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  • 1 Jan 1990— 9 Sep 2017

1933 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Special Newmarket Permanent Sedan by Brewster

120 bhp, 7,668 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptical leaf springs with live rear axle, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes with power assist. Wheelbase: 150 in. One of six similar examples, each unique; special Henley Roadster-style design features Well-known, fascinating history since new; original chassis, engine, and body 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Best in Class winner Superb and authentic restoration by marque specialists Documented ownership history from new Eligible and desirable for any major international concours d’elegance Rolls-Royce of America records note that Phantom II chassis number 289AJS was initially specified as a Croydon Convertible Coupe, but that the order was subsequently changed to the Special Newmarket Permanent Sedan eventually delivered. None of the six examples of this spectacular design were exactly the same, with each being truly “special;” this car was one of three with the Henley Roadster-style side molding, raked split windshield, and gracefully sloping tail, and is the only example with extended front fenders that cover the side-mount cradles and undercarriage. It all comes together as probably the best-looking closed body mounted to a U.S.-delivery Phantom II, and one of the sportiest sedans of the Classic Era. As researched by marque historian Rubén Verdés, the car was delivered on 14 March 1933, to E.L. King, a prominent Minnesota banker and chairman of Watkins Products (the famous manufacturer of health remedies and baking products). Mr. King was something of an automobile connoisseur, in particular of Rolls-Royces, who bought numerous examples over the years. Nineteen thirty-three was an especially good year for him, perhaps, as he acquired this car, a second similar sport sedan (number 295AJS), and a Henley Roadster (number 291AJS) all within a few months of one another! The Special Newmarket Permanent Sedan was apparently intended for his daughter, Mary Eleanor Boalt, of Daytona Beach. Ms. Boalt subsequently married Alfred Thomas Gardner in 1936, and later Rolls-Royce records show chassis number 289AJS as the “ex-Mrs. Gardiner [sic] car.” The Phantom II passed in 1939 to second owner Dorothy Tuckerman, daughter of vaudeville house magnate Maurice Shea, who apparently received it as a college graduation gift, continuing the car’s tradition of generous parental benefactions. Mrs. Tuckerman was followed in 1941 by James N. Lambert of Grand Isle, Vermont; in 1948 by Arthur D. Osborne; and in 1955 by Andrew Darling of Minneapolis. Andrew Darling was a prominent Twin Cities banker, car dealer, and philanthropist, known for his good-hearted nature and for his love of antique automobiles. Over the years he built a remarkable stable of the finest Full Classics, all beautifully restored and equally well-maintained, and all of them regularly driven. (He famously kept a car for every month of the year and would drive that particular car all month as his everyday car, usually with his small dog riding shotgun.) Chassis number 289AJS was restored early in his ownership and was shown twice in 1962, at the RROC meet in Dearborn, winning 2nd in Class, and at the Classic Car Club of America Grand Classic in Dearborn, winning 1st in Class. Following Mr. Darling’s passing, his beloved Phantom II was sold after 40 years of ownership to renowned California collector, John Mozart. Following four years in the Mozart collection, the car was purchased by the noted British dealer, Charles Howard, before returning to the United States in the hands of Mark J. Smith. Orin Smith (no relation) purchased the car in 2010, ending a known chain of owners back to “day one.” With the original restoration now 50 years old, it was considered time for a fresh restoration to the highest modern concours standards. This was painstakingly completed by noted marque specialists, Vantage Motorworks of Miami, to an absolutely exceptional standard of fit and finish throughout. The restoration made its debut at the 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was justly awarded Best in Class. Today the car presents in virtually show-ready condition, including deep, glossy black paint accented by polished reveals, a beautiful black leather top covering, and an immaculate interior, trimmed as-original with a divided brown leather front seat and pleated broadcloth rear compartment. Every nut and bolt is beautifully fitted, with exquisite interior wood trim, perfect instruments, and correct C.M. Hall headlights and side lamps, an accessory trumpet horn and marquee-shaped license plate lamp, plus an original “Trilin” tail lamp. The wheel discs are batched NilMelior, from a company that sold exotic auto accessories from the Waldorf Astoria during the 1930s. A spectacular automobile ready for continued showing with pride, this car truly is “special,” in every sense of the word. Long beloved by known enthusiasts, most prominently the late and much-adored Andrew Darling, and boasting the most pristine and unblemished of histories, with its original engine, chassis, and body, it is, in Diane Brandon’s words, “probably one of the most perfect, correct, beautiful, and desirable cars in the entire collection. It has it all.” Chassis no. 289AJS Engine no. A75J Body no. 7399

