 275 GTB’s October 1964 introduction. Low and menacing, the new coupe was accompanied by a rather bland GTS Spyder, as if mother had forced it to take its sister to the dance. But both cars had independent suspension all round, with a de Dion rear axle, for the first time. The five-speed transmission had been shifted to the rear axle as well, resulting in 50-50 weight distribution. Although designed as a street car, the 275 GTB evoked the 250 GTO racing coupes, a point which was noted by a Car & Driver writer sitting in his host’s car late one evening after dinner: “You sit very low, wrapped in a round, firm bucket seat that reclines very sharply – arms and legs out straight, head cocked. The shift lever is close by, but on top of the driveline tunnel and unusually high. All of the controls are extremely light and positive, while the instruments are large, legible and well-placed. There is a very definite WWII fighter feeling...” And all this before he drove it. The writer’s enthusiasm wasn’t dampened on the road, and he found even when the car was driven hard, “winding it tight in all five gears, throwing it hard into corners, trying to disturb its composure,” the 275 always did as it was bidden and did it so well “that the driver’s gaffes were kept secret.” Other writers were equally complimentary, and 440 buyers plunked down $13,900 for a 275 GTB, when a Corvette Stingray cost $4,233. Formula One driver Jean-Pierre Beltoise took a 275 GTB/4 on a de-restricted French Autoroute in 1967, an experience recounted in the French magazine l’Auto-Journal. Beltoise covered 46 miles in 23 minutes – including stopping to pay tolls. He commented that the journey was “in complete safety and the greatest comfort, without once having to use the brakes hard and carrying on a normal conversation with my passenger.” Beltoise was even more complimentary in summation. “It is first and foremost a serious and comfortable gran turismo, but it retains the lineage of a race car, in the response of the engine and the quality of the handling. The 275 GTB/4 is one of the greatest automobiles created in our times,” he said. The 275 GTB might have been meant for the street, but lots of owners went racing. The factory offered aluminum bodies and then built 12 lightweight cars meant for the track. These had six Weber carburetors instead of three, dry sump engines, big fuel tanks and altered frames. Racing lessons transferred to the next variation of the 275 GTB when the nose was lengthened and the air intake diminished to reduce front-end lift at high speed. A single 25-gallon gas tank was replaced by two 12-gallon tanks and the rear window enlarged. Valve seals were installed to reduce the exhaust smoke that had been a hallmark of Ferrari V12s up to that point. The second series cars of 1966 united the engine and the rear-mounted transaxle through a rigid torque tube, which eliminated the vibrations that had plagued earlier cars. A handful of racing GTB/Cs were also built, with thinner aluminum panels and plastic windows. One of them won its class at Le Mans in 1966 and was 8th overall. That Fall, the 1966 Paris Auto Show saw all the improvements in place in the GTB/4, which also replaced the old SOHC heads with DOHC heads, such as had been part of F1 racing Ferraris since the early 1950s. The new GTB/4 had six Weber carburetors and a dry sump engine with a 17-quart capacity and a raised center section in the hood to accommodate the new motor. The GTB/4 would only be in production for 18 months with about 300 cars built, but as they say, the last examples of any model are always the best sorted. The cancellation of the 275 GTB/4 has been hotly debated in the years since, and there’s no doubt the model hit a sweet spot in terms of size and performance. But in 1967, Ferrari was facing two threats to his market position, and they both came from America. The first issue was the upcoming 1968 emissions regulations, which were going to strangle his engines. And the second was Ford, still smarting from its failure to buy Ferrari and building the GT40. Clearly, Enzo needed a bigger weapon. The result was the 365 GTB/4 Daytona, and while it was powerful and purposeful, it lacks the grace of the earlier car and the instant frontal recognition. The car offered here is 275 GTB/4 chassis no. 10387. It was built in September 1967 and delivered to its first owner, a Mr. Bertuzzi, in Italy in October of the same year. It made its way to the U.S. in the early 1970s and next appeared advertised in the New York Times on July 13th, 1975, described as red with a black leather interior, new paint, new engine and other extras. The car disappeared from the market place for 14 years, apparently in the happy ownership of Michael Greenblat of Muttontown, New York, who finally advertised it in the Ferrari Market Letter, volume 14, number 4 in February 1989. It was described as a recent restoration, including engine, brakes, paint and chrome, showing 49,000 miles. In December 1989, #10387 was advertised again in the Ferrari Market Letter, volume 14, number 26 by Berlinetta Motorcars of Huntington Station, New York. The engine was described as rebuilt 7,000 miles ago by F&F Motorcars and the car as repainted two years ago and showing 50,500 miles. The reader may conclude this was on consignment, as the ad reappeared in January 1990. By March 1990, Michael Greenblat was again his own agent, advertising #10387 in volume 15, number 5 of the FML, as a 90-point plus show car, with recent lacquer paint, that was absolutely perfect mechanically. In December 1990, Carroll F. Cook, of KEA Classic Cars in Nanuet, New York, advertised #10387 in FML volume 15, number 26, noting recent paint and describing it as mechanically excellent. Ryuzo Kyoki next offered #10387 in the FML in February 1991 and again in March, also competing in the 27th Annual Ferrari Club of America National Meet and Concours at Tyson’s Corner/Summit Point, West Virginia and Washington, D.C. In May 1994, #10387 was shown at the Reading, Pennsylvania Ferrari Concours by Wayne Carini. The next record of it is in Japan, where the car won First in Class Three on April 8th, 1995. By May 2006, #10387 was back in the US. Since 2006, its current owner has cared for and driven it sparingly. More recently, the current owner fitted new Borranis and tires all round. New carpets were also fitted to the interior, and he invested great effort to make sure that the perfect alignment of all panels was reached. Over 43 years, #10387 seems to have received consistent care and has been enjoyed by a couple of long-term owners. It has clearly been well maintained and is a relatively low-mileage example of a late 275 GTB/4, with the most desirable improvements. If you’ve read any of the late 1960s road tests and want to see what all the fuss was about, this could be your opportunity. Chassis no. 10387

