All auctions in one place

  • 0—191 000 000 USD
  • 1 Jan 1990— 9 Sep 2017

Filters

Clear all
- USD
image
Pick of the day!
Marc Newson - Lounge chair

Low estimate: 4 000 USD

Want your valuables appraised by experts?

Send in an object valuation push image

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Alloy Berlinetta

300 bhp, 3,286 cc Tipo 213 overhead camshaft V12 engine, six Weber carburetors, Tipo 563/1015 five-speed manual gearbox in rear-mounted transaxle, Tipo 563 chassis, four-wheel independent suspension with A-arms, coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5" - From the collection of Mr. Reggie Jackson - An original alloy-bodied, long-nose, six-carburetor example - Iconic Pininfarina styling, Scaglietti-crafted body In many ways, the Ferrari 275 GTB is often lauded by enthusiasts and the media as the last of the “classic Ferraris.” Conceived and executed under the guidance of Enzo Ferrari himself, the 275 GTB was introduced at the 1964 Paris Auto Show and marked a natural evolution from its immediate predecessors, the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta and Lusso. It was also by far the most advanced road-going Ferrari produced at the time of its introduction, and it served as a production test-bed for several notable engineering advances. Designed by Pininfarina and executed by Scaglietti, the 275 GTB was an especially organic but aggressive and purposeful design. Named number three on Motor Trend's list of the 10 greatest Ferraris of all time, many enthusiasts have been drawn to its instantly recognizable looks alone, before opening its hood or even settling into the driver's seat. The 275 was considered by many to have been the finest production Ferrari ever built, combining the strong pedigree of its legendary road-racing forebears with sufficient creature comforts and a new fully-independent rear suspension to produce a superlative high-speed, long-range GT car. The engine was based on the race-proven Colombo-derived V12, now displacing 3,286 cc to produce 280 bhp with the standard triple Weber carburetor setup and 300 bhp with the optional and desirable set of six Weber 40 DNC/3 dual-choke carburetors. With its sensuous lines, covered headlights, long hood, short rear deck, neat Kamm tail, abbreviated bumpers, low oval air intake, “egg crate” grille, and limited brightwork highlighting the 275 GTB’s purposeful design, it literally suffers from no “bad angle.” In particular, its long, slim nose and four side-ventilation louvers per side gave it a shark-like appearance, a theme that could also describe its ample performance. With their advanced chassis, four-wheel independent suspension and ideal weight distribution, the 275 series, and the 275 GTB in particular, represented what many enthusiasts believe to be among the last true dual-purpose GT cars, equally suitable for both road and competition use. With the final evolution of Ferrari's relatively small-displacement Colombo V12 under its hood, the 275 GTB was an extraordinarily rev-happy machine, even by Ferrari standards. In a period road test, legendary Hollywood star and automobile enthusiast Steve McQueen described the smooth action of the five-speed manual transaxle as “like sliding a knife through butter.” It helped get the most out of the Colombo's enlarged 3,286 cc displacement. Weighing merely 1,200 kg, the 275 GTB easily accelerated from rest to 60 mph in a scant 6.3 seconds. Today’s collectors divide the 275 GTBs into the early (short-nose) and late-production (long-nose) cars. As with many things Ferrari, the reality is not so simple. While high-volume carmakers produced endless quantities of nearly identical cars, Ferraris were still built – to an astonishing degree – by hand. As improvements were devised, they were incorporated into production, often with the very next car in the production sequence. In other cases, features from earlier production would appear on later cars, to the delight of their owners and to the consternation of Ferrari historians and marque experts. The changeover to a longer-nose body design, which was introduced at the 1965 Paris Salon with production beginning in early 1966, was the result of the alarming incidence of frontal lift at high speeds caused by the short-nose setup. While the 275, whether in GTB or GTS form, featured near-perfect weight distribution by virtue of its innovative rear-mounted five-speed transaxle, another common point of differentiation among 275 GTB variants is in their driveshaft configuration. The earliest cars were fitted with an open Hotchkiss-style, normal U-joint and driveshaft setup, the perfect alignment of which was crucial to avoid vibrational tendencies. Unfortunately, this driveline setup could become misaligned over time, and sorting it out required skill and special training. Ferrari therefore switched to a driveshaft and constant velocity (CV) joint setup with a center bearing, referred to as the “interim” setup, which made the driveshaft alignment process much simpler. Ultimately, Ferrari switched to an enclosed torque-tube driveline. Chassis no. 08233 This particular 275 GTB/6C, chassis 08233, has one of the most desirable specifications available – a lightweight aluminum-alloy body, the sleek long-nose configuration and six Weber dual-choke carburetors. The alloy-bodied cars are, aside from the pure competition cars, the most desirable variants of the 275 GTB series. The body was fully constructed by Scaglietti in lightweight aluminum, like the competition cars, to save weight and thereby improve performance. With its lightweight alloy body and six-carburetor setup, this car easily has the same performance capabilities as the next evolution of the 275 range, the GTB/4. Chassis 08233, the original left-hand drive example offered here, was ordered by official Ferrari dealer M.G. Crepaldi S.a.s. of Milan, Italy, with alloy bodywork and six-carburetor induction, on November 23rd, 1965. Its long-nose body was originally finished in Argento (silver grey) with Nero (black) leather upholstery, and it was equipped with the aforementioned “interim” driveshaft arrangement. In March 1966, 08233 was delivered in Milan to its first owner, who was named Toninelli. During the early 1970s, the car was exported from Italy to the US. A succession of owners followed, including Norman M. Thomson of Santa Barbara, California and Don Young (also of Santa Barbara) in the late 1980s. It showed about 41,000 original miles. In fact, the car remained in sunny, dry California thereafter, owned by Dr. Henry Kleinberg of Woodside. In 1993, following a full restoration, Scott Cote of Los Gatos showed the car at the FCA’s Palm Beach National Meeting and Concours, where it placed third in class. Recent Years S/n 08233 was acquired in November 1993 by its current owner, Hall of Fame Major League baseball player Reggie Jackson, in whose collection it has resided ever since. Mr. Jackson has owned over 500 investment-grade collector cars over the past 40 years, including some of the most rare and desirable Ferraris, a NART Spyder, Daytona and Lusso included. The car has been maintained in this exclusive company for the past 17 years. He speaks very highly of this particular car and its performance, stating “It is one of the best cars I’ve ever owned.” The engine was rebuilt by marque expert Patrick Ottis in 2000. The car continues to present very well, and it is believed the outside fuel filler was added in the late 1980s. The combination of its lightweight alloy body, long-nose design and six-carburetor specification renders this 1966 275 GTB/6 a perpetually desirable Ferrari, the likes of which are very rarely offered at public auction. With the hope that “it goes to a wonderful new home,” the Ferrari has been comprehensively and professionally detailed in Mr. Jackson’s ownership and in preparation for sale. Chassis no. 08233

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
Show price

1967 Toyota 2000GT

150 bhp, 2,000 cc Yamaha DOHC hemi-head inline six-cylinder engine, three twin-choke side-draft carburetors, five-speed fully synchromesh manual transmission with overdrive, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel power-assisted Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 91.7 in. “Toyota’s E-Type,” the greatest Japanese car of all time One of only 351 built Original left-hand drive U.S.-delivery example Beautifully restored, with great attention to authenticity and detail Among the very best in the world The Toyota 2000GT is perhaps most aptly described as “the best sports car you’ve never heard of.” Developed in conjunction with Yamaha, this slinky two-passenger coupe packed a two-liter inline six-cylinder engine with a cast iron block and double overhead cams, good for 150 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and a top speed of over 135 mph. James Crowe, writing of the car in Road & Track, described it as “highly refined in handling and driving and one of the most exciting cars we have driven.” The luxurious interior fittings, including a rosewood veneer dashboard and a signal-seeking radio, were described as “up to par for a luxurious GT—an impressive car in which to sit or ride, or simply admire.” The 2000GT was the Japanese E-Type, a car that could run against the best that Europe had to offer and, frankly, win, and it has been credited with establishing the Toyota name as a force to be reckoned with in the automotive world. Unfortunately, the 2000GT has never achieved the same fame outside of Japan as its European brethren, in large part because only 351 were built and very few were exported outside of its home country. As its wonders have begun to achieve recognition in recent years, surviving examples have become highly sought-after, and today, the 2000GT is universally described as the most collectible, desirable, and valuable Japanese automobile ever produced. Don Davis’ 2000GT is very special, as it is one of only 62 left-hand drive examples produced and an original U.S.-delivery car. After spending its first few decades stateside, the car returned to its home nation in the ownership of a private enthusiast, then, once again, it made its way to the United States. It was acquired by Mr. Davis from another prominent Texas collector only a short time ago. The car had been previously restored to high standards, but during its time in the Davis Collection, it has undergone significant work to improve the restoration’s authenticity, including painting the inside of the headlamp buckets black, applying the correct grey finish around the side window surrounds, finishing the wheels the correct color, and taking the Toyota down to bare metal and respraying the body its original Bendix Yellow. The reading of 62,000 miles is believed original, as demonstrated by the excellent condition of the unrestored gauges, dash, console, and seats, which are all in highly original condition. The car’s authenticity and quality is documented against the factory specifications in Shin Yoshikawa’s respected volume on these automobiles, Toyota 2000GT: The Complete History of Japan’s First Supercar. This car is without a doubt the finest and most authentic 2000GT to come to market in recent years, and as such, it is an outstanding and virtually unrepeatable example of a car that has only grown ever difficult to find as its greatness has begun to be recognized. If the world is fair, there will be a time in the future when the collections that require a Daytona, a Miura, and a Ghibli also demand a 2000GT. Don Davis’ car offers an opportunity to move ahead of the pack and to acquire an example that stands firmly head and shoulders above the rest. Chassis no. MF1010147

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-04-27
Hammer price
Show price

1929 DUESENBERG MODEL J CABRIOLET MURPHY

1929 DUESENBERG MODEL J CABRIOLET MURPHY Titre de circulation hollandais Châssis n° 2239 Moteur n° J-219 - "Best of show" Concours d'Elegance de Pebble Beach 1981 - Importante automobile - Etat irréprochable - Historique suivi La compagnie Duesenberg fabriqua des automobiles de qualité et de compétition de 1913 à 1937. Elle fut créée par deux frères, Fred et Auguste Düsenberg, immigrés allemands aux Etats Unis d'Amérique dans les années 1880, et installés à Des Moines dans l'Iowa. Dès 1914, une Duesenberg termina 10ème des 500 miles d'Indianapolis avec à son volant le fameux aviateur Eddie Rickenbacker. Ce dernier rejoindra l'équipe Peugeot à la fin de cette année ou Peugeot remporta la seconde et la quatrième place de cette même épreuve. Mais la qualité et les performances des Duesenberg éclatèrent au grand jour lors du redoutable Grand Prix de France 1921 qui se tenait au Mans. Bien que blessé aux essais une semaine auparavant, Jimmy Murphy conduisit une Duesenberg à la victoire et passa la ligne d'arrivée, bandé de la taille aux épaules, avec un radiateur fuyant et deux pneus crevés...suivi par un célèbre aviateur français à la 4e place, André Dubonnet, et à la 6e place, Albert Guyot, et enfin à la 17e place par Louis Inghilbert, lui aussi blessé dans l'accident des essais. Une belle leçon de courage que le premier américain à gagner un Grand Prix donna aux pilotes européens. Ce fut la première voiture de GP équipée de freins hydrauliques, et le modèle A de 1921, fut la première voiture de série équipée de 4 freins hydrauliques. Duesenberg remporta Indianapolis en 1924, 1925 et 1927 et fabriqua sous licence les moteurs d'avion Bugatti aux USA. L'usine fut déplacée en 1927 à Auburn dans l'Indiana car son nouveau propriétaire Erret Lobban Cord, déjà à la tête de Cord et Auburn était très intéressé par les talents des deux frères Duesenberg, par la renommée sportive de leurs automobiles de courses et par leur qualité de fabrication. Le nouveau défi de cette association fut de construire la meilleure et la plus luxueuse voiture du monde, rien de moins. Cord désirait présenter la voiture la plus rapide, la mieux finie et la plus chère sur le marché et entrer en concurrence avec les marques européennes les plus prestigieuses: Hispano-Suiza, Rolls-Royce, Isotta Fraschini et Mercedes-Benz. Il fallut seulement 27 mois pour concevoir et révéler trois exemplaires du premier model J au salon de New York 1928 dont un splendide roadster à capotage escamotable par le carrossier Walter M. Murphy, à ne pas confondre avec le pilote des premières heures, tout cela sur fond de crise de 1929... Le model J fut équipé d'un moteur Lycoming à 8 cylindres en ligne à double arbre à cames en tête et à 4 soupapes par cylindre dessiné par Fred Duesenberg lui-même. Ce moteur de 7 litre développait 265 ch soit presque 100 ch de plus que la Cadillac V16 et 120 ch de plus que la Packard roadster, ses concurrentes nationales directes. Ce modèle essayé sur l'anneau de vitesse d'Indianapolis atteignit 151 km/h en 2e et 187 km/h en 3e ainsi, chaque modèle était essayé sur cet anneau pendant 160 km avant d'être livré chez le carrossier préféré du nouveau client. Le tableau de bord du model J était le mieux équipé alors, le compteur de vitesse indiquait un très optimiste 150 mph, un altimètre, un baromètre et des voyants lumineux de service indiquant la prochaine révision moteur étaient déjà de mise. Le châssis s'autolubrifiait automatiquement tous les 75 miles. La puissante " Duesie " devint rapidement la coqueluche de l'élite et transformait en symbole tout personnage que l'on voyait à son volant. Les milliardaires de tous bords, les entrepreneurs, artistes et aristocrates du monde entier se l'arrachèrent. On peut compter parmi les plus célèbres, Clark Gable, Greta Garbo, Howard Hughes, Rudolph Valentino, le duc de Windsor, le prince Nicolas de Roumanie, la reine Marie de Yougoslavie et les rois Victor Emmanuel III d'Italie et Alphonse XIII d'Espagne. Le distributeur parisien de la marque n'était autre que Edmond Z. Sadovich. Cette automobile a toujours été considérée par les amateurs comme une des plus puissantes, rapides et mieux fabriquées de son temps. Les roadsters carrossés par Walter M.Murphy de Pasadena en Californie, au nombre d'une soixantaine, sont indéniablement les plus racées, les mieux finies et il faut noter que les roadsters à capotage non escamotable, comme celui que nous présentons, laissant plus d'espace pour les jambes dans le petit habitacle d'appoint à l'arrière, seraient beaucoup plus rares. Ce modèle J, équipé de son capotage non escamotable, fut vendu en 1929 par l'agence de New-York pour 14500 dollars à Monsieur John R. Mac Kinnay, un multimillionnaire et associé dans la Standard Oil'S de Monsieur John D. Rockfeller Sr. Ce gentleman avait son propre siège à la bourse de New-York et était propriétaire de différentes sociétés. En 1934, la voiture fut vendue par Hilton Motors à Mr H.P.Ammidown de New-York et fut ensuite cédée en 1936 à Mr Kaysley Blake, du Connecticut qui possédait déjà une autre Duesenberg. En 1954, J-219 était en la possession de Mr Clarence F. Roibichaud du Connecticut et en 1955 fut achetée par Mr Paul Graehling d'Illinois. Ce dernier possédait une importante collection de voitures et elle fut envoyée chez Clinton Car Parks Co. dans l'Iowa, où la restauration fut menée par Sam Heend. En 1957, J-219 fut vendue à Mr Floyd Du Val et Mr Ernest Paulus de Davenport dans l'Iowa. Mr Du Val, restaurateur émérite, compléta les travaux commencés par Sam Heend. J-219 partit au Canada dans l'Ontario en 1977 et le nouveau propriétaire Mr Terry Radey commanda à Mr Harry Sherry de Warsaw dans l'Ontario une restauration, cette fois-ci aux standards des concours d'élégance. Ce travail s'étala sur 3 ans et J-219 emporta le premier prix du concours de l'ACD (Auburn, Cord, Duesenberg), à Auburn dans l'Indiana. L'année suivante, J-219 fut jugée " Best in show " au prestigieux concours d'élégance de Pebble Beach, recevant ainsi le prix le plus prestigieux qu'une automobile classique puisse recevoir. En 1991, J-219 fut acquise par Mr Bruce Meyer de Beverly Hills, gagnant du concours du " Meguiar's Person of the Year " en 1999 et membre fondateur du célèbre musée Peterson Automotive de Los Angeles. La voiture fut alors entretenue par l'expert en Duesenberg Mr Randy Ema. Le respecté collectionneur belge Mr Bob Lalement importa la voiture en Europe, remportant à son tour plusieurs prix tels que : Louis Vuitton Classique à Paris en 2002, le Best of Show au salon d'Essen en Allemagne en 2006 et le Best of Show du Classic Show à Anvers en Belgique en 2007. L'actuel propriétaire acheta la voiture en 2008, lors de la succession de Mr Bob Lalmement. La Duesenberg model J est le fleuron de l'industrie automobile américaine des années 30, et figurera comme le fleuron de n'importe quelle grande collection d'automobiles classiques. Dutch title Châssis n° 2239 Engine n° J-219 - Best of show at Pebble Beach Concours d'élégance 1981 - An important Automobile - Superb Condition - Well documented The Duesenberg Company produced high-end, luxury automobiles and racing cars from 1913 through 1937. It was created by the Duesenberg brothers, Fred and August, who formed the Duesenberg Automobile & Motors Company, Inc. in Des Moines, Iowa with the intent to build sport and racing cars. Originally 'Düsenberg', the family had immigrated to the United States from Germany in the 1880's. Duesenberg's place in history was officially solidified in 1914 when Eddie Rickenbacker drove a Duesenberg to an astonishing 10th place finish at the Indianapolis 500. Many great racing names and WWI Aviators, such as Captain Eddie Rickenbacker (who also joined the Peugeot racing team at the end of 1914) raced in Duesenberg's. Duesenberg racing history was not just for the United States; in 1921, Jimmy Murphy drove a Duesenberg to victory at the French Grand Prix in LeMans. He was joined by teammates André Dubonnet the great French aviator and racecar driver along with Albert Guyot racecar driver and Louis Inghilbert. This victory designated Jimmy Milton the first American to win the French Grand Prix. It also recognized the Duesenberg as the first vehicle to start a Grand Prix with hydraulic brakes. Duesenberg later went on to win the Indianapolis 500, capturing victories in 1924, 1925, and 1927. Following the string of wins in racing, the factory was relocated from Indianapolis in 1927 to Auburn, Indiana. E.L. Cord, owner of Auburn Automobile, and other businesses, bought the company in 1926 mainly for the 2 brothers' engineering skills, their talent and the well established brand name, allowing him to produce a world class luxury automobile. Cord challenged Fred Duesenberg to design an automobile that would be the best in the world. Indeed, Cord wanted to build the biggest, fastest, and most expensive automobile ever made. He also visualized a large chassis able to compete with the likes of Hispano-Suiza, Isotta-Fraschini, Mercedes-Benz, and Rolls-Royce then the most powerful, and luxurious European automobiles of the era. It took Fred 27 months to design and unveil the spectacular Model J at the 1928 New York Auto Salon which also included a Disappearing Top roadster by Walter M. Murphy Company as one of the three automobiles shown. The Model J arrived with a 420 cubic inch straight-eight built by Lycoming according to Fred's design. Horsepower was advertised as 265bhp with its twin overhead camshafts, 32 valves, straight eight engines. Fitted with a three speed transmission on the 142.5 inch wheelbase chassis, the Model J realized outstanding performance. The top speed achieved at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway was 116mph (187km/h) with 90mph (151km/h) attainable in second gear, making the new Duesenberg one of the fastest automobiles of its time. Each chassis was driven 100 miles at the Motor Speedway prior to factory delivery and then shipped to the customers preferred coachbuilder. Instruments were the most numerous yet seen on an automobile; the speedometer (reading to 150 mph), ammeter, water-temperature, oil-pressure gauges, plus tachometer, brake pressure gauge, stopwatch/clock, and altimeter/barometer. Warning lights reminded the owner to change engine oil, add chassis oil (the chassis lubricated itself every 75 miles) or fill the battery with water. Quickly becoming one of the most popular automobiles in the world, the Duesenberg was a status symbol for the elite. From the roaring twenties through most of the thirties, the Duesenberg Model J was the choice of movie stars, entrepreneurs, millionaires and royalty. Clark Gable, Greta Garbo, Howard Hughes, Rudolph Valentino, HRH Duke of Windsor, Prince Nicholas of Romania, Queen Maria of Yugoslavia, and the Kings Victor Emmanuel III of Italy, Alfonso XIII of Spain along with noted Paris Duesenberg distributor Edmond Z. Sadovich all owned Duesenbergs. The Model J Duesenberg has long been regarded by automotive experts as one of the most outstanding examples of design and engineering during the Full Classic era. The Walter M. Murphy Company of Pasadena, California is recognized as the most successful coachbuilder on the Duesenberg Model J chassis, both because of their designs and superb craftsmanship. Around sixty examples of the convertible coupes were produced and it is believed that a very small numbers of non-disappearing top bodies were built. This correct Model J with its original non-disappearing top body, original chassis #2239 and original engine # J-219 was sold new in 1929 by the New York Duesenberg Agency for $14,500.00 to Mr. John R. MacKinney. A multi-millionaire and partner with Standard Oil's Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Sr. he had his own seat on the New York Stock Exchange and owned his own company also. In 1934, the car was sold by Hilton Motors dealership to Mr. H.P. Ammidown, of New York City and in 1936 was sold to Mr. Kaisley Blake, of Connecticut, whom at the time owned another Duesenberg. In 1954, J-219 was in the possession of a Mr. Clarence F. Roibichaud, of Connecticut and in 1955 J-219 was sold to Mr. Paul Graehling, of Illinois. Mr. Graehling owned an extensive collection of Classic cars and the Duesenberg was sent to the Clinton Car Parts Co. in Clinton, Iowa where a restoration was started by Mr. Sam Heend. In 1957 J-219 was sold to Davenport, Iowa residents Mr. Floyd Du Val and Mr. Ernest Paulus. Mr. Du Val being an experienced restoration manager completed the restoration that Sam Heend had started. Terry Radey of Ontario, Canada was J-219's next recorded owner. Mr. Radey acquired the car in 1977 and immediately commissioned a further restoration, this time to Concours d'Elegance standards. This restoration took three years to complete and was carried out by Mr. Harry Sherry, of Warsaw, Ontario. In 1980 J-219 won the Best in Show award at the ACD (Auburn, Cord, Duesenberg) meeting in Auburn, Indiana. The following year J-219 was judged Best in Show at the prestigious Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance receiving the highest award a Classic automobile can achieve. In 1991, J-219 was acquired by enthusiast, Mr. Bruce Meyer, of Beverly Hills, California, winner of the Meguiar's 'Person of the Year' award in 1999 and a founding member of The Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. During Mr. Meyer's ownership, the car was maintained by Duesenberg expert Mr. Randy Ema. J-219 subsequently came to Europe into the ownership of the famous and respected Belgian collector Mr. Bob Lalement and again once while in Europe won many more Concours events including People's Choice at the Luis Vuitton Classic in Paris, France in 2002; Best of Show at the Essen Motor Show, Germany in 2006; and Best of Show at the Antwerp Classic Show, Belgium in 2007. J-219 was acquired by the current owners, a Dutch collector in 2008 from Mr. Bob Lalement's estate. The Model J Duesenberg is the apex of the American Automotive effort in the 20th century. It is the finest example of a true Pre-war Classic; the mightiest of American automobiles and would be the centerpiece of any great automotive collection in the world. Estimation 850 000 - 1 100 000 € Sold for 1,036,344 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2013-02-08
Hammer price
Show price