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
Show price

1964 Shelby Cobra 289 Competition Roadster

The 1968 “B” Production National Champion, Officially Recognized as The Winningest Cobra in History 271bhp, 289 cu. in., 6,000rpm overhead valve V8 engine, Front- mounted Borg-Warner T-10 M transmission driving a Salisbury limited slip ear end with 3.77 gears, Ladder steel tubular frame with independent front and rear suspension via A-arms, transverse leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers and four-wheel Girling disc brakes with alloy calipers. Curb weight: 2030 pounds Wheelbase: 90" CARROLL SHELBY – A REAL LIVING LEGEND Today Carroll Shelby is secure in his role as one of a few celebrated heroes of postwar American Motorsport. “The Legends,” a small and exclusive club has less than a dozen members – certainly Phil Hill, Dan Gurney and Jim Hall are considered charter members, along with Carroll Shelby. In the early days he seemed like an amiable east Texas “good old boy.” Scratch that surface and you would have discovered qualities of drive, ambition and a tenacity that one associates with moguls of industry. Creativity and an uncanny sense of timing were also seemingly natural facets of Shelby’s personality. In 1960, Shelby, aged 37, was diagnosed with a heart condition. After only eight years of successful motor racing, including a first overall for Aston Martin in the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans, Shelby was forced to think about retirement. One more race beckoned before he would hang up his helmet: the LA Times-Mirror Grand Prix at Riverside, in which he scored a fine third place. Shelby’s self-enforced “cold-turkey” was hard to take after the glamour and personal challenge of an international racing career. He tried drilling wildcat oil wells and started a Texas trucking company. In 1961, still bored, he became the West Coast Goodyear Racing tire distributor and formed a motor racing school at Riverside Raceway in California. Now with a steady flow of cash, Shelby was at last positioned to pursue a longheld dream of building his own sports car. Carroll Shelby’s many years of racing had taught him what worked and what did not, and the idea of a hybrid sports car fascinated him. Since the Brits had styling, road holding and superb brakes and the Yanks held the horsepower advantage, why not combine these traits for a “best of both worlds” concept? Of course, Shelby did not originate the idea – postwar Allards, Cunninghams and Nash-Healeys come to mind, but he did it better than anyone before, or thereafter, for that matter. After considering Austin Healey and others, he heard that AC, builders of the stylish and sturdy Ace-Bristol Sports Cars, had lost their engine supplier when Bristol ceased production. Timing is everything – in September, 1961, Shelby wrote Charles Hurlock of AC Cars to propose a hybrid car using the AC sports car body and chassis. “I’m interested”, wrote Hurlock, “if a suitable V8 could be found.” Shelby moved quickly when editor Ray Brock of “Hot Rod” magazine told him of Ford’s new lightweight V8 and soon had an early 221 cu. in. example installed in a stock AC Ace. After Hurlock’s blessing – the V8 weighed only a few more pounds than the six-cylinder Bristol, Ford engineer Dave Evans offered Shelby more good news. A high performance 260 cubic inch version was already in production for Ford’s Falcon and two engines would be on the way to him soon. These were immediately sent by air-freight overseas and on February 1, 1962, Carroll Shelby flew to England to test drive the new Shelby Ford “Cobra.” The rest is, as they say, is history! CSX 2473: THE WINNINGEST COBRA IN HISTORY Invoiced to Shelby American on 6/10/64, CSX 2473 was shipped to Los Angeles on the SS American Princess on June 23. Shelby employee James Findley bought this car with help from the City National Bank of Venice, California, also apparently Shelby’s bank. Findley got what amounted to a “wholesale deal” of $3,778 since he took possession as it arrived from England, agreeing to complete the car and add options, parts and upgrades as his paycheck allowed. By 1965 he had it in black paint with white Le Mans stripes, 6.5 inch and 8.5 inch Halibrands, flared fenders, a roll bar, side pipes, hood scoop and quick-lift jacks. In 1966, Jim Findlay turned #2473 back to Shelby American who sold it to Hi-Performance Motors of Los Angeles, California. The purchaser was a young Arizona aerospace engineer by the name of Don Roberts who had a burning desire to enter competitive motorsport. After a relatively coddled and sedentary two years, CSX 2473 was about to begin a competition career that would see it score more wins than any other Cobra in the history of the storied marque! After minimal preparation – shortening the springs to add negative camber, adding a wind screen and freshening the engine, Roberts won every autocross event he entered in 1966 and 1967 as well as scoring fastest time of the day at both the local Arizona hillclimbs. SCCA AutoCross time trials as well as hillclimbs, in which the entrants race their cars up a hill closed to public traffic for the day, have traditionally proved to be excellent training grounds for outright wheel-to-wheel road racing. Apparently a quick learner, Roberts was now ready for Regional and National “B” Production racing. During the 1967 and 1968 seasons with Don Roberts at the helm, CSX 2473 notched 25 “BP” 1st place finishes, including 14 first overalls without a single DNF. As race #89 and sponsored by Watkins Ford of Scottsdale, Arizona, he not only won the South-Pacific Region SCCA “B” Production title but finished with 54 points – 23 more than his nearest competitor. Under the Sports Car Club of America rules, the first three cars in about 12 regions are invited to the ARRC (American Road Race of Champions), a super competitive shoot-out of the best SCCA racing drivers in the Nation. Guess who won? That would be CSX 2473 and our hero Don Roberts, the latter in only his third year of racing. The swift blue #89 Cobra set a new qualifying record for B-Production and in the process of dusting the entire field of American BP Regional Champions, also laid down the fastest lap time. Competition Press enthused in their race report, “The other competitors just never saw him after the opening minute!” Following his victorious 1968 season, Don Roberts sold this Cobra to Bob Rodgers of San Francisco who qualified for the ARRC, now held at Road Atlanta, Georgia in 1969 and 1970. Early in 1971, it was advertised for sale by Stafford Performance Racing in Missouri as “Bob Rodgers 289 Cobra BP car, top finisher last two years, concours condition, trailer, etc; make offer.” Don Roberts saw the ad and re-purchased #2473 in July, 1972, managing a second trip to the SCCA run-offs that fall after winning his Nationals at Salt Lake City, Phoenix and Willow Springs. Don spun out of the lead in 1972 but fought back to second in the end. In 1973 he again won BP at Phoenix, setting a lap record in the process. He duplicated this feat at Riverside. At Willow Springs he won B Production again, lowering the class lap record by a full three seconds. This gave him his 3rd Southern-Pacific Regional Championship before again nabbing a solid 2nd at the Road Atlanta ARRC. By February, 1974 the Cobra was on the market again as Don Roberts sold #2473 to Ted Laverack of Salem, Oregon. By 1979 it was with Larry Less of California. Then amazingly, Roberts bought it back for a third time, now in order to enter historic racing with partners Jere Clark and Dave Walters, both keen Shelby buffs. # 2473’s winning ways continued as it captured the Riverside LA Times Historic Auto Races in April, 1981 and another first at the Monterey Historics in August. After repeating these Monterey Historics results at Laguna Seca in both 1982 and 1983 with old hand Roberts at the wheel, the Cobra was sold to England for Werner Oswald. George Stauffer of Wisconsin returned # 2473 to the U.S. and it was re-painted in Guardsman Blue with 7.5 inch Halibrands. Ten years ago the “winningest Cobra” was sold to the current owner, a great Shelby enthusiast whose exploits in west coast historic racing almost rivals Don Roberts’ dominating performance of the late 1960s and early 1970s. An overview of this important Cobra’s competition history is most interesting – it has now won races in five consecutive decades – a feat that no other Shelby Cobra can likely claim. The current mechanical condition of CSX 2473’s components is described as “perfect” while the appearance, as evidenced by studio photography is even better. Both the original B Production National Champion Don Roberts and the present owner are expected to attend the RM auction accompanied by huge files which thoroughly chronicle #2473’s history, competition record and even the current mechanical condition and specifications in detail. The classic car market has recently experienced a tremendous upsurge of interest and a corresponding hike in prices for proper Cobra competition cars, a trend which is likely to continue, providing here an excellent opportunity for a discerning collector or historic racer to acquire a Shelby Cobra with unparalleled success and racing provenance. CSX 2473 - A PERIOD EVENT RECORD - 1966 to 1981 as per Pete Hylton/SCCA Archivist All in all, it is estimated that CSX 2473 won more than 30 National, Regional and Hillclimb races sanctioned by the SCCA in a 15 year period, making it according to several Shelby American Automobile Club Historians, “The Winningest Cobra” in history. 1966: Don Roberts ran the car in an SCCA Driver’s School at Sportsland on October 9th. He then raced in A Production in Regional Races at Tucson (November 20th) and Holtville (December 4th), taking 1st and 2nd, respectively in AP. 1967: The car was in B Production from this point on. Roberts was 1st in a Regional Race at Riverside (August 5th), 2nd in a National Race at Salt Lake City (August 31st), and 1st in a Regional Race at Phoenix International. He apparently finished 4th in Southern Pacific Division BP points. He also won the Phoenix All American Hill Climb (January) and the Clifton, Arizona FCCA Hillclimb (September 20th). 