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
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1934 Packard Twelve Conv. Victoria

Model 1108. 160bhp 445 cu. in. side valve V12 engine with Stromberg downdraft carburetion featuring automatic cold start, three-speed synchromesh transmission, shaft drive with hypoid rear axle and four wheel adjustable vacuum assisted brakes. Wheelbase: 147" It has long been regarded as ironic that the greatest creations of the classic era came during the depths of the recession. Although the Packard company was in excellent financial health at this time, Packard was deeply concerned about the devastating effect of the depression on sales in the fine car segment. Packard’s response was to redouble its efforts, meeting the threat from Cadillac and Lincoln head on with the new Twin Six and a range of spectacular custom bodies. Packard’s Twelve was, in many ways, the signature car of the classic era; it was the top of the line offering from America’s leading manufacturer of fine cars. It was the Brooks Brother’s suit of the time: a conservative car with finely tailored lines, elegant appointments, a refined chassis and a whisper-quiet, twelve-cylinder engine. In a sense, Packard’s Twelve was never meant to be. In fact, the car’s history goes back to the Cord L-29 and the great Miller engined front drive race cars. Packard’s management was intrigued with the idea of front drive, and commissioned the construction of a prototype. A decision was made to develop a twelve-cylinder engine for this new car, as the shorter length of a V12 – compared with Packard’s venerable inline eight – allowed more flexibility in packaging the front drive chassis. Extensive testing revealed weaknesses in the front drive chassis’s design, and anticipated development costs soared. Meanwhile, Cadillac had ignited the multi-cylinder race with their exquisite new sixteen and twelve-cylinder models, and Packard’s dealerships were feeling the pressure. The solution, born of necessity, created one of the defining models of the classic era: install the new twelve-cylinder engine in Packard’s proven Deluxe Eight chassis. The result was christened the Twin Six, in honor of Packard’s first V12, introduced more than 15 years earlier. By 1933, the name had been changed to the Packard Twelve to clearly convey the power behind the new car. It and the eleventh series were the last cars with flowing fenders and classic lines, before the advent of the streamlined look. The front ensemble is truly beautiful, with a graceful vee shaped radiator, and matching head lights and fender lights. Notably, the dash is a work of art, looking more like a jeweler’s display than an instrument panel. One of the most respected designers of the classic era, Ray Dietrich was also one of the most influential. After stints at Brewster and LeBaron, he formed Dietrich, Inc., where his smart and elegant designs attracted the attention of Packard management, and as a result, Packard became one of Dietrich’s best customers. Lacking an in-house styling department, Packard incorporated Dietrich design cues in later production cars. In fact, after 1933, all open Packards carried Dietrich body tags. Nevertheless, Dietrich still built a few custom bodies for the senior Packards, and these special cars have come to epitomize the ultimate in classic styling. Every line is exquisite, starting with the graceful vee windshield, continuing with the Dietrich trademark beltline, and finishing with a superbly crafted top that makes the car look as good with the top up as it does down. The Convertible Victoria is in many respects the most desirable of the custom Dietrichs. Although styling is certainly a matter of personal judgment, there can be no denying that the car’s blind quarters give it an unsurpassed elegance. Unlike its convertible coupe cousin, the car provides luxurious accommodations for four, making it far more versatile. Although commonly owner driven, the spacious rear seating made the car suited for both owner and chauffeur driven roles. Although the style was offered from 1932 through 1934, the 1934 models have proven to be the most desirable today. They are unique in many respects, offering special “windsplit” trim, a redesigned dash intended to accommodate a built-in radio, and several chassis enhancements. It is the body changes, however, that make the 1934s so desirable. The hood was extended back over the cowl to the base of the windshield resulting in an unbroken line from the radiator to the main body, giving the car the look of a much longer hood than the earlier cars. In addition, the vent doors are beautifully curved, as are the leading edges of the doors. The combination is quite striking, and as a result, the 1934 models command a substantial premium today. Although exact numbers are not known, it is believed that as many as four of five cars may have been built, although only three are known to survive. The example offered here is a well-known car, having passed through the hands of several notable collectors over the years. Although the car’s very early ownership is not known, it was purchased in Maryland by a Westchester, NY enthusiast named Robert Wellcome in 1948. Now 78, his recollection is that the man he bought the car from was a local bookmaker, who had purchased the car from a local dentist. The dentist had bought the car for his daughter, but she had decided that the car was too big for her to handle. At that time he was