1989 Ferrari F40

478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC 90-degree V-8 engine with two turbochargers and Weber-Marelli engine management and fuel injection, five-speed manual gearbox, tubular steel and carbon-composite chassis, independent double-wishbone suspension with Koni hydraulic shock absorbers and front and rear anti-roll bars, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm Delivered new to Stefano Casiraghi in Monaco Fitted with desirable Plexiglas windows Just over 4,000 kilometres from new and recently serviced Complete with original tools and books Single private ownership for the last 26 years The year 1987 was big for Enzo Ferrari. Not only did he celebrate his 90th birthday, but, more importantly to him, it was also 40 years since he built his first car. A year earlier, Enzo was reported to have said, “Let’s make something special for next year’s celebrations, in the way we used to do it”. The name for this new car had been suggested by a friend of Ferrari’s, Gino Rancati, who was at Ferrari’s office for a meeting with Razelli, the general manager. Razelli had shown him the new Ferrari, which was to be unveiled at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Rancati asked what it would be called, and Razelli replied that they had two or three possible names but wondered what he would call it. Rancati replied, “Since Ferrari’s biggest market is the United States, and since it is now 40 years since the first Ferrari car has appeared, it should have an English-language name, for example ‘Ferrari Forty’”. Mechanically, the F40 bore much in common with the 288 GTO, and it was, in fact, closely based on the GTO Evoluzione, the race version of the GTO. The F40’s engine was also based on the twin-turbocharged V-8, which was bored to displace almost three litres. The car’s output exceeded 478 horsepower, making the F40 Ferrari’s most powerful road car to date. Ferrari’s riposte to the Lamborghini Countach and the Porsche 959 was to create the first production car to break the mythical 200-mph barrier, and the F40 did just that, as it was capable of reaching a top speed of 201.4 mph. THE ROYAL CONNECTION Fittingly for what was the world’s fastest car, those with the means and appetite for such a car were often large personalities with a daredevil attitude. Few people sum up this description better than Stefano Casiraghi, to whom this F40, with its desirable Plexiglas windows, was delivered in March 1989. Casiraghi was an Italian socialite and businessman who would go on to become the second husband of Princess Caroline of Monaco. He was photographed many times in this car with Princess Caroline, as the couple made the most of the Monaco nightlife. A true daredevil, Casiraghi participated in 80 offshore powerboat races during his lifetime. Over a 20-year career, he won a dozen competitions and was the offshore speedboat world champion at the time of his shocking death in a race off the coast of Monaco. During his time with this F40, Casiraghi was often photographed in it, most notably when he led the Speedboat Parade around the streets of Monaco (images of which, as well as several publications covering the event, are included on file). In May 1989, the F40 was sold to the current owner at the request of the Princess of Monaco. As Stefano had a reputation for spirited driving, the Princess was apparently scared of the car. A copy of the sales invoice with Casiraghi’s signature on it is also noted on file. Well cared for over its life, this F40 has been driven sparingly, amassing just over 4,000 kilometres from new. In fact, it has travelled just over 600 kilometres in the past eight years. The F40 has benefitted from a recent service at Rolf Plus Renn-und Sportcars in Switzerland and is presented in original condition with factory tools and books. The Ferrari F40 was the last Maranello road car to be engineered under Enzo Ferrari’s direct leadership and remains one of the most celebrated high-performance supercars ever built. This example, with its desirable configuration, its royal connection, and the fact it was owned by a true daredevil, is surely one of the best. V8 à 90°, 2 936 cm3, 2 ACT par banc, 478 ch, 2 turbos, injection et gestion moteur Weber-Marelli, transmission manuelle cinq rapports, châssis tubulaire acier et carbone, suspension indépendante par doubles triangles, amortisseurs hydrauliques Koni, barre antiroulis avant/arrière, freins à disques ventilés sur les quatre roues. Empattement 2 450 mm. • Livrée neuve à Stefano Casiraghi, à Monaco • Un des premiers exemplaires, avec vitres coulissantes en plexiglas • seulement 4 000 km depuis l'origine, révision récente • Complète avec outils et manuels d'usine • Un seul propriétaire depuis 26 ans L'année 1987 est importante pour Enzo Ferrari. Non seulement il célèbre son 90e anniversaire, mais en plus il s'est écoulé 40 ans depuis la fabrication de sa première voiture. L'année précédente, Enzo aurait affirmé : "Préparons quelque chose de spécial pour les célébrations de l'année prochaine, comme nous avions coutume de le faire." Le nom de ce nouveau modèle a été suggéré par un ami de Ferrari, Gino Rancati, lors d'une réunion chez Ferrari avec Razelli, directeur général. Razelli lui a montré la nouvelle Ferrari, qui devait être dévoilée au Salon de Francfort. Rancati a demandé comment elle allait s'appeler, et Razelli lui a répondu qu'il existait deux ou trois possibilités, tout en sollicitant son propre avis. Rancati a répondu : "Pour Ferrari le marché, le plus important sont les États-Unis, et c'est il y a quarante ans qu'est sortie la première Ferrari, donc il faudrait choisir un nom à consonance anglaise, comme par exemple "Ferrari Forty"." Mécaniquement, la F40 partageait beaucoup avec la 288 GTO ; elle était en fait étroitement dérivée de la GTO Evoluzione, sa version compétition. Le moteur de la F40 était basé sur le V8 à deux turbocompresseurs, réalésé à presque 3 litres. Les modifications permettaient une augmentation de puissance, qui dépassait 478 ch, ce qui faisait de la F40 la voiture de route la plus puissante de son époque. La réponse de Ferrari à la Lamborghini Countach et à la Porsche 959 était de produire la première voiture de série capable de franchir la barre symbolique de 200 mph (321 km/h). Par conséquent, la F40 atteignait 201,4 mph (324 km/h) en pointe. La connexion Princère Il était logique, s'agissant de la voiture la plus rapide du monde, que ceux qui avaient les moyens et le goût pour une telle machine soient des personnalités expansives, affichant une attitude intrépide. Rares sont ceux qui répondent aussi bien à cette définition que Stefano Casiraghi, à qui était livrée en mars 1989 cette F40, dotée de ses désirables vitres coulissantes en Plexiglas. Casiraghi était un homme d'affaires et une personnalité mondaine qui allait devenir le deuxième mari de la princesse Caroline de Monaco. Il avait été photographié de nombreuses fois en compagnie de la princesse Caroline, avec qui il sortait souvent le soir à Monaco. Pilote hardi, Casiraghi avait pris le départ de plus de 80 compétitions à bord de bateaux de course offshore. Au cours d'une carrière de plus de 20 ans, il avait remporté une douzaine d'épreuves et il était même, au moment de l'accident qui lui a coûté la vie au large de Monaco, Champion du monde en titre de cette spécialité. A l'époque où il possédait la Ferrari F40, il était souvent photographié au volant, en particulier en ouvrant la "Speedboat Parade" dans les rues de Monaco (dont des photos et articles sont inclus dans le dossier). En mai 1989, la F40 était vendue à son actuel propriétaire, à la demande de la princesse de Monaco. Stefano avait la réputation de conduire vite, et cette voiture effrayait semble-t-il la princesse. Une copie de la facture de vente, portant la signature de Casiraghi, fait partie du dossier. Très bien entretenue, cette F40 a été utilisée avec parcimonie, ne couvrant qu'à peine plus de 4 000 km depuis l'origine. En fait, elle n'a parcouru que 600 km au cours des huit dernières années. Elle a bénéficié d'une révision récente effectuée par Rolf Plus Renn- und Sportcars, en Suisse, et se présente en état d'origine, avec outils et manuels d'usine. La Ferrari F40 est la dernière voiture de Maranello conçue sous l'autorité directe d'Enzo Ferrari et elle reste une des supercars les plus célèbres jamais produites. Cet exemplaire, avec sa configuration désirable, sa connexion monégasque et le fait qu'elle a appartenu à un pilote audacieux, est certainement un des meilleurs. Chassis no. ZFFGJ34B000080161 Engine no. 15321 Gearbox no. 096 Body no. 92

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-02-03
Hammer price
Show price

1965 Iso Grifo A3/C Stradale

350+ hp, 5,359 cc OHV Chevrolet Corvette V-8 engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension via wishbones, coil springs, telescopic shocks, and an anti-roll bar, de Dion tube, coil-spring, hydraulic shocks, longitudinal struts, and an anti-roll bar rear suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,446 mm. Early rivet-body example Recently restored by a marque specialist Dubbed the “Green Apple” Giotto Bizzarrini was most famously known as the Ferrari engineer responsible for the design and racing success of the fabled GTO. After leaving the factory, Bizzarrini joined one of his most enduring clients, and the one with which he has been most closely associated, Milanese industrialist Renzo Rivolta, of Isothermos and Isetta fame. Rivolta was a keen auto enthusiast who wanted to build a genuinely reliable GT car, and Bizzarrini worked closely with Iso’s chief technician, Pierluigi Raggi, in developing an extremely sophisticated platform-type chassis for the 2+2 Iso Rivolta GT. To solve the reliability issues that Renzo had encountered with his personal GT cars, Isos used a Chevrolet Corvette engine and transmission. After much development work, the Iso Rivolta GT debuted to rave reviews at the 1962 Turin Show. Next came the landmark model that would serve as the basis for Bizzarrini’s own car: the Iso Grifo. It was a spectacular two-seat GT that was based on a shortened Rivolta chassis, and two variants of it were shown at the model’s debut at the 1963 Turin Auto Show. The Grifo A3/L (“L” for Lusso, or luxury) was on the Bertone stand, whilst the other, the A3/C (“C” for Corsa, or competition) debuted on the Iso stand; the latter car was built by Bizzarrini in his Autostar Works in Livorno. Both Grifos had Giugiaro-designed coachwork, and they featured a stunning combination of Italian styling, a race-inspired chassis, and reliable Chevrolet Corvette V-8 power. For the next 18 months, Bizzarrini made his version of the Grifo under agreement with Iso, and they achieved great success on the track. During this period, however, the relationship between Rivolta and Bizzarrini grew increasingly conflicted, with Bizzarrini wanting to focus on racing and Rivolta wanting to concentrate on production. In the summer of 1965, a deal was ultimately struck, where Bizzarrini would continue to build the cars under his own name in the “Strada” road going form and the “Corsa” form for racing. Whilst the machine was ostensibly a street car, its specifications read like those of an all-out competition car, with lightweight aluminium bodywork, a fabricated platform chassis, and a semi-monocoque body riveted to the frame. This advanced chassis, combined with near-perfect weight distribution, resulted in outstanding performance and incredible handling. Output of the Chevrolet V-8 engine ranged between 350 and 420 horsepower, providing a claimed top speed of up to 180 mph. However, very few examples were produced during an approximate six-year production run, including 124 A3/Cs and approximately 10 fibreglass-bodied examples. Ultimately, the engineer returned to private practice as a consultant, working for such varied companies as Iso and AMC and building the occasional car for an admiring client. Chassis number B 0216 was originally sold new as an Iso Grifo A3/C to Auto Becker in Germany. As an early car, prior to the Iso/Bizzarrini split, it is believed to be one of only twenty riveted-aluminium Drogo-bodied examples with left-hand drive. As such, it also included many features similar to the Le Mans competition variant, namely the aforementioned riveted bodywork, as well as the side vents and four taillights. It is also believed to have been originally finished in the unique and eye-catching Mela Verde (similar to Lamborghini’s famous Verde Miura), which was only discovered during its recent comprehensive restoration. At some point in the late 1960s or early 1970s, the car was returned to the factory. During that time, it was rebuilt and modified to appear more in line with the later Bizzarrini 5300 GTs. As such, the rivets were filled in and the body was painted black. It is also believed that, at this time, the car was re-titled and sold as IA3 0283. Around this time, the Iso left Italy for Germany and was then shipped to the U.S. around 1978. The car remained, in its updated configuration, with several subsequent owners in the U.S. for quite some time, until it was sold to a new owner in 2002. The following year, the car was sent to the renowned restoration shop of Chuck Wray and Kendall Merritt, who thoroughly inspected the car. As its older restoration was starting to fade, evidence of some of the earlier features were beginning to show. The black paint had shrunk, cracked over time, and started to show signs of the rivets that had been covered up. Also, after further inspection, its original chassis number, B 0216, was found stamped into the chassis, and upon purchase, it was titled back to B 0216, as the other number it had been known by could not be found. In 2012, the previous owner commissioned a complete restoration of this early A3/C by one of the leading marque restorers, Salvatore Diomante in Turin, Italy. Interestingly, when the black paint was first stripped off of the car, the original vibrant green was found underneath, even on the door jambs. The running gear, suspension, braking system, and electrical system were all completely restored to as-new condition, and the interior was completely re-trimmed in correct black leather. The later-designed dashboard was also returned to the early style, which featured a centre-mounted speedometer and tachometer that were angled toward the driver. This extremely rare and absolutely flawless Iso A3/C, known in many circles as the 1965 GTO, is an exceptional example. It has been returned to its original look, including in its original eye-popping colour, and it is known as, simply, the “Green Apple”. Moteur V-8 Chevrolet Corvette, 5 359 cm3, + 350 ch, soupapes en tête, boîte manuelle quatre rapports, suspension avant indépendante par triangles, ressorts hélicoïdaux, amortisseurs télescopiques et barre antiroulis, suspension arrière par essieu de Dion, ressorts hélicoïdaux, amortisseurs hydrauliques, bras longitudinaux et barre antiroulis, freins à disque sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 446 mm • Exemplaire des débuts, à carrosserie rivetée • Récemment restaurée par un spécialiste de la marque • Surnommée la « Green Apple » (Pomme Verte) Giotto Bizzarrini s'est rendu célèbre, quand il était ingénieur chez Ferrari, en participant à la conception et aux succès en compétition de la fameuse GTO. Après avoir quitté l'usine, Bizzarrini se rapprochait d'un de ses clients fidèles, avec qui il connaîtra la plus proche association, l'industriel milanais Renzo Rivolta, connu pour l'Isothermos et l'Isetta. Rivolta était un authentique passionné d'automobile qui souhaitait produire une voiture de Grand Tourisme fiable. Bizzarrini a donc travaillé en collaboration étroite avec Pierluigi Raggi, technicien en chef d'Iso, pour mettre au point un châssis-plateforme extrêmement sophistiqué pour l'Iso Rivolta GT 2+2. Pour résoudre les problèmes de fiabilité que Rivolta avait rencontré sur ses voitures de sport, Iso choisissait un moteur et une transmission de Chevrolet Corvette. Après un important travail de mise au point, l'Iso Rivolta GT faisait ses débuts au Salon de Turin 1962 et s'attirait les louanges de la presse. Cette voiture était suivie d'un modèle important, qui allait servir de base pour la propre voiture de Bizzarrini. L'Iso Grifo était une spectaculaire GT deux places, basée sur un châssis Rivolta raccourci et dévoilée sous forme de deux variantes au Salon de Turin 1963. La Grifo A3/L (« L » pour Lusso, luxe) était sur le stand de Bertone alors que l'autre, l'A3/C (« C » pour Corsa, compétition) se trouvait sur le stand Iso ; la deuxième voiture était produite par Bizzarrini dans son atelier Autostar à Livorno. Les deux Grifo comportaient une carrosserie dessinée par Giugiaro, et elles constituaient une impressionnante combinaison de style italien, de châssis inspiré de la compétition et de puissance procurée par le fiable V-8 Chevrolet Corvette. Au cours des 18 mois suivants, Bizzarrini produisit sa version de la Grifo, sous contrat avec Iso, et elle rencontra un grand succès sur circuit. Mais pendant cette période, les relations entre Rivolta et Bizzarrini eurent tendance à se dégrader, Bizzarrini souhaitant se concentrer sur la course alors que Rivolta s'intéressait plutôt à la production en série. En été 1965, un accord était finalement trouvé, au terme duquel Bizzarrini continuait à produire les voitures sous son propre nom, en version « Strada » pour la route, et « Corsa » pour la compétition. Alors que cette voiture était supposée conçue pour la route, ses spécifications correspondaient à celles d'une pure machine de compétition, avec une carrosserie en aluminium, un châssis-plateforme spécifique et une carrosserie semi-monocoque rivetée à la structure. Cette conception avancée, associée à une répartition des poids presque parfaite, générait des performances exceptionnelles et un comportement hors du commun. La puissance du V-8 Chevrolet allait de 350 à 420 ch, ce qui permettait d'atteindre une vitesse de pointe de 290 km/h. Cependant, la production s'est limitée à un faible nombre d'exemplaires, sur une période d'environ six ans, y compris 124 A3/C et environ 10 exemplaires à carrosserie en fibre de verre. Finalement, Bizzarrini retournait à une activité privée de consultant, travaillant pour des entreprises comme Iso ou AMC, ou produisant occasionnellement une voiture pour un client admiratif. Avec son châssis n° B 0216, cette voiture a été vendue neuve, comme Iso Grifo A3/C, à Auto Becker en Allemagne. Faisant partie des premières produites, avant la séparation entre Iso et Bizzarrini, elle serait une des 20 versions carrossées par Drogo avec une carrosserie en aluminium riveté et conduite à gauche. En tant que telle, elle présente aussi des caractéristiques identiques aux versions utilisées aux 24 Heures du Mans, comme la carrosserie rivetée mentionnée plus haut, ainsi que les ouïes latérales et quatre feux arrière. Elle aurait aussi reçu d'origine une peinture unique de teinte Mela Verde (identique au fameux Verde Miura de Lamborghini), ce qui n'a été découvert que lors de sa restauration récente et complète. A la fin des années 1960 ou au début des années 1970, la voiture était renvoyée à l'usine. Elle était alors refaite et modifiée pour apparaître plus proche des Bizzarrini 5300 GT. Ainsi, les trous de rivets étaient comblés, et la carrosserie peinte en noir. Il est probable qu'à cette occasion, la voiture ait été redéfinie et vendue sous le numéro IA3 0283. A peu près à la même époque, l'Iso quittait l'Italie pour l'Allemagne avant d'être envoyée aux États-Unis, en 1978 environ. Elle y restait, avec plusieurs propriétaires, dans sa nouvelle configuration, jusqu'à son achat en 2002 par un nouveau propriétaire. L'année suivante, celui-ci la confiait à l'atelier de restauration réputé de Chuck Wray et Kendall Merritt, qui procédaient à une inspection approfondie de la voiture. Son ancienne restauration commençant à vieillir, certaines caractéristiques anciennes commençaient à réapparaître. La peinture noire, qui s'était craquelée, laissait deviner les rivets qu'elle avait recouverts. De plus, le numéro de châssis d'origine, B 0216, était découvert marqué sur le châssis. Ainsi, lors de la vente de la voiture, elle retrouvait officiellement son numéro B 0216 car l'autre numéro sous lequel elle était connue était resté introuvable. En 2012, le propriétaire précédent passait commande d'une restauration complète de cette ancienne A3/C auprès d'un des meilleurs restaurateurs spécialisés dans cette marque, Salvatore Diomante, à Turin. Lors du décapage de la peinture noire, la teinte verte d'origine est réapparue, y compris sur les montants de porte. Toute la mécanique, la suspension, les freins et le système électrique ont bénéficié d'une restauration complète de haut niveau, la sellerie étant complètement refaite avec un cuir noir conforme. Le tableau de bord retrouvait sa première configuration, avec compteur de vitesses et compte-tours au centre, orientés vers le conducteur. Désignée dans certains milieux comme la GTO 1965, cette Iso A3/C impeccable et rare est un exemplaire exceptionnel. Ayant retrouvé son allure d'origine, dont sa teinte attirante, elle est connue, tout simplement, comme la « Green Apple » (Pomme Verte). Chassis no. B 0216

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-04
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1957 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

215 bhp (DIN), 240 bhp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, coil-spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. The third from last 300 SL Gullwing built; one of only 73 produced in 1957 Known history from new with only five long-term caretakers Wonderful originality and authenticity throughout; original engine Long-term maintenance for previous owners by the noted Paul Russell & Company Complete with manuals and original tools An extremely satisfying Gullwing for the enthusiast driver THE MENNEN GULLWING To those who know Mercedes-Benz serial numbers, 198.040.7500077 is instantly identifiable as something truly special. It is a 300 SL Gullwing, of course, but more unusually, it is a 1957 Gullwing, one of just 73 built, very early in that year, before production moved to the new 300 SL roadster. No. 7500074 was only three chassis before the final Gullwing built, and delivery was made on 7 May 1957, making it one of the final 300 SL coupes delivered to a customer. Outside of the famous “alloys,” the 1957s are the last of the legendary breed, the rarest of all Gullwings, and among the most difficult to acquire today. The original Daimler-Benz data card for this car, a copy of which is on file, notes that it was built with engine number 198.980.7500072, that which is still installed today; both the chassis and engine number stampings are present in their expected locations and appear original and authentic. The car was finished in Fire Engine Red with Black leather interior, and it was optioned for the United States with sealed-beam headlights and turn signals, English instruments, Becker Mexico radio with automatic antenna, and a rear-view mirror. The car was shipped stateside from Hamburg to original owner George Mennen of Montclair, New Jersey, a prominent Garden State philanthropist and aviator, and the last family chairman of the Mennen Company (manufacturers of men’s toiletries). Joseph M. Stoytak of Springfield, Massachusetts, acquired the car from Mr. Mennen in 1978 and retained it for 30 years, then passed it to David Zagaroli of Hickory, North Carolina, via the well-known specialists Paul Russell & Company, which had cared for the car since Mr. Stoyak’s acquisition. Following brief ownership in New York, the car was acquired by Orin Smith in 2010 and has remained well looked-after in his studious ownership ever since. The Gullwing received major services by Tamburr Motorcars of Melbourne, Florida, later that year, including rebuilding the brakes and rear axle. Overall the car retains a wonderfully solid and, to use a clichéd but appropriate term, honest appearance, with no suggestion of undue molestation or hasty repairs to be found anywhere; underneath is clean and solid. Repainted correctly some years ago, it has a good patina, with the correct, more recent leather interior being carefully worn-in and as comfortable and well-fitted as an old baseball glove. The steering wheel exhibits minor cracking but is very presentable and in character with the remainder of the interior. The finishes underhood appear original and well-maintained, and Sekurit glass is still present in all the windows, although the original belly pans are no longer present, as is commonplace. Accompanying the Gullwing are an original owner’s manual, a reprint of the factory instruction manual in English, a proper jack and wheel tool, the pair of original and complete tool rolls, and a correct spare. Many 300 SL Gullwings were driven hard, as their manufacturer intended, necessitating today’s world of fully restored examples of widely varying quality. This car is different; a lovely and sympathetically maintained, carefully curated original, which has been improved only as needed, and retains all the charm and originality of its past. For the enthusiast seeking a 300 SL to drive, there is simply no better or more authentic choice. Chassis no. 198.040.7500077 Engine no. 198.980.7500072 Body no. 198.040.7500074

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
Show price

1992 Ferrari F40

478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC 90-degree V-8 engine with twin turbochargers and Weber-Marelli engine management and fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, tubular steel and carbon composite chassis, front and rear independent double-wishbone suspension with Koni hydraulic shock absorbers and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm Less than 26,800 kilometres Recent service by Motor Service Srl The very first production car to top 200 mph, the F40 was a landmark car in Ferrari’s history for a variety of reasons. It was created in celebration of the company’s 40th birthday and would be the very last Ferrari that Enzo Ferrari personally oversaw before his passing. Looking to its Formula 1 team for inspiration, Ferrari sought to make the F40 as lightweight as possible, pioneering the use of carbon fibre for its chassis and bodywork, resulting in a svelte 2,400 pounds. In addition to its top speed of 201.4 mph, the F40 could sprint from 0–60 mph in just 3.8 seconds and rocket through the quarter-mile in 11.8 seconds. Originally outfitted with catalytic converters and a non-adjustable suspension, chassis 91464 was delivered new to Dr Daniel Schick through Graber Automobile AG in Wichtrach, Switzerland, on 18 December 1991. Dr Schick resided in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, but kept his F40 in Switzerland and Germany for his personal use and the use of his son living in Germany at the time. It was later sold to a Mr Goldschagg of Switzerland before passing to an owner in Munich, Germany, who registered the car on German plates M-WW 8833. During its time in Germany, the F40 was fitted with non-standard wheels, a new nose with slightly flared fender arches, and its suspension was upgraded. The F40 had returned to its native Italy around 2007 and received its 30,000 kilometre service (with 26,761 kilometres showing) by Michelotto Giuliano & Co s.n.c in Padova that year. More recently, it has been serviced by Motor Service Srl, the official Ferrari dealership in Modena. Motore V-8 a 90°, doppio albero a camme in testa per bancata, 2936 cc, 478 Cv, con doppio turbocompressore e sistema di gestione del motore e dell’iniezione elettronica Weber-Marelli, cambio manuale a 5 marce, telaio in acciaio tubolare e fibra di carbonio. Sospensioni a quattro ruote indipendenti con doppio quadrilatero deformabile con ammortizzatori idraulici Koni e barre anti rollio, quattro freni a disco autoventilati. Passo: 2450 mm • Meno di 26.800 chilometri • Recentemente tagliandata presso la Motor Service Srl La prima vettura di normale produzione a raggiungere i 320 Km/h, la F40 è stata, per molte ragioni, una delle pietre miliari della storia Ferrari. Creata per celebrare il 40° anniversario della società, diventerà l’ultimo modello ad essere deliberato da Enzo Ferrari, poco prima della sua morte. Ispirandosi alle soluzioni tecniche della Formula 1, la Ferrari si è impegnata per fare l’F40 il più leggera possibile, anticipando l’uso della fibra di carbonio per la realizzazione del telaio e della carrozzeria, ottenendo il risultato finale di una vettura pesante poco più di 1110 chili. In aggiunta alla sua velocità massima di 320 Km/h, la F40 è capace di passare da 0 a 100 Km/h in soli 3,8 secondi e di traguardare i 400 metri in 11,8 secondi. Originalmente equipaggiato di catalizzatore e di sospensioni non regolabili, il telaio 91464 è stato consegnato nuovo in Svizzera, al Dr. Daniel Schick, tramite la concessionaria Graber Automobile AG, di Wichtrach, il 18 dicembre 1991. Il Dr. Schick, residente a Rio de Janeiro, Brasile, teneva comunque la sua F40 tra Germania e Svizzera, pronta per essere usata da lui o dal figlio, al tempo abitante in Germania. Successivamente è stata venduta, sempre in Svizzera, al Sig. Goldschagg poi seguito da un altro proprietario a Monaco, Germania, che l’ha targata M-WW 8833. Durante gli anni trascorsi in Germania, la macchina è stata equipaggiata con cerchioni non originali, un nuovo muso e passaruota leggermente allargati e le sospensioni sono state modificate. L’F40 è tornata nella natia Italia verso il 2007, ed ha subito effettuato, a 26.761 chilometri, il tagliando dei 30.000 chilometri presso l’officina Michelotto Giuliano & Co. s.n.c. di Padova. Più recentemente è stata tagliandata presso la Motor Service srl, officina ufficiale Ferrari e Maserati di Modena. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue, this lot will now be offered with Italian Libretto. Please note this lot is currently under an order of seizure, which will be removed following the sale. Upon receipt of payment from the buyer, RM Sotheby’s will liaise with the appointed administrator for release of the seizure, which is expected to take approximately 10 days. During this time, lots will remain onsite at the Fiera Milano and collection can be arranged after confirmation from RM that the seizure order has been lifted. For lots with a current Italian libretto, please be aware that the PRA must remove the seizure order from its records before re-registration can take place in any country. This process is expected to take 6-8 weeks, during which lots may be transported to an EU destination but may not be exported. Chassis no. ZFFGJ34B000091464

  • ITAItaly
  • 2016-11-25
Hammer price
Show price

1955 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports Saloon by H.J. Mulliner