1968: A Championship Car! Roberts won National Races at Las Vegas (February 25th), Willow Springs (March 10th), Tucson (April 1st), San Diego (July 21st) and Phoenix (October 13th). He placed 1st in the Southern Pacific Division BP points, and won BP in the American Road Race of Championships (Runoffs) at Riverside on November 24th. He also won the Phoenix hillclimb again (January 21st) and the Clifton Hillclimb again (September). He also won an ICSCC (Intl. Council of Sports Car Clubs) race at Phoenix (January 6th). 1969: The car was driven by Robert Rodgers who had begun racing in 1968 in a B Production Corvette, Driving the Cobra, Rodgers won at Seattle International on June 15th and was 3rd at Riverside on October 5th. 1970 – 1971: No record of the car being raced during this time period in which Don Roberts was driving a Mustang in “A” Sedan and TransAm competition and a Mustang GT350 in B Production. 1972: Don Roberts repurchased the Cobra and won a Regional at Laguna Seca (August 27th), a National at Salt Lake City (September 4th) and a National in Phoenix (October). He finished 2nd in Southern Pacific Division and 2nd at the American Road Race of Champions at Road Atlanta in November. 1973: Roberts finished 2nd at the ARRC at Road Atlanta again. Several wins in Southern Pacific Region earned his invitation to the runoffs. 1974: Roberts ran the Cobra to a win in a May Regional Race at Phoenix, and then spent the rest of the year driving a Formula Atlantic, sprint cars and an IMSA Datsun. 1980: Roberts repurchased CSX 2473 for a 3rd time and showed that he had not forgotten how to drive as he won both the Riverside and Monterey Historic Races! 1981, 1982, 1983: CSX 2473 wins the Monterey Historics once again. DON ROBERTS AND CSX 2473 Don Robert’s experience as an aerospace engineer was an asset when he went road racing in 1966. Combining natural driving talent with time behind the wheel in competition, he became one of the dominant factors in sports car racing in the late 1960s and early 1970s. He has served as a SAAC Advisory Board member since the club was conceived in 1975. SAAC: What were your first experiences with fast cars? ROBERTS: Probably my first real car was in Germany in 1961 as a field engineer for Goodyear Aerospace. I purchased a 1956 Porsche Carrera. It had a four-cam motor and was very fast on the autobahns. I was learning mechanics at the time, as just keeping that car in fine tune was a real chore. After that, it was a Corvette and just this and that, until I realized going fast enough to win meant “COBRA”. SAAC: What changes did you have to make once you got the Cobra? ROBERTS: The car I purchased was basically a race model that had been converted back to street. It had the pin-drive wheels, roll bar, fender flares, scoops, etc. Actually, in those days a full-race Cobra really meant just taking off the windshield and going racing! I did shorten the springs for more camber, put a windscreen on and rebuilt the motor. No solid suspension bushings or trick engine parts or anything like that. SAAC: What were your first impressions of the Cobra when you first drove it on the street and on the track? ROBERTS: When I picked up the car in 1966 at Hi-Performance Motors, it had all the street equipment installed; top, side curtains and heater. I elected to drive it back to Phoenix and encountered fog at Banning (outside of Riverside). Ever try to stick your head out through a side curtain and drive a mountain road? I really didn’t drive it much on the street after I got back to Phoenix. I rigged up a tow bar and took it out to autocrosses before buying a trailer. SAAC: What type and degree of maintenance did the Cobra need? ROBERTS: My DNF record was almost non-existent. The car did not break anything. I would put the car up on jack stands after each race and spend hours on a creeper under the car, just looking at everything on the underside; checking for suspicious oil leaks, loose nuts and bolts, etc. In close to 100 races since 1967, the car has never DNF’d. No suspension, transmission or engine failures. Can you believe the car has never had a flat tire! SAAC: How was the car suited to the circuits that you raced on? ROBERTS: I don’t think a Cobra is particularly suited to any circuit. It hates slow turns, camber changes, high speed transient response, hilltop crest turns (Road Atlanta). Didn’t I just describe a race course? It does like acceleration and braking, which it does very well. As far as handling, it’s really up to the driver to throw the car around like a go-cart and hang on. The Corvettes were usually faster at Road Atlanta because of their suspension’s ability to adapt to the changing road. SAAC: How about hillclimbs? ROBERTS: As I stated, the Cobra should not do well at hillclimbs, although all of the hillclimbs I have run, I’ve won. I really believe most hillclimbs are won with superior acceleration and braking. The Cobra has a very good torque/weight ratio. SAAC: Who was your most formidable opposition and why? ROBERTS: Many of the drivers I’ve driven against were interesting to race with for different reasons. Elliott Forbes-Robinson and I started racing at about the same time. We were gridded together several times and had some good dices, but he always had a lot of reliability problems. Rich Sloma in a Corvette was always a challenge to drive against. He is an engineer like myself, and we seemed to be tuned to each others driving style. My most frustrating opponent was Alan Barker in a Corvette. He was an excellent driver and had factory help with his car. He was National Champion in B/Production from 1969 to 1972. SAAC: What race, other than the 1968 ARRC, was the most interesting? ROBERTS: I think Road Atlanta in 1973 was most interesting but also the most disappointing for me. Allan Barker sold his Corvette to Bill Jobe. Bill qualified for the run-offs and was going to be there. I had already planned to retire “Old 89” after this race and to concentrate on business commitments. I had never seen Bill run but knew that he had picked up factory assistance from Chevrolet. This would be my fourth year in a row at Road Atlanta, so I should have the experience over him. “Now, just make the car faster, and we will be able to retire the car as a National Champion”. How to make a Cobra faster? Can’t change suspension settings because there are none. Can’t put on larger tires because no Cobra tires were available. We used TransAm tires up front. And no fender flares. Oh well, we put new rod bearings in the motor, changed the oil and headed for Road Atlanta. We qualified 2nd place to Jobe by .6 seconds. The old Road Atlanta “ups and downs” got us and Bill won by 1.2 seconds. It was an interesting race. I set fast lap but could just not get by him. I could out-accelerate on the straights but the Cobra was not capable of coming off the corners as well as the Corvette. Exit Cobra – to Vintage Racing. SAAC: What are your recollections of the 1968 ARRC race and your national title? ROBERTS: I was pretty new to National racing at that point, and it was my first complete year. I ran only one National race in 1967. We arrived at Riverside much the same as several times before – with practically no spares. I had thrown together a spare engine but hoped we would not have to use it. Fortunately, we didn’t. Goodyear had given me a set of new tires, so I thought this was really the Big Time! That was, until the transporters started rolling up loaded with cars. Owens-Corning Fiberglass rolled out a couple of Corvettes for Jerry Thompson and Tony DeLorenzo. I think each car had two spare engines. Anyway, this was going to be some race as the races then were run with both A/Production and B/Production together. After qualifying, we were gridded in third position overall. Two A/Production cars were in front of me and six or eight behind. This infuriated Don Yenko in an A/P Corvette that was gridded in fourth spot. He tried to have the order changed to grid all B/P cars behind the A/P cars in their respective order, but to no avail. The race is history now, but we finished 30 seconds ahead of second B/P finisher Jerry Thompson – transporter, spare engines and all! SAAC: How did you find the Cobra the second time around? ROBERTS: OK, after I changed it back to its original configuration. SAAC: After you bought back your Cobra for the third time, what did you have to do to put it into original condition? ROBERTS: The car was unchanged from 2 to 3. I just rebuilt the engine and re-painted it as it originally was. It’s almost exactly as it was raced in 1973. SAAC: What are the differences in the Cobra between the two periods, both technically and in handling and performance? ROBERTS: The car, as raced in 1968, was almost stock. It had rubber bushings, stock front sway bar, stock Hi-Po flat top pistons, early Hi-Po rods (mill cut), 715 CFM Holley carburetor and stock air cleaner. For the ’73 configuration, we used a one-inch front sway bar, solid bushings in the suspension, TRW pop-up pistons, GT40 carburetor and ram-air from the head light area. The handling was quite a bit better, of course, but slicks made a lot of difference. Horsepower was up from 340 HP in 1968 to 385 HP in 1973. Both versions were using the reworked, stock cast-iron low-rise manifold. For vintage racing, we now use an Edelbrock Torker, getting something over 400 HP at 7800 RPM and still using a C7FE cam! SAAC: What’s it been like in vintage racing? ROBERTS: It’s a lot of fun. The car is now owned by two other people and myself – Jere Clark (427 S/C) and Dave Walters (289 Cobra, ’68 GT350 and ’66 GT350 Hertz). Dave and Jere will be doing most of the vintage driving this year while I concentrate on the TransAm. It’s interesting to note that at the Riverside vintage races, on Firestone Indy tires, we turned 1:36:2 – or almost a half-second faster than our qualifying time in 1968. SAAC: Thanks – we’re sure we haven’t heard the last of Don Roberts. This interview is reprinted courtesy of the “The Shelby American” Issue #35, 1982. Chassis no. CSX2473