told that the car was originally sold in the Philadelphia, PA area. Wellcome said what impressed him most was that the seller reached into the car and touched the starter button and it fired on the first turn. He kept the car for nine years, reluctantly selling it only when he became engaged to be married – a decision he regrets to this day. When the time came to sell the car, Wellcome had been using Excelsior Garage in Mamaroneck, NY to maintain the car. The owner, Carl Lambiasi (who is still in business today) introduced Wellcome to another customer, Ted Fuller, who owned several Packards, and put the deal together. Fuller, 85, who now lives in Greenwich, CT, bought the big Dietrich Packard immediately. Fuller kept the car for 16 years before selling it to Frank McGowan on August 29, 1973. Today, Frank remembers the car as being in excellent condition. Finished in black with a black leather interior, the car was original for the most part. He remembers that the body was exceptionally solid, with no rust at all. Before long, Frank sold the car to John Wheatley, a long time Packard enthusiast who was one of the first to recognize the potential of the custom Dietrich cars. He had been buying them as long-term investments in order to provide for his eventual retirement. He restored the car, probably in the late 1970s or early 1980s, selling it to noted Texas collector Jerry J. Moore in 1984. The car remained in Moore’s vast collection until 1996, when it was acquired by dealer Jerry Sauls for his client, Dr. Joseph Murphy. The vendor reports that he had the opportunity to inspect much of the car’s wooden body framing when he saw the car at a shop where Murphy had sent the car to have interior work done, and he was surprised to find that from what he was able to observe the car retained its original body wood, still in solid original condition. In 1998, the Packard joined the renowned Otis Chandler collection in Los Angeles, CA, where it would remain on display for four years before the vendor had the opportunity to acquire it in 2002. The vendor is a well-known Packard enthusiast, who has seen to it that the Dietrich Convertible Victoria was well maintained, remaining in excellent overall condition today. A recent road test revealed that the engine starts easily and runs smoothly. The transmission shifts easily and the clutch action is light and positive. The car’s ride and handling are exceptional for the period, demonstrating even today, the advantages of owning a Packard. Today the car is in excellent overall condition, capable of both Concours wins and touring events. In fact, although the original restoration was completed almost 20 years ago, the car has been well maintained, and remains in excellent condition today. The vendor reports that he has successfully shown the car in national level Concours competition. It is well equipped, having dual sidemounted spare tires with covers and accessory mirrors, chrome wire wheels with whitewalls, and twin Pilot Ray driving lights. In the world of American Classics, some cars stand out as being among the very best of the best; this is just such a car. Its lines are without fault, and its condition permits it to be shown or driven. As the only such example likely ever to be available on the open market, it may well represent a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and accordingly we recommend it highly. Addendum Please note that this car is titled by the engine number. It is a entrant in the 2004 Meadow Brook Concours d'Elegance on Sunday. Chassis no. 902030

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-07-31
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1958 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-camshaft inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension and coil-spring single point swing axle rear suspension, and servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Mercedes-Benz’s iconic Roadster Finished in its original, rare, and beautiful color combination Recent extensive refinish and service by 300 SL experts Rudi & Company Matching-numbers example To many, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL is an automobile that needs no introduction. American Mercedes-Benz importer Max Hoffman was convinced that a road-legal version of the successful W194 racer would be profitable in the United States. He knew that his clients would love the performance and styling of such a vehicle, so he lobbied the top brass at Mercedes-Benz to develop the car. Luckily for him, and us, Hoffman’s wish was granted. The automobile that followed was nothing short of extraordinary. Sporting a chassis directly developed from lessons learned in campaigning the W194, the 300 SL was the first production automobile that used fuel injection as opposed to carburation, which was a technological advancement that allowed it to become the fastest street legal car of its day. When it premiered at the 1954 New York Auto Show, the public fell in love with the car not only for its performance but also for its breathtaking good looks and proportions. The design of the 300 SL would even catch the eye of Andy Warhol in 1986, when it was featured in a painting entitled Cars, which was commissioned by German art dealer Hans Meyer. Max Hoffman wanted an open version from the very beginning, and after the success of the Coupe, a convertible version of the 300 SL was released, going on to attract even more buyers towards Mercedes-Benz’s most innovative sports car. Since the 300 SL would lose its top, engineers reinforced and modified the space-frame chassis to fit conventionally hinged doors, which simultaneously allowed for greater ease of entry by lowering the height of the chassis on the door line, albeit a small forfeiture of the original model’s character. Designers used this opportunity to make several slight changes to the 300 SL’s body, and many installed new headlights, a smaller grille opening, and fitted dual chrome strips on the side sills, to give the car a more streamlined and glamorous look. The Roadster was introduced in 1957, and it offered the performance and style that the Coupe was known for but with a dash