178 bhp, 4,887 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors, four-speed automatic transmission, independent front suspension with wishbones, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 120 in. The ultimate R-Type Continental Factory left-hand drive, lightweight seats, and a 4.9-liter engine Matching-numbers engine and original upholstery Still the ideal gentleman’s driving machine A MODERN MAGIC CARPET Even after becoming the “Silent Sports Car” in the mid-1930s, Bentley held tight to its performance heritage. Later in the decade, the company began experimenting with aerodynamic designs and eventually created the Georges Paulin-designed Corniche prototype of 1940. The Corniche did not survive World War II, but its spirit did, and after the war, it evolved into H.I.F. Evernden and J.P. Blatchley’s R-Type Continental. It is “a car which would not only look beautiful but possess a high maximum speed, coupled with a correspondingly high rate of acceleration, together with excellent handling and roadability.” H.J. Mulliner was contracted to design and build the prototype Continental, which was based on the frame, suspension, steering, and braking components of a standard R-Type. The body, window, and seat frames were built of light alloy, resulting in a four-passenger body that weighed only 750 pounds and less than 4,000 pounds when mated to the chassis. After extensive road tests in France, the prototype’s overdriven top-gear gearbox was found to be unsuitable for the rpms offered by the engine, so it was replaced by a direct-ratio top gear and lower axle ratio, which was a combination that proved best for both high-speed touring and well-spaced gear changes for city driving. Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. The Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental created a space for itself that was unique. It combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” CHASSIS NUMBER BC67LD Chassis number BC67LD, the car offered here, is part of the fourth “D” series of R-Type Continentals, and it is, of course, listed in the Bentley R-Type Continental Register. Copies of its original build sheets, which were acquired from the Rolls-Royce Foundation, are also on file. These document and verify its original specifications, which are some of the highest and most desirable of any of its ilk. The car was ordered by J. Guinness, of Monaco. By this time, R-Type Continentals were being equipped with the later, more desirable 4.9-liter engine, which was used as an upgrade on numerous earlier cars. This car has had the 4.9 engine since new, and it has been mated to an especially smooth and compliant four-speed automatic gearbox. The order of a car with an automatic gearbox caused some consternation at Bentley Motors, as apparently Mr. Guinness was a significant enough customer to warrant a car being built for him without delay, but no chassis with an automatic gearbox was near completion. Bentley paid H.J. Mulliner ?157 to remove the body from chassis number B16D, as yet unsold, and install it on this new chassis. Thus, as the register explains, “The body number is lower than that found on other late D series chassis.” Mr. Guinness’s car was also equipped from new with Mulliner’s famous lightweight bucket seats, which are both extraordinarily supportive and sporting. The completed R-Type Continental was flown from Ferryfield Airport to Le Touquet via Silver City Airways on March 1, 1955, and it underwent much testing before being delivered to Mr. Guinness via Franco-Brittanic Automobiles of Paris. FBA would go on to handle the car no fewer than three more times, for its next trio of owners—Monsieurs Chauvel, Bonnal, and Meuli—all of whom were French residents. In 1980, the car was purchased by French collector Christian Teissier through Frank Dale & Stepsons. It later passed to Belgian owner Michel Kruch during a private sale on January 1, 1998, and it then joined the well-known and highly regarded stable of Friedhelm Loh prior to joining the Andrews Collection several years ago. The car has a wonderfully patinated appearance throughout, including on its original maroon leather interior, which is beautifully worn and as comfortable as a favorite baseball glove. Its bodywork is finished in rich, deep black, which is perhaps the best color for this body style, and it is accentuated by the original Wilmot Breedon bumpers, dual driving lights, and subtle blackwall tires. Presently, the car records 27,816 kilometers on its odometer. Under the hood, its finishes are somewhat worn but tidy, in keeping with a car that has been driven and enjoyed for some years, and it still wears its original firewall-mounted serial number tag, its original body number, and the delivery plate from Franco-Brittanic Automobiles. Accompanying this R-Type Continental is a small but rather fascinating file, which includes not only the aforementioned build sheets but also such valuable original literature as maintenance instructions for H.J. Mulliner Coachwork, a guidebook to Rolls-Royce Service Facilities worldwide, and, amusingly, a directory for Lucas electrical system service in Europe. R-Type Continentals are beloved by collectors for being superb long-distance touring automobiles, and few are better suited for continued road trips and rallies than this charmingly original, well-maintained, and eminently drivable Sports Saloon. Chassis no. BC67LD Engine no. BCD66 Body no. 5732

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
Show price

1962 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-camshaft inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension and coil-spring single-point swing axle rear suspension, and servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. A wonderful recent discovery Offered from 40 years of single-family ownership Factory European-specification disc brake car Original leather interior and removable hardtop There was no doubt that Mercedes-Benz had a hit on their hands with their spectacular 300 SL Gullwing. The car’s looks, performance, and brilliant engineering captivated the automotive world, and it proved to be a runaway success for Mercedes-Benz. As production was soon coming to an end for the iconic 300 SL Coupe, the marque grew more eager to add a convertible version to its lineup. A prototype of this new model was first spotted by German magazine Auto, Motor und Sport at Stuttgart in the summer of 1956, and the production model would later debut at the 1957 Geneva Motor Show. By the end of that year, the final 70 of the 1,400 Coupes and the first 618 of the 300 SL Roadsters were assembled. Along with a convertible top, the 300 SL brought a host of advancements to the already state-of-the-art platform. The central section of the 300 SL’s space-frame chassis was lowered and smaller sills and enlarged doors were added to improve entrance and egress. Its strength was maintained, nonetheless, with the addition of diagonal struts bracing the lowered side sections to the rear tubular members. The suspension was also revised to allow for a more comfortable ride and improved handling. At the rear, the spare tire was repositioned below the trunk floor, necessitating a smaller fuel tank but also maintaining reasonable luggage space. Even though these revisions added some 250 pounds, the majority of which were associated with the convertible top and its mechanisms, the car remained an excellent performer, with a factory-claimed 137 mph top speed. Just like the 300 SL Coupe, the Roadster proved to be the vehicle of choice for those with brilliant taste in aesthetics and cutting-edge engineering. As such, many wound up in the garages of celebrities, racing drivers, and other financially successful individuals. With a list price of $11,000, ownership of a 300 SL was a dream to most when the car was new, and to those with the funds to spare, the car was worth every penny. To those looking to make a statement with the purchase of a new car, there was simply no better option. MR. ROJO’S PUERTO RICAN ROADSTER The factory data card of the 300 SL Roadster offered here, chassis number 198.042.10.002992, records that it was originally delivered in Ivory (608) and came with a Black (040) removable hardtop and Red (204) leather upholstery. Importantly, its chassis number falls into the range of late Roadsters that were equipped by the factory with disc brakes, which the car retains to this day. In addition, the car is an original European-delivery example, and therefore, it has worn its desirable full-lensed headlamps and original factory fog lights since new. Ownership is recorded in the Gull Wing Group’s Roadster Registry as far back as the early 1970s, when the car was owned by V. Schafharst, of Amsterdam, Netherlands. While in Mr. Schafharst’s ownership, the Roadster was maintained by Agam-Kronenburg B.V., the Mercedes-Benz dealer in his hometown. In 1974, Agustin Rojo Jr., a successful businessman from San Juan, Puerto Rico, traveled to Europe in search of his dream car, a 300 SL Roadster. He acquired this car from Agam-Kronenberg B.V., by which time it had already been repainted its present color. He proceeded to spend two months driving the car throughout Europe, with no hotel reservations or fixed schedule. His daughters joined him for the last part of this “once-in-a-lifetime” journey, which, it is reported, cured its owner’s “midlife crisis.” The following year, with the Roadster now safely in Puerto Rico, it was registered with the Gull Wing Group, which recorded 99,175 kilometers on its odometer. The registration form documents that by this point the car was already fitted with its present engine, number 198.980.10.003062, which, interestingly, is only three numbers off of the engine originally fitted. For the last 40 years, this prized Roadster has remained in the ownership of the Rojo family. It was repainted some time ago in its present soft grey, which is a wonderful contrast to the lovingly worn-in original leather upholstery. The 110,405 kilometers presently recorded shows that Mr. Rojo has covered only 11,000 kilometers since he registered the car with the Gull Wing Group, which previously stated it at 99,175 kilometers. That mileage was covered on the sun-drenched roads of Puerto Rico, where it participated with the family in rallies and other events, as well as in picking up pastries for the Rojo children on Sundays. Mr. Rojo’s son recalls learning to wash cars by cleaning the 300 SL, and incredibly, this was also the car in which he learned to drive! The car is accompanied by a collection of valuable documentation, which includes both of its original owner’s manuals (in English and German), a mint-condition original disc brake manual, a water-damaged original 300 SL Roadster catalogue, and records from its service in Puerto Rico over the passing decades, as well as several Gull Wing Group newsletters, paperwork involving Mr. Rojo’s involvement in the group, and family photographs taken with the car over the years. Also included is documentation of its purchase in the Netherlands and importation to Puerto Rico, including the original invoice to Mr. Rojo, his handwritten notes on currency exchanges to pay for the car, and the traveler’s letter of credit, issued for the purchase by the Royal Bank of Canada. The “Puerto Rican Roadster” is one of the most exciting 300 SL Roadsters to be offered in recent memory. Numerous restored examples have been fitted with disc brakes, European headlights, and a hardtop, but this one has had all three features since new, and it combines them all with stunning originality. This car is worn-in but not worn out, and it is ready for continued refreshing and a return to the roads or to be used as the best possible basis for a restoration. The opportunities, like a good driving road, go on forever. Ella es hermosa! Addendum This title is in transit. Chassis no. 198.042.10.002992 Engine no. 198.980.10.003062 Body no. 198.042.10.00254

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
Show price

1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast

400 bhp, 4,962 cc single overhead camshaft V12 engine, five-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.3" - One of the last of the 36 Superfasts built, delivered new to John von Neumann - One of 12 Series II examples - Air conditioning, power windows and power steering - Shown and judged in multiple concours d’elegance, including Pebble Beach, Amelia Island, Cavallino Classic and Rodeo Drive - Paul Russell Concours Award Winner In its day, the 500 Superfast was the undisputed pinnacle in Ferrari ownership. At a time when a 275 GTB’s V12 produced about 300 horsepower, the 500 Superfast’s 4.9-liter V12 put out a full 400 horsepower, was capable of exceeding 170 mph and was produced in miniscule, ultra-exclusive numbers. The list of owners was the usual who’s who of Ferrari’s elite clientele – Principe Sadhruddin Aga Khan, Peter Livanos (later to own Aston Martin), Georges Filipinetti, the Shah of Iran and Peter Sellers, to name a few. The 500 Superfast was a supercar in the truest modern sense of the word – impossibly powerful, beautiful and unbelievably expensive yet perfectly suited to high speed continental trips in true GT fashion. Introduced at Geneva in 1964 and designed and built by Pininfarina, the 500 Superfast was built in a limited run of only 36 cars. It was a logical evolution not only of the 410/400 Superamerica but also the one-off “Superfast” styling/engineering executed by Ferrari in previous years. Its Type 208 V12 was unique to this model with the bore and stroke dimensions of the Lampredi V12, but its construction with detachable cylinder heads was more akin to the Colombo motor. Enthusiasts typically divide the car’s production run into two series, the first having 24 cars and the second 12. Generally speaking, the difference with Series II examples is the five-speed gearbox, suspended pedals, Borg and Beck clutches, power steering and other features, but as with all things Ferrari, the distinctions are not as cut and dry. The 500 Superfast we have the pleasure of offering here is definitely a Series II model and is the 33rd of the 36 total cars built. The fourth from the last built, it was delivered new with left-hand drive, air conditioning, power windows and power steering. Completed by Pininfarina in April 1966, it was sold new the same year to first owner John von Neumann, resident of Los Angeles, California and Geneva, Switzerland. The Austrian-born von Neumann is of course best known for his involvement in West Coast racing and as an importer for European sports cars, including Ferraris. A founder of the California Sports Car Club, in many ways, he and his colleagues were responsible for the growth of imported sports car racing in the United States, and he enjoyed great success as the founder of Competition Motors. Von Neumann owned this Superfast for several years, and in 1973, it was sold to Charlie Hayes of Tustin, Texas. It is also known that at some point in the 1970s the car was temporarily fitted with the engine from 8083 SF, another Superfast, and that later in the decade it was acquired by Sal di Natale’s S&A Italia Sports Car Specialists of Van Nuys, California. Charles Borin of Calabasas bought the car in 1979 and had it repainted red with a tan interior. Ed Waterman of Ft. Lauderdale acquired the car in the early 1990s, before it was fully restored, reunited with its original engine and repainted dark blue with a cognac leather interior. In 2003, Charlie Morse of Seattle, Washington, yet another well respected collector, owned the car and showed it at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance and the Palm Beach Cavallino Classic at The Breakers, where it handily won first in class in both events. It also won the DuPont Registry award for the Most Elegant Sporting Car. In 2004, Morse sold the car to Dr. Ervin “Bud” Lyon, yet another well known collector, of New Hampshire. Lyon actively campaigned the car at all the major concours events, first showing it the following year at the 55th Annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in Class M-1 for Ferrari GT cars, where it received a score of 95 points (copy of National Ferrari Concours scoring sheet in file) as well as at the Palm Beach Cavallino Classic at The Breakers in January 2006. Following this showing, the car received extensive mechanical and cosmetic work by marque expert Paul Russell. In 2007, the car returned to Florida and won the Amelia Award at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. The current owner acquired the car in 2008 and has driven the car less than 400 miles since Paul Russell finished preparing the car for the 2007 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. The current owner is also the proud owner of a Paul Russell restored Mercedes 300SL Gullwing, and he immediately flew to Paul Russell’s facility when he heard this car may be available for sale, because he knew what quality of workmanship to expect. He was not disappointed when he inspected the car, and he purchased it on the spot! He showed the car at the 2009 Rodeo Drive Concours where Charlie Morse, one of the previous owners, came up and introduced himself. The car is still finished in blue with a lovely cognac interior and retains its air conditioning, power windows and power steering, the way it left the factory. Offered in outstanding restored condition, the car comes with a comprehensive dossier of information including receipts and records of the restoration totaling over $280,000 as well as all its books and tools. The current owner has recently had mechanical work completed at Francorchamps of America and Ferrari Beverly Hills, and the car is on the button and ready to be driven. The offering of a 500 Superfast of this caliber is a rare occurrence indeed and a unique opportunity for the true connoisseur. These cars are rarely brought to auction, and they were and remain one of Ferrari’s finest gran turismos. Chassis 8565 SF combines all the elements of desirability tifosi look for – an award-winning restoration, superb color combination, matching-numbers original engine and known provenance, provided in this case with ownership by John von Neumann, one of this country’s most important Ferrari personalities. Addendum Please note that according to Ferrari authorities, this car was sent back to the factory early in its history to be upgraded with coil-spring front suspension to improve drivability. Chassis no. 8565 SF

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
Show price

1948 Tucker 48 4Dr Sedan

166 bhp, 335 cu. in. OHV horizontally-opposed six-cylinder engine, four-speed preselector transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 130" - From the estate of Mr. John M. O'Quinn - Revolutionary postwar design - One of 51 built - Icon of American film and culture Preston Tucker had automobiles in his blood. First employed as an office boy in Cadillac Engineering, he later worked on the Ford assembly line. It was in auto sales, however, that he finally made his mark, eventually appointed as a regional sales manager for Pierce-Arrow. Tucker befriended Harry Miller and teamed with him as Miller and Tucker, Inc. to build the front-wheel drive Indianapolis race cars for Ford Motor Company in 1935. As war loomed in Europe in the late 1930s, Tucker envisaged a light, maneuverable scout car for the services, with a swiveling gun turret. He built a prototype and had talks with the Dutch, but before he could complete the deal, their country was overrun by the Germans. He marketed the vehicle to the U.S. forces unsuccessfully, although the turret was eventually used on PT boats, landing craft and bombers. It was during the war, however, that Tucker resolved to build his own automobile. The concept was revolutionary. He intended to use a Miller-designed engine mounted in the rear. Suspension was to be all-independent, with disc brakes at each wheel. A wide, one-piece windshield would be designed to pop out in case of accident. Sketches appearing in Science Digest in 1946 were titled “Torpedo on Wheels,” and the name “Torpedo” was briefly allocated to the car. Tucker soon changed it to simply “Tucker 48” to escape any military connotations. His significant inspiration was hiring Alex Tremulis to complete the design. Tremulis, who had come from Auburn and Cord, finished the drawings in five days, and a full-page ad was running in March 1947. The initial prototype, completed in 100 days, had a version of Miller’s horizontally-opposed six-cylinder engine. With overhead valves operated by oil pressure rather than a camshaft, pushrods and rockers, it had hemispherical combustion chambers and displaced a whopping 589 cubic inches. Drive was to be by twin torque converters, one at each rear wheel, and suspension would be a “Torsilastic” affair, independent with rubber springing all around. The Miller engine proved impractical, as did the direct torque converter drive. Instead, Tucker bought Air Cooled Motors, a Syracuse, New York company making helicopter engines for the Bell Aircraft Corporation. Reworking the helicopter engine, which was a Franklin derivative, for water cooling, he installed it in the Tucker 48 with a four-speed transaxle from the Cord 810 and 812. Disc brakes were dropped for economy reasons, and the one-piece windshield became a more conventional split design. Eventually, 51 cars were built, but by the time they appeared in public, the Tucker Corporation had come under the scrutiny of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, some say brought on by Big Three automakers and Senator Homer Ferguson from Michigan. The gears of government ground slowly, and it was January 1950 before Tucker and his executives were eventually declared “not guilty” on all counts. But by that time, the Tucker 48 had effectively been torpedoed and its inventor left indelibly in debt. Purchased in 2006 from Robert Pass, founder of Passport Transport, this Tucker 48 has a long heritage within the Tucker community. In the 1950s, it was owned by Nick Jenin, a Florida entrepreneur who amassed a collection of ten or more cars and various memorabilia. Jenin created a traveling Tucker show, which appeared at fairs and car shows. After about ten years, he dispersed his collection, and Tucker #1045 was sold to Walter Bellm, who put it on display at his Bellm’s Cars and Music of Yesteryear museum in Sarasota, Florida. It subsequently had a number of owners, ending up in Ohio about ten years ago before being acquired by the current private collection. Overall, the car has nice paint and chrome. With the exception of slight misalignment of the doors, the car has very few cosmetic issues and presents very well indeed, finished in Navy Blue with blue cloth upholstery. The instrument panel and steering wheel show no blemishes; the odometer reads 608 miles. The engine compartment is clean and correct without being excessively detailed. This is a very nice example of one of America’s most innovative automobiles, however, it has been part of a large private collection and may need some mechanical reconditioning prior to road use. Tuckers have a loyal following and are well documented by their enthusiast owners. In the years since the construction of his cars, Preston Tucker has entered the history books as a visionary car builder. His design and safety concepts were decades ahead of their time and are clearly in evidence in this very rare Tucker 48. Chassis no. 1045

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
Show price

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spyder

352bhp, 4,380 cc double overhead cam V12 engine, six Weber 40DCN20 carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5" Beginning with the 166 Inter, the success of Ferrari’s road-going cars has been closely intertwined with the Scuderia’s achievements on the track. Competition racing provided not only a proving ground for continued testing of newer and better technologies, but also garnered a formidable reputation for the prancing horses of Maranello. The mid-1960s were characterized by a staunch prototype rivalry between Ferrari and Ford, who had entered the endurance racing scene with the extraordinary GT 40. After being vanquished repeatedly at Le Mans, Ferrari struck back in 1967 with a 1-2-3 photo finish with their P4 and P3/4 sports-racing cars at the Daytona Continental 24 Hours. Of course, it was this particularly meaningful podium sweep that would nickname the company’s latest high-speed grand tourer, the 365 GTB/4, introduced the following year in Paris. The “Daytona”, however, owed much of its lifeblood and heritage to its spectacular predecessor, the 275 GTB, introduced at the same venue four years earlier, following the end of production for Ferrari’s 250 GT SWB Berlinetta. Model nomenclature was derived from engine and cylinder displacement and helped differentiate the new from the old. The size of the twelve-cylinder engine was increased from 3 liters to 3,286 cc, with each cylinder displacing roughly 275 cc. The Ferrari 275 GTB signaled an important evolution for Ferrari as the company had finally adopted a fully independent suspension, which had been tested, developed, and proved in Ferrari’s sports racing cars beginning with the Testa Rossa in the early 1960s. Bodied by Scaglietti and designed by Pininfarina, the 275 GTB echoed the aggressive, purposeful appearance of the 250 Tour de France and GTO with its long hood, covered headlights, fastback roofline, Kamm tail, and vents in both the front wings and roof sail panel. In October 1966, again at the Paris Salon, Ferrari introduced the next evolution of the 275 GTB, the 275 GTB/4. Other than an increase in track by 24mm, the chassis was unchanged. Pininfarina’s body, which had been enhanced during the 275 GTB’s production with a longer nose to reduce front end lift at speed, also remained the same with the exception of a small bonnet bulge to clear the carburetors. The change in model designation simply reflected the single substantial difference between the GTB/4 and its predecessor; the V12 engine was fitted with four overhead camshafts, two per cylinder bank. This revised powerplant, known as Tipo 226, developed as much power as Ferrari’s competition twin-camshaft engine. In addition to four camshafts, the Tipo 226 featured a number of engine modifications also developed directly from racetrack competition. All told, this formidable powerplant was capable of propelling the new 275 GTB/4 to a top speed of 160 miles per hour. Competition power levels had been made available to Ferrari’s clients right off the showroom floor. The engine, driveshaft, and rear-mounted transaxle were combined in one sub-assembly, mounted to the chassis at four points. All of this helped produce a rigid car that handled superbly, with neutral handling and near-perfect 50/50 weight distribution. 365 GTB/4 Daytona In 1968, Ferrari unveiled its replacement for the beautiful 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta in Paris. The new 365 GTB/4 was more than a worthy replacement for its predecessor, with which it shared a chassis, suspension, 2,400mm wheelbase, and much of its layout. As the last front-engine Berlinetta, Pininfarina produced an attractive design that at once paid homage to the car’s heritage while providing clients with an exciting new look for Ferrari’s flagship road-going model. The smooth, unbroken design was accented by a crease that ran the length of the body, just below the top of the wheel wells. Up front, the small, black egg crate grill was complemented by rubber-tipped bumperettes. A matching set of bumperettes was fitted at the rear below four round taillights, a design feature that has persisted to this day. Constructed by Scaglietti, overall weight of the Daytona was reduced by utilizing aluminum for the doors, bonnet, and boot lid. Initially, the headlights were set back behind a transparent full-width plastic cover. American safety regulations required that Daytonas produced for stateside exportation be fitted with retractable headlights under two flush-fitting panels. Three-eared knock-off wheels were also replaced with plain, hexagonal-type units. By 1971, however, the concealed headlamps were adopted series-wide. In fact, about 1,285 Daytona Coupés were assembled over a production run that lasted through 1974. For the 365 GTB/4, Ferrari adopted its tried and true Colombo-designed V12. Displacing 4.4-liters, the 12-cylinder engine utilized four overhead camshafts and was fitted with six Weber 40DCN 20 carburetors, producing 352 horsepower at 7,500rpm. The not-unrealistic top speed of 174 miles per hour claimed by Ferrari was tested by the daring drivers at Road and Track who reached 173 miles per hour in their GTB/4. From a standstill, 60 miles per hour came up in 5.9 seconds and the 3,500-pound car could turn the quarter-mile in 13.8 seconds. Incidentally, several 365 GTB/4s were raced by their owners. As late as 1979, a factory-prepared, NART-entered version came in second at Daytona with Paul Newman as one of the drivers. Not all racing endeavors were entirely legal, however; Brock Yates and the Le Mans-winning Dan Gurney claim to have tested the Daytona’s top speed for themselves on the public highways of Arizona during the second running of the original Cannonball Baker Memorial Trophy Dash between New York City and Los Angeles. The Cannonball Rally, as it came to be known, was later immortalized on the silver screen. What had initially been conceived as an interim model for the long-overdue 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer had not only become the costliest production Ferrari to date but also the fastest, most attractive, and quite possibly, the most desirable car in the world. Alongside the 365 GTB/4 Berlinetta, however, Ferrari also produced a small series of Spyder variants, which remain among the most sought-after and highly regarded Ferraris to date. Interestingly, those examples officially exported to the United States were stamped as “365 GTB/4” instead of “365 GTS/4” and are therefore referred to as such. The first “Daytona Spyder” was presented at the 44th Annual IAA Motor Show in Frankfurt on September 11, 1969. The example shown was finished in yellow with the concave bodyline finished in black, and featured Borrani wire wheels. The rear wings were squared-off on the top edges, losing some of the roundness of the Berlinetta and subtly altering the accent of the bodyline. The first Daytona Spyder was fitted with the Perspex-covered headlights, although all further examples sported pop-up headlights. In all, Ferrari produced just 121 Daytona Spyders, including the prototype example. 96 units were destined for the U.S. market and merely 25 were built to European specifications. Clearly, the bulk of production was destined for Ferrari’s most important export market: the United States of America. CHASSIS NO. 15171 The Ferrari GTB/4 Spyder offered here was the 41st Daytona Spider produced, bearing chassis number 15171 and assembled as a left-hand drive U.S. version, finished in a very attractive bright shade of red, termed Rosso Chiaro. The nero (black) interior benefited from air conditioning as well as red seat inserts. 15171 was delivered new in 1971 to Bill Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors of Reno, Nevada and was sold the same year through Hollywood Sport Cars to a lady in California. The car was returned to Hollywood Sport Cars shortly thereafter before being sold once more on August 31, 1974 to a chemical engineer in La Jolla, California who, quite remarkably, has owned the car ever since. A doctor of chemistry, he was by all accounts tremendously attentive to the proper maintenance and care of his rare Daytona Spider and saved every important piece of documentation associated with its history. By 1992, the car had only amassed 32,000 miles. According to the owner, the car incurred minor damage three years later, after which he elected to replace the trunk lid and repaint the entire car, returning it to pristine condition. Having remained in California its entire life, the car is simply outstanding and factory correct in every respect, showing less than 39,000 miles. As would be expected of an original car that received such meticulous care, the Ferrari’s condition is wonderful. The red and black interior, for instance, is in lovely, original condition throughout and the red carpeting and original door panels and black upholstery with red inserts are particularly exceptional. In fact, the original “mousehair” dash material has survived beautifully. The quality of the engine bay, undercarriage and trunk are equally impressive and commensurate with the quality of the exterior and interior. Perhaps most importantly, the vendor has saved every element of the car that warranted replacement, including the original convertible top and such smaller pieces as the ignition switch. Furthermore, the list of original historical documentation accompanying the car is unmatched; owners manuals, an original Ferrari briefcase, a warranty booklet, receipts, service records, correspondence, a wiping cloth, the original bill of sale, and even the car’s original advertisement published in the Los Angeles Times have all been saved and remain in outstanding condition. In fact, both original tool kits are in pristine, as-new condition and the Ferrari also retains an original set of five-spoke knock-off Cromodora wheels to complement the optional Borrani wire wheels, spare wheel and tire currently fitted to the car. Fully serviced, the car more recently received a new clutch, fuel bladders, and the transaxle was rebuilt and completely serviced. It runs and drives beautifully, performing absolutely without fault and with all the power and brute Ferrari performance characteristic of the 365 GTB/4 Daytona. The open Spyder configuration is a favorite among Ferraristi; it is a perpetually desirable and rare model that benefits from a gorgeous Pininfarina design and remarkable V12 performance. Alongside its superb condition, the example presented here further sets itself apart with a tremendously well-documented history, complementing its status as one of a limited few Daytona Spyders produced between 1969 and 1974. Powerful, sexy, and tremendously fast, the 365 GTB/4 and GTS/4 stand out as one of the finest sports cars ever produced by Ferrari and undoubtedly one of the most exciting to drive. Chassis no. 15171