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-18
Hammer price
Show price

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing

195 hp (DIN), 220 hp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, coil spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of the finest examples of the Star and the Laurel’s legendary sports car Known history, with three owners from new Rudge wheels, belly pans, fitted luggage, “sport camshaft,” and other highly desirable features Beautiful Kevin Kay restoration To many, the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing remains the ultimate road car. That it appeared in production form at all, however, was the result of fortuitous circumstance. The original 300SL was created for the 1952 season to simply test the waters prior to a full-scale return to racing, and it was intended more as a way to keep the Mercedes-Benz name in the news long enough for the firm’s new Grand Prix car to be completed for 1954. To deem this exercise a success would be a gross understatement—the 300SL’s results included 2nd and 4th at the Mille Miglia, 1st and 2nd at Le Mans and the Nürburgring, the same in Mexico’s deadly Carrera Panamericana, and 1-2-3 at Bern, Switzerland. While Mercedes-Benz initially had no plans for series production, its U.S. importer, Max Hoffman, had other ideas. Hoffman, a master marketer and a man of great insight, convinced Daimler-Benz to offer a production model by ordering 1,000 of them for sale in the United States. Since the racing 300SL was sourced to a degree from off-the-shelf 300 series parts, it seemed relatively easy for the manufacturer to honor Hoffman’s request. However, the 300SL was, in fact, quite complex and not suited to volume production. Nonetheless, thanks to the persistence and clout of Hoffman, Mercedes proceeded with limited production, and the car was born. Fuel injection replaced the race car’s carburetors; the Bosch mechanical unit would be the first for a production car. After a handful of early production models were made in alloy, as the competition cars were, the new Karl Wilfert-designed body was largely steel, retaining aluminum doors, hood and trunk lids, and included the bumpers (with over-riders for U.S.-spec cars) and numerous creature comforts, including a tilt-wheel for ease of entry and featuring a sumptuous interior requisite for road use. Of particular note, the 300SL was the first Mercedes to be introduced in the United States before it was shown in Germany, and when unveiled in New York on February 6, 1954, it took the automotive world by storm. The SL (translated to English as “Sport Light”) moniker reflected the pioneering use of welded tubular-steel frame construction. It also featured a fully independent suspension in addition to its fuel-injected, 3.0-liter (2,996 cc) OHC straight six with dry-sump lubrication; the motor was inclined to the side in order to reduce the height of the front end. The power, rated at 240 brake horsepower at 6,100 rpm (SAE) and 215 brake horsepower at 5,800 rpm (DIN) with the factory-optional or dealer-installed “sport” camshaft, was delivered through a four-speed manual gearbox. A 161-mph top speed and 0–60 acceleration of approximately eight seconds, depending upon the rear-end ratio selected from five options, made the 300SL the fastest production automobile of its time. The remarkable, upward-opening “gullwing” doors of the racing version of the car continued to production and contributed largely to the unique visual signature of the 300SL. When production ended after the 1957 model year, Hoffman’s original request for 1,000 cars was exceeded, as production of the semi-hand-built car reached just 1,400 units. Demand has always been strong, and today, the 300SL continues to be one of the most recognized and coveted of all sporting cars, almost indisputably considered the “core” model for any serious collection. Don Davis’ 300SL carries a particularly fascinating history. Its original owner, Alex Locke, was a U.S. Air Force jet pilot who went on to study medicine at Stanford University and eventually became a flight surgeon and, ultimately, a practicing physician in the Sacramento, California, area. While on active duty with the Air Force, he acquired the 300SL from a Fresno, California, dealer circa 1957, seen on the Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin (MSO) as a dealer demonstrator, to become its first registered owner. It was factory-equipped with desirable Rudge “knock off” wheels, and the optional “sport” camshaft (with the corresponding fuel-pump governor and ignition timing upgrades) is believed to have been dealer-installed in period, as was often the case. Engines equipped with these options from the factory were designated NSL to denote that they were sonderteile or “special parts”-specification units. The car retains these components today, as well as its original belly pans, which are rarely preserved. Period images circa 1960 show the 300SL at an air show sporting a black racing stripe, and Mr. Locke did indeed race the car in local events from time to time. Mr. Locke, a founding and active member of the Gullwing Group, enjoyed his Gullwing, even when he was reposted several times during his Air Force career, residing for a time in Texas, Montana, and Wisconsin before he eventually returned to the Sacramento area. There, the car was stored in Dr. Locke’s garage for approximately 25 years, until the second owner, also a former United States Air Force member and now a retired airline captain, acquired the car from Mr. Locke’s widow in the summer of 1999, after several years of solicitation. The Gullwing received a single exterior refinish while in Texas with Mr. Locke, but it required a full restoration upon acquisition by the current owner. The noted Kevin Kay Restorations, of Redding, California, was selected for the task, which was undertaken in 1999 and completed in 2003. The 300SL was refinished in classic silver with black leather upholstery. Ken and Cindy Nemanic, of Vintage Automotive Upholstery from Walnut Creek, California, restored the interior using some of the very last available sets of correct Roser surface-dyed leather hides. Characteristic of the Pebble Beach-caliber work of the Nemanics, the interior of the 300SL displays breathtaking workmanship. In all, over $375,000 in parts and labor was invested to return the 300SL to its show-quality condition. Noted 300SL experts, Pacific Injectors, of Burlingame, California, overhauled the fuel-injection system. The instruments were restored and the dial faces were silk screened by none other than VDO, their original manufacturer, in Germany. Air Force T-33 aircraft seat belts were installed under Dr. Locke’s ownership, but they have since been removed and given to his son, with new, aircraft-style belts properly installed in their place. The car retains its original mid-range 3.64:1 rear-axle ratio (providing a 145 mph-plus top speed), contrary to the Gullwing Registry entry for this car. Already impressively sorted for reliable high speed touring, and maintained by Don Davis to Gullwing Group standards and frequencies, the car was recently detailed for presentation by Kevin Kay Restorations to refresh the first, high quality restoration. This wonderful three-owner 300SL retains its original Rudge wheels, restored belly pans, fitted luggage, and its higher-output “sport” camshaft, adding significant, exhilarating “urge.” A trunk-mounted Halon fire extinguisher allows the car to be shown at events requiring this item. With only about 7,500 careful miles since its comprehensive photo-documented restoration, and now being offered without reserve, this very fine and complete Gullwing provides a truly rare opportunity to acquire a fully restored, sorted, and carefully maintained two-owner example with excellent, documented history, including many charming period snapshots of the car with the young Locke family, confirming their true pride of ownership. Chassis no. 198.040.5500621 Engine no. 198.980.5500665 Body no. 198.040.5500601

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-04-27
Hammer price
Show price