of practicality and the thrill of open-air driving, making for a motoring experience that was second to none. In order to keep performance on par with the Coupe, all Roadsters were offered with the more sporting NSL engine of the Coupe as standard configuration. This made the Roadster capable of top speeds that ranged from 133 to 155 mph, depending on the final drive ratio specified. Production on the Roadster and the iconic W198 platform stopped in early 1963, with 1,858 examples being produced, making it even more popular than its gull-winged predecessor. Also like the Coupe, the Roadster was certainly the item to have for the jet-set in the late ’50s and early ’60s. The 300 SL Roadsters were favored by celebrities for its style and racing drivers for its performance and brilliant engineering, and they often found homes with just about anyone who appreciated fine machinery, and those who had the bank account to acquire it. With a list price of $11,000 when new, the style and performance it provided certainly came at a price. As with all great and historically important automobiles, it has retained that same persona to this day, and it remains amongst the world’s most desired cars. This 1958 300 SL Roadster is finished in Mercedes-Benz Light Blue (DB 334) over a red (1079) leather interior, which is the color combination that is original to this car, according to its build sheet. This 300SL was originally destined for the North American market, but it found its way to the home of a collector in the Netherlands, where it was completely restored to its original color combination and the arguably more elegant European headlights were added. Sometime afterwards, this Roadster was repatriated to the United States by a Texan collector. This matching-numbers 300 SL was purchased by a gentleman who has owned, over the past decade, nearly two dozen 300 SL Gullwings and Roadsters. This Roadster caught his attention because of the high-quality of workmanship that went into the restoration. Noting that some of the work was showing age, and a few other aspects were not as correct as they should be, he sent the car to the renowned 300 SL specialists at Rudi & Company in Victoria, British Columba, Canada, where Rudi and his team were given free reign to make this 300 SL Roadster proper, correct, and to factory specifications. From front to back, Rudi & Company left nothing wanting for the next owner. Every piece of exterior trim was re-chromed; the exhaust tip was replaced; the taillights were replaced to European specifications, to complement the headlights; new rubber was added in areas, as well as a new old stock hood emblem; a chrome wheel was refinished; and the rocker panels were completely taken off and refinished to the high standards of the rest of the car. Under the hood, all black paint was correctly applied in the correct matte finish; all cad plating was redone; all-new correct hoses and clamps were added, as well as a new windshield washing system; the radiator was re-cored; the gas tank was re-lined; the timing and valves were set; and a major service was completed on the engine. The interior was also freshened, with new, correct sun visors, a new shift knob, new rubber floor mats, new window felts, and new speaker grilles. There were also many components that were correctly refinished, including the tonneau leather, the dash leather, and the steering column. The Roadster was road tested and then wet-sanded and polished before finally passing Rudi & Company’s intense scrutiny. The result speaks for itself: this 300 SL is quite simply stunning. This very correct Roadster comes complete with color-matched two-piece fitted luggage, a tool roll, a jack, the rare Becker Mexico short wave radio, and an original owner’s manual. It ticks all the important boxes, and it is as delightful to drive as it is to look at. As perhaps the most iconic model of Mercedes-Benz’s illustrious history, a 300 SL Roadster is a staple of any serious collection. They are beautifully engineered and designed, and they are incredible automobiles to drive, as they exhibit both timeless styling and more than respectable performance by today’s standards. With close to $40,000 dollars in refinishing and service by Rudi & Company, this Roadster is turn-key ready to take on a long tour or show at a local concours, and it exhibits a high level of factory correctness, down to all the correct stickers and markings in the engine bay. This SL is offered wearing a rare and interesting factory color combination and displaying wonderful mechanical and cosmetic condition, and it would be at home in any collection. Addendum Please note that contrary to the catalog this vehicle is being sold with "No Reserve". Chassis no. 198.042.8500244 Engine no. 198.980.8500245 Body no. 198.042.8500244

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
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1935 Hispano-Suiza J12 Cabriolet deVille by Rippon Brothers

Type 68. 220 bhp, 9,424 cc overhead-valve V-12 engine, three-speed manual gearbox, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel servo-assisted mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 157.8 in. Mark Birkigt’s 12-cylinder pièce de résistance Offered with known ownership history Equipped with its original chassis, engine, and body Show-quality restoration, with recent extensive sorting As the name implies, Hispano-Suiza was a cosmopolitan marque, with Swiss and Spanish origins and a parallel manufacturing base in France. Swiss engineer Marc Birkigt had designed the Barcelona-built Castro, which became the basis for the first Hispano-Suiza of 1904. Over the years, he developed a strong reputation for building everything from T-head fours, overhead-cam engines, a water-cooled V-8, and also the innovative H6, which was described by British historian T.R. Nicholson as “the last word in advanced transport for the rich.” The 12-Cylinder Hispano-Suiza Birkigt was mindful of the developments in multi-cylinder engines going on in the United States and elsewhere in Europe, and he was determined to build one of his own. In 1929, he began work on what would become the J12, Type 68. The engine was a new design, a V-12 with pushrod overhead valves, twin alloy cylinder blocks mounted on a common crankcase, and a seven-main-bearing crankshaft with side-by-side connecting rods. A vast displacement of nearly 9.5 liters and convex pistons resulted in a horsepower of 220, and rubber engine mounts were adopted for the first time. A prototype chassis was tested during the summer of 1931, and the Type 68 was shown at the Paris Salon that autumn. Its sheer size dominated the show, despite the presence of the massive Maybach DS8 Zeppelin. At ? 200,000 (then $8,000 or £2,200), it was very expensive. Customers included the Shah of Persia, Emile Dubonnet, Lord Anthony de Rothschild, C.T. Weymann, and the Maharajah of Indore. Chassis number 13506 – A Newly Discovered History It had been previously known that factory records indicate that chassis 13506 was constructed on the large 4,009-millimeter (157.8-inch) wheelbase and that it was shipped to Smith & Co., Hispano’s agent in London. The car was apparently delivered to its first owner, a Mr. Batcock of 1 Melville Road, Sidcup, Kent, by Motor Distributors of Leeds, which was also located in Sidcup. Although the coachwork had long been previously attributed as having been built by Saoutchik, due to that attribution being printed in Johnnie Green’s The Legendary Hispano-Suiza, a newly discovered letter, written in 1976 by previous long-term owner John Ellis, of Kildare Co., Ireland, indicates that the coachwork is actually by Rippon Brothers, of Huddersfield. Ellis was a motorcycle manufacturer, as well as an early collector who was active in the 1950s and ’60s. He had an enviable collection of pre-war veteran and vintage marques, including examples of Mercedes-Benz, a pair of Isotta Fraschinis, and this Hispano-Suiza, among others. In the letter, a copy of which is on file, Ellis clearly states, “The chassis number was 13506, engine number 321099. The sedanca body was by Rippon Bros., of Huddersfield, Yorkshire, England, as far as I remember.” Rippon, whose history dates back to 1555, is known for its fine craftsmanship. According to Nick Walker’s reference on British coachbuilders, “As to quality, in the thirties a Rippon body could only be compared with those of a very few other coachbuilders…a Rippon body was correspondingly expensive, and the company therefore tended to build on only the best chassis.” Then, the presence of a Rippon body on a J12 Hispano-Suiza chassis should not come as a total surprise, and those familiar with the products of Saoutchik will also note that the coachwork, while extremely fine in construction, is more understated than is typically associated with Saoutchik. John Ellis presumably owned the car throughout the 1950s and ’60s, and after he sold off his collection, it was lost from sight. It then appeared in the May 1982 issue of the Hispano-Suiza Society Newsletter as having been discovered by new HSS member John Upton, of London. It was later offered by Upton in the March 1984 newsletter, having been fully restored. Upton’s advertisement is important, as it identifies the car by chassis number and depicts it still wearing its original registration, JX 4926, which is also clearly legible in a period image that depicts the car when it was new. The Hispano was then exported to the United States, and after residing for a short time in the collection of Richard and Linda Kughn, it was a part of the Imperial Palace Collection from 1989 through 1999, and then it spent time within the Atwell Family Collection in Texas. John O’Quinn acquired the car from the Atwell family in 2006, at which point it joined his large collection in Houston. The car has most recently been entrusted to Chris Charlton’s revered Classic Car Service, of Oxford, Maine, who performed a great deal of mechanical and cosmetic sorting of the engine, which has been returned it to its proper operating order. The car had lacked power, due in part to the fact that the original magnetos had been replaced with Lucas distributors. Amazingly, Charlton’s shop was able to source correct new old stock Scintilla magnetos and caps. There was also work and adjustments done to the carburetors, timing, clutch, and transmission, and new brake cables were installed. In addition, all of the wiring contacts were cleaned to ensure that the lights functioned properly. As offered, the paintwork is presentable, with some minor blemishes that could be attended to, and the brightwork is generally good. The doors shut nicely, and the glass is all excellent. The hood is similarly excellent, and valuable Marchal lighting is fitted all around. The interior is understatedly elegant, as would be expected from a coachbuilder to the aristocracy, and it is done in Oxblood leather with matching carpeting. The wood trim is beautifully presented, and twin cabinets are mounted on the division partition. The driving compartment is upholstered and carpeted to match the passenger space, which has Jaeger instrumentation. The dials for the adjustable shock absorbers, which are often missing, are present and in good condition. Under the hood, the engine compartment is sanitary and generally well detailed. It has the correct whittle belt for the fan, which is now all but impossible to find. Handsome and formidable, this Hispano-Suiza is equally desirable as a candidate for public performance or as a prized addition to any private collection. Few Classic Era motor cars hold the cache of a Hispano-Suiza. With its stunning coachwork and the large, powerful 12-cylinder engine, this is a particularly special example. Offered with clarified history, including a copy of Ellis’ 1976 letter, as well as copies of the period image and aforementioned copies of the Hispano-Suiza Society Newsletter, this J12 is eminently eligible for any number of tours or automotive events around the globe. Chassis no. 13506 Engine no. 321099

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
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1938 Bugatti T57C Aravis Drophead Coupe

One of Only Two Supercharged Aravis Drophead Coupes Built; Formerly the Property of Lord Doune, the Earl of Mourey 220hp 3,257cc twin overhead cam inline supercharged eight-cylinder engine, four-speed Wilson preselector gearbox, coil springs with semi-elliptic leaf springs and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 3.3m The Type 57 is one of the most celebrated of all non-racing Bugatti chassis. Its unbeatable combination of style and performance made it an instant success, and from its first introduction, it provided Jean Bugatti with a final and lasting legacy. Prior to 1934, Bugatti set the lofty goal of creating a Grand Touring automobile that would include the excitement of the racing heritage of the company, while incorporating the refinement and drivability of a road car. The Type 57 was successful in combining some of the temperament of the racing chassis with a level of comfort that satisfied the refined tastes of the European elite. The Bugattis of the late 1930s represented the company’s crowning achievement in engineering. The pace of technical innovation was vigorous from the Type 57’s introduction in 1934, until its demise in 1939. Many updates were introduced as they were developed; notable examples included improved suspension and hydraulic brakes. Some of the most memorable automotive designs carry the Bugatti name. Many of these were the inspiration of Jean Bugatti, a remarkably talented artist and designer, and offered by him as factory catalog body styles. Most of the Type 57 drophead coupes were dignified and pleasing to look at, but lacked the flair seen on his racy closed cars, such as the Atalante or Atlantic. As a result, Bugatti envisioned a more exotic open car that would set a new standard for styling. The coachbuilding firm of Gangloff was entrusted with the task of crafting the new model; the results were nothing less than spectacular. Considered by many to be the most beautiful open car design to grace a Type 57 chassis, the Aravis was introduced to the public in 1938. From every angle, the car was a masterpiece. All of the lines were softly sculptured to express motion, from the pontoon fenders to the elegantly sculpted body side moldings that cascaded rearward towards a gracefully lengthened tail section. The dramatic fastback convertible top styling was one of the sleekest designs ever implemented when erected, and was even more impressive in its ability to disappear entirely from view when folded. Power ratings ranged from 140hp on the standard model, up to 220hp for the supercharged sport model, which featured Bugatti’s tried and tested twin lobe Rootes-type compressor. Flexible and powerful, performance of the Type 57 was always at the driver’s discretion. In fact, the Type 57 chassis was so versatile and its supercharged engine so reliable, a race modified version placed first at Le Mans in 1939. It is unfortunate that the talented Jean Bugatti would enjoy the fruits of his labor for only a short period after the introduction of the Aravis. Tragically, while test driving a car, Bugatti was killed in August 1939. Only four of these striking Aravis dropheads were completed before production of the Type 57 chassis ceased, making them among the most coveted of all Type 57s. Chassis no. 57736 is one of just two supercharged Aravis drophead coupes built. The Aravis was sold new to Canadian industrialist Orr Lewis by the Bugatti agency in Nice. The car was shipped to England in 1939 at the outbreak of the Second World War. It is thought that Lewis was a cousin of its next owner, the honorable Lord Doune who graciously offered to hide the Bugatti from the ravages of war. In 1952 the car was purchased by Lord Doune (who later became the Earl of Mourey). 57736 remained in the collection of his family until 2000, when the Aravis was purchased by a noted American collector. Since then the Bugatti has remained virtually hidden away, untouched and used sparingly. Regardless of his personal use, he ensured that the Bugatti was properly maintained, serviced and exercised on a regular basis. Most recently, the Aravis was given a thorough service and road tested for preparation for its sale. On a recent test drive the Bugatti ran faultlessly, starting easily and running smoothly. The engine proved to be a more than competent performer, accelerating strongly from rest. Perhaps the most enjoyable aspect of driving the Aravis is the delightful Cotal preselector gearbox, which shifts quickly, smoothly, and with authority. The refinement added by the gearbox transforms the car, enhancing the pleasure of driving, as it allows the driver to concentrate more fully on the adept handling and vigorous acceleration, while enjoying the sounds and sensations generated by Bugatti’s wonderful supercharged twin cam engine. The Earl of Mourey was a true automotive enthusiast has a reputation to this day of having maintained his motor cars in outstanding mechanical condition. It has been reported that the Lord submitted all of his cars for regularly scheduled services and maintenance, including having the oil changed every 3,000 miles. Today, the Aravis displays this thoughtful attention and maintenance of such fastidious care in every respect. Cosmetically the Bugatti is a wonderful car whose largely unrestored original condition engages the driver with an honesty and appeal that cannot be replicated in a restored car, regardless of the money spent or the talents of the restorer. Although the car was repainted in the 1960s, the workmanship was certainly more than competent and the finish has aged gracefully, appearing today as an exceptionally preserved original finish might. The engine bay is highly correct, and has the air of careful and skilled maintenance, rather than the artificial detailing of a modern concours car. The interior appears to be largely, if not completely original, with the lovely blue leather seats showing appropriate wear for their age. The wood dash and gauges are almost certainly original, correct, and unrestored. This is a car that is meant to be driven and enjoyed. When shown, it will be appreciated for the beauty of its lines and the excellence of its engineering rather than the skill of its restorer. Those lucky enough to have driven 57736 are eloquent in their praise for the car, with many suggesting it may be the best driving T57C extant. There is little doubt that the Aravis represents the zenith of Jean Bugatti’s career; it is certainly among the last of his beautiful creations. Chassis 57736 is a late car, and is accordingly mechanically superior to most, incorporating the latest advances from Molsheim including the telescopic suspension and shock absorbers. While any Aravis would be a treasure to own, the originality and quality of 57736 combine with its status as one of just two supercharged examples built to make it quite possibly the ultimate open Bugatti Type 57C. Chassis no. 57736

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-01-20
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BUGATTI TYPE 35B Ex-usine

BUGATTI TYPE 35B Ex-usine, Divo, Lepori, de Graffenried Année: 1928 Numéro de série: 4913 Numéro de moteur: 157T (voir texte) Moteur: huit cylindres en ligne, arbre à came en tête, compresseur Bugatti-Roots, 2.292cm3, 130ch à 5.500t/m; Boîte: quatre vitesses, transmission aux roues arrière; Suspension: avant: Essieu Bugatti sur ressorts semi-elliptique, arrière: Essieu rigide sur ressorts quart-elliptique; Freins à tambour sur les quatre roues fonctionnant par câble; Volant à droite. Carrosserie: deux sièges sport Grand Prix, bleu avec intérieur noir. Histoire du modèle Au Grand Prix de France à Lyon en 1924, Bugatti a dévoilé une nouvelle voiture de course de production, le célèbre Type 35. Elles ont pris part à toutes les compétitions possibles jusqu'en 1930. Au cours de cette période, ce petit joyau a collectionné un nombre impressionnant de succès aussi bien dans les mains de pilotes d'usine ou privés. Aujourd'hui encore le Type 35 reste le symbole de la marque Bugatti. Tout au long de sa production, il y a eu un certain nombre de variations proposées par l'usine, alors que le modèle évoluait notamment avec des versions à compresseur, mais toujours basé sur le moteur huit cylindres. Le 35B était la version définitive du moteur à simple arbre à came en tête, avec vilebrequin à roulement, un moteur de 2,3 litres et un compresseur agrandi. Le modèle est inspiré de la voiture utilisée lors de la Targa Florio de 1926, le 35T, mais maintenant avec un compresseur Roots. Au cours des quelque quatre années de production environ 45 exemplaires ont été assemblés dont nombre d'exemplaires ont disparu, notamment au cours de carrières sportives particulièrement actives. C'est pourquoi des exemplaires avec une histoire continue telle que celui qui est proposé aujourd'hui sont extrêmement rares. Histoire spécifique de la voiture Cette voiture, équipée du moteur No 157T, a été immatriculée pour la première fois par l'usine Ettore Bugatti Automobiles de Molsheim le 21 mars 1928, avec le numéro minéralogique de l'Alsace '6538 J4', pour être utilisée comme une voiture de course 'usine'. La première compétition majeure pour 4913 remonte à la Targa Florio de 1928. Cette année-là, 4913 était l'une des quatre Bugatti engagées par l'usine, les autres étant un Type 37A et deux Type 35C. Menée par le pilote d'usine Alberti Divo, elle a largement remporté l'épreuve en dominant toutes ses concurrentes et en finissant les cinq tours de la course de 110km en 7heures 20minutes, comme illustré. La course de cette année-là est très connue pour la performance réalisée par un autre Type35B, celui d'Elizabeth Junek, dont la couleur distinctive jaune est restée en tête pendant un temps devant Divo avant que des problèmes mécaniques ne relègue sa voiture à la 5e place. Lors de la Targa Florio de 1928, on notait la présence d'un coureur amateur suisse, Mario Lepori. Il terminera à la 9e place mais à l'issue de l'épreuve, il rachète 4913, la voiture gagnante, via son agent local Bugatti, Bucar de Zurich. Lepori conduisit 4913 au Grand Prix de Rome, le 10 juin 1928, et prit la 6e place, le vainqueur, Chiron, s'imposant avec un Type 35C. La voiture a été officiellement facturée six jours plus tard à Lepori et immatriculée à son nom sous le numéro '7066 B', comme illustré. Le 25 juillet 1928, lors du Grand Prix de Saint-Sébastien, 4913 a été inscrite par Lepori avec Edmond Bourlier pour équipier. Malheureusement, la voiture a été disqualifiée sur une infraction technique mineure, alors qu'elle occupait la 3e place avec Bourlier au volant. Cette course aussi avait été remportée par Chiron sur un Type 35C. L'année suivante en 1929: La voiture remporta le Grand Prix d'Antibes-Juan-les-Pins le 1er avril. Deux semaines plus tard, au premier Grand Prix de Monaco, 4913 termina 7e. A la Targa Florio, le 5 mai, elle abandonna au troisième tour en raison d'une défaillance de soupape. Le 26 mai dans le Grand Prix de Rome, elle abandonne au 27e tour. Le 25 juillet à Saint Sébastien, Lepori termine à la 8e place. C'est à la fin de la saison 1929 que l'on pense que Lepori a pris sa retraite en tant que coureur. Après cela, 4913 est sans doute retournée à l'usine parce que l'on sait qu'elle a été livrée par la route depuis Molsheim à l'agent de Zurich, Joseph Karrer, utilisant des plaques minéralogiques temporaires allouées à la voiture du 14 au 16 août 1930. Elle fut ensuite vendue au Prince Louis Napoléon. Le prince garda la voiture pendant toutes les années 1930 et on pense qu'elle a disputé plusieurs petites compétitions en Suisse. Malgré des recherches poussées, il n'existe aucune preuve documentaire sur des événements précis auxquels la voiture aurait participé, à l'exception d'une seule photo de la voiture dans une course non identifiée en Suisse en 1936/7. En 1945/6, Gino Bessadona acheta 4913 à l'agent Bugatti de Genève. Bessadona a fait faire des travaux de carrosserie et changé tout l'équipement routier. En 1946, la voiture est cédée à un pilote suisse très connu, le Baron 'Toulo' de Graffenried. De 1947 à 1950, elle est la propriété de H. Leichti de Fribourg. En 1950, elle est revendue à Boris Guinard. A cette époque, on sait que le moteur a des problèmes mécaniques et on pense que l'on doit à Guinard l'enlèvement du moteur. Puis la voiture est venue à Roland Rutschi et M Rubi de Berne. Rutschi et Rubi ont reconstruit le Type 35B. Vraisemblablement en raison du manque de pièces détachées à l'époque, ils ont d'abord installé un moteur de Type 49, un radiateur de Type 43, un boîtier de direction et une boîte de Type 44/touring. Une carrosserie de type roadster est à présent montée. Un peu plus tard, Rutschi et Rubi ont changé le moteur pour un moteur plus approprié de Type 43. Le châssis 4913 est à ce moment immatriculée en Suisse avec la plaque minéralogique 'BE-8128' et elle a servi à Rutschi dans quelques courses en Suisse. En 1958, la voiture est mise en vente par le marchand néerlandais Bart Loyens. Loyens est connu pour avoir vendu de nombreuses Bugatti d'Europe en Amérique, 4913 est l'une d'elles et a été vendue à John Truslow du Maryland. Sous la propriété de Truslow, 4913 a été reconstruite par le célèbre restaurateur de Bugatti, 'Bunny' Phillips de Santa Barbara. On sait qu'à cette époque, le vilebrequin a été modifié, tout le reste de la voiture étant maintenu dans l'état et la forme dans lesquels la voiture a été achetée. Plus tard, toutes les pièces qui avaient été installées par les propriétaires précédents ont été remplacées par des pièces standard à la seule exception du boîtier de direction. En 1962, 4913 figure dans le 'Bugatti Register and Data Book' de Hugh Conway comme appartenant à Truslow. A cette époque, le numéro du moteur était 157T, une autre note mentionne le fait que la voiture ait cinq roues originales en aluminium deux pièces et tous les instruments d'origine. Mais on estime que la voiture a été reconstruite à partir d'autres voitures durant son séjour en Suisse. En 1971, 4913 a été inspectée par Hamish Moffatt, avec une éventuelle intention d'acheter la voiture. Toutefois, Moffatt s'est trouvé dans l'incapacité de l'acheter et c'est le marchand Chris Renwick qui l'a acquise et l'a emmenée en Grande-Bretagne. Au cours de la même année, Moffatt a négocié avec Renwick et a fini par acheter la voiture. Entre le moment de la première inspection de Moffatt et son achat, 4913 a perdu sa plaquette de châssis d'origine et les estampilles de son carter ont été retirées. Ce détail frustrant a souvent été expliqué par le fait que tout cela avait été fait pour faciliter l'importation en Grande-Bretagne, bien que, naturellement, une telle affirmation ne puisse être vérifiée. Moffatt a gardé 4913 de 1971 à 1998. Durant cette période, la voiture a été reconstruite à un haut niveau et, plus important, au cours de cette reconstruction, Moffatt a réussi à acquérir le boîtier de direction d'origine auprès de Miles Coverdale aux Etats-Unis. Cette pièce est connue pour être d'origine car elle est numérotée avec le numéro moteur 157. Moffatt a également saisi l'occasion de cette reconstruction pour remplacer toutes les pièces qui n'étaient pas d'origine par des pièces correctes. En janvier 1998, elle a été achetée par le propriétaire actuel. Depuis 1998, la voiture a été entièrement restaurée mécaniquement par l'un des meilleurs restaurateurs de Bugatti, Tim Dutton. Etat 4913 a été inspectée par David Sewell, l'historien réputé de la marque Bugatti. Effectuée en 1995, cette inspection a permis à Sewell d'établir un rapport très détaillé sur l'histoire de cette voiture. Dans son rapport, il note que le longeron porte correctement le numéro 603 et que ce châssis dispose encore de trous pour monter la roue de secours dont les voitures courant la Targa Florio étaient équipées. Sewell a également confirmé que la cloison, les instruments, l'essieu avant, le radiateur et le réservoir sont tous d'origine. En ce qui concerne le moteur, l'inspection de David Sewell a permis d'apporter des éclaircissements quant à son statut. Il a ainsi pu confirmer que le carter n'était pas un carter de Type 43 comme on l'a d'abord pensé, parce que ce carter n'aurait pas pu tenir dans le châssis de du Type 35B à moins de subir une transformation, ce qui n'a pas été le cas. De plus le carter était du type allant uniquement sur les modèles Type 35B à compresseur, distinguante par une partie arrière plus large conçu pour correspondre au châssis des voitures de Grand Prix; de même, le carter porte le numéro 28C sur la face avant, le C voulant dire 'Compresseur'. Une inspection supplémentaire du moteur a conduit M. Sewell à en déduire que si la moitié supérieure du moteur a été remplacée en partie par des composants de Type 43, la partie inférieure était l'originale laquelle n'a probablement jamais quitté la voiture. Le compresseur est numéroté 157T correspondant au numéro du moteur ainsi qu'au numéro original du châssis de cette voiture. La boîte de vitesse est répertoriée comme provenant du châssis 4935 et l'essieu arrière, s'il est correct, n'est pas numéroté avec la même séquence comme les autres composants de la voiture, il est donc improbable que ce soit celui d'origine. La carrosserie Grand Prix est pour l'essentiel originale mais on suppose qu'elle provient d'une autre voiture. Esthétiquement, le Type 35 est attirant avec une apparence légèrement patinée de sa carrosserie et sa sellerie intérieure. Cöté mécanique, la voiture a subi une restauration complète par Tim Dutton qui fait qu'elle est en parfait état de marche. En travaillant sur cette voiture, son restaurateur aussi bien que son vendeur ont tenu à respecter la performance de cette voiture mais en tenant compte de l'aspect pratique et de la sécurité sur les routes d'aujourd'hui. Là où des pièces d'origines ont été remplacées, elles ont été gardées de coté. Depuis que cette restauration a été effectuée, la voiture n'a parcouru que très peu de kilomètres, aussi la voiture est prête à l'emploi, à être appréciée. Il parait que l'auto est très rapide ! Pour ajouter à la confirmation de l'histoire de la voiture réalisée par David Sewell, le Club des propriétaires de Bugatti (Bugatti Owners Club) a délivré une réplique de plaquette de châssis portant le numéro 4913 comme reconnaissance de son identité. Disposant de toute sa documentation, la voiture est également présente dans de nombreux ouvrages sur la marque y compris dans l'excellent livre de Raffaelli 'Mémoires d'un chasseur de Bugatti'/'Archives Passion'. La voiture est également pourvue de papiers de la FIA et de la FIVA. Ex Works, Divo, Lepori, de Graffenried BUGATTI TYPE 35B Year 1928 Chassis No. 4913 Engine