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-15
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 S by Bertone

370 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC transverse mid-mounted alloy V-12 engine with four Weber 40 IDL 3C carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension with A-arms, coil springs, tubular shock absorbers, and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel hydraulic ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in. One of the final examples of the Miura P400 S produced The latest evolution of the Miura P400 S; fitted with numerous updates, including desirable ventilated disc brakes and a reinforced chassis Only 30,000 kilometres from new Fully matching numbers Recently refurbished and ready for the road To many, the introduction of the Lamborghini Miura heralded the birth of the “supercar” as we know it. Prior to its introduction in 1966, there were of course many cars that offered incredible levels of performance and exclusivity to the privileged few, but there were none like the Miura. It offered a thrilling combination of not only performance and tremendous speed but also design and technical innovation that were meant to shock and awe, as well as a price tag to match. Its Bertone bodywork was penned by Marcello Gandini, and the development team included two brilliant engineers that were privileged enough to work on the Miura at the start of their long careers, Gian Paolo Dallara and Paolo Stanzani. Additionally, the Miura’s chassis was carefully tuned to provide excellent handling and control the Miura’s horsepower, which came at the hands of Bob Wallace, whose name would become inextricably linked with the brand from Sant’Agata Bolognese. Its mid-engined layout revolutionised the industry, and whilst the Miura was the only performance car of its kind in production, other manufacturers, including Ferrari, would quickly follow suit to remain competitive against this talented upstart. Nineteen sixty-eight heralded the introduction of an updated Miura: the P400 S. This model retained the same gorgeous Bertone design penned by Marcello Gandini and featured the ongoing updates that were applied over the course of the production run of the original Miura P400. Visually, what differentiated the P400 S from the P400 were bare-metal headlight bezels and its chrome-plated exterior window trim, as well as the addition of an “S” badge to the rear. Inside, the P400 S benefitted from higher-quality interior trim throughout and a revised instrument layout with power windows. Adding to interior comfort was air conditioning, which was made available in later models. Similarly subtle changes followed for the drivetrain, which resulted in 20 more horsepower being coaxed from the Miura’s 4.0-litre V-12, bringing total output to 370 horsepower. This was possible thanks to the installation of higher-lift camshafts with revised timing and the utilisation of four Weber 40IDL-3L carburettors. Additionally, the Miura’s splined driveshaft system was replaced with constant velocity joints. For the suspension, the Armstrong shocks were replaced by Koni shock absorbers. Just like its predecessor, the P400 S’ performance was astounding. Road & Track tested a new P400 S Miura for their April 1970 issue and clocked a 5.5-second 0–60 mph time, as well as a top speed of 168 mph, whilst a later test by Autocar magazine that August cited a top speed of 172 mph. The Miura presented here, bearing chassis number 4827, was one of the last fifteen examples of its kind produced, with a factory completion date of 28 December 1970. This is one of the final examples of its kind, as it has benefitted from numerous upgrades that were incorporated into the P400 S production run, such as a reinforced chassis and ventilated disc brakes, which replaced the solid disc brakes, as they had a tendency to fade under spirited driving. Following its completion, it was delivered to its first Belgium owner, through dealer Socaria, on 11 January 1971. In 1980, it was purchased by another enthusiast in Belgium, who retained the car for the following 22 years. At that time, the car was offered for sale in France, where it was finished in its current colour combination of yellow over black and was showing just 24,611 kilometres on its odometer from new. When the car was purchased by an Italian enthusiast in 2004, it was well-preserved and had been rarely used. Its current owner purchased the car through RM Sotheby’s in 2012, and under his custody, it has been maintained in exemplary condition. During his ownership, it received another coat of yellow paint and its original Nero leather interior had been refreshed. At the time of refreshing, all the body panel numbers were confirmed as matching and original to chassis 4827. Mechanically, the carburettors, brakes, and suspension have all been refurbished to ensure that they are functioning properly. Additionally, the car comes with its very rare original Miura S owner’s manual. Within the history of sports cars, it can be argued that there are few vehicles more significant than the Lamborghini Miura. The Miura set the industry standard for years to come for both performance and design, and it single-handedly started the supercar industry, which it continues to reign over today as the king of all performance cars. Equally impressive is the fact that throughout its seven-year lifespan, Lamborghini was able to constantly improve the car over time so that it would remain competitive in the marketplace. The Miura offered here is a wonderful example of a late-production P400 S that has benefitted from several key updates over the first examples to leave the factory. As such, this would be a wonderful acquisition for the collector looking to enjoy their Miura at speed, just as Ferruccio Lamborghini would have intended. 370 cv, 3.929 cc, motore V-12 in alluminio, con doppio albero a camme in testa, montato in posizione centrale-trasversale con 4 carburatori Weber 40 IDL 3C, cambio a 5 rapporti, sospensioni a ruote indipendenti, con bracci triangolari, ammortizzatori idraulici e molle elicoidali, barra antirollio, 4 freni a disco auto ventilanti con comando idraulico. Passo: 2.500 mm • Uno degli ultimi esemplari di Miura P400 S prodotti • L’ultima evoluzione della Miura P400 S; dotata delle numerose migliorie, come i freni a disco autoventilanti ed il telaio irrigidito • Soli 30.000 km percorsi da nuova • Matching numbers in ogni suo particolare • Recentemente revisionata pronta per essere guidata Per molti la presentazione della Lamborghini Miura coincide con la nascita del termine “supercar” così come ancora oggi viene inteso. Prima del suo arrivo sul mercato nel 1966, c’erano state numerose auto che offrivano un incredibile livello di prestazioni ed esclusività ai pochi fortunati proprietari, ma, nessuna, è stata come la Miura. La Miura univa un’eccitante combinazione fatta non solo di prestazioni ed altissima velocità massima, ma anche design ed innovazione tecnica pensati per stupire ed incutere soggezione ad un prezzo di acquisto di conseguenza. Il suo design porta la firma di Marcello Gandini, ed il suo sviluppo è stato curato, tra gli altri, da due brillanti giovani ingegneri, così privilegiati da trovarsi a lavorare sulla Miura all’inizio della loro carriera: Gian Paolo Dallara e Paolo Stanzani. In aggiunta a questo, lo sviluppo del telaio della Miura fin da subito pensato per offrire un ottimo comportamento stradale e maneggevolezza malgrado la potenza del motore installato, è stato affidato alle mani di Bob Wallace, il cui nome diventerà poi sinonimo stesso della casa di Sant’Agata Bolognese. La posizione del motore e cambio, in posizione trasversale, centrale posteriore, rivoluzionerà il settore, e, se al momento del lancio la Miura era la sola GT ad utilizzare questa configurazione meccanica, ben presto tanti altri costruttori, tra cui la Ferrari, dovranno rapidamente adeguarsi per rimanere competitivi nei confronti della giovane e quasi debuttante Lamborghini, da poco arrivata sul mercato. Il 1968 ha visto l’introduzione di una nuova, migliorata, Miura: la P400 S. Questa versione, che manteneva invariata la strepitosa linea di Bertone, disegnata da Marcello Gandini, raggruppava tutte le migliorie che erano state man mano applicate nel corso della produzione alla P400 e ne aggiungeva di nuove. Visivamente cosa differenziava la nuova P400 S dalla precedente P400 si riduceva alle cornici dei fari anteriori ed alle cornici esterne dei finestrini cromate, oltre all’aggiunta della “S” al badge montato sulla coda. All’interno la P400 S godeva di una migliore qualità dei rivestimenti, una disposizione diversa dei pulsanti di comando ed era dotata dei vetri elettrici. Ad ulteriore miglioramento del confort, sugli ultimi esemplari, l’aria condizionata era disponibile a richiesta. Allo stesso modo, alcune migliorie avevano riguardato la meccanica, con altri 20 cv estratti dal già potente 4.0 litri V-12, per un nuovo totale di 370 cavalli, grazie all’utilizzo di alberi a camme più spinti, una fasatura rivista, e l’utilizzo di 4 carburatori Weber 40IDL-3L. In aggiunta a questo, la Miura S ha beneficiato anche della modifica dei semiassi, con giunti omocinetici e, per quanto riguarda le sospensioni, gli ammortizzatori Armstrong hanno lasciato il posto a quelli Koni. Come la sua progenitrice, la P400 S aveva delle prestazioni stupefacenti. La rivista Road & Track, durante la prova di una P400 S per il numero di Aprile 1970, ha registrato 5,5 secondi per lo 0-100 km/h, con una velocità massima di 269 km/h, mentre un test successivo realizzato dalla rivista Autocar per il numero di Agosto 1970 ha registrato la velocità massima di 275 km/h. La Miura di queste pagine, numero di telaio 4827, è una delle ultime quindici prodotte della sua serie, completata il 28 Dicembre del 1970. Questa è quindi una delle ultime “S” prodotte , ed ha potuto beneficiare di tutte le numerose migliorie che hanno caratterizzato la serie nel corso del periodo di costruzione, tra cui il telaio irrigidito ed i freni a disco autoventilanti al posto di quelli pieni che tendevano a surriscaldarsi se sollecitati con troppa veemenza. Appena deliberata è stata consegnata in Belgio, attraverso la concessionaria Socaria, al suo primo proprietario, in data 11 Gennaio 1971. Nel 1980 ha cambiato proprietà, rimanendo sempre in Belgio, finendo presso un appassionato che l’ha tenuta per i successivi 22 anni. Nel 2002 è stata messa in vendita in Francia, riverniciata nell’attuale combinazione cromatica di Giallo con interno nero, con soli 24.611 chilometri all’attivo. Al momento dell’acquisto da parte di un appassionato italiano nel 2004, la macchina si presentava ben conservata e poco sfruttata. Il proprietario attuale ha acquistato la vettura attraverso RM Sotheby’s nel 2012, e, sotto la sua custodia, è stata mantenuta in perfette condizioni. Proprio durante la sua proprietà la macchina ha ricevuto una velatura del precedente colore Giallo, mentre l’originale interno in pelle nera è stato rinfrescato. Al momento dei lavori, tutti i pannelli e le componenti principali della vettura sono stati confermati essere quelli originali, assegnati al telaio 4827. Meccanicamente tutti i particolari dei carburatori, dei freni e delle sospensioni sono state revisionati per garantire il perfetto funzionamento. In aggiunta, la macchina è ancora dotata del rarissimo ed originale libretto uso e manutenzione dedicato alla Miura S. Nella storia delle vetture sportive, è difficile non concordare sul fatto che la Miura sia stata una delle vetture più importanti mai prodotte. La Miura ha stabilito i nuovi parametri con cui tutti i produttori si sono dovuti confrontare per parecchi anni successivi, sia in termini di prestazioni sia di design, e la sua unicità ha fatto nascere la parola supercar, per quella nicchia di mercato che ancora oggi regna sovrana come simbolo di eccellenza di tutte le vetture sportive ad alte prestazioni. Allo stesso modo rimane impressionante pensare che per tutti i 7 anni della durata della sua produzione industriale, Lamborghini sia sempre riuscito a migliorare la macchina ed a permetterle, così, di rimanere competitiva sul mercato. La Miura qui proposta è un magnifico esemplare di tarda P400 S, che beneficia di importanti migliorie rispetto ai primi esemplari che hanno lasciato la stessa linea di produzione e, in quanto tale, sarebbe una magnifica aggiunta per il collezionista alla ricerca di una Miura di guidare e da godersi alla velocità che Ferruccio Lamborghini in persona aveva ipotizzato per la sua creatura. Chassis no. 4827 Engine no. 30604 Body no. 699

  • CANCanada
  • 2015-05-23
Hammer price
Show price

1991 Ferrari F40

1991 Ferrari F40 Carte grise française Châssis n° ZFFGJ34B000089385 - Supercar mythique - La Ferrari des 40 ans de la marque - 8510 km d'origine, sortant de révision La dernière : la F40 est la seule à pouvoir se prévaloir d'être la dernière Ferrari dévoilée du vivant d'Enzo Ferrari. En septembre 1987 au Salon de Francfort est en effet présentée celle qui célèbre le quarantième anniversaire de la marque. Un an plus tard, le Commendatore s'éteint à Modène et la F40 devient une icône. La production est initialement limitée à 400 exemplaires mais, devant la forte demande, ce chiffre passe à 1 311 exemplaires produits entre 1987 et 1992, tous en conduite à gauche et de teinte Rosso Corsa. Véritable voiture de piste aménagée pour la route, la F40 réunit tous les superlatifs. Son V8 de 3 litres double turbo, dérivé de celui de la 288 GTO, développe près de 500 ch et sa coque composite mêlant acier, fibre de carbone et Kevlar est assemblée selon un procédé avant-gardiste. Avec son aérodynamique particulièrement travaillée, elle est la première voiture de série à franchir la barre des 200 mph (322 km/h). La F40 que nous présentons est exceptionnelle par son faible kilométrage. Immatriculée pour la première fois en Allemagne le 1er juillet 1991, elle a été achetée en juillet 2011 par son actuel propriétaire, qui nous a indiqué qu'il s'agissait alors d'une première main. Le compteur n'affichait que 5 800 km et, depuis, la voiture a peu roulé puisqu'elle indiquait 8 507 km lors de sa dernière révision, effectuée en avril 2015 chez Modena Sport. A cette occasion, la distribution a été refaite et la pompe à eau remplacée, de même que les écrous de moyeux de roues arrière. Les travaux totalisent plus de 7 000 €, selon la facture qui est jointe au dossier. Vu sa faible utilisation, cette Ferrari F40 est en très bel état d'origine, certains revêtements en carbone étant encore sous leur plastique d'origine. Les pneus Pirelli sont en bon état. A l'intérieur, les harnais Sabelt ont été remplacés au moment de l'achat par son actuel propriétaire, les sièges baquets d'origine étant bien préservés. La voiture est accompagnée de sa housse et sa pochette contenant la traditionnelle lampe de poche, le manuel de conduite et le carnet comportant les adresses du réseau. Un essai en compagnie du propriétaire a révélé le parfait fonctionnement de cette machine, très impressionnante et redoutable d'efficacité sur les petites routes du centre de la France. Malgré son âge, la F40 reste une des supercars les plus impressionnantes de son temps et cet exemplaire ayant peu roulé en est un des meilleurs exemples. En termes de prix, il est évident que la F40 représente l'archétype de l'automobile dont la cote ne va cesser de monter, la génération des 35/40 ans arrivant sur le marché et désireuse de réaliser ses rêves d'enfant. La F40 symbolise le mythe absolu, une Joconde des années 80/90, immortelle, ultime et celle que nous présentons, révisée, n'a que 8510 km d'origine… French title Chassis n° ZFFGJ34B000089385 - Legendary supercar - The marque's 40th anniversary Ferrari - Very low mileage, stunning, original presentation The very last: the F40 has the distinction of being the last Ferrari to be unveiled during Enzo Ferrari's lifetime. This was the model presented in September 1987 at the Frankfurt Motor Show in celebration of the marque's 40th anniversary. One year later Il Commendatore died in Modena and the F40 became an icon. Initial production was limited to 400 but faced with strong demand, the number of examples built between 1987 and 1992 rose to 1 311, all left-hand drive and all painted Rosso Corsa. The F40 was basically a race car for the road, and attracted all the superlatives. The 3-litre twin-turbo V8 engine, derived from the 288 GTO engine, produced close to 500 bhp and the composite shell of steel, carbon fibre and kevlar, was assembled according to a highly innovative procedure. With advanced aerodynamics, it was the first production car to exceed 200 mph. The F40 on offer has exceptionally low mileage. It was first registered in Germany on 1 July 1991, and the current owner has informed us that it was a one-owner car when he bought it in July 2011. At that time the odometer recorded just 5 800 km and the car has hardly been used since: the mileage was recorded at 8 507 km when it was last serviced by Modena Sport in April 2015. At this point the valve gear was refurbished and the water pump replaced, as were the nuts on the rear wheel hubs. The bill for this work, in the file that comes with the car, came to over 7 000 €. This Ferrari, having been used so sparingly, is presented in superb original condition, with plastic still covering some of the carbon coatings. The Pirelli tyres are in good condition. Inside, the Sabelt harnesses were replaced when the current owner bought the car, and the original bucket seats have been well preserved. The car comes with its cover as well as its wallet containing the traditional pocket light, owner's manual and network booklet. A test-drive with the owner revealed that the car runs perfectly, performing with impressive efficiency on the small roads in the middle of France. Despite its age, the F40 remains one of the most imposing supercars and this little-used example must be one of the best. In terms of price, it is clear that the F40 represents the archetypal automobile that is ever increasing in value, with the generation of 35 - 40 years now coming to the market looking to realise their childhood dreams. The F40 symbolises the ultimate icon, the Mona Lisa of the '80s and '90s, immortal, absolute, and the one that we are presenting, serviced, has covered just 8,510 km from new... Estimation 900 000 - 1 100 000 € Sold for 1,013,200 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-06-22
Hammer price
Show price

1948 Ferrari 166 Inter Spyder Corsa by Carrozzeria Fontana

Est. 190 bhp, 2-litre overhead-camshaft V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension via A-arms, transverse leaf spring and hydraulic shocks, rigid rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and hydraulic shocks, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,420 mm (95.3?) • The ninth Ferrari built, the sixth of the iconic 166 Spyder Corsas • Elegant 1950 Barchetta body by Carrozzeria Fontana • Extraordinary provenance, including winner of the 1949 Italian Hill Climb Championship; twice run in the Mille Miglia and three documented entries in the Targa Florio • Numerous race wins with top drivers, including Giovanni Bracco, Umberto Maglioli, Giannino and Vittorio Marzotto and Froilan Gonzales • Superb, fresh, no-expense-spared restoration by respected specialists, utilising original chassis and 1950 Fontana body The Story of ‘Chiodo’ 012I is one of the most charismatic Ferraris we’ve had the pleasure of representing. This very early example was the ninth Ferrari built, according to the chassis sequence, and the sixth of the extremely competitive 166 (two-litre) Spyder Corsas. It was a potent weapon, regularly discharged in capable hands and its racing record is illustrious, certainly equal to or exceeding all 166 SCs. 012I’s career was punctuated with numerous upgrades to its drivetrain and coachwork to remain competitive. 012I began its ‘life’ as a 166 Inter with cycle-winged bodywork by Ansaloni, one of the factory race cars to become known as ‘Spyder Corsas’. Completed in May, 1948, it just missed entry into the 1948 Mille Miglia, alongside its sister car, 010I, driven by Tazio Nuvolari. Under the Scuderia Ferrari flag, 012I was first deployed as a Grand Prix racer in the Bari GP, piloted by Ferdinando Righetti. Next came the Jun Mantua, (Giampiero Bianchetti), then on to the Pescara GP, where Count Bruno Sterzi garnered the car’s first podium trophy, finishing an impressive second overall. More success was to come at the Coppa d'Oro delle Dolomiti, with Sterzi finishing ninth overall with co-pilot Enzo Monari. This event was the occasion of 021I’s first engine transplant (believed to be 022I, now in the first Barchetta, 0002M). Thereafter, in the car’s inaugural season, factory driver Giovanni Bracco brought further victories to Ferrari in hill climbs, starting with the Coppa d’Oro Dolomiti and the Rocco di Papa Hill Climb, where Bracco achieved an astonishing first place overall, winning the Gallenga Cup. It was thus that Giovanni Bracco, an impatient young man from Cossila, Italy became the first ex-factory owner of 012I in early 1949. Bracco was an extrovert who loved food, women and the high life. After the death of his father, Bracco discovered a talent for road racing and did so with a passion. His motto was, famously, “Either it goes or I crash it”. Bracco and 012I competed in at least 13 different races in 1949, though not without some sweat and frustration. The Ferrari motor from 1948 required, as it was once said, acrobatic feats to operate. In those days, racing fuel was a blend of gasoline and alcohol. Once started, one had to lick a finger and touch the exhaust manifold to verify that all 12 cylinders were firing correctly. After bringing the motor up to temperature, it was necessary to change the spark plugs–not an easy task. As a result, 012I became known as “Il Chiodo di Bracco”, or just “Chiodo” (literally meaning “nail”). With at least 13 recorded entries, Chiodo was remarkably active in Bracco’s hands in 1949, sometimes co-piloted by Ferrari Grand Prix driver, Umberto Maglioli. Bracco and Maglioli’s first race together was in the Giro di Sicilia, followed by entry into the Mille Miglia (24 April, 1949), with Bracco finishing sixth overall in the Grand Prix di San Remo in between. Though he raced in Grand Prix and endurance road races, such as the Mille Miglia, with Chiodo, it was his mastery of the hill climb that earned him the title, “Il Re di Montagna”, King of the Hill, for 1949. Bracco took first place overall at Como-Lieto Colle and again at the Corsa al Brinzio, both in May of that year. No fewer than five further hill climbs were contended with Bracco in Chiodo that year, every one a podium finish, including yet another first place at Pontedecimo-Giovi. For this remarkable effort, Bracco officially became the 1949 Italian Hill Climb Champion. A footnote here opens a particularly interesting chapter in motorsport history, with Ferrari’s contribution to another racing dynasty. At the conclusion of the 1949 season, Count Vittorio Emanuele Marzotto acquired Chiodo from Bracco for a reputed one million lire, the first Ferrari of a long line that were to become part of Scuderia Marzotto, established by the five dashing and adventurous sons of textile mogul Gaetano Marzotto. The car was re-registered by its second owners, the Marzottos, with Vicenza plates ‘VI 18132.’ Being courtesans by trade, the Marzotto brothers were famous for ‘re-clothing’ the cars in their stable, as routinely as some of us might change our jacket. Deciding that Chiodo was too “Nuvolari” in appearance, the Marzottos commissioned a re-body that was termed “Spyder da Corsa Ferrari projecto Mille Miglia 1949”, or as we now know it, a Barchetta. Entrusted to Carrozzeria Fontana, this initial collaboration emulates the popular design of the Touring-bodied Ferrari, the legendary 166 MM ‘Barchetta’ (little boat). It is this variation from original that has survived, remarkably intact, through the present day. Fontana’s homage to the Touring Barchetta was fresh and attractive, with Chiodo’s new wrapper an arguably more graceful execution than the well-known Touring version. Aside from its longer, more seductive rear profile, notable dissimilarities include lack of a boot aperture, a full width, peaked windscreen and a distinctive aggressive stance. Wasting no time after completion, Giannino Marzotto entered Chiodo in the 1950 Targa Florio (2 April 1950), with co-pilot Marco Crosara. (Ultimately, they abandoned the race to save the life of their friend and competitor, Fabrizio Serena.) Soon, however, it was time for the Mille Miglia, this time entered by Vittorio with the car’s designer Paolo Fontana as his co-pilot. Displaying the now-iconic race number ‘722’, the official entry indicated Chiodo as a ‘Type 195S Barchetta Fontana’ (indicating what is presumed to be another engine upgrade, to 2.3 litres). The result was a stunning ninth overall finish, representing an estimable Sixth in Class, and beating the Ferrari team entries–to the enduring consternation of “Il Commendatore” himself. This event may mark the beginning of the love/hate relationship that Enzo Ferrari had with the Marzotto brothers–young men who dared to alter his designs but refused to lose when competing head-to-head with factory entries. Subsequent to its magnificent performance in the Mille Miglia that year, hill climb champion Bracco was enlisted at least once again, this time to drive the car at the Parma-Poggio de Berceto hill climb, where he again achieved first place overall. This appearance was followed by a hill climb entry by Vittorio Marzotto, where he also finished first overall at the Treponti-Castelnuovo event, sponsored by the Automobile Club di Padova. At the end of 1950, the coachwork was modified, yet again, by Fontana for the 1951 season, with the addition of a fastback hardtop, along with the requisite ‘Berlinetta’ fixed windscreen, outside door handles and windscreen wipers, and now liveried in an apparent shade of silver. By June, 1951, Chiodo was becoming obsolete in racing terms. However, never satisfied to give in to practical realities, the Marzottos pressed on and registered a form for the Italian tax authorities, specifying an increase from 23 to 29 taxable bhp. It is believed that Chiodo ran in August 1951 at the Giro di Calabria, driven by the Mancini brothers (#805), with 2,080 cc, finishing third overall, proving beyond any doubt that it was still competitive after all. In the next recorded event for Chiodo, Scuderia Marzotto entered the German Grenzlandring with driver Franco Comotti, who placed second overall in September, 1951. This was followed later that month with an entry to the Gran Prix di Modena, where none other than Ferrari Grand Prix champion Froilan Gonzalez (the “Pampas Bull”) placed Chiodo sixth overall for the Marzottos. The 1952 season for Chiodo began at the Gran Premio di Siracusa, again with Comotti at the wheel, who placed sixth overall–very respectable for a car now into its fourth year of competition. Comotti, yet again, was chosen to pilot the car at the Grand Prix of France at Montlhéry (DNF). Remaining with Suderia Marzotto until the team’s liquidation in 1953, Chiodo was sold to Ferrari test driver Martino Severi, in a package with nine Ferraris, their transport truck and “a mountain of parts”. This lot was thereafter dispersed with some of the cars sold to the Mancini brothers of Rome, where Chiodo was likely utilised within the network of famed elder gentlemen drivers known as “The Roman Racers”, including Serina, Taraschi, Matrullo and Raffaeli. As a final act of fate, it is said that Giannino Marzotto was approached for financial support by a broke and anxious Enzo Ferrari, circa 1953. Giannino agreed to invest, and Ferrari received its new lease on life to the great relief and benefit of automobile enthusiasts. The Marzottos’ contribution to the Ferrari legacy cannot be overstated. The last recorded competition entry for Chiodo was as a Targa Florio entrant in 1955, in the hands of aging Roman racer Francesco Matrullo, in his last known race. A thrilling coda for Matrullo one imagines, but finally, Chiodo was, officially, no longer competitive. Interestingly, and documented by an event photograph, Chiodo now had a shortened wheelbase, reduced by some 150 mm. One can only speculate the reasons why, but as a warrior with an eight-season racing career, including noteworthy success as a hill climb champion, a shorter wheelbase might have provided some handling advantage on twisty ascents. Fast forward to 1970. Chiodo resurfaces in a dark garage in south Rome, now with the auxiliary hard top removed but with the Fontana body remaining on the shortened original chassis. A single photograph of the car, looking forlorn and war weary, by Ferrari aficionado Corrado Cupellini, documents this. Cuppelini agreed to acquire the car, along with a 166 engine from the 1950 Marzotto Formula 2 Ferrari, 116MS, and proceeds with a light overhaul to get it into running condition. He then sold Chiodo to Jacques Thuysbaert in 1972. (Engine 116MS remains with Chiodo to this day. A more potent two-litre Ferrari powerplant was never produced; this is the 166 engine in its ‘ne plus ultra’ form.) Around 1975, noted Ferrariste, author and historian Jess G. Pourret inspected the car for California Ferrari collectors Ed Niles and William A. Schnabacher. Mistaking Chiodo for the non-existent “09C”, they were expecting an F2 chassis from Scuderia Marzotto. Not realising they were standing before the ninth Ferrari to leave the factory, they send it back to Willy Felber’s Haute Performance SA in Morges, Switzerland, whereupon it was sold to Giuseppe Medeci of Reggio Emelia. Medeci embarked on its first restoration, which was entrusted to Autofficina Piero Mazzetti in 1976. And so, Chiodo emerged roadworthy and was completed in time for entry into the first Mille Miglia Storica event, held 17-19 June 1977. The car, wearing race number 84, was piloted by the owners, Medici & Medici, helping to establish the Storica, which continues to this day as perhaps the most high profile of all the world’s historic revival road races. Sometime later in 1977, Chiodo was sold back to Willy Felber, after which ownership was transferred to Jean Zanchi of Lausanne, Switzerland in 1978. In 1979, Zanchi campaigned Chiodo in historic events, such as the Coupe de Lage d’Or at Montlhéry, Paris and the VII AVD-Oldtimer-Grand Prix at the Nürburgring in Germany, driven by Pierre De Siebenthal. Zanchi raced Chiodo one last time in the Grand Prix of Lausanne, after which he decided it was time to restore the car properly, intending to replace the tired 40 year old metal that was then held together by rivets and plaster. Thankfully, he didn’t get very far… In the late ‘90s, the current owner travelled from California to the small garage of Beppe Castagno, outside Turin, to inspect this enigmatic car and found what he was looking for. He purchased it mid-restoration, with the objective of saving the original body, chassis and the F2 engine and to restore Chiodo to its former glory from its penultimate 1950 season. Castagno was initially commissioned to re-restore the car, but years later, with little progress made, the owner made the decision to collect the car and bring it to California, where he could more ably manage the process, entrusting Chiodo with top experts in the rarified field of early Ferrari restoration. So, by the mid-2000s, the car was safely in California, with a game plan now formulated to use its remarkably intact 1950 Fontana body on the original chassis, extending them to their original proportions. The engine, still the ex-Scurderia Marzotto 166 F2 unit, was rebuilt by master Ferrari technician Patrick Ottis of Berkeley, California. The fresh engine was dyno tested at 190+ bhp at 6000 rpm, impressive by any standards for a 2-litre, and outstanding power in a light car. The chassis and body were ultimately sent to ‘preservationist-restorer’ Curtis Patience in Portland, Oregon. A veteran of Brian Hoyt’s Perfect Reflections, Curtice is also a world-class metalworker. As well as locating and confirming Chiodo’s original chassis number (012I), he found another original 166 Spyder Corsa chassis from which to confirm dimensions and engineering, along with original blueprints, which also served to ratify the chassis as an original Syper Corsa. Curtis’s ‘carchaeologist’ account of his own odyssey restoring the car is documented in the second quarter of the 2011 issue of the The Prancing Horse (#179), just as the project was reaching its wonderful finale. Ultimately, Chiodo was sent to Ivan Zaremba and the inestimable team at Phil Reilly & Co. of San Rafael, California for final sorting, fettling and testing. This is one of the most critical stages in any ambitious restoration, but “Fortunately”, as Ivan says, “I’ve done this before”. This final phase was completed in January, 2012. So, Bracco’s wondrous ‘nail’ has survived, a testament to its intrepid competition career and the enthusiastic, meticulous research and commitment to authenticity and excellence on ample display by its current owner, who has admirably resurrected a piece of living history. The car now speaks for itself, the product of the best minds and technicians in the Ferrari world today. Unveiled here for the first time since its completion, this important Ferrari is ready to be shown and/or enjoyed on the road. As a (twice) past competitor in the original Mille Miglia, it has virtually guaranteed entry acceptance into the MM Storica and indeed, for most any other historic event on the planet. And with 190 bhp on tap, Chiodo is once again prepared to dominate the field. Addendum Please be advised that the Ferrari F2 motor in 012I is a 2-litre unit. Please note that this vehicle is eligible for import into the UK at a reduced rate of 5% VAT. Chassis no. 012I

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
Show price

1930 BUGATTI TYPE 43A ROADSTER

The ex-Bill Serri, Jr. 1930 BUGATTI TYPE 43A ROADSTER Chassis No. 43292 Engine No. 121 Red with original black leather interior Engine: straight-eight in two blocks of four, single overhead camshaft actuating 24 valves via fingers, Zenith 48K carburetor, Roots-type Bugatti supercharger, Bosch magneto ignition, 2,262cc, c120bhp at 5,000rpm; Gearbox: separate four speed unit with center change; Suspension: beam front axle with semi-elliptic springs, live rear axle with reversed quarter-elliptic springs; Brakes: fully compensated cable actuation to front and rear drums integral with the aluminum road wheels. Right hand drive. In the 1920s production two seater sports cars which could achieve and maintain a genuine maximum speed of 100mph on the road were few and far between. The introduction in early 1927 of the four seater Type 43 Bugatti Grand Sport with a top speed well in excess of this magic figure caused a sensation in the motoring world. This outstanding performance was achieved by the simple installation of a mildly de-tuned version of the current Type 35B Grand Prix car's supercharged straight-eight engine into the chassis frame of the aborted Type 33 two liter sports car of 1923. Like that of the Type 35, this frame had curved side rails following the plan-view profile of the bodywork but with a greater wheelbase capable of accommodating two rows of seats. According to the factory records, this particular example, chassis no. 43292, fitted with engine no.121 was completed in late 1928 but did not leave Molsheim until August 1930. It was one of only nineteen or twenty Type 43A roadsters built. The identity of this Type 43's first owner in 1930 remains unknown, however it must certainly have been imported to the US sometime prior to World War Two. Its first American owner is believed to have been Mr. L. Cabot Briggs who then sold it to Inskip Motors of New York from where it was purchased by Mr. Al Garthwaite on 3 August 1944. Mr. Garthwaite was a Bugatti enthusiast who, in the mid-1930s had acquired a Type 39 Grand Prix Bugatti which he raced during the 1938 and 1939 seasons. After the War he is known to have competed in this Type 43A Roadster in the Pennsylvania Turnpike High Speed Trial held in July/August 1947. The car's next owner was Mr. Arthur Iselin, and it then passed to Mr. Joel Finn in whose ownership it is listed in Hugh Conway's update to his 1962 Bugatti Register. However by 1979, the year of publication of the American Bugatti Club Register compiled by Andy Rheault, this still completely original and un-restored car had been acquired by the late William Serri of New Jersey. Little work had been started by the date of his untimely death in 2001 and in December 2002 the car was entrusted to English Bugatti specialists Ivan Dutton Ltd. for a complete mechanical and sympathetic cosmetic restoration. This restoration has been carried out with the greatest of care to obtain the best performance and reliability yet still retaining all original references and details. This Type 43A is built on frame no. 125 and fitted with engine no. 121, gearbox no. 122 and front and rear axle nos. 123. Generally Type 43 Bugattis had similar numbers on their frames, engines, gearboxes and axles. Thus it seems certain that this example retains all its original mechanical components. In addition it comes preserved with everything from its original leather seats and leather-covered bulkhead to all of its patinated bodywork, including undertrays and front valence. A complete set of original wheels have been thoroughly checked and fitted with new Blockley triple stud tires. The wiring has been renewed inside the old looms and the radiator has been completely flushed out and tested retaining all its patina and G Moreux makers plate. A full set of Stephen Grebel headlights, side-lights and tail lamp are fitted, together with a matching windscreen and pillar-mounted spotlamp. The dashboard is complete with blackface 70 liter Le Nivex fuel gauge, black face Huile pressure gauge, 7000rpm Jaeger rev counter and a fully operational time of trip clock by the Jaeger Watch Co. of New York, probably installed when the car first arrived in the US. The temperature gauge is also a period American fitment. A Ki-gas pump is fitted and the unusual steering wheel has been drilled and leather covered, again probably early in the car's life. All the chrome plating is original and has not been ruined by over enthusiastic polishers trying to make the car look better than new. The car is offered with a handbook and an extensive file of bills detailing the extent of all recent restoration work. This is surely a unique opportunity to obtain a completely original and wonderfully preserved, thoroughbred sports car that has been fully rebuilt from the inside out and ready for road or competition use.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-18
Hammer price
Show price

1988 Porsche 959 'Komfort'

450 bhp, 2,849 cc rear-mounted, air- and liquid-cooled, horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin two-stage turbochargers and Bosch electronic fuel injection, six-speed manual transmission, all-wheel drive, front and rear independent double-wishbone suspension with electronically adjustable ride height and shock-absorber control, and four-wheel hydraulic ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,270 mm Less than 29,200 kilometres Retains its original engine Italian-delivery example Porsche’s first supercar; one of only 329 produced Based on Porsche’s iconic 911, the 959 was built to win the FIA Group B World Rally Championship whilst serving as a development platform for the new all-wheel-drive Type 964. It was shoehorned full of innovative technologies and lightweight materials, and it was powered by a rear-mounted, 2.8-litre turbocharged engine. Quite docile and civilized at driving speeds, the 959 could leap from 0–60 mph in less than four seconds, run the standing quarter-mile in just over 12, and reach a maximum speed approaching 200 mph. In the fully leather-upholstered, carpeted, air-conditioned confines of a 959, this was accomplished in a calm and controlled, even quiet, fashion. Delivered new to Padua in July 1988, it is believed that this 959 ‘Komfort’ has remained in northern Italy its entire life. The car’s odometer currently shows just under 29,200 kilometres from new and is finished in silver over a black leather interior. It presents nicely throughout and would surely make a wonderful addition to any collection of Porsches. Furthermore, it is important to note that the car retains its original engine. Even by today’s standards, Porsche’s 959 is one of the automobile world’s true wonders—very fast, well built, and extremely rare. It pioneered technologies that would not appear in other production cars for years afterword and asserted Porsche’s position in the industry as the leader in performance and automotive technology. Well preserved and with limited mileage since new, this 959 will not disappoint. Motore posteriore a sei cilindri, orizzontali e contrapposti, con due turbocompressori a doppio stadio e iniezione elettronica Bosch, 450 CV, 2849 cc, raffreddato ad aria e a liquido, cambio manuale a sei marce, trazione integrale, sospensioni anteriori e posteriori indipendenti con doppio quadrilatero, con regolazione elettronica dell’altezza di marcia e della taratura degli ammortizzatori. Quattro freni a disco autoventilati ad azionamento idraulico. Passo: 2270 mm • Meno di 29.200 chilometri • Ancora con il suo motore originale • Originariamente consegnata in Italia • La prima “supercar” prodotta da Porsche, soli 329 esemplari costruiti Sviluppata sulla base dell’iconica Porsche 911, la 959 è stata costruita per vincere il Campionato del Mondo Rally FIA, Gruppo B e, al contempo, per servire come piattaforma di sviluppo per il nuovo sistema a quattro ruote motrici Tipo 964. Realizzata utilizzando tutte le tecnologie più innovative ed i materiali più leggeri, era spinta da un motore posteriore da 2.8 litri dotato di turbocompressore. Docile e civile alle velocità più basse, la 959 può balzare da 0 a 100 chilometri orari in meno di 4 secondi, percorrere i 400 metri con partenza da fermo in poco più di 12 secondi e raggiungere una veloctà massima di circa 320 Km/h. Nell’interno totalmente rivestito in pelle, dotato di moquette ed aria condizionata della 959, le prestazioni vengono raggiunte mantenendo un ambiente raffinato, calmo, controllato e, per certi aspetti, anche silenzioso. Consegnata nuova a Padova nel luglio del 1988, si pensa che questa 959 “Komfort” sia rimasta nel nord Italia per tutta la sua vita. Il contachilometri attualmente indica poco meno di 29.200 chilometri percorsi. La macchina è verniciata in Argento ed ha gli interni in pelle nera. Si presenta bene in ogni sua componente e, senza ombra di dubbio, sarebbe una perfetta aggiunta ad ogni collezione Porsche. E’ altresì importante notare che il motore montato, è ancora quello originale. Ancora oggi, anche utilizzando riferimenti contemporanei, la Porsche 959 è una delle auto più meravigliose al mondo: velocissima, ben costruita ed estremamente rara. Ha utilizzato una tecnologia così all’avanguardia che, in tanti casi, non apparrirà su altre vetture di produzione per molti anni a venire, ed ha definitivamente affermato la Porsche come produttore di riferimento a livello di prestazioni e di tecnologia automobilistica. Ben conservata e con pochi chilometri percorsi, questa 959 non deluderà. Addendum Please note this lot is currently under an order of seizure, which will be removed following the sale. Upon receipt of payment from the buyer, RM Sotheby’s will liaise with the appointed administrator for release of the seizure, which is expected to take approximately 10 days. During this time, lots will remain onsite at the Fiera Milano and collection can be arranged after confirmation from RM that the seizure order has been lifted. For lots with a current Italian libretto, please be aware that the PRA must remove the seizure order from its records before re-registration can take place in any country. This process is expected to take 6-8 weeks, during which lots may be transported to an EU destination but may not be exported. Chassis no. WP0ZZZ95ZJS900133 Engine no. 65H00200

  • ITAItaly
  • 2016-11-25
Hammer price
Show price

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 Sport Lightweight

210 bhp, 2,687 cc SOHC air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,268 mm One of just 200 M471 lightweight “Sport” versions A matching-numbers example; four documented owners from new Freshly and thoroughly restored by Porsche specialists, with no expense spared The “must-have” for any serious Porsche collector In the early 1970s, Porsche wanted to build on the success of its world-beating Type 917 endurance prototypes, but it faced a dilemma: the muscular five-litre 917 had been regulated out of existence by the FIA, which set a new displacement maximum of three litres for the World Championship of Makes. In response, Porsche’s competition department decided to create a small series of purpose-built race cars based on the production 911 for the FIA’s Group 5 Special Grand Touring class. They would be called the Carrera 3.0 RSR. To meet the FIA’s Group 5 regulations, a minimum of 500 street-legal Group 4 cars would have to be constructed and sold within one year. To emphasise the car’s racing heritage, they were dubbed the Carrera RS and two versions would be offered, the M472 Touring, which had a great deal of standard 911 S equipment, and the stripped-down M471 Sport, which was more commonly known as the Lightweight. To Porsche’s amazement, the first run of 500 cars quickly sold out on word-of-mouth, even before the Carrera RS made its public debut at the 1972 Paris Auto Show. A second run of 500 units was approved, comprised mostly of Touring versions. The company, realising that the first cars had been under-priced, boosted the retail price by another 1,000 Deutschmarks, but these, too, quickly sold, and a third run was completed at an even higher price. Eventually, a total of 1,590 Carrera RSs (including prototypes and homologation units) left the factory. The Carrera RS Touring and its competition-oriented sister made extensive use of lightweight materials. Fiberglass was used for the engine cover and front and rear bumpers (Series 2 Touring models had steel rear bumpers). The rear quarter panels were artfully widened to accept wider seven-inch wheels and tyres (the front wheels remained six inches wide). What was to become the RS’s trademark feature, the “ducktail” rear spoiler, was added to the engine cover after wind-tunnel testing had demonstrated that it was very effective at increasing high-speed stability by reducing rear-end lift. Whilst the Touring version was intended for road use, the M471 Lightweights were aimed at club-level racers. This very exclusive series, of which only 200 were produced, scaled only 975 kilograms, about 100 kilograms less than the Touring model, which was accomplished through the utilisation of thinner-gauge steel for their wings, roof panel, and doors and thinner and lighter (and very expensive) clear glass from the Belgian firm Glaverbel. This special glass was fitted to most Series 1 Lightweights but only a few from the second series where available with this option. There was no sound insulation, and only very thin carpeting and simple rubber mats covered the floor, whilst the rear folding seatbacks, sun visors, dashboard clock, radio, and glovebox door were deleted. The standard armrests and latch handles were replaced by simple plastic pull handles and pull-cord door releases. As the story goes, Tony Lapine’s styling department conceived the now-famous “negative” Carrera side striping after Lapine happened to glance at the negative of a photograph taken of the car wearing its originally planned “positive” lettering. The heart of the Carrera RS was a new six-cylinder engine of 2.7 litres. The 2.4-litre 911 S’s 70.4-millimetre pistons and cylinders were replaced with 90-millimetre aluminium barrels which were coated with Nikasil (Nickel-silicon carbide) for improved lubrication and wear characteristics. With this increased displacement, 8.5:1 compression, and Bosch mechanical fuel injection, the new Type 911/83 engine developed a reliable 210 brake horsepower at 6,300 rpm and 202 foot-pounds of torque at 5,100 rpm. Also new was the stronger Type 915 five-speed manual transmission, which replaced the old Type 901 with its “dog-leg” first gear. This beautiful Series 2 Carrera RS Sport was the 649th RS built and amongst 160 finished in Light Ivory (code 131). It was trimmed with red Carrera graphics and the spokes of the anodised Fuchs forged alloy wheels were painted to match. The interior was a black leatherette, and as a Lightweight, this RS was fitted with a pair of Nylon-upholstered Recaro competition seats with adjustable headrests. There is a mix of Glaverbel and Sekurit glass, and the backlight is heated. The car was delivered with several items that are included on the Touring version, such as a glovebox door and a standard Porsche badge on its bonnet instead of a decal. The lightweight rear lid has a pair of rubber hold-downs as well. Only a few options were specified, including a 40-percent limited-slip differential. Per usual, both the clock and radio were deleted. Chassis 600649 left the factory on 1 February 1973 and was shipped through Porsche’s Italian distributor to a dealer in Torino. It enjoyed long-term ownership by two local enthusiasts before coming into possession of ITALCLASSIC, a company owned by the former president of the ASI (Automotoclub Storico Italia), Vittorio Zanon (ASI President 1987–1997), and managed by Maurizio Tresoldi on his behalf. In 1995, it was acquired by the present Italian owner. He more recently embarked on a complete restoration of the Carrera RS, entrusting it to Porsche specialists at Tirelli Motorsport in Turin. This time-consuming work was recently completed at a cost of some €225,000 and included a complete disassembly and stripping of the tub to bare metal, a fresh re-spray in the car’s original and correct colour, the installation of a new interior, and a complete mechanical overhaul. The restoration was fully photo-documented. The odometer reads just over 67,000 kilometres, which are believed to be original and correct. Here is an extremely rare opportunity to acquire what is certainly amongst the finest Carrera RS M471 Lightweights extant, one that has been newly restored to its original mechanical and cosmetic specification and has a small number of owner-added improvements, including a handsome four-spoke leather steering wheel, a front strut brace, and twin outside mirrors. The car, including the undercarriage, is presented in immaculate condition inside and out. Not only would it be a perfect addition to any collection of fine high-performance sports cars, but it would also be a worthy candidate for both concours d’elegance and vintage rallies anywhere in the world. The sound of a fuel-injected Carrera RS at full song is amongst the most glorious aural experiences imaginable, and 600649 is ready to provide its next owner with that wondrous symphony whilst showing its heels to any number of more modern sports cars. 210 cv, 2.687 cc mono albero a camme in testa, motore sei cilindri boxer raffreddato ad aria con iniezione meccanica Bosch, cambio a 5 marce, sospensioni a ruote indipendenti anteriori e posteriori,quattro freni a disco. Passo: 2.268 mm • Una delle sole 200 versione M471 “Sport” Lightweight • Esemplare matching numbers; quattro proprietari da nuova • Appena restaurata completamente e senza economie, presso uno specialista Porsche • Un vero e proprio “must” per ogni serio collezionista Porsche Nei primi anni ’70 Porsche voleva continuare a sfruttare il successo ottenuto, su scala mondiale, dai sui prototipi Tipo 917, costruiti per il campionato Endurance, ma si è trovata di fronte ad un imprevisto: la FIA ha bandito i potenti motori 5 litri utilizzati sulla 917, imponendo una cilindrata massima di 3 litri per chi disputava il Campionato Mondiale marche. In risposta a questa nuova regola, il reparto corse di Porsche ha deciso di creare una piccola serie di vetture da corsa appositamente assemblate, basate sulla 911 di serie, da far correre nella classe col regolamento del Gruppo 5 Special Gran Turismo. Il nome prescelto sarebbe stato Carrera 3.0 RSR. Per soddisfare il regolamento FIA Gruppo 5, sarebbe stato necessario produrre un minimo di 500 vetture, tutte omologabili per la strada come Gruppo 4, che avrebbero dovuto essere vedute entro un anno. Per enfatizzare la provenienza sportiva della macchina, le vetture sarebbero state chiamate Carrera RS e ne sarebbero state offerte due versioni, la M472 Touring (Stradale), che adottava tantissime soluzioni utilizzate sulla 911 S, e l’alleggerita M 471 Sport, più comunemente conosciuta come Lightweight. Con stessa grande sorpresa di Porsche, il primo lotto di 500 auto è stato vendute in un attimo, semplicemente attraverso il passaparola, ancor prima che la Carrera RS facesse il suo debutto ufficiale al Salone di Parigi del 1972. Così un secondo lotto di altre 500 vetture, la maggioranza con specifiche Touring, è stato deliberato per essere messo in produzione. Porsche, nel frattempo, aveva realizzato che il primo lotto era stato venduto sotto costo e così, decise di aumentare il prezzo di altri 1000 Marchi Tedeschi per le seconde 500 vetture, ma malgrado questo, anche il secondo lotto è andato rapidamente esaurito, prima che una terza produzione fosse deliberata e venduta, anch’essa, ad un prezzo ulteriormente maggiorato. Alla fine, sono state prodotte un totale di 1.590 Carrera RS (includendo i prototipi e le auto usate per l’omologazione). Sia la Carrera RS Touring che la sorella in versione Sport, facevano ampio uso di parti alleggerite. La fibra di vetro era usata per il cofano del motore e per il paraurti anteriore e posteriore (i modelli Touring della Serie 2, invece, hanno i paraurti in acciaio). La forma del pannello laterale posteriore, è stato magistralmente allargato per accogliere le gomme ed i cerchioni da 7? (mentre gomme e cerchi anteriori sono rimasti da 6?). Quello che poi diverrà una delle caratterizzazioni più importanti della RS è lo spoiler a “coda d’anatra” montato sulla parte posteriore. Lo spoiler è stato aggiunto sul cofano motore, dopo che i test in galleria del vento, avevano dimostrato che lo spoiler era molto utile per migliorar la stabilità alle alte velocità, riducendo il sollevamento causato dall’aria, della parte posteriore. Mentre la versione Touring era pensata per un uso prettamente stradale, la versione M471 Lightweight era destinata alle corse club. Questa serie esclusiva, solo 200 le vetture prodotte, pesava solo 975 chili, 100 chili meno del modello Touring di serie, raggiunti grazie all’utilizzo di acciaio più sottile e meno resistente per le ali posteriori, il pannello del tetto, le porte ed i rivestimenti. I pannelli del tetto e delle porte sono più leggeri e sottili (e molto costosi) ed il vetro bianco, trasparente, è della firma belga Glaverbel. Questo vetro speciale equipaggiava la maggioranza delle Lightweights della prima serie, mentre ne erano dotate pochissime della seconda serie, anche se era disponibile con sovrapprezzo. Mancava l’isolamento antirumore, la moquette dei rivestimenti era sottilissima mentre semplicissimi erano anche i tappetini in gomma che coprivano il pavimento. Al contempo anche il sedile posteriore reclinabile, le alette parasole, l’orologio della plancia la radio e la porticina dello sportello porta guanti, erano stati tolti. I braccioli centrali solitamente di serie, e le maniglie erano rimpiazzate, rispettivamente, da delle manigliette in plastica ed una corda da tirare come apri portiera. La storia ci ha poi tramandato che la decisione del centro stile diretto da Tony Lapine di usare lettere “in negativo” per scrivere Carrera sulla parte inferiore della fiancata, è stata presa dopo che Lapine stesso vide i negativi delle foto della macchina quando, ancora doveva utilizzare la scritta “in positivo”. Il cuore della Carrera RS era il nuovo 6 cilindri da 2.7 litri. Il motore da 2.4 litri preso dalla 911 S, faceva da base, con i pistoni da 70.4 mm ed i cilindri, rimpiazzati con pezzi da 90 mm, realizzati in alluminio e rivestiti in Nikasil (carburo di Nickel e Silicio) per migliorare la lubrificazione e la durata. Con la cilindrata maggiorata, il rapporto di compressiono di 8,5:1 e l’iniezione meccanica fornita dalla Bosch, il nuovo motore Tipo 911/83 sviluppava una potenza di 210 cavalli a 6300 giri/min. con una coppia massima di 27 kgm a 5100 giri/min. Nuovo anche il cambio a 5 rapporti, irrobustito, del Tipo 915, a rimpiazzare il vecchio Tipo 901 con la sua prima in basso. Questa bellissima Carrera RS Sport della seconda serie, è stata la 649° RS costruita, e tra le 160 verniciate in Light Ivory (codice 131). Era rifinita con le scritte Carrera in rosso, e le razze dei cerchi Fuchs forgiati erano verniciate in abbinamento. L’interno era rivestito in finta pelle (leatherette) nera, e, come Lightweight, questa RS era dotata anche dei sedili Recaro competition, rivestiti in Nylon, con poggiatesta regolabile. C’e un misto di vetri Glaverbel e Sekurit, mentre il lunotto posteriore è riscaldato. La macchina è stata consegnata da nuova con alcuni accessori che facevano parte della dotazione della Touring, come lo sportellino del cassetto porta guanti e lo stemma Porsche smaltato sul cofano, al posto della decalcomania. Il cofano posteriore alleggerito, ha anche un paio di ganci ferma cofano in gomma. Solo poche opzioni furono quelle richieste, ma includono il differenziale autobloccante al 40%. Come da specifica, sia l’orologio che la radio non erano state fornite. Il telaio 600649 ha lasciato la fabbrica il 1° Febbraio 1973, per essere consegnato, attraverso l’importatore per l’Italia, al concessionario di Torino. La macchina ha trascorso parecchi anni in zona, con due proprietari locali prima di diventare di proprietà della ITALCLASSIC, una società posseduta dall’allora presidente dell’ASI (Automotoclub Storico Italiano), Vittorio Zanon (che ne è stato presidente dal 1987 al 1997), e gestita da Maurizio Tresoldi per suo conto. Nel 1995 è stata acquistata dall’attuale proprietario, sempre italiano. E’ con lui che, recentemente, la Carrera RS è stata sottoposta ad un restauro completo, effettuato presso la Tirelli Motorsport di Torino. Questo lavoro svolto con molta cura ed attenzione e solo recentemente terminato, ha avuto un costo nell’ordine dei 225.000 €, ed ha compreso lo smontaggio completo della macchina, che è stata riportata al nudo metallo, la riverniciatura nei colori originali, il montaggio di un interno totalmente nuovo e la completa revisione della meccanica. Il restauro è comprovato da una ricca documentazione fotografica. Il contachilometri riporta 67,000 chilometri, che si crede siano quelli originali. Qui è offerta la rarissima opportunità di acquistare quella che è certamente, tra le Carrera RS M471 Lightweight più belle in circolazione, una macchina completamente restaurata di fresco, con il rispetto totale di ogni specifica originale sia dal punto di vista meccanico che estetico, con l’eccezione di pochissime modifiche apportate dal proprietario che includono un volante a quattro razze in pelle, una barra duomi anteriore, ed i due specchietti laterali esterni. La macchina, anche nel suo fondo, si presenta immacolata, sia dentro sia fuori. Non solo potrebbe essere una fantastica aggiunta a qualsiasi collezione dedicata alle autovetture sportive, ma potrebbe essere anche una valida pretendente al successo sia ai concorsi d’eleganza sia nei rally che si tengono in tutto il mondo. Il suono del motore ad iniezione della Carrera RS a pieno regime è tra le emozioni più forti e selvagge che si possano provare e, 600649 è pronta ad offrire al prossimo proprietario l’intensa sinfonia di cui sa essere capace, mentre rende la vita difficile a numerose, anche moderne, vetture sportive. Chassis no. 9113600649 Engine no. 6630653

  • CANCanada
  • 2015-05-23
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1991 Ferrari F40

478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC 90-degree V-8 engine with two turbochargers and Weber-Marelli engine management and fuel injection, five-speed manual gearbox, tubular steel and carbon-composite chassis, independent double-wishbone suspension with Koni hydraulic shock absorbers and front and rear anti-roll bars, and four-wheel steel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm Recent full service by Motor Service S.r.l in Modena Complete with its original books and tools Undergoing Ferrari Classiche certification “THE BEST-EVER FERRARI” Nineteen eighty-seven was a big year for Enzo Ferrari. Not only did he celebrate his 90th birthday, but more importantly to him, it was 40 years since he built his first car. A year earlier, Enzo was reported to have said: “Let’s make something special for next year’s celebrations, in the way we used to do it”. That special car was the F40, and it would be the last one that “The Grand Old Man”, as he was affectionately known, would see launched from the legendary company he had created. At that time, Ferrari was engaged in an all-out war with arch-rivals Lamborghini and Porsche. Lamborghini’s Countach had taken the world by storm, with its radical styling and record-breaking performance, and it became the ultimate poster car for a whole generation. Not to be outdone, Porsche introduced the superb 959 in 1986. The car was laden with a host of technological firsts and was capable of an unbelievable 197 mph, making it the world’s fastest road car. Never one to be bested by his rivals, “Il Commendatore” did not sit idly by and let Lamborghini and Porsche have the last word. His response would be emphatic, describing the car as “the best Ferrari ever”. The name for this new car had been suggested by a friend of Ferrari’s, Gino Rancati, who was at Ferrari’s office for a meeting with Razelli, the general manager. Razelli had shown him the new Ferrari, which was to be unveiled at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Rancati asked what it would be called, and Razelli replied that they had two or three possible names but wondered what he would call it. Rancati replied: “Since Ferrari’s biggest market is the United States, and since it is now 40 years since the first Ferrari car has appeared, it should have an English-language name, for example ‘Ferrari Forty’”. Rancati received a silver plaque with the inscription: “To Gino Rancati, for a brilliant idea”. On the left was a black Cavallino Rampante and on the right “F40 June 1987”. An accompanying letter said: “Dear Rancati, with this plaque I want to commemorate our meeting on the 4th June, when you kindly contributed to the choice of name for the GT car we presented at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Your contribution has produced excellent results—the ‘F Forty’, based on the idea of 40 years of Ferrari cars, identifies and personalises the fastest Ferrari GT. Kindest regards, G.B. Razelli”. Next to this, in slightly shaky script and violet ink, was “To Signor Gino, Ferrari”. Mechanically, the F40 bore much in common with the 288 GTO, and it was, in fact, closely based on the 288 GTO Evoluzione, which was a race version of the GTO. The F40’s engine was also based on the 288 GTO’s twin-turbocharged V-8, which was bored to displace almost three litres. When this displacement was combined with additional tuning, the car’s output exceeded 478 horsepower, making the F40 Ferrari’s most powerful road car to date. Ferrari’s riposte to the Lamborghini Countach and the Porsche 959 was to create the first production car to break the mythical 200-mph barrier, and the F40 did just that, as it was capable of reaching a top speed of 201.4 mph. THIS FERRARI FORTY This F40 was produced in May 1991 and originally sold in Italy by Crepaldi Autos, of Milan, to Mr Pietro Brigato, of Grumolo delle Abbadesse, Vicenza. It was first registered through his company, Old Cars S.r.l. The F40 was then offered for sale in November 1991, showing only 625 kilometres on its odometer. The Ferrari was bought by a resident of Fürstenfeldbruck, Germany, and then, on 4 June 1992, it was taken to Garage S&T in Munich for its first service. Later that year, the car returned to the shop for another service, this time with 5,834 kilometres on the odometer. The F40 was regularly maintained by S&T, receiving four additional services up until April 2002. Its next service was at Eberlein Automobile, another Ferrari dealer in Kessel, Germany, where it was noted that the cam belts were changed at 34,229 kilometres. In 2008, the car received another cam belt service, this time at Ch. Pozzi S.A.R.L. in France. The car, a later model in the production run, which ended in 1992, comes with catalytic converters and adjustable suspension and is now presented with less than 41,000 kilometres. It has been submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification and has recently received a full service at Motor Service S.r.l in Modena, which included the installation of new cam belts and a new set of Pirelli P Zero tyres, fuel tank, suspension, and brake rebuilds, and an engine calibration. This F40 also retains its original manual, tools, and a spare set of keys. With the added distinction of the last Maranello road car to be engineered under Enzo Ferrari’s direct leadership, the F40 remains one of the most celebrated high-performance supercars ever built, and this example is certainly one of the best. 478 cv, 2.936 cc motore V-8 di 90° con doppio albero a camme in testa, doppio turbocompressore, con iniezione elettronica e sistema di gestione del motore Weber-Marelli, cambio a 5 rapporti, telaio tubolare in acciaio con inserti in fibra di carbonio, sospensioni a ruote indipendenti con doppi quadrilateri, ammortizzatori idraulici Koni e barre antirollio sia anteriori sia posteriori, 4 freni a disco in acciaio auto ventilati. Passo: 2.450 mm • Tagliando completo, recentemente effettuato presso la Motor Service S.r.l di Modena • Completa dei libretti uso e manutenzione e del kit attrezzi originali • In fase di certificazione Ferrari Classiche “LA MIGLIOR FERRARI DI SEMPRE” Il millenovecento ottanta sette è stato un anno importante per Enzo Ferrari. Non solo compiva 90 anni, ma, cosa per lui ancora più importante, celebrava i 40 anni da quando aveva realizzato la sua prima auto vettura. Un anno prima aveva detto: “Realizziamo qualcosa di speciale per le celebrazioni del prossimo anno, come usavamo fare in passato”. La “macchina speciale” sarebbe stata la F40, e sarebbe stata l’ultima che “Il grande Vecchio” come era affettuosamente chiamato, avrebbe visto presentata dalla leggendaria azienda che lui stesso aveva creato. Al tempo Ferrari combatteva una Guerra aperta con i suoi arci rivali Lamborghini e Porsche. La Lamborghini Countach aveva sorpreso il mondo, con il suo design estremo e le prestazioni da record, diventando la vettura nel poster appeso in camera di un’intera generazione. Non da meno era stata Porsche, che aveva presentato, nel 1986, la sua superba 959. La macchina era farcita di tecnologia innovativa, mai vista prima su un’autovettura, e capace di raggiungere l’incredibile velocità di 315 km/h, rendendola, di fatto, la macchina di serie più veloce del mondo. Tipo da non accettare mai di essere surclassato dagli altri, “Il Commendatore” non si è seduto lasciando a Porsche e Lamborghini l’ultima parola. La sua risposta sarebbe stata energica, per quella che lui avrebbe nominato “la miglior Ferrari di sempre”. Il nome per il nuovo modello era stato suggerito a Ferrari dal suo amico Gino Rancati, presente nell’ufficio di Ferrari durante un suo incontro con il general manager della casa, Razelli. Razelli gli aveva mostrato la nuova vettura, pronta per essere presentata al prossimo Salone di Francoforte. Fu Rancati a chiedere come sarebbe stata chiamata e Razelli rispose che stavano valutando due o tre possibilità, ma si chiedeva come lui, Rancati, l’avrebbe chiamata. La risposta di Rancati fu chiarissima: “Siccome il mercato più importante per la Ferrari è quello americano, e la nuova macchina celebra i 40 anni dalla prima vettura prodotta dalla casa, dovrebbe avere un nome di origine inglese, qualcosa come Ferrari Forty (quaranta in inglese ndt)”. Rancati avrebbe in seguito ricevuto una targa in argento, con inciso: “A Gino Rancati, per una brillante idea” e, sulla sinistra un Cavallino Rampante nero, e, sulla destra, “F40 Giugno 1987”. La lettera che l’accompagnava, riportava: “Caro Rancati, con questa targa vorrei celebrare il nostro incontro del 4 Giugno scorso quando lei ha, molto cortesemente, contribuito alla scelta del nome della nostra ultima GT, che abbiamo presentato al recente Salone di Francoforte. Il suo contributo ha prodotto un eccellente risultato. L’‘F-Forty’, basato sull’idea dei 40 anni di automobili Ferrari, identifica e contraddistingue la più veloce delle GT Ferrari. I miei migliori saluti, G.B. Razelli”. Di fianco, con calligrafia leggermente tremolante, scritto con inchiostro viola, “Al Signor Gino, Ferrari”. Meccanicamente l’F40 aveva tantissimo in comune con la 288 GTO, ed era, infatti, strettamente derivata dalla 288 GTO Evoluzione, con il suo V-8 con doppio turbo compressore, rialesato per raggiungere i 3 litri di cubatura. La crescita della cilindrata, abbinata alla miglior preparazione del motore, aveva portato la potenza del motore a superare i 478 cv, rendendo l’F40 la Ferrari stradale più potente mai prodotta. La risposta di Ferrari alla Lamborghini Countach ed alla Porsche 959 aveva creato la prima vettura stradale capace di superare la barriera dei 320 Km orari. L’F40 non si fermava a quello, visto che era capace di raggiungere i 322 chilometri orari di velocità massima. QUESTA FERRARI F40 Prodotta nel Maggio del 1991, questa F40 è stata venduta attraverso la Concessionaria Ferrari di Milano, Crepaldi Automobili, al Sig. Pietro Brigato di Grumolo delle Abbadesse, in provincia di Vicenza che l’ha intestata alla sua società, la Old Cars srl. Rimessa in vendita nel Novembre del 1991, la F40 riportava nel suo contachilometri solo 625 chilometri. Comprata da un tedesco, residente a Fürstenfeldbruck, il 4 Giugno del 1992 è stata portata al Garage S&T di Monaco di Baviera per il suo primo tagliando. Nel corso dello stesso 1992, la macchina ha fatto un altro tagliando, sempre presso lo stesso garage, quando il contachilometri riportava la distanza di 5.834. Mantenuta con regolare precisione dalla S&T l’F40 ha ricevuto altri 4 tagliandi fino all’Aprile del 2002. L’intervento successivo è stato presso il garage Eberlein Automobile, un altro concessionario ufficiale Ferrari, nella città di Kessel, sempre in Germania, dove è stato anche annotato il cambio delle cinghie a 34.229 chilometri. Nel 2008 la macchina ha nuovamente cambiato le cinghie, in Francia, presso la concessionaria Ch. Pozzi S.A.R.L. La vettura, costruita verso la fine della produzione, che terminerà nel 1992, è dotata dei catalizzatori di scarico e delle sospensioni anteriori regolabili in altezza ed ha percorso, ad oggi, poco meno di 41.000 chilometri. E’ in corso la certificazione Ferrari Classiche e, recentemente, ha ricevuto un tagliando completo presso la Motor Service S.r.l di Modena, dove sono state cambiate le cinghie di distribuzione, messi nuovi pneumatici Pirelli P Zero, un set di nuovi serbatoi, ed è stata effettuata la revisione completa dell’apparato frenante, di tutta la ciclistica, e la registrazione del motore (carburazione, accensione, e pressione turbo). Questa F40, inoltre, ha ancora i suoi manuali originali, il kit attrezzi ed il secondo set di chiavi. Con il “plus” di essere l’ultima vettura stradale di Maranello sviluppata sotto l’egida di Enzo Ferrari in persona, l’F40 rimane una delle più celebrate supercar ad alte prestazioni mai prodotte e, certamente, questo esemplare è uno dei migliori rappresentanti di questa serie. Chassis no. ZFFGJ34B000089693 Engine no. 27175 Body no. 291 Gearbox no. 394

  • CANCanada
  • 2015-05-23
Hammer price
Show price

1936 Delahaye 135 S

Est. 160 bhp 3,557 cc inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed Cotal racing gearbox, independent front suspension with transverse leaf springs and Raxef friction dampers, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and Raxef friction dampers, and Duo-servo four-wheel cable-operated light alloy drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,700 mm Unbroken ownership since new Painstakingly accurate restoration by marque experts in France One of only 16 examples constructed Extensively raced in period, including First Place at the 1936 24 Hours of Spa Perfectly sorted mechanically and delivered with valid FIA HTP The vehicles for Delahaye’s new direction were the Superluxe and its sports sibling, the Delahaye Type 135. The Superluxe’s and Type 103’s engine, a long-stroke, pushrod-operated overhead valve, four-main-bearing F-head inline six, was designed by Jean François, under the direction of Delahaye’s technical director, Amédée Varlet, and it would become one of the most versatile, long-lived engine designs in history. At the same time, Delahaye engineer Jean François was hard at work on a new chassis, the Type 135, to complement the more powerful engine. The chassis was a particularly advanced assembly for its time, with boxed rectangular rails, a central crossmember, and a welded-in floor, which contributed to additional stiffness and rigidity. The front suspension was independent, using its transverse leaf spring as the lower control arm. Introduced at the 1953 Paris Salon, the road going version of the Type 135 was offered with two engine sizes and two aspiration options, yielding a choice of 95 horsepower, 120 horsepower, and two 110 horsepower configurations. The competition prospects for the Type 135 were embodied in a fifth model, the short-wheelbase Delahaye Type 135 Special that had a 3,557-cubic centimetre engine with triple carburettors, which could produce 160 horsepower. The Type 135 Special was more than just highly tuned, as it also featured additional engine block cooling passages, a lighter and better balanced crankshaft that was capable of higher rpms, an 8.4:1 compression ratio cylinder head, a modified valve gear, and a high-lift cam. It breathed through three horizontal Solex carburettors and had six exhaust ports with individual exhaust header pipes. All the Type 135 Specials were bodied with similar lightweight, two-seat coachwork with removable teardrop wings, making them acceptable in both sports car and grand prix competition. They were aggressively functional, gracefully styled, and effectively aerodynamic, and their rugged, naturally aspirated engines and dual-purpose functionality made the Delahaye Type 135 Special the ideal race car for the 1936 French racing season. The Automobile Club de France had proposed a series of French races for “sport-competition” cars, which were designed to avoid the dominance of German and Italian marques in grand prix. Included in the ACF’s schedule, in addition to the 24 Hours of Le Mans, was the French Grand Prix, which was the proudest laurel any French auto manufacturer could win. The French Grand Prix was held at Montlhèry, outside Paris, on 28 June, over a distance of 1,000 kilometres. The Delahaye Type 135 Specials threw a scare into Bugatti, finishing 2nd through 5th behind Wimille and Sommer in an envelope-bodied Bugatti Type 57G. Albert Perrot, with co-driver Dhome, finished 5th, just behind Laury Schell and René Carrière. Schell had finished 2nd in the 3 Hours of Marseilles, which was held a month before on the Miramas circuit, in a sweep of the top six positions by Delahaye Type 135 Specials. Two weeks after the French GP, Schell and Carrière finished 3rd overall at the 24 Hours of Spa. Delahaye’s hopes of adding the victory wreath from the 24 Hours of Le Mans to the company’s history was unfortunately interrupted by 1936’s social and labour unrest in France, which forced the cancellation of the endurance classic. Chassis 47187 started life with a two-seater sport body by O. Lecanu-Deschamps in Levallois, Paris, France. It was purchased new in the spring of 1936 by the young Rene Le Begue, along with chassis 46075, a Competition Court chassis. He immediately began to campaign the car, entering it in the 3 Hours of Marseilles on 13 May and no fewer than 12 events throughout the 1936 season, all wearing the registration plate 2204 YB 6. Notable amongst these entries were the 24 Hours of Le Mans on 13 June, but, unfortunately, the race was cancelled due to social unrest. Following this was the Grand Prix de l’A.C.F., which was an important event due to the overwhelming presence of nine Delahayes on the grid, and there Le Begue managed to qualify 3rd. As Le Mans was cancelled, many teams shifted their focus to the 24 Hours of Spa. At the event there were categories A and B, which represented supercharged cars and those which were naturally aspirated, respectively; each of these categories was further subdivided into five classes that were based on displacement. The day was hard fought, with torrential rain to boot, but in the end, Le Begue and 47187 emerged victorious, finishing 1st in the two-to-four-litre class, first in Category A, and 2nd overall behind the powerful, supercharged 8C 2900 Alfa of Sommer and Severi. At the Grand Prix du Comminge in August, the car did well, finishing 4th overall and 1st amongst the seven 135 Specials present on the track. Next came the Tourist Trophy, held on 5 September in Belfast, which is a notable entry because this is the first time that 47187 appeared with white wheels, a white dash and steering wheel, and the “Blue Buzz III” moniker painted on the cowl. In the qualifying rounds, Le Begue earned the pole position and took a quick lead out of the muddy starting grid, achieving the fastest lap time at a recorded 137.658 km/h. Unfortunately, he did not finish this race due to electrical issues. After participating in the Mount Ventoux Hill Climb, the car travelled to England for the Donington Grand Prix on 3 October, where there was a big showdown, which saw supercharged Alfas, Maseratis, Bugattis, and ERA against the naturally aspirated Delahayes. Being in the UK, Le Begue also took the opportunity to travel to Brooklands for testing trials in order to best calibrate his machine. At the end of the 1936 season, Le Begue was hired by Ecurie Talbot, resulting in the ownership of 47187 being passed to Count Pierre Merlin, with registration number 2339 RK 8. Due to a change of regulations, the car was fitted with a proper door, as were all of the other similarly bodied sports racers. Under Merlin’s ownership, the 135 S was entrusted to Raphael “Ralph” Bethenod de Las Casas, who placed 5th overall at the Grand Prix de Pau on 21 February and 3rd overall at the Coupe de Printemps in Montlhery. Merlin himself piloted the car in the 3 Hours of Marseilles, which would be the last event that the car was campaigned in in its original two-seater sport configuration. At the end of the 1937 season, Merlin decided to use the Delahaye as a road car, and he had it rebodied into a roadster, which was more appropriate to his new intended use. On 27 June 1946, the car was sold to Miss Schwob de Lure, of Paris, who maintained the same registration number. At the end of 1947, de Lure sent the car to the coachbuilding shop of Jules Grignard in Enghien. The result of Grignard’s efforts was a cabriolet very much of the school of Figoni et Falaschi, and it was entered into the Concours d’Elegance of Enghien-les-Bains on 2 June 1948. Miss Schwob sold the car shortly thereafter, and it passed through a short succession of known owners, with one of whom commissioning a berlinetta body by Henri Molla. In 1958, it was eventually acquired by George Marut with the intent to race. Marut entered the Delahaye into the Course de Cote de Limonest - Mont Verdun on 27 September 1959, and he finished 13th overall and 4th in class. Following Marut’s ownership, the Delahaye ultimately came into the possession of Charles Sadoyan, who would retain the car for four decades, from 1964 through to 2004, when it was acquired by the present owner. In 2005, the owner made the decision to return the car to its 1937 specification, and the work was entrusted to Carrosserie Francois Cointreau. His efforts were greatly aided by Bernard Brule, a designer and engineer at Peugeot, who painstakingly created all of the necessary engineering drawings to make the project a reality. The blueprints he created were as accurate as possible, as they were based on all available period photography, as well as the original 135 S plan pour carrossier (factory chassis plans for coachbuilders), which were supplied by well-known expert Christian Huet. From Brule’s blueprints, wooden body bucks were created and metal was sculpted over a frame of ash, and the racing Delahaye of Le Begue came back to life. When the painstakingly created body was completed and placed onto the original chassis, it was aligned directly with the original bolt holes from the original body. The engine has been mechanically sorted by Fred Novo, a specialist well-known for his expertise with such great pre-war French racing cars as Bugatti, Delahaye, Delage, and Hispano Suiza. As such, it is unequivocally offered “on the button”. The engine has been tuned to racing specification, with high compression pistons, a hot camshaft, and other items, so that the output is likely higher than the 160 horsepower of the original 135 S engine. The life of 47187 has been heavily documented by Christian Huet, and a file of two binders that comprise a great deal of history and restoration documentation should be reviewed by all parties interested in this lot. Today, it is believed that 7 of the 16 original Delahaye Type 135 Specials survive, which is ample evidence that enthusiasts recognised even in the darkest days of World War II that these were exceptional automobiles of the highest quality and rare distinction. Chassis 47187 was built from its inception as a dual-purpose grand prix and sports car, making it adaptable to, and acceptable for, all of the most important and enjoyable events and tours. The Type 135 Special has scored points in grand prix, sports car, and endurance events, and it has been driven by legends in racing history. This Type 135 is beautifully presented and carefully prepared, and it would make a fabulous addition to the stable of the French racer. Competition history for this car can be found in both our print and digital catalogues. Moteur six cylindres en ligne à soupapes en tête, 3 557 cm3, 160 ch (estimé), boîte de vitesse électromagnétique Cotal course « 38 m.kg » à 4 rapports, suspension avant indépendantes par ressort à lames transversal et amortisseurs à friction Raxef, pont arrière rigide oscillant sur ressorts à lames semi-elliptiques et amortisseurs à friction Raxef, quatre freins Duo-servo commandés par câbles, tambours en alliage léger. Empattement: 2 700 mm. Chaîne des propriétaires in interroup u depuis l’origine Restauration méticuleuse par spécialistes de la marque en France Une des 16 voitures construites, dont 7 ont survé cue Nombreux engagements en course avant et après-guerre dont une 1e place aux 24 Heures de Spa 1936 Mécaniquement parfaite et livrée avec ses papiers FIA HTP valides La voiture qui concrétisa la nouvelle orientation de Delahaye fut le modèle Superluxe et son dérivé sportif surbaissé, la Delahaye Type 103. Conçue par l’ingénieur Jean François sous la supervision du directeur technique de Delahaye, Amédée Varlet, la Superluxe et le moteur type 103, un six cylindres monobloc « longue course » à culbuteurs et soupapes en tête en ligne, à quatre paliers, allaient vivre une longue et glorieuse aventure. À la même époque, Jean François consacra de longues études à un nouveau châssis, le Type 135, destiné à exploiter au mieux des versions du moteur les plus puissantes. Ce châssis était une structure très moderne en son temps avec des longerons tubulaires rectangulaires, une traverse caissonnée centrale et un plancher soudé qui ajoutait à la rigidité et à la résistance du cadre. La suspension avant à roues indépendantes utilisait le ressort transversal comme bras de liaison inférieur. Introduit au salon de Paris 1935, le Type 135 offrait au choix des système d’admission à un ou trois carburateurs outre deux moteurs de capacités différentes, un 18 CV de 3 227 cm3 et un 20 CV de 3 557 cm3 donnant aux acheteurs un choix de configurations ; 95 ch, 120 ch et deux versions de 110 ch. La version routière du Type 135 était donc proposée avec deux moteurs au choix et deux systèmes d’admission en option donnant les mêmes possibilités : 95 ch, 120 ch ou 110 ch. Mais les projets dans le domaine de la compétition pure avec le Type 135 étaient servis par un cinquième modèle : le châssis le plus court avec le moteur 3 557 cm3 à trois carburateurs c’est-à-dire le Type 135 Spécial de 160 ch. Plus que simplement préparé, le Type 135 Spécial se caractérisait par un bloc cylindre pourvu de passages d’eau supplémentaires, un vilebrequin mieux équilibré et allégé capable de prendre des tours plus vite, un diagramme de distribution modifié et des cames à grande levée. Il était alimenté par trois carburateurs horizontaux Solex et la culasse offrait six orifices d’échappement avec sorties séparées. Tous les châssis Type 135 Spécial furent habillés de la même caisse légère biplace et d’ailes amovibles en goutte d’eau, permettant ainsi de courir en Grand Prix comme en Sport. Agressivement fonctionnelles, élégamment proportionnées et surbaissées et d’une aérodynamique correcte, ces voitures au robuste moteur atmosphérique se révélèrent polyvalentes au point de faire du Type 135 Spécial la machine idéale pour la saison de course 1936 en France. L’Automobile Club de France s’était proposé d’organiser une série de courses réservées aux voitures « sport-compétition » dans le but de contrer la domination en Grands Prix des voitures allemandes et italiennes. Le calendrier du Club avait prévu selon cette formule, outre les 24 Heures du Mans, le Grand Prix de l’ACF, la plus belle victoire aux yeux des constructeurs français. Le Grand Prix de l’ACF fut couru à Montlhéry au sud de paris le 28 juin sur une distance de mille kilomètres. Les Delahaye Type 135 Spécial s’insinuèrent entre les Bugatti en se plaçant de la deuxième à la cinquième place derrière Wimille et Sommer au volant d’un « Tank » Bugatti 57 G. Albert Perrot qui faisait équipage avec Dhome finit cinquième juste derrière Laury Schell et René Carrière. Un mois avant, Schell avait terminé deuxième aux 3 Heures de Marseille courues sur le circuit de Miramas où les six Delahaye 135 Spécial avaient raflé les six premières places. Deux semaines après le GP de l’ACF, Schell et Carrière arrivèrent trosièmes des 24 Heures de Spa en Belgique. Les espoirs de Delahaye d’ajouter au palmarès de la marque un triomphe aux 24 Heures du Mans furent déçus en raison des grèves et des troubles sociaux qui paralysèrent la France et qui entraînèrent l’annulation de la course. Le châssis n° 47187 commença sa carrière habillé d’une caisse biplace réalisé par O. Lecanu-Deschamps, carrossier à Levallois, près de Paris (France). Il fut acheté au pritemps 1936 par le jeune René Le Bègue en même temps que le n° 46075, un châssis « Compétition Court ». Il l’engagea immédiatement en participant aux 3 Heures de Marseille le 13 mai et en ne prenant pas moins de 12 engagements tout au long de la saison 1936, toujours sous l’immatriculation 2204 YB6. On note parmi ses engagements les 24 Heures du Mans le 13 juin, mais cette course fut annulée en raison des grèves. Suivit le Grand Prix de l’ACF, un événement important en raison de la présence sur la grille de 9 Delahaye et où Le Bègue se qualifia en troisième position. En raison de l’annulation du Mans, de nombreuses écuries reportèrent leur effort sur les 24 Heures de Spa. Cette épreuve réunissaient des voitures des catégories A et B, celles à compresseur et les « atmosphériques » elles-mêmes subdivisées en cinq catégories en fonction de leur cylindrée. La course fut très disputée sous la pluie, mais à la fin, Le Bègue et 47187 s’imposèrent à l’arrivée en terminant premiers de la catégorie « 2 à 4 litres », premiers de la catégorie A et en prenant la deuxième place au général derrière la surpuissante Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 à compresseur de Sommer et Severi. Au Grand Prix du Comminges en août, la voiture marcha bien et termina 4e au général et première des sept 135 Spécial présentes au départ. Vint ensuite le Tourist Trophy couru le 5 septembre à Belfast, engagement notable car pour la première fois, 47187 apparut avec des roues blanches, une planche de bord blanche et un volant blanc et le surnom « Blue Buzz III » peint sur l’auvent. Aux qualifications, Le Bègue prit la pole position, puis un bon départ malgré une piste détrempée pour réaliser le meilleur tour avant d’être arrêté par des problèmes électriques. Après une participation à la course de côte du Mont Ventoux, la voiture partit pour le Grand Prix de Donington le 3 octobre où se produisit la grande confrontation entre les Alfa, Maserati, Bugatti et ERA à compresseur et les Delahaye atmosphériques. Profitant de son séjour en Angleterre, Le Bègue se rendit à Brooklands pour y procéder à des essais en vue de calibrer sa voiture. A la fin de la saison 1936, Le Bègue fut recruté par l’Ecurie Talbot et 47187 devint la propriété du comte Pierre Merlin sous le numéro d’immatriculation 2339 RK8. En raison d’un changement de règlement, la voiture fut équipée d’une porte comme toutes les autres machines sport-compétition. Aux mains de Merlin, la 135 S fut confiée à Raphaël « Raph » Béthenod de Las Casas qui prit la 5e place au GP de Pau le 21 février 1937 et la 3e au général de la Coupe de Printemps à Montlhéry. Merlin pilota lui-même la voiture aux 3 Heures de Marseille, dernière épreuve disputée par la voiture sous sa forme originale de biplace sport de compétition. À la fin de la saison 1937, Merlin décida d’utiliser la Delahaye comme une routière et la fit recarrosser en roadster mieux adapté à cet usage. Le 27 juin 1946, la voiture vendue à Mlle Schwob de Lure à Paris conserva le même numéro d’immatriculation. À la fin de 1947, de Lure envoya la voiture à l’atelier de carrosserie de Jules Grignard à Enghien. Le résultat du travail de Grignard fut un cabriolet très inspiré par Figoni et Falaschi qui fut inscrit au Concours d’Elégance d’Enghien-les-Bains du 2 juin 1948. Mlle Schwob vendit la voiture peu après et celle-ci passa aux mains de plusieurs propriétaires identifiés dont l’un commanda une caisse de berlinette à Henri Molla. Elle fut ensuite achetée en 1958 par Georges Marut dans l’intention de courir. Marut engagea la Delahaye à la course de côte de Limonest-Mont Verdun le 27 septembre 1959 où il finit 13e au général et 4e de sa catégorie. Après avoir été la propriété de Marut, la Delahaye finit par arriver chez Charles Sadovan qui la conserva pendant quarante ans, de 1964 à 2004, date à laquelle elle fut acquise par le propriétaire actuel. En 2005, le propriétaire prit la décision de remettre la voiture dans sa configuration de 1937. Les travaux furent confiés à la Carrosserie François Cointreau qui bénéficia d’une aide considérable de la part de Bernard Brulé, styliste et ingénieur chez Peugeot. Celui-ci retraça méticuleusement tous les plans techniques nécessaires à la réalisation du projet. Ces plans furent dessinés avec la plus grande précision possible sur la base des photos d’époque disponibles ainsi que du « plan pour carrossier » original du châssis 135 S fourni par l’expert bien connu Christian Huet. D’après les plans de Brulé, les pièces de bois furent fabriquées et les tôleries formées sur le mannequin de bois de frêne et la Delahaye de course de Le Bègue ressuscita. Lorsque la carrosserie patiemment recréée fut achevée et posée sur le châssis original, ses fixations s’alignèrent parfaitement sur les perçages des boulons de la caisse originale. Le moteur, remis en état par Fred Novo, spécialiste bien connu pour ses compétences en matière de voitures de course françaises d’avant-guerre comme les Bugatti, Delahaye, Delage et les Hispano-Suiza, est donc déclaré capable de démarrer « au quart ». Il a été mis au point selon les spécifications « course » avec des pistons haute compression, un arbre à cames spécial et autres pièces de performance si bien qu’il est crédité d’une puissance supérieure aux 160 ch du moteur d’origine. L’existence de 47187 a été solidement documentée par Christian Huet et un dossier comportant deux classeurs qui retrace la plus grande partie de son histoire et de sa restauration doit être consulté par tous ceux qui s’intéressent à ce lot. De nos jours, on estime que 7 des 16 Delahaye Type 135 S originales survivent, preuve que les passionnés ont toujours reconnu, même dans la période la plus sombre de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, que ces automobiles exceptionnelles étaient de la plus haute qualité et d’une rare distinction. Construit dès sa conception à la fois comme une voiture de Grand prix et une voiture de sport, le châssis 47187 est à sa place dans les plus importants événements routiers et sportifs historiques qui l’accueilleront sans réserve. Le Type 135 Spécial a brillé en Grands Prix, en endurance et en rallyes, piloté par des légendes vivantes de l’histoire de la course. Magnifiquement présenté et méticuleusement préparé, il ne peut être que le prestigieux fleuron de toute collection de machines de course françaises. Chassis no. 47187

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-05
Hammer price
Show price

1971 Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spyder

352 bhp, 4,380 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber 40DCN20 carburettors, five-speed manual gearbox, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5") • Ferrari Classiche certification, FCA Platinum Award winner • One of only 18 European-specification, LHD examples • Well-documented history; the third of 122 Daytona Spyders produced • Complete with original tool roll and both Borrani and Cromodora wheels Perhaps the most intriguing piece of history behind the immensely revered Ferrari 365 GTB/4 is its unofficial nickname, “Daytona”. Since Ferrari’s electrifying one-two-three victory at the 1967 24 Hours of Daytona was so monumental, the marque’s diehard enthusiasts felt that the forthcoming replacement for the 275 GTB/4 should bear the name “Daytona”, which had been used internally at Ferrari to commemorate the victory. Enzo Ferrari insisted, however, that the car’s technical nomenclature be used instead, in keeping with tradition. Name aside, the 365 GTB/4 quickly became a legend in its own time as the last front-engine Ferrari GT designed before the marque’s business involvement with Fiat in 1969. In addition, the 365 GTB/4 was one of the last fully hand-assembled, regular production Ferraris, making it a uniquely hand-crafted masterpiece. The 365 GTB/4 Berlinetta that replaced the earlier 275 GTB/4 in 1968 differed dramatically in styling, though the tubular steel chassis bore many similarities to its predecessor and provided superior balance. Where the curvaceous 275 GTB/4 was clearly a traditional Pininfarina design, the 365 GTB/4 was at once modern, edgy, sleek and forward-looking. Penned by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti, who continues to maintain an independent styling studio, Fioravanti Srl., outside of Turin, the 365 GTB/4 features a number of styling cues that continue to influence modern Ferrari design. Famed Modenese coachbuilding firm Scaglietti executed the striking body with hand-formed and hammer-welded steel used for every panel other than the doors, bonnet and boot lids, which were composed of lightweight aluminium alloy. Initially, the headlamps were covered in Perspex, though retractable headlamps were later introduced to comply with U.S. safety regulations imposed in 1971. The 365 GTB/4’s quad round tail lamps are an iconic design element seen on nearly every Ferrari produced to this day. The simplicity of the car’s tail, combined with the aggressiveness of four chrome tail pipes making their appearance below the bumper, makes a lasting impression on even the most seasoned Ferrari enthusiast. The outgoing 275 GTB/4 lent its 60-degree V-12 engine to the 365 GTB/4, though it was enlarged from 3.3 to 4.4 litres or 4,390 cc. Power output rose accordingly. The new engine, designated Tipo 251, delivered 352 bhp and 315 foot-pounds of torque at 7,500 rpm through six Weber twin-choke carburettors. A five-speed manual gearbox was, of course, the only available transmission. That the 365 GTB/4 was capable of a top speed three mph greater than its archrival, the Lamborghini Miura, was not a fact lost on contemporary media or enthusiasts eager to see the speedometer needle tickle 175 mph—nor was the car’s spectacular driving experience. The last great front-engine, rear-drive GT to emerge from Maranello for two decades, the 365 GTB/4 represents the ultimate expression of the concept. Ferrari débuted the new model at the October 1968 Paris Salon. A handful of coupés were produced for customers in the 1968 model year. At the Frankfurt International Auto Show in September 1969, Ferrari unveiled a Spyder version of the car that was now unofficially nicknamed ‘Daytona.’ Unsurprisingly, the seductive drop-top enjoyed critical acclaim that continues unabated today. The Frankfurt prototype show car was the only Spyder to be fitted with Perspex headlamps; all subsequent production models utilised retractable headlamps. Production of the Spyder and Berlinetta continued through 1973 before being replaced with the mid-engine 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer. Scaglietti also handled production of the bodies for the open-top Spyder. In all, Ferrari produced just 122 Daytona Spyders, including the prototype, with 96 destined for the important U.S. market and just 25 (plus the prototype) built to European and UK (RHD) specifications. Of those, 18 were built to European specifications with left-hand drive, including the handsome example offered here, chassis 14415. While its serial number is the 10th in numerical sequence, according to the Ferrari Assembly Number, the car is in fact the third Daytona Spyder ever built. It was originally finished in Blu Dino (106-A-72) with a white stripe on the body flanks, a Nero interior and with the convertible top material reportedly supplied by the client. According to Ferrari records, the car was delivered in Italy to a Sara Scapula, then later to John Baus, an employee of Chinetti, before being exported from Cherbourg, France to the United States by Luigi Chinetti Motors. By 1975, the car was owned by Ed Lazzarin of Miami, Florida and had since been repainted red. Subsequently, the car was damaged, and Mr. Lazzarin had the repairs completed by marque specialists Shelton Ferrari of Fort Lauderdale. By the late-1980s, the Spyder had accumulated approximately 50,000 kms and remained under Lazzarin’s ownership before eventually being acquired in 1993 by an individual in Japan before going to noted American Ferrari collector Chris Cox. During a brief period of ownership with Mr Jim Mathews, 14415 was restored, repainted black and then acquired once more by Mr Cox, who brought the car to the Ferrari Club of America Annual Concours in Leesburg, Virginia, where it received the coveted Platinum Award in Class 5. In the 1998 Cavallino Classic held at the Breakers in Palm Beach, 14415 received the coveted Gold Award. Thereafter, the car remained in San Diego, California and then Arizona, driven sparingly and shown at several local events. Since its acquisition by the current owner, the car has continued to see limited, careful use and has been maintained within a private collection by an in-house mechanic. This fantastic European-specification Daytona Spyder is sold with its original tool roll and offered complete with both Borrani wire-spoke and Cromodora wheels. Powerful, sexy and tremendously fast in the best Ferrari tradition, the 365 GTS/4 and its 365 GTB/4 Spyder brethren remain some of the finest sports/GT cars ever produced by Ferrari and undoubtedly some of the most thrilling to drive. This wonderful example is further distinguished by its Ferrari Classiche certification and well-documented history, enhanced by its status as one of the very limited number of left-hand drive, European-specification Daytona Spyders originally produced. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is eligible for import into the UK at a reduced rate of 5% VAT. Chassis no. 14415 Engine no. B1242

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
Show price

1968 Alfa Romeo T33/2 ‘Daytona’

270 bhp, 1,995 cc fuel-injected DOHC V-8 with dual ignition, six-speed gearbox, independent front and rear suspension by double wishbones, rear-wheel-drive, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,250 mm (88.58”) • One of the best documented Tipo 33/2 Dayontas of the period • Ex-Nino Vaccarella, Teodoro Zeccoli, winner of 500 Km of Imola • Stunning eight-cylinder power; gorgeous design • Exceptional event car; FIA, HTP and FIVA documentation Post-War Alfa Romeo Sport Car Racing At the end of 1951, after winning the first two World Driving Championships with its Tipo 158/159 racers, Alfa Romeo retired from international Grand Prix competition. The company’s next major competitive effort was to be the famed Disco Volante (the ‘Flying Saucer’) sport car. An entirely new design, it appeared in 1952–1953, in both open and closed form. An intriguing 2-litre V-8 prototype engine design, built shortly afterward and intended for a sporting GT car, was shelved. In the early 1960s, when Alfa Romeo and its competition arm, Autodelta, were scoring many victories in touring and GT races, especially with the Giulia coupé derivatives and the TZ1 and TZ2, Alfa Romeo decided to re-enter international sport car racing. The stillborn 2-litre V-8 engine, which had been set aside ten years earlier, became the heart of Alfa’s return to sport cars. This effort would encompass eleven racing seasons and result in Alfa Romeo winning the World Championship in 1977. The first of the new cars appeared in 1967, with a rather exotic H-shape chassis made of magnesium and aluminium. It was powered by a 2-litre V-8. This car was entered in a number of events, the first being a Belgian hill climb at Fleron, where Teodoro Zeccoli finished 1st overall. Zeccoli of course had a long history with the marque, having been an Abarth Works driver, a well-respected Le Mans and hill climb veteran and an Alfa Romeo test driver who was actively involved in the Tipo 33 project development. The name ‘Fleron’ became associated with this model, and that name persisted with the Tipo 33 Alfa Romeo sport cars. Alfa Romeo won four victories in 1967: three were in hill climbs and one was at the Vallelunga circuit later in the year. For 1968, Autodelta’s brilliant chief engineer, Carlo Chiti, was preparing an “all-new” car for a serious international effort. Although it retained the original H-shape chassis, everything else was re-designed. Testing began in late-1967, and four cars, equipped with beautiful new coupé bodies, were ready for the February 24 Hours at Daytona race. They finished 5th, 6th and 7th overall, with an impressive 1st, 2nd and 3rd in the 2-litre class. These short-tail cars soon became known as the T33/2 ‘Daytona’. The later long-tail Le Mans racers similarly became known as the ‘Le Mans’ models. The new bodies had much better aerodynamic qualities, and the 1995 cc V-8 benefited from significant development work, producing 270 bhp at 9600 rpm. The 6-speed gearbox had been refined. The long-tail version was reaching just under 300 km/h at Le Mans. Factory and private entry T33/2s took part in 23 racing events in 1968, and won eight victories at various venues. Chassis 75033.029 According to Alfa Romeo authority, Ed McDonough, chassis number 75033.029 is one of the few Alfa Romeo racing cars of the period, for which there is strong evidence of its identity. As McDonough writes, “…both Alfa Romeo and Autodelta kept very poor records of their competition cars and no comprehensive (official factory) written record exists which identifies which Tipo 33 chassis raced at which event. No one knows exactly how many T33/2 chassis were built, although there were believed to be about twenty. The chassis numbering system has always defied understanding”. For the car on offer, however, there are two principal sources of provenance: the first is Teodoro Zeccoli, who did most of the early testing, kept his own diary and worked closely with Chiti. Race entry forms exist which match the chassis number on this car as it appeared at the races. There is also testimony from the original owners, as well as from the late Marcello Gambi, an ex-Autodelta mechanic who kept his own records and went on to restore many cars. McDonough believes the history of 75033.029 is “reasonably complete”, and notes “…that can only be said of about five or six of the 1968 cars”. As such, this particular racing car is in a very rarefied class of Alfa Romeos. Documents show the first and most important race for 75033.029 was a 500 km non-championship event at Imola in September, 1968. Three Works entries appeared: Ignazio Giunti/Nanni Galli in chassis 017, Mario Casoni and Spartaco Dini in chassis 018 and Nino Vaccarella and Teodoro Zeccoli in 029. This race was considered a shakedown event for the team, prior to competing at Le Mans two weeks later. (The race was delayed several months that year.) Galli and Giunti starred in practice and the early laps, but it was 029, in the hands of the legendary Nino Vaccarella and the veteran, Teodoro Zeccoli, which worked its way steadily into the lead. That race was Autodelta’s best showing since Daytona, and it proved to be the team’s first 1-2-3 victory, with the T33/2’s outperforming the field of Porsche 910s by a wide margin. In July, Vaccarella and Lucien Bianchi won the Circuit of Mugello race in what was thought to be 029, although irrefutable evidence for this claim has not yet been established. Nino Vaccarella reportedly told Ed McDonough and Peter Collins that “after Mugello, it was nice to win again in the same car at Imola”, which would argue strongly for the Imola winner being the Mugello 029 car. Late in 1968, Autodelta, developing a new 3-litre car for 1969, sold some of the 1968 racers to privateers, whilst retaining a few to use until the new model was complete. 75033.029 was sold to an Italian, Antonio Zadra, who planned to compete in a number of events with his friend, Giuseppe Dalla Torre. The first of these was the 1969 Monza 1000 Kilometres, where the Scuderia Trentina 029 scored an impressive 10th overall and won the 2-litre prototype class. Zadra had Mario Casoni as his co-driver at the Targa Florio, where the car ran well but eventually retired. On 13 July, Zadra finished 8th at the Trento Bondone hill climb in Italy, and a week later, Zadra/Dalla Torre had Works support at the Circuit of Mugello. McDonough noted that 029 appeared there with a more open body fitted. Then came the Austrian 1000 Kilometres at Osterreichring, where Autodelta brought the new 3-litre cars. Zadra/Dalla Torre competed in 029 along with other private Alfa entries. 029 turned out to be the only Alfa to finish, this time in 17th place. Zadra was 12th at the Karlskoga races in Sweden in August, and he shared 029 with Carlo Facetti at the Imola 500 Kilometres in September, but they retired. In 1970, Hubert Ascher bought the car and it appeared at Dijon, after which Klaus Reisch drove it at Neubiberg and again at Magny Cours in 1971. 029 was in the USA in the 1980s, and it returned to Europe, where Paul and Matt Grist found and restored it, then successfully competed in a number of historic events, including the French Tour Auto. The owner states, “This is my personal Tipo 33/2 Daytona, the most original and best documented racing Alfa of that period. It’s well-sorted and blindingly fast for an 8 cylinder 2-litre. I have been invited (to compete) in about every event in this part of the world. It is versatile, exciting to drive and very reliable”. Indeed, Classic & Sports Car seem to agree wholeheartedly with this assessment of the car in a recent road test, entitling their article “Once you’re in the groove, it has a lightness of touch not unlike that of a Grand Prix racer”. Mick Walsh went on to say, “With wide ‘pepperpot’ wheels packing its arches, gaping vents dominating its profile and aero wing-flicks indicating serious speed, the Daytona is the best-looking of the line that ran from the ‘66 Periscopica to the ‘77 twin-turbo flat-12 SC wedge”. Complete with both Dutch and UK road registration, as well as all the requisite FIA, HTP and FIVA documents, it is certainly quite unique and ready for any number of historic racing events. Indeed, the opportunity to acquire a T33/2 Daytona is a very rare one. This particular car’s offering, however, marks what is surely a unique opportunity, by virtue of 029’s stellar racing record and known history. From the corkscrew at Laguna Seca to the open roads of France, there is surely no more exciting way to exercise one’s right foot than with a high-revving, 2-litre Alfa Romeo V-8. ________________ 75033.029 Racing Record 1968 500 km Imola – 1st OA – Nino Vacarella / Teodoro Zecolli 1969 1000 km di Monza – 10th OA – Antonio Zadra / Giuseppe Dalla Torre 1969 Targa Florio – DNF – Antonio Zadra / Mario Casoni 1969 Mugello GP – DNF – Antonio Zadra / Giuseppe Dalla Torre 1969 1000 km Zeltweg – DNF – Antonio Zadra / Giuseppe Dalla Torre 1969 GP Swerige – 12th OA – Antonio Zadra 1969 500 km Imola – DNF (Engine) – Antonio Zadra / Carlo Facetti 1969 Preis von Salzburg – DNA – Antonio Zadra (did not run) 1969 Sports Neubiberg – 7th OA – Klaus Reisch 1970 Dijon – 14th OA – Hubert Ascher 1970 Mugello GP – DNF – Klaus Reisch 1970 1000 km Zeltweg – DNF – Klaus Reisch 1970 Sports Neubiberg – 5th OA – Klaus Reisch 1970 Magny Cours International – 3rd OA - Klaus Reisch Chassis no. 75033.029

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
Show price

1961 Chaparral 1 Sports Racing Car

One of the Two Jim Hall Team Cars Built by Troutman & Barnes for the 1961-1963 Seasons Chevrolet Corvette derived, based on the 1961 327 cu. in. cast iron V8, approximately 375bhp at 7,000 rpm with induction by six Stromberg “97” carburetors, transmission is an aluminum-cased Borg Warner T-10 manual four-speed with all synchromesh gears, rear end is Ford ring and pinion gears in custom magnesium alloy case by Halibrand to T and B design and Quick-Change final drive capability via spur-gears at rear of case, independent front and rear suspension, front has upper and lower A-arms with coil-over shock units plus adjustable anti-sway bar, rear has single upper links, N-arm lower, with fore and aft location by parallel trailing arms, Coil-over shock units and adjustable anti-sway bar, cast magnesium rear uprights to T&B design, Girling disc brakes front and rear with BR front calipers, AR rear brakes, rears are mounted inboard, custom cast wheels by Halibrand to a T&B design, pin-drive, knock-off location, nominal sizes – 15 inch x 6 inch, 15 inch x 7 inch, steel tubing chassis to a triangulated space-frame design by T&B, main chassis tubes are 1.25 inch diameter, chassis incorporates innovative full width 1/4 inch magnesium engine mounting plate/main bulkhead, overall weight 1,560 lbs. Wheelbase: 90" THE HISTORY - AN UNFAIR ADVANTAGE The year was 1961. An ambitious young Texan who had already done well in West Texas oil was determined to do even better in pro racing. Jim Hall of Midland, Texas, a 1957 engineering graduate of Cal Tech, had already waded deeply into the waters of going very fast in very powerful cars. He had raced a thumping great 5.7 liter Maserati and a pavement blistering supercharged Lister-Chevrolet. He was not bashful about using massive horsepower and he wanted to get to the front – and in the glare of his later technological accomplishments, it is often overlooked that Jim Hall was one of the most gifted drivers of his time. Having been partners with Carroll Shelby in a Dallas sports car dealership, Hall had waded into an even deeper pool – the-shake-and-bake world of racing entrepreneurism. It was a world of strong personalities and fierce ambition, and Hall felt right at home. He had watched Lance Reventlow’s beautiful, powerful frontengined Scarabs, built by brilliant Southern California craftsmen Dick Troutman and Tom Barnes, dominate racing. He saw that it was not enough to have talent and drive the wheels off a car, the successful racer/engineer must have technology to give him what Mark Donohue would later call an “unfair” advantage. While not all of Hall’s subsequent brain-boggling innovations were successful, each was aimed at this singular ideal. In American racing of 1961, the inevitability of rear-engine (more properly, mid-engined) design was not yet confirmed. Following on the heels of World Champion Cooper Formula 1 cars of 1959 and 1960, two important rear-engined sports racers appeared; the Cooper Monaco and Colin Chapman’s Lotus 19. They were desperately fragile, small-bore cars. In America, big-bore, frontengined cars remained dominant. After a November 19, 1960 meeting at Riverside, the idea for a new sports racing car was discussed by Hall, Troutman and Barnes. A short time later, Hall agreed to underwrite the project. Troutman and Barnes were then commissioned by Hall to design a prototype for the sports car wars – at a price of $ 16,500 Hall hoped for an “unfair” advantage. Troutman and Barnes called the prototype the Riverside Sports Racer but told Hall he could rename it whatever he liked. The Texan later named it the Chaparral… and the legend began. Two Chaparrals, chassis 001, the prototype and this car, chassis 003 were ordered by the Hall/Sharp Team. The new car, while conventional in layout, was a dramatic improvement upon the Italianate Scarab. Smaller, lighter and lower, it had a shrinkwrapped body bound tightly around its components. It had right-hand drive and in place of the Scarab’s de Dion rear and used four-wheel independent suspension. It had an 88 inch wheelbase (the succeeding four chassis would get a 90 inch wheelbase) and four-wheel disc brakes were used, mounted inboard at the rear. The front engine was shoved far back, for good weight distribution, an ideal 45 per cent on the front and 55 per cent on the rear. TIMING IS EVERYTHING Just as the P-51 Mustang was “fast” one minute before the revolutionary 100mph faster Messerschmitt 262 jet appeared, the Chaparral was “fast” just as in Europe, the 2.5 liter Coopers and Lotuses were proving rear-engine cars lighter, more agile, faster. In the U.S., it was thought that Hall’s “torquey” small block would prove them wrong. With 318 cubic inches fed by three Stromberg 97’s, the compact 1500 lb. Chaparral (in light of later models, known as Chaparral 1) was a straightaway dragster. If it did not corner as tidily, its greater power would find the checker first. But, alas, the pro racing scene was exploding in 1961 and the Chaparral 1’s competition was far tougher than that of the Scarab’s. Nevertheless, in its June debut at Laguna Seca, Hall led convincingly but fell to second behind Chuck Sargent’s Maserati Birdcage as a result of running half the race with three broken rocker studs. Later, at the LA Times GP at Riverside in October, the Grand Prix pantheon – Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham, Dan Gurney and Bruce McLaren – together with the latest English Monacos and 19’s would prove formidable. But Hall, his Chaparral retrofitted with the world’s first chin spoiler and no fewer than six Strombergs, was only a half-second behind Brabham’s pole winning time. He started from the second row and finished third behind Brabham’s winning Cooper. Hall set the highest trap speed – 180 on the long back straight – but clearly, he had not yet found his unfair advantage. The Chaparral 1 remained reasonably competitive for two seasons, Hall winning twice on the long straightaways of Elkhart Lake, first in the 1962 June Sprints, then in the grueling Road America 500 partnered by Hap Sharp (who would race Chaparrals as Hall’s partner for years to come). By now, chassis 002 had gone to the Meister Brauser team, and in it, Harry Heuer finished second in the June Sprints and behind Dan Gurney’s fast, winning Lotus 19 in the 1962 Daytona Continental, Hall put up a fierce battle with Phil Hill and Ricardo Rodrigues to finish third. Joined by Sharp, the team placed both cars in the top 10 at the 12 Hours of Sebring. Later, at Mosport, Hall would set the fastest lap but fail to match the pace of Maston Gregory in a Lotus 19. By 1963, front-engined cars were plainly obsolete. And secretly, though the new car was not ready for the Daytona USRRC or Sebring, Hall was building his revolutionary, plastic monocoque, rear-engine Chaparral 2. At Sebring, Hall’s twin Chaparral 1’s made their penultimate appearance, one leading briefly, but neither finishing. The Chaparral 1 on offer here, with chassis No. 003, is one of the two team cars, that together with 001, was campaigned by Hall and Sharp – and currently owned by Skip Barber… yes, that Skip Barber. No. 003 is one the five Chaparral 1’s produced, 004 was raced by Roger Ward prior to being totally destroyed in a racing incident and 005 went to England in chassis form to be used as a Hillclimber. In the golden age of front-engined sports racers, the Chaparral 1 stands as the highest achievement, though there have been later dalliances, by Ford in the 1980s and Panoz today. As racing veered toward rear-engine design, the Chaparral fought bravely – and occasionally triumphantly – against the laws of physics. This car taught Jim Hall a vital lesson: To achieve the true “unfair” advantage you must build your own cars using top-secret technology no one knows is there, and by the time the competition begins to suspect you, you must be well into your next top secret technology. In the following years, notably in the Can-Am series, no one implemented this strategy more insistently or more brilliantly than Jim Hall. When Jim Hall’s first new in-house designed mid-engined Chaparral 2 was completed and tested in the Fall of 1963, both of the Chaparral 1’s were sold. These early cars, chassis 001 (the 88 inch wheelbase prototype) and this example, chassis 003, were the only Chaparrals ever sold by Jim Hall since each and every one of the subsequent models are retained by Hall to this day. In April of 2004, these remaining six racing cars were installed at The Chaparral Gallery’s Gala Opening in Midland, Texas. This custom built wing of the Petroleum Museum of Midland, is designed to preserve the Chaparral technical legend and to inspire young future engineers to creative excellence. This Chaparral 1, chassis 003 was sold to Gary Wilson’s Kansas Racing Team and later to Joe Starkey who won the southwest SCCA Region’s C-Modified Championship with it. Sadly neglected but reasonably complete, the rolling chassis and body was purchased by Dr. Gary Lund around 1970. In 1987 he was about to sell it when Arizona racing enthusiast and restorer Steve Schultz became a 50 per cent partner in the project, in return for agreeing to carry out a full restoration of chassis 003. CHAPARRAL 1 – 003 RESTORATION – 1987-1997 Schultz’s restoration took the better part of a decade and was finally completed in the late 1990s. Much technical and historical research was carried out and the finished product reflects this in every detail, even to the magnesium wheels which have been gold-anodized exactly as the originals. Since the restorer decided not to use the “FIA vandalized” nose and tail sections from the 1963 Sebring race, new pieces were formed on body bucks taken from Chaparral 001 by Adler Metal Works of Ontario, Canada. Selected suspension and other parts were also re-fabricated as required in order to return this Chaparral to its original specifications and condition. It is important to note that all of these replaced suspension and structural components were boxed and retained and all will accompany the sale of this car. Also included in the sale are all of the 1963 Sebring FIA body panels, still in the original paint and identified as No. 9. While somewhat unattractive in appearance, these artifacts are nevertheless very important to this Chaparral because they illustrate the serious aero experimentation that Jim Hall was carrying out by 1963. The Kamm tail, raised nose and front spoiler arrangement of this body is in fact nearly identical to the panels found on the first mid-engined car, the Chaparral 2 that Hall raced later in 1963. POST RESTORATION After displaying the completed restoration at various vintage venues for a few years, the partnership of Lund/Schultz sold C1-003 to the famed Skip Barber Collection of Sharon, CT at the beginning of 2001. In 2002 Jim Hall was reunited with the car at the site of its most famous win, Road America, as part of the Chaparral feature, where he drove three of his mid-engined Chaparrals in an on-track demonstration. After the 6’4” tall Hall climbed out of the Barber C-1 with some difficulty, on-lookers wondered how he managed to race this car so successfully. Jim Hall thought for a minute and then said in his quiet and humorous manner, “I guess I was a lot more bendy 40 years ago.” As nice as it looks and starts as well as it runs, a new owner who intends to enter vintage races with this historic Jim Hall team Chaparral is urged to undertake a thorough check-over and race preparation prior to such usage. 1961 CHAPARRAL 1 - 003 SELECTED PERIOD RACING HISTORY MARCH 1962 - 12 HOURS OF SEBRING - Car No. 10 (Engine reduced to four liters) Jim Hall/Hap Sharp/Ron Hissom. Ran 3rd, Finished 6th O/A. 1st in Sports Prototype. SEPTEMBER 1962 - ROAD AMERICA 500 - Car No. 4 Jim Hall and Hap Sharp finished 1st O/A, defeating the Meister Brauser Scarab and No. 002 Chaparral of Augie Pabst and Harry Heuer plus the entire Cunningham team. FEBRUARY 1962 - TEXAS RACE - NASSAU, BAHAMAS - Car No. 66 Jim Hall, 1st O/A. MARCH 1963 – 12 HOURS OF SEBRING – Car No. 9 Displaying various experimental aerodynamic devices, the two Hall team cars had tall FIA windshields and rear fender-fin, constructed the night prior to the race. Despite their strange appearance, one of the Chaparrals managed to lead the race for a time, before overheating. JUNE 1963 - PLAYERS 200 - MOSPORT PARK, ONTARIO, CANADA Car No. 11. Jim Hall led a strong international field for half of the race but dropped to 2nd at the checker behind Chuck Daigh’s Lotus 19 but ahead of Roger Penske’s Zerex Special and Dan Gurney’s Lotus. CONCLUSION Naming the titans of postwar American road racing does not take long, for this is a short list, headed by World Champion Phil Hill. The others include Dan Gurney, Mario Andretti, Carroll Shelby and Jim Hall. All excelled in a variety of racing and all scored major wins in international events. But only three, Gurney, Shelby and Hall are credited with backing and producing a series of racing cars under their own name. Of these, only Jim Hall can be truly described as having designed and engineered his own cars, in addition to winning major races in them. Even the other original creators of this Chaparral reads like a who’s who of American Road Racing of the 1950s – body by Scarab designer, Chuck Pelly, who later headed BMW’s Designworks/USA, panel production by California Metal Shaping and of course, Dick Troutman and Tom Barnes, the foremost racing car designers and constructors of that glorious era. This is indeed a rare and likely unrepeatable opportunity to purchase one of the original cars which founded the Chaparral racing car dynasty. General marque history courtesy of a Ted West Feature article in the No. five, 2001 Issue of Vintage Motorsport Magazine. Chassis no. 003

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-08-13
Hammer price
Show price

Ex-Achille Varzi, Lindsay Eccles

Ex-Achille Varzi, Lindsay Eccles BUGATTI TYPE 51 GRAND PRIX Year 1932 Chassis No. 51150 (see text) Engine No. 651 European registration documents Engine: Eight cylinder in line, twin overhead camshafts, Bugatti-Roots supercharger, 2,262cc, c.185bhp at 5,500rpm; Gearbox: four-speed; Suspension, front: Bugatti axle on semi-elliptic leaf springs, rear: solid axle on quarter-elliptic leaf springs; Brakes: four wheel drum, cable operated; Right hand drive. Grey with black leather interior. Model history The Type 51 was the final development of the classic and outstandingly successful Grand Prix racing Bugatti that had been introduced in 1924. Announced at the Paris Salon in October 1930, the Type 51 was the direct replacement for its predecessor the Type 35B. The main improvement was in the development of the engine which now featured twin overhead camshafts, as well as a new one piece block, cam drive and modified manifolding. Other distinguishing features from the 35B were the relocation of the magneto to the left side of the dashboard, twin filler caps, new well-base alloy wheels and a lower position between the louvers for the blower relief valve hole on the right hand side of the bonnet. With approximately 40hp more power, for three years, from 1931 to the conclusion of the 1933 racing season, the Type 51 Bugatti was a principal contender for top Grand Prix honours. With works drivers of the calibre of Chiron, Varzi, Williams and others, outright wins were secured during 1931 in the Tunis, Monaco, French, Belgian and Czechoslovakian Grands Prix, together with a number of lesser victories. Second place was taken in the German Grand Prix and 3rd in the Italian Grand Prix, whilst Varzi finished 3rd in the Targa Florio after leading most of the way. In 1932, wins were again secured in the Tunis and Czechoslovakian events and third place again in the Targa Florio. In the following year Varzi famously beat his great rival Nuvolari's Alfa Romeo at Monaco, with other wins for the model being gained at Monza and Dieppe, and second place in the Belgian and third in the Spanish Grand Prix. The Type 51 Bugatti is considered by many to be the most beautiful racing car of its period. A good Type 51 is also one of the most exciting and satisfying cars to drive well, both in competition and on the open road. It is this fact, just as much as its universal appeal as an automotive art form, which makes these cars so sought after. Specific history of this car A letter from TASO Mathieson on file states that this particular Type 51 was almost undoubtedly Varzi's official car on the works team (one of three 1933 team cars with geared up blowers giving 185-190hp.) The two other works drivers that season were Rene Dreyfus and W.G.Williams (William Grover). While it is difficult to identify which car was driven by which driver in particular events, it was quite common practice for works drivers to request or be allocated the same car for most of the season. In the major races that season in the Type 51s, Varzi was 1st at Monaco and Tripoli and second in Belgium. Dreyfus finished second at Dieppe and Nice and was 3rd at Monaco and Belgium, while Williams was 7th at Monaco and 6th in Belgium. It is quite a well known fact Bugatti paid his drivers with works motor cars and when the team's commitments in 1933 were completed, Varzi continued as an independent and had his car painted red. Archille Varzi was a superb driver from Italy, who like many learned his skill in motorcycle racing and went on to race in a wide variety of different cars. He drove in over 70 major races, won 28 of them and only crashed twice. His Bugatti went to Sorel in London by road on 22nd January 1934 for Lindsay Eccles. Lindsay Eccles was a well known Bugatti exponent at Brooklands and Donington in the period 1932-6. He had many successes in a Type 35B and later in the 3.3 litre Type 59. Eccles crashed this car at the Dieppe Grand Prix in June 1934. Following the accident it was rebuilt on an earlier frame no. 245, all the 51 pieces being transferred to this chassis. In 1940 the car was sold to English car collector George Milligen and raced occasionally by Bernard Kain. Milligen kept the car until 1979 when it was sold to the current owner. Condition This car is offered in very good condition throughout having only been used sparingly since a meticulous restoration was carried out over a seven-year period by well known Bugatti expert Geoffrey St. John. It was at this time that the original large capacity oil tank and twin oil pumps were removed from the passenger seat area. The twin oil pumps are still with the car as is the original cylinder block that was replaced during the rebuild. A replacement chassis plate has been issued by the Bugatti Owners Club and the car is listed in their register as such. It is one of the few Type 51's surviving with original bonnet with widened louvres and original tail. Crankshaft, gearbox and back axle are all numbered 26 whilst the sump is a period factory replacement numbered 651. It is not currently licensed for the road but comes with English registration no. 222 EPW. This example with a fine continuous history and having had only four owners from new is a very rare opportunity to acquire one of the most desirable of all pre-war Grand Prix cars ever produced. It is an ideal car for vintage events around the world. Année: 1932 Numéro de série: 51150 (voir texte) Numéro du moteur: 651 Documents d'immatriculation européens Moteur: 8 cylindres en ligne, double arbre à cames en tête, compresseur Bugatti-Roots, 2262 cm3, c.185 ch à 5500 t/min; Boîte: manuelle à 4 rapports; Suspensions, AV: essieu rigide Bugatti monté sur ressorts 1/2 elliptiques, AR: essieu rigide et ressorts 1/4 elliptiques; Freins: à tambour sur les 4 roues, commandés par câbles; Volant à droite. Carrosserie grise, sièges en cuir noir. Histoire du modèle Le Type 51 représente l'ultime développement de la Bugatti Grand Prix introduite en 1924, un classique qui connut une immense réussite. Annoncé au Salon de Paris en octobre 1930, le Type 51 succéda directement au modèle précédent, le Type 35B. Les changements les plus importants concernaient l'amélioration du moteur avec une distribution à double arbre à cames en tête, un bloc d'une seule pièce ainsi qu'un collecteur modifié. D'autres éléments le différenciant du 35B étaient le déplacement de la magnéto vers le coté gauche du tableau de bord, deux bouchons de réservoir à essence, de nouvelles roues en alliage d'aluminium et une position plus basse, entre les ouïes de ventilation du côté droit du capot, pour le trou de la soupape de surpression du compresseur. Avec une puissance supplémentaire de l'ordre de 40 ch, le Type 51 fut durant trois années, entre 1931 et 1933, l'un des prétendants les plus sérieux aux honneurs dans les Grand Prix. Des pilotes d'usine tels que Chiron, Varzi, Williams et d'autres remportèrent des victoires en 1931 dans les Grands Prix de Tunis, de Monaco, de France, de Belgique et de Tchécoslovaquie ainsi que dans d'autres épreuves moins importantes. Une 2e place fut obtenue dans le Grand Prix d'Allemagne, une 3e en Italie, alors que Varzi termina 3e à la Targa Florio après avoir mené la plus grande partie de la course. Pour la saison de 1932, des victoires furent obtenues à Tunis et en Tchécoslovaquie et une 3e place à nouveau à la Targa Florio. La saison suivante, Varzi battit fameusement l'Alfa Roméo de son grand rival Nuvolari à Monaco, avec d'autres victoires pour le modèle à Monza et Dieppe, ainsi qu'une 2e place dans les Grand Prix de Belgique et d'Espagne. Le Type 51 est considéré par beaucoup comme la plus belle automobile de course de son époque. C'est également l'une des automobiles qui, bien conduite, donne le plus de satisfaction à son pilote, sur circuit ou sur route. Tout cela, ainsi que son statut d'oeœuvre d'art automobile, la rend immensément désirable. Histoire spécifique de la voiture Une lettre de TASO Mathieson figurant dans le dossier indique que 51150 fut presque certainement la voiture officielle d'Achille Varzi dans l'équipe d'usine en 1933 (l'une des trois voitures d'usine dont l'entraînement du compresseur était modifié pour augmenter la puissance à 185-190 ch). Les deux autres pilotes d'usine pour cette saison étaient René Dreyfus et W. G. Williams (William Grover). Alors qu'il est difficile de déterminer quelle voiture fut utilisée par quel pilote dans chacune des courses, il était coutumier pour les pilotes d'usine de demander ou de se voir attribuer la même monture pour la saison. Cette année, pour ne retenir que les courses les plus importantes auxquelles participa le Type 51, Varzi gagna à Monaco et Tripoli et termina 2e en Belgique; Dreyfus termina 2e à Dieppe et à Nice, 3e à Monaco et en Belgique, alors que Williams termina 7e à Monaco et 6e en Belgique. Il est bien connu que Bugatti payait ses pilotes avec des voitures d'usine et, lorsque la saison 1933 fut terminée pour l'écurie officielle, Varzi continua en tant qu'indépendant et changea la couleur de son Type 51 en rouge. Achille Varzi était un pilote italien au talent exceptionnel. Comme beaucoup, il avait forgé son expérience sur deux roues. Il prit ensuite le volant d'une multitude d'automobiles. Il participa à plus de soixante-dix grandes épreuves, en remportant vingt-huit et ne sortant de la route que deux fois. Le 22 janvier 1934, sa Bugatti 51 partit chez Sorel à Londres, par la route. Elle était destinée à Lindsay Eccles, un animateur régulier des courses disputées à Brooklands et Donington entre 1932 et 1936. Il avait précédemment glané de nombreux succès avec un Type 35B et aurait par la suite un Type 59. Eccles endommagea son Type 51 lors du Grand Prix de Dieppe en juin 1934. Après l'accident, l'automobile fut reconstruite sur un châssis plus ancien portant le numéro 245, toutes les pièces du Type 51 étant transférées sur ce châssis. En 1940, elle fut vendue au collectionneur anglais George Milligen et fut de temps à autre utilisée en course par Bernard Kain. Milligen la tint jusqu'en 1979 et la vendit alors au propriétaire actuel. Etat La Bugatti 51 est offerte en excellent état, n'ayant été que très peu utilisée depuis sa restauration méticuleuse sur une période de sept ans par l'expert de la marque bien connu, Geoffrey St. John. Le bloc cylindres fut remplacé, le réservoir d'huile de grande capacité et les deux pompes à huile furent retirés de l'emplacement du passager. Les pièces d'origine accompagnent la voiture et seront livrées à l'acquaereur. Une plaque de châssis de remplacement a été fournie par le Bugatti Owners Club et 51150 est reprise dans leur registre en tant que telle. C'est l'un des rares Type 51 ayant encore son capot, avec des aérations élargies, et sa partie arrière d'origine. Le vilebrequin, la boîte de vitesses et l'essieu arrière portent tous le numéro 26, alors que le carter est une pièce de rechange d'origine et d'époque portant le numéro 651. 51150 n'est pas actuellement autorisée pour un usage routier mais est vendue avec un document d'immatriculation britannique 222 EPW. Cet exemplaire à l'historique continu et n'ayant eu que quatre propriétaires constitue une occasion rare d'acquérir l'une des plus fabuleuses automobiles de Grand Prix d'avant-guerre, un engin idéal pour les manifestations historiques dans le monde.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2002-02-12
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1931 Stutz DV-32 Convertible Victoria by Rollston

Body Style 159. 156 bhp, 322.1 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid front and live rear axles with semi-elliptic leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 145 in. Offered from the collection of marque specialist Richard Mitchell The first of five examples built to this design on the DV-32 Stutz chassis Known ownership history since new Exquisite restoration; multiple Best of Show and Best in Class victories A superior Stutz in every regard THE ROLLSTON STUTZ Many of the finest bespoke creations on Stutz chassis were produced by the Rollston Company of New York City, who, for three decades, was Manhattan’s most prestigious coachbuilder. Rollston produced an astonishingly diverse portfolio of work, encompassing everything from fleet roadsters to massive town cars, which were all distinguished by exceptional build quality and priced accordingly. Rollston’s design number 159, a convertible Victoria for the Stutz chassis, was drawn on December 30, 1930, as the rest of New York City likely prepared for the New Year, as is noted in a letter on file from Rollston heir Bill Creteur. This design had been originally developed in Europe in the early 1920s and then popularized in the U.S. by Waterhouse and, later, Rollston, who continued producing it after Waterhouse folded. The style was distinguished by a formal top with no rear quarter windows, providing a sheltered perch for rear-seat passengers when the top was raised. When lowered, however, the top would lie flat into a scooped “notch” behind the doors, giving the Rollston convertible Victoria a smooth, clean contour across the beltline. Long doors and a lowered windscreen served to accentuate the length and elegance of the design. According to Creteur’s letter, six convertible Victorias were eventually built, with this car, body number 507-A, believed to have been the first Rollston body built on the ultimate DV-32 chassis, with its double-overhead-cam engine with hemispherical combustion chambers suitable for 156 horsepower. CHASSIS NUMBER DV-PC-1294 Remarkably, Bill Creteur supplied a copy of this car’s Rollston build sheet, included on file, which notes that it was originally to be finished in Pyramid Gray, only to have been changed to all-over black with silver striping before delivery, as seen in period coachbuilder photos of the car in New York City’s Central Park, a familiar setting for such promotional photos during the 1920s and ’30s. The car was originally to have Eagle Ottawa Persian Morocco leather and all of its hardware chrome plated. The completed Stutz made its way to Toronto, Ontario, where local dealer V&S Motors sold it to prominent local businessman John Paris Bickell. Mr. Bickell enjoyed a successful career in international commerce and politics, including serving as one of the “dollar a year” executives that managed the vast war machines of the United States and Canada during World War II; he was acquainted with Winston Churchill and other notables of the era. Mr. Bickell is believed to have owned the Stutz until his passing in 1951, after which it was sold to Samuel Foote, a Professor at the University of Toronto and an early enthusiast. This was Mr. Foote’s summer automobile, with a Cadillac V-16 limousine serving as his transportation in the winter! It remained with the good professor until 1962, when it was then sold to Gary Campbell, a Snap-On tool dealer then living in the Toronto-area town of Stoney Creek, Ontario. Campbell was also a member of the Classic Car Club of America, listing his car in the member’s register and using it on the 1962 CARavan to Montreal. Around 1968, the Stutz passed to Dr. Donald Vesley, a well-known collector from New Orleans and later Ocala, Florida, from whom Stan Staniszewski of Troy, Michigan, purchased it around 1978. Mr. Staniszewski began the Stutz’s restoration, which progressed off and on for some three decades. Research conducted by Mr. Staniszewski included digging into the background of the car’s previous owners and contacting the Creteur family, resulting in the build sheet and correspondence accompanying the sale of the car. In late 2010, Mr. Staniszewski sold the Stutz to its present owner, recognized marque connoisseur Richard Mitchell. Mr. Mitchell’s own Old Iron Works of Montgomery, Texas, began the restoration anew to modern concours standards, which was completed in 2013. The complete restoration, described by the owner as a full frame-off job from top to bottom, was undertaken using almost all original components and trim, which had survived with the Stutz for the many decades of its life. It has been taken back to the original color scheme specified on the Rollston build sheet. This Stutz, well maintained to the highest-point standards since its completion, has collected numerous awards, most prominently Best of Show victories at Keels and Wheels and the Louisville Concours d’Elegance, as well as Best in Class at Amelia Island and Chairman’s Choice at the Milwaukee Masterpiece, all in 2013. “It is really a pleasure to drive, as most Stutzes are,” Mr. Mitchell notes. “It is light in steering, the suspension is soft and comfortable, and it is just overall a very nice car.” An outstanding example of a landmark coachbuilt design on the most developed and powerful Stutz chassis, with known history since new and a restoration by the personal shop of the foremost modern Stutz collector, this will prove a landmark acquisition for its new owner. Chassis no. DV-PC-1294 Engine no. DV-33007 Body no. 507-A

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-03-12
Hammer price
Show price

1953 Ferrari 212 Inter Coupe by Vignale

170 bhp, 2,563 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 36 DCF3 carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, front upper and lower wishbone independent suspension with transverse leaf springs and shock absorbers, rear live axle with leaf springs, parallel trailing arms, and Houdaille shock absorbers, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm The 23rd of 26 of the 212 Inters with coachwork by Vignale Formerly owned by Pennsylvania State Senator Theodore Newell Wood Well preserved in largely original condition Although Enzo Ferrari built his reputation upon the success of his sports racing cars, it was the financial success of his road cars that his company relied on for continued success in racing. As the company grew, the two sides of Ferrari were inextricably linked; one could not prosper without the other. With the 166 in 1948, one of Ferrari’s most successful early racers, Ferrari introduced an Inter model, which was a more luxurious version intended for road use rather than on the racetrack. The 212 succeeded the 166 in late 1950 and was produced through 1953. The cars were blessed with a modified Colombo V-12 that was bored out to 2.5 liters to provide high horsepower, as well as a chassis that was largely based on that of the earlier 166 MM but had been adapted by engineers to handle the higher horsepower of its updated engine. The 212 could be had in two different models: competition-ready Export models, which sported even-numbered chassis, and road-going Inter models, which received odd-numbered chassis. As was the custom with Ferrari at the time, customers had their choice of coachbuilders to clothe the chassis and drivetrain, and a number of companies with differing styles were available. One of the most distinctive and compelling of those was Vignale of Turin. CHASSIS NUMBER 0285 EU Completed in early 1953, chassis number 0285 EU, the 212 Inter by Vignale presented here, was finished in Rosso with a Nero roof over a Beige interior, the 23rd of 26 of the 212 Inters built with Vignale coachwork. It was immediately shipped to Luigi Chinetti’s New York distributorship and was sold through Chinetti to Pennsylvania State Senator Theodore Newell Wood. An avid racer and sports car enthusiast, Senator Wood represented the 20th district of Luzerne, Susquehanna, Pike, Wayne, and Wyoming counties in the Pennsylvania State Senate. Away from politics, he was active in the SCCA, served as president of the Hill Climb Association, and founded the Brynfan Tyddyn Road Races, which were held from 1952 to 1956. Senator Wood owned the car for several years before it was traded into Buz Boback Enterprises in Harvey’s Lake, Pennsylvania, in the late 1960s or early 1970s. By 1976, chassis number 0285 EU had been purchased by Tiny Gould’s Prova Automotive Enterprises in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The car remained in Gould’s possession until 1977 when it was sold to Joseph J. Pendergast of Tampa, Florida. That same year, Mr. Pendergast took his newly acquired Ferrari to the 15th Ferrari Club of America Annual Meet in Watkins Glen, New York, where it won 1st in class. In 1981, the car returned to Florida where it was owned by Peter Hasterlik of Seminole for three years before moving to the West Coast under the ownership of Craig A. Davis of Atherton, California, who owned the car for another three years. By 1989, the car was owned by collector Hans Thulin of Stockholm, Sweden, and remained with him for four years before returning to Pennsylvania in 1993. The car was then sold to Bill Jacobs of Joliet, Illinois, in 1994 before being subsequently sold to the current owner. For the last 20 years, the car has remained in the Golden State and presents today in largely original and unmoles