1929 Duesenberg Model J Dual Cowl Phaeton by Derham

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. four valves per cylinder twin overhead camshaft inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed transmission, front beam axle, live rear axle, four-wheel semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" - One of only two short-wheelbase Model J Dual Cowl Phaetons by Derham - Driven by Elvis Presley in the film Spinout - Fully restored by RM Auto Restoration and shown at Pebble Beach in 2007 - Known provenance The Duesenberg Model J’s introduction on December 1, 1928 at the New York Auto Salon was front-page news. The combination of the Duesenberg reputation with the Model J’s grand concept and execution made it the star of the show and the year. Duesenberg ordered enough components to build 500 Model Js while development continued for six months after the Model J’s introduction to ensure its close approximation of perfection. The first customer delivery came in May 1929, barely five months before Black Tuesday. Unfortunately, the Model J Duesenberg lacked financing and support from E.L. Cord and Auburn Corporation, which were both struggling to stay afloat in the decimated middle market. The effect of the Duesenberg J on America cannot be minimized. Even in the misery of the Depression, this paragon of power illustrated the continued existence of wealth and the upper class. Duesenberg’s advertising became a benchmark, featuring the wealthy and privileged in opulent surroundings with only a single line of copy: “He drives a Duesenberg.” The outside exhaust pipes inspired generations of auto designers and remain, 60 years later, a symbol of power and performance. “She’s a real Duesy,” still means a slick, quick, smooth and desirable possession of the highest quality. Duesenbergs were expensive cars, and only men or women of means could afford them. At a time when a perfectly good new family sedan could be purchased for $500 or so, a coachbuilt Duesenberg often cost $20,000 or more. If a full-size sedan sells for $25,000 today, that is the equivalent of more than $1 million dollars now. Such extravagance was born of an era of unbridled capitalism – a time when a man with vision and ability could make, and keep, a fortune of staggering size. The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom body industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the style and grace of the factory sheet metal was ideally suited for the execution of elegant custom coachwork. Derham Body Company As was the norm at the time, the Derham Body Company came about through the evolution of a carriage building company into an automobile coachbuilder, primarily because of the similarity of the skills required and the changing nature of the demand. Derham was founded by Joseph J. Derham and was, at various times, managed by his four sons, Joseph Jr., Phillip, Enos and Jim. Unfortunately, after the three oldest brothers’ return from the First World War, Joseph Jr. died unexpectedly, leaving his three brothers to manage the firm with the assistance of their father. After their father’s death in 1927, a family dispute arose, and Phillip left to form the Floyd Derham Body Company. The two remaining brothers, Enos and Jim, were able to overcome their problems by offering to finish incomplete projects and to address outstanding complaints. Before long, Enos (who managed the plant) and Jim (who was responsible for sales) were even more successful than before, with strong demand for their product and more than 200 employees to build it. By the end of the 1920s, Jim had recognized the benefits of building series customs – unique designs made in small quantities ranging from five to 40. The company’s designs were in many ways similar to Hibbard & Darrin’s work in Paris, to the point that Tom Hibbard once recalled having licensed features to Derham, something Enos Derham disagreed with. Regardless, Derham managed to carve out a niche as a quality coachbuilder in the Philadelphia area, a city known for its cosmopolitan tastes and large population of wealthy citizens. J116/2136 J116 was one of just two short-wheelbase Dual Cowl Phaetons by Derham. It was shown at the West Coast Auto Salon in 1929 and at the Duesenberg display at the Kansas City Auto Show in 1930 before being sold new to Charles Hooper Crosby of Piedmont, California. John Thorpe, a later owner, wrote to Bing Crosby many years ago, asking if the original owner was any relation. Bing replied that he had been to many parties at the Crosby home in Piedmont and had ridden in the car but was no relation. Nevertheless, Thorpe later received a letter from Everett S. Crosby, the brother of the original owner, who said he and his brother were second cousins of Bing Crosby and that Dixie Lee, Bing’s first wife, had often attended their parties in Piedmont. In 1933 or 1934, Crosby sold the car to George Pasha of San Francisco, California. The next owner was another California man, Thomas H. Crawford. A number of other California owners followed, including Bruce Kellog of Hollywood, Al Gerard of Culver City, and a Mr. Zoll. Afterwards, the car was relegated to a wrecking yard, where it was rescued by Morris and Ken Derringer in 1948. The car passed through a known succession of owners before it was restored in the early 1960s, most likely by Gil Cartwright of Los Angeles. John Thorpe, also of California, acquired it from Cartwright and gave the big Duesenberg to his son Nelson as a 16th birthday gift. Nelson was quite familiar with the J since he had learned to drive at the wheel of a Duesenberg at the age of twelve! This beautiful one-of-a-kind Duesenberg was rented by the studio from Nelson and driven by Elvis Presley in the 1966 movie Spinout. Elvis’s character, Mike McCoy, used the Model J to tow around his race car in several scenes. The car figures quite prominently in the movie, and in one particularly interesting scene, McCoy discusses the car with Howard Foxhugh, played by Carl Betz: Foxhugh: Model J Duesenberg. ’29, right? McCoy: Yep. Foxhugh: When I was a kid this was one of the most powerful cars around. McCoy: Still is. McCoy and Foxhugh: Sure don’t make ’em like that anymore! Presley dinged the underside of the radiator shroud loading the car onto a trailer, so he called the owner, apologized, and said he would have George Barris repair the dent. (At the time, Barris was in the process of restyling a Greyhound bus for Elvis.) Presley also offered to buy the car, saying he would trade a new Cadillac plus cash for the Duesy! Nelson said it was not for sale, and Elvis did not push it further. Nelson drove it to shows in various parts of California. It won several awards during this period, including the prestigious President’s Trophy given annually by the members of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg club, along with many concours awards. In its lifetime, the Model J Dual Cowl Phaeton was photographed several times for publicity purposes, by both Duesenberg and Derham Body Company during its early show career. It has also been featured in several books by noted Duesenberg historians. In the late 1990s, some of Nelson Thorpe’s assets were seized by creditors and sold, J116 among them. As a result, it eventually became part of the Duesenberg display in the Imperial Palace Auto Museum. The predecessor to the current vendor ultimately acquired the car in 2004 and commissioned a complete show-quality restoration from RM Auto Restoration, the multiple Pebble Beach Best in Show-winning restoration facility. The restoration began with a thorough inventory and dismantling of the car. Although an older restoration, the car proved to be remarkably complete and correct. Nonetheless, the decision was made that, given the rarity and importance of the car, it would be taken back to its very foundation and completely rebuilt. As a result, although much of the original wood framework survives, every joint was carefully taken apart, cleaned and refastened. Where wood decay had appeared (primarily in the forward portions of the body sills), new pieces were fabricated in the exact manner of the originals and carefully installed. While the sheet metal was complete, previous repairs were not conducted to RM’s satisfaction. As a result, although much of the original sheet metal was saved, new fabrication was required in some areas to ensure a long-lasting and first-quality repair. The frame was in excellent condition and required little more than a thorough cleaning and repainting. Similarly, the original chassis components were rebuilt and reinstalled, including suspension, steering and braking system. During the restoration, every critical part was magnafluxed and checked for cracks. Exhaustive research and access to engineering drawings ensured that every component, no matter how minor, was returned to factory tolerances or better. An intensive program of research was undertaken to ensure that each detail was faithful to the original materials and finish. The balance of the drivetrain was complete, but every component required both mechanical rebuilding and cosmetic refurbishing. The entire system, engine, gearbox and rear end were completely disassembled and every bearing surface, gear set and actuating mechanism rebuilt or replaced. It was discovered in conversations with the historians within the ACD Club that the crank-up second windshield, although not originally fitted to J116, was installed shortly thereafter by Derham. As originally constructed, J116 was fitted with a conventional folding tonneau cover and windshield. It is interesting to note that the crank-up window fitted later by Derham would prove similar to that used on the firm’s Tourister design, making J116 in some respects the missing link between the two styles. Also, although the external exhaust pipes found on J116 were an extremely popular enhancement, they were probably added when the tonneau windshield was modified, given that the external pipes echoed the looks of the SJ, which had not been introduced when J116 was delivered. While most examples featuring the external pipes also had the shuttered radiator grille (and its longer hood), J116 retains its original honeycomb radiator. The interior trim and upholstery is identical in form and pattern to the originals, as is the top and its liner, which were painstakingly cut and fitted to match the original patterns. Each instrument was restored, and a new wiring harness fabricated for the complete car. Each light, bezel and lens was carefully rebuilt and reinstalled. The woodwork was carefully re-veneered and properly refinished. Hundreds of hours were dedicated to careful blocksanding and preparation for painting. The finish, a very elegant combination of greys, was color-sanded and buffed to provide a superior shine and finish quality. The restoration was completed in early 2007. At this point, the car was invited to participate in the 2007 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance special display honoring the “Year of the Duesenberg.” The same year, the car completed the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance, successfully and without issue. Addendum Please note that our catalog entry for this car states that the Duesenberg was seized and sold by Nelson Thorpe’s creditors. In fact, the car was sold to satisfy an obligation on the part of John Thorpe, Nelson’s father. Chassis no. 2136 / J116

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-01-20
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2006 Lamborghini Concept S

The first and only fully functional example A true street-legal roadster Twice shown at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Only 180 kilometers from new From the universally applauded Miura to the trend-setting Countach to the outlandish Veneno, the House of the Raging Bull has always been on the cutting edge of automotive design. In fact, Lamborghini’s production cars are more often than not close descendants of their concepts, with no compromises taken from sketch to street. This philosophy holds true for the Concept S, which was first presented as a non-running design study at Geneva in 2005. It was conceived of by then-head of design Luc Donckerwolke at Centro Stile Lamborghini, and introduced as an extreme interpretation of an open-top spyder version of the Gallardo. Donckerwolke envisioned the concept as a modern rendition of the classic single-seater racing car, albeit with twin cockpits side by side. The astonishing amount of public interest at the Geneva Motor Show prompted the decision to build a functional version in order to further gauge potential customer demand. It was a stunning design, to say the least, and the initial prototype model remains at the Lamborghini museum in Sant’Agata Bolognese. The following year, this fully operable Concept S, which was based on the Gallardo platform, was first shown to the public at the Concorso Italiano. The so-called “saute-vent” windscreens were re-designed and lowered for homologation reasons, though the result is even more radical than the original design. These screens serve to visually divide the cabin into two distinct compartments, giving the car an aggressive and futuristic look. They also create a “spine” that runs between the passenger and the driver, essentially dividing them from one another. It also acts as an additional air inlet for the powerful 520-horsepower V-10 engine at its heart, which is positioned behind the occupants. The aerodynamics of the Concept S were further optimized by the use of front and rear spoilers and a large rear diffuser. Lamborghini initially slated the car for production, then decided to produce a limited run of 100 examples for favored customers. However, the exceedingly high cost and time-consuming production of the Concept S ultimately ended with the first example also being the last, leaving the roadworthy Concept S as a true production-ready, one-off Lamborghini. Even after its sale into private hands, the stunning spyder was so popular that it was routinely invited back by Lamborghini to be shown around the world. In fact, it was invited to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance not just once, but twice. It was first shown on the concept lawn in 2006, and then, again at the behest of Lamborghini, it was invited back to the main lawn two years later in 2008. This fully operable and street-legal Concept S has only been driven 180 kilometers, with many of those being accumulated during initial testing and the rest from driving around concours show fields. Based on the production drivetrain and the sharing of the cockpit, which is familiar to anyone who has spent time in a Gallardo, the Concept S drives and functions just as any production Lamborghini from that time, albeit with a unique look and sense of theater all its own. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions, this vehicle must be sold to a dealer or out-of-state resident. Chassis no. ZHWGE32T86LA00001

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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1961 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster avec Hard-top

1961 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster avec Hard-top Titre de circulation hollandais Châssis n° 198.042-10-002781 Moteur n° 198.980-10-02843 - Restauration complète par Mercedes Grunning & Sohn KG - Freins à disque, moteur bloc aluminium - Livré avec son hard-top dans sa caisse bois d'origine - Modèle légendaire - La deuxième 300 SL fabriquée avec freins à disque Cette Mercedes 300 SL roadster n'est pas banale : d'après son numéro de châssis, il s'agit de la deuxième qui a été livrée avec des freins à disque. C'est en effet à partir du numéro 02780 que cette modification est apparue, en 1961, apportant un indéniable progrès sur le plan de la sécurité. Vendue neuve en 1961, cette voiture a été importée de Californie, où elle se trouvait, en Allemagne, par le fameux collectionneur de Mercedes Erich K. Hillgruber. En effet, celui-ci vivait alors entre la Côte ouest des États-Unis et Hambourg. C'est d'ailleurs dans cette même ville qu'il a ensuite vendu la voiture, à M. Claus P. Armbruster. Ce nouveau propriétaire l'a alors confiée au concessionnaire Mercedes Grunning & Sohn KG, qui a notamment installé un moteur neuf bloc aluminium commandé à l'usine le 4 mai 1984 (commande n°2094) en échange standard, sans aucun doute un des derniers disponible à l'usine. La restauration s'est poursuivie pendant trois ans et à cette occasion, la teinte extérieure, qui était blanche, a été remplacée par du noir et la sellerie rouge a laissé place à un cuir crème répondant aux spécifications usine. Après la remise en état, M. Armbruster a pu profiter de sa voiture fraîchement rénovée pendant presque 30 ans, ne parcourant que 20 000 km au volant. Grâce à cet usage parcimonieux, accompagné d'un entretien soigneux, la voiture se présente aujourd'hui dans un état superbe. Elle est équipée d'un autoradio Becker, de son hard-top d'origine qui vient dans sa caisse bois d'origine, tel qu'il était livré à l'époque, de ses bagages et d'un nécessaire à outils. Elle est accompagnée de toutes les factures de la restauration, ainsi que de photos. Le roadster 300 SL fait partie des voitures les plus fascinantes des années 1950/1960. Si la 300 SL "papillon" offre une allure plus spectaculaire, elle souffre d'une utilisation moins aisée à cause de son habitacle fermé, difficile à ventiler. Le roadster permet de combiner la sophistication mécanique de cette voiture très en avance sur son époque avec le plaisir d'une conduite décapotée et décontractée. Son six-cylindres à injection issu de la compétition lui procure des performances de premier ordre, ces qualités techniques étant accompagnées d'un luxe et d'un confort dont seules bénéficiaient à l'époque les voitures de haut niveau. Cet exemplaire, disposant d'un hard-top, peut être utilisé pendant les mois d'hiver avec le même agrément qu'un coupé papillon, tout en évitant les hauts seuils de porte. LA PENSEE DU SPECIALISTE Avec ses concurrentes de l'époque, la BMW 507 roadster et la Ferrari 250 California, la 300 SL fait partie de ces voitures emblématiques qui ont marquées l'histoire de l'automobile de la deuxième moitié du XXème siècle. Elles font parties des voitures de Grand Tourisme les plus courues sur le marché actuel et, grâce à cette place de légende qu'elles occupent, conserveront une cote régulièrement en hausse. Cet exemplaire précis est le deuxième à avoir été livré avec des freins à disque et se trouve dans un très bel état à tous les niveaux. Dutch title Chassis n° 198.042-10-002781 Engine n° 198.980-10-02843 - Completely restored by Mercedes Grunning & Sohn KG - Disc brakes, aluminium engine block - Delivered with hard-top in original wooden case - Legendary model - The second 300 SL built with disc brakes This is no ordinary 300 SL roadster : according to its chassis number, this was the second example to be delivered with disc brakes. It was from number 02780 that this modification appeared in 1961, bringing with it undeniable progress in terms of safety. Sold new in 1961, this car was imported from California into Germany, by renowned Mercedes collector Erich K. Hillgruber. In fact, he was living between the west coast of America and Hamburg. It was in Hamburg where the car was then sold to Mr Claus P. Armbruster. The new owner entrusted the car to the dealer Mercedes Grunning & Sohn KG, who installed a new aluminium engine block, ordered from the factory on 4 May 1984 (order no. 2094), undoubtedly one of the last available from the factory. The restoration took three years and during this time, it was repainted, from white to black, and the red leather upholstery was replaced with cream leather matching factory specifications. When the work was finished, Mr Armbruster enjoyed his newly renovated car for nearly thirty years, covering just 20,000 km during this time. This frugal use and regular maintenance has ensured that the car is presented in superb condition today. It is equipped with a Becker radio, and original hardtop in the original wooden case that it was delivered with, suitcases and a toolkit. It comes with all the invoices from the restoration and photos. The 300 SL roadster is one of the most mesmerising cars of the 1950s/1960s. Although the Gullwing 300 SL had an even more spectacular appearance, it was not such a user-friendly car, having a small, rather claustrophobic cockpit. The roadster combined the sophisticated engineering of a car that was very advanced for its day, with the enjoyment of relaxed open-top driving. Its six-cylinder injection engine was derived from competition and ensured a top-notch performance, and these technical qualities were combined with a level of luxury and comfort that only the most exclusive cars offered. This example, with hardtop, will provide the same driving experience as a Gullwing during the winter months, without the inconvenience of the high door sills. THE SPECIALIST'S OPINION Alongside its rivals of the day, the BMW 507 and the Ferrari 250 California, the 300 SL is an automotive icon with an important place in the history of the automobile during the second half of the 20th century. They are amongst the most appreciated Grand Touring cars on the market today, and due to this legendary status, they continue to increase steadily in value. This particular example is only the second to have been delivered with disc brakes and is presented in wonderful condition on every level. Estimation 1 100 000 - 1 200 000 € Sold for 1,115,600 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-07-05
Hammer price
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1962 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 bhp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead cam inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual gearbox, coil spring independent front suspension, coil spring single point swing axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5 in.) Matching-numbers and low-mileage Roadster Originally delivered to Switzerland Five-year comprehensive restoration Uprated for pleasurable driving on today’s roads Racing languished at Mercedes-Benz after World War II, but a competition car was soon developed, using many components from the mighty 300 “Adenauer” Saloon. Designed primarily by chief engineer Rudolf Uhlenhaut, the car was built on a tubular space frame and clothed in aluminium. The configuration of the space frame necessitated unusually high sills, so the hallmark “gullwing” doors, pivoting upward, were adopted in place of a conventional forward-hinged arrangement. Christened “300SL”, for Sport-Leicht (Sports Light), a team of cars was entered in the 1952 Mille Miglia, finishing 2nd and 4th. This promising result was followed by a 1-2-3 sweep in the Berne Grand Prix and, six weeks later, a 1st and 2nd at Le Mans. A 1-2-3-4 finish at Nürburgring and a 1-2 victory in the Carrera Panamericana in Mexico followed, the latter bringing Mercedes-Benz to the attention of Americans. Among its American enthusiasts was Max Hoffman, the New York importer for Mercedes-Benz. Hoffman visualised a market for a road going version of the 300SL and ordered 1,000 cars. The production 300SL debuted at the International Motor Sports Show in New York City in January 1954. Whilst the name was retained, invoking the fame of the competition cars, the internal nomenclature designated the new car as W198. It differed in many respects from its competition forebears. With the exception of 29 special order examples clothed in all alloy, the body shell was now made of steel, with an aluminium hood, doors, and boot lid, and the chassis was made stronger. To compensate for the additional weight, the engine was made correspondingly more powerful, developing 195 brake horsepower, thanks to a direct fuel injection setup, the first ever on a gasoline-powered production car, helping to make the 300SL the fastest production car of its day. In all, 1,400 Gullwing Coupés were sold between 1954 and 1957, approximately 80 per cent of them in the United States. As demand for the coupé weakened, Max Hoffman’s initial wish for an open version of the 300SL was finally heard by the factory. To transform the 300SL into a roadster, the chassis was re-engineered to accommodate more conventional doors. The revised chassis was heavier, so the engine received uprated camshafts as standard (previously available as a high performance option in the gullwing), and the fuel pump was adjusted to deliver more fuel under full load. The improvements were good for an additional 20 brake horsepower. The rear suspension was redesigned with a compensating spring added to reduce oversteer. During the production cycle, many of the components from the competition cars eventually made their way into the roadster. This included, after March 1961, the addition of four-wheel disc brakes on the last 479 cars. An aluminium cylinder block also replaced the cast iron unit a year later. Production continued into early 1963, by which time, with 1,858 built, it had proved more popular than the coupé. Delivered new to Mannheim, Germany, this 300SL Roadster was first sold to a Swiss customer. It has had no more than two registered owners since, and the original owner’s widow has confirmed that the 34,000 kilometres now showing on the odometer is consistent with the usage it received during their long-term stewardship; it also features a factory hard top. Many aficionados consider the configuration of this example as the most desirable variant with disc brakes in combination with the more reliable cast iron block. (This particular car is one of the last built before the changeover to aluminium engines.) This Mercedes has been the subject of a painstaking, five-year body-off rebuild. Acquired as a rust- and accident-free original car, it was restored to international show quality, using new-old stock and Mercedes-Benz replacement components. Performed in Portugal under the supervision of its current owner, the representative of 300SL specialists HK-Engineering for Portugal and Spain, for his personal collection, the restoration is documented with an extensive dossier of invoices and photographs. The car was finished in its original, authentic Mercedes-Benz White (DB-050), with a contrasting interior in rich Burgundy, and with matching soft top and a corresponding White hard top. The glass has all been replaced with new pieces from the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center, bearing the correct imprints. The Mercedes also includes a new set of fitted luggage by Karl Baisch. Originally delivered without a radio, it is equipped today with a correct new-old stock Becker Mexico unit with electric antenna. During restoration, several upgrades were made to enhance drivability on today’s roads. Originally built with the shortest-available gearing, required for mountainous countries, it now features the tallest 3.25:1 ratio for effortless motorway cruising. The cockpit has been heat-insulated for maximum comfort, and the stainless steel exhaust system and manifold have been thermo-wrapped. Additionally, the engine has been upgraded for unleaded fuel with uprated valves and hardened seats. It is equipped with a “123” electronic ignition system, a Dutch product. Originally developed for Formula One racing, this advanced feature individually adjusts the timing of each cylinder to suit driving conditions. The original ignition system was removed, but it is included with the car and could easily be refitted. Today, the rebuilt engine, as modified, develops significantly more horsepower than when new. A major advance is the Easydrive electric power steering. Developed from the technology of a Japanese-owned factory in France, which furnishes OEM equipment to Renault, Peugeot, and Opel, Easydrive uses a hidden computer-controlled electric motor to assist steering effort, and it is manually adjustable according to the driver’s preference. At maximum assist, the car can be parallel parked with one finger. With no fluids to leak, and no pumps or hoses to disfigure the engine compartment, it provides an ideal solution to manoeuvring at low speeds, and it is easily removed without trace, should original specification be desired. Other upgrades include an electric radiator fan with both thermostat and manual controls, for optimum operation in all weather, and a removable blind on the oil cooler, which helps the oil to come up to operating temperature more quickly. An alternator conversion from HK Engineering has been fitted. Nearly completed, the 300SL was shipped to Germany, where it underwent a general inspection at HK Engineering in August 2011, at which time it was fitted with the aforementioned tall axle ratio and cockpit insulation. A precision engine and brake system tune-up, along with other maintenance, were performed at that time. The driveability of the car, with its electronic ignition and electric power steering, is said to be “amazing”. An evaluation letter from Hans Kleissl accompanies the car, including his opinion that the car was accident-free and rust-free prior to its meticulous restoration. The car has done fewer than 1,000 kilometres since this inspection. Fresh, correct, and highly-equipped, this desirable disc brake, hard top 300SL Roadster is both stunning in appearance and exhilarating in performance. As such, it invites close inspection. Addendum Please note this car is actually the last Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster to have an iron block. Also, note the Italian translation of the catalog description incorrectly states that this is the very last such car built before the changeover to aluminum, when it is in fact one of the last. Chassis no. 198.042.10.003044 Engine no. 198.980.10.003112

  • CANCanada
  • 2013-05-25
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1953 Lancia Aurelia PF200 C Spider by Pinin Farina

Est. 90 bhp 1,991 cc DOHC V-6 engine with dual Weber 32 DR7 SP carburetors, four-speed manual rear-mounted transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 114.5 in. The 1953 Geneva and Turin Motor Show car A unique Pinin Farina concept on the rare Aurelia B52 chassis Ten-year restoration to exquisite condition, with further recent improvements Well-known enthusiast history for decades; an exceptional example 2015 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este Class Winner; FIVA Identity Card Prominently featured in Donald Osborne’s Stile Transatlantico/Transatlantic Style At the Turin Motor Show in the spring of 1952, Pinin Farina (later, simply Pininfarina) debuted a new concept car built on a Lancia B52 Aurelia chassis alongside their freshly redesigned Nash-Healey. Pinin Farina’s new Aurelia was abundant with Jet Age styling cues and featured a protruding circular nose with a large chromed bezel, reminiscent of the intake of an F-86 Sabre fighter plane. A raked windshield, pontoon-style fenders, and uninterrupted beltlines led to a finned tail that had six individual exhaust tips emerging immediately above the rear bumper. This unique roadster was dubbed the PF200 and was the first of a short run of similarly styled cars that Pinin Farina built over the next four years, which all featured the signature gaping nose and general proportions of the first Turin car. This run principally consisted of two more open-top cars and three to four coupes. No two PF200s were identical, with only the prototype featuring the circular nose. Succeeding versions were constructed with more ovular shapes, while some had standard tailpipes, and others featured the bumper-through exhausts of the original Turin car. Even the three open cars varied from one another, as one had a removable top and side curtains (in true spider fashion) and the others featured wind-up windows and a more permanent soft top. With a fire at the Pininfarina factory reportedly destroying a fair amount of documentation, including the individual records of the PF200 examples, definitive original sources regarding the model are scant, but it is believed that no more than a total of eight cars were produced, with perhaps just over half of those surviving today. CHASSIS NUMBER B52 1052: THE PF200 C The second of what is believed to be three open-top examples of the PF200 built, chassis number B52 1052 was shown at the Geneva Salon in March 1953. Slightly more ornate than the original prototype, it had chrome hashes behind the doors and featured front bumperettes that were directly underneath the headlamps, rather than in the inboard bumper arrangement of the prototype. It is the only car of the entire run to feature a nose badge that reads “pf200 C,” prompting speculation that this car was conceptually positioned as a competizione version of the style. It was equipped with a two-position windscreen and omitted wind-up windows, for a more sporting appeal. The PF200 concept again appeared the following month at the 1953 Turin Motor Show. As with the other PF200 examples, this Aurelia was constantly being updated by Pinin Farina, as evidenced by minor changes from appearance to appearance, including sometimes being finished in different colors. Following its appearance at Turin, B52-1052 was next photographed at the Stresa International Concours d’Elegance in September 1953, where the car won a Grand Prize Honor. A placard commemorating this win was mounted to the dashboard, and this original distinction continues to grace the car today. By this time, the Lancia had been equipped with a full windshield frame, complete with a top edge that features a charming ‘blip’ curve in front of the driver, as well as wind-wings and a hood deflector (à la competition cars). The presence of Milan license plates reading “MI 215522” suggests that this Spider had been purchased and registered by a private owner at this point. By the 1960s, chassis B52 1052 was imported to the United States. Following ownership by a California-based enthusiast, the car was acquired by a friend of William Borrusch, an American automotive engineer from Michigan, who bought the car in 1968. The PF200 C was in strong overall condition at the time of this purchase, and it remained in this ownership for over the next 30 years, eventually following Mr. Borrusch to Florida when he moved there in 1996. Soon thereafter, Mr. Borrusch began restoration with specialist Tom Palisi of Tarpon Springs, Florida. Mr. Palisi meticulously disassembled and bagged all of the car’s parts. The body was acid-dipped and minor corrosion areas were removed and re-fabricated, after which Mr. Palisi treated the exterior to a deep finish in elegant maroon. The front axle and the transaxle were sent for a rebuild to Luciano Sanzogni, of Sarasota, Florida, a former Lancia apprentice. The brakes, suspension, and wiring harness were each properly rebuilt. Several highly regarded authorities in the American Lancia community were consulted during the restoration, including Mike Kristick and the late Walt Spak, both of whom were instrumental in sourcing numerous correct parts. As the original motor was beyond recovery, Mr. Spak hunted for an authentic Aurelia engine and was fortunate enough to locate the block from the PF200 coupe that had been owned by Kjell Qvale. Mr. Spak saw to a complete rebuild of the replacement engine, which included the installation of many new parts, such as pistons, rings, sleeves, and other such components. This work included sourcing the proper shorter carburetors and unique offset air filter, both of which were mandatory acquisitions for the concept car’s hood to properly close, as the original Aurelia engine was not designed to be used in such a diminutive compartment! As this Aurelia is a one-off concept car, many of the trim pieces were essentially irreplaceable elements that could not be sourced. Accordingly, Mr. Palisi arranged for the fabrication of numerous items. He also ensured that the unique exhaust setup, which had been blocked off at the time of the consignor’s 1968 purchase, was properly routed to newly chromed pipes. The windscreen, top, and curtains were all carefully rebuilt using components from the originals, and all of the frame pieces were beautifully chromed. The interior was reupholstered by Rudy Bailey, of Tampa, Florida, who also sourced authentic NOS Pirelli trunk mats, and a correct Autovox radio was rebuilt from two original units. The exacting restoration, taking roughly 10 years to complete, was finished in early 2013, and no expense was spared. This stunning PF200 C was presented at the Concours d’Elegance of America at St. Johns in June 2013, where it won First in Class and The Art that Moves Us Award, and the following March, the car took home another class award from the 2014 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. Subsequently acquired by Orin Smith from Mr. Borrusch, the Lancia has continued to be shown and enjoyed, with selective improvements that included the installation of a new glass windshield. Most prominently, after receiving its FIVA Passport, it was accepted to the renowned Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este in 2015, and was judged Class Winner in the “Hollywood by the Lake” class. It then returned to Florida for the 2016 Boca Raton Concours d’Elegance, where it won Best Open Pre-War Car and People’s Choice. More recently it was prominently featured in Donald Osborne’s important work, Stile Transatlantico/Transatlantic Style, with photography by Michael Furman. Today still in exquisite show condition, this spectacularly restored Lancia presents collectors with a unique opportunity to acquire an important, one-of-a-kind Pinin Farina show car, one that proved to be a styling influence on many cars to come. It is a singular, award-winning collectible that would crown any collection or design study, and it is eminently worthy of both museum exhibits and world-class concours d’elegance. Addendum Please note that the Elegance at Hershey has kindly extended an invitation for this car to attend their event on June 9-11, 2017. Please refer to an RM Sotheby's representative for additional information. Chassis no. B52-1052 Engine no. B21-4843

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
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1963 Aston Martin DB4 Series V Convertible

240 bhp, 3,670 cc DOHC alloy inline six-cylinder engine with dual HD/8 carburettors, four-speed manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with upper and lower control arms and coil springs, live rear axle with Watt linkage, trailing arms, and coil springs; and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,490 mm One of the rarest Aston Martin road cars; only 70 built Desirable late-production Series V variant with factory overdrive Beautiful concours restoration and detailing by marque specialists Equipped with its original engine A wonderful example in every regard THE CAR THAT SPELLED THE FUTURE In many ways, the DB4 was the model that spelled out Aston Martin’s future. Introduced at the 1958 London Motor Show, it carried an all-new six-cylinder engine, developed by the famous engineer Tadek Marek, variations of which would power the company’s products for a generation. In addition, its styling set the basic template that the company would follow for many years to come. The twin-cam mill produced 240 horsepower in its standard tune, with dual SU carburettors, and was mounted in a new pressed steel platform frame with four-wheel disc brakes. Enclosing all of this was a lightweight Superleggera body, built by Touring of Italy in its famous style, with aluminium panels over a tubular inner frame. Capable of 0–100 mph in under 30 seconds, the DB4 placed Aston Martin on equal footing with its Italian arch-rivals, earned the Duke of Edinburgh’s Royal Warrant of Appointment, and would eventually grace the silver screen in the iconic “car movie” The Italian Job, in which Michael Caine drove a rather ill-fated DB4 Convertible. It was the convertible that was the most exclusive and elusive of the road-going DB4s. With only 70 examples built, it is one of the rarest Aston Martin convertibles ever. Examples seldom become available for sale; rarer still are those restored to the standard of the car offered here. CHASSIS NUMBER DB4C/1102/R Chassis number DB4C/1102/R is the most desirable late-production Series V variant. Its original build sheet, a copy of which is on file, records its delivery new to Bell & Lunn Ltd., of 44 West Upper Berkeley Street in London, on 4 May 1963, via the agent in Brooklands. Finished in Platinum over Red, it was outfitted with the factory 3.77:1 rear axle with overdrive, considered a “necessary” option by enthusiasts. The build sheet further confirms that the car was delivered with engine number 370/1106, that which is still fitted today. Aston Martin Dorset records note an unusually long period of factory service records, through 1969, as the car was routinely looked after and “dialled-in” for its enthusiast owners. Those owners included a Mr C. Hirsch, also of London. According to the consignor, the car was shipped to the United States around 1969 and spent the 1970s and early 1980s there, visiting both coasts. It returned to the United Kingdom in early 1985 and was registered to its next owner, Rodney Butterfield of Witney, Oxon, that January. By 1988 it had been acquired by Tim Walton, who, with co-driver Richard Young, raced the DB4 in the 3rd Pirelli Classic Marathon; the car wore #71 and finished 3rd in Class and 27th Overall. Mr Young must have been suitably impressed by the DB4’s performance in the event, as he acquired the car for himself in 1997. By 2000, the car had been purchased by David Boden, of Casteinau de Montmiral, near Carcassonne, in southwest France. The consignor notes that Mr Boden took meticulous care of the DB4, entrusting marque specialist Chris Shenton Engineering of Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, to perform services and a full restoration, with Chris Shenton himself even traveling to Mr Boden’s Chateau Corduries to perform work on the car. This refurbishment, costing approximately ?60,000, receipts for which are on file, included restoration of the body, as well as a complete inspection of the engine and gearbox; installation of a new clutch, fuel pumps, stainless steel exhaust system, and bumpers; re-plating of the brightwork; and a re-trimming of the interior in red leather, as original. By 2006, the car was in concours condition. It was sold that year to Tom Alexander, a highly regarded Aston Martin collector and racing driver, who retained it for a decade, during which time it was maintained by Aston Engineering and his own racing company, 22GT Racing. The consignor acquired the car from Mr Alexander and entrusted it to Spray Tec Restorations of Northamptonshire, noted Aston Martin experts, who performed a thorough detailing and sorting, including removing the engine for further detailing, refinishing the engine bay and undercarriage, installing new brakes and brake pads, re-carpeting the interior in proper red Wilton, and relining the boot in black. A superbly finished example with decades of known history and careful restoration and preservation by known enthusiasts, this car is certainly among the finest DB4 Convertibles on the market today and will enhance any Aston Martin connoisseur’s collection with its rarity and quality. Chassis no. DB4C/1102/R Engine no. 370/1106

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2016-09-07
Hammer price
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1939 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Sport Cabriolet by Touring

125 bhp, 2,443 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber 36 DO2 carburettors, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,997 mm Believed to be the earliest-known Touring-bodied 6C 2500 Sport cabriolet Certificato di Omologazione from Registro Italiano Alfa Romeo Listed in the Registro Internazionale Touring Superleggera Equipped with a 256-specification triple-carburetted engine Restored for noted Alfa Romeo authority Dieter Dambacher THE GREAT 6C 2500 In the ’20s and ’30s, Alfa Romeo was equivalent to today’s Ferrari, and more, supplying not only competitive rides for the best drivers, but also a steady stream of beautifully engineered and constructed cars for privateer entrants. When the company, which employed thousands of artisans, mechanics, and functionaries to build only a few cars, encountered the inevitable financial difficulties, it was bailed out by the state. Instead of being directed to downsize and build saleable automobiles to generate cash flow and keep those thousands employed, Italy directed Alfa to build great racing machines to demonstrate Italy’s technology and competitiveness on Europe’s racecourses. Production shrank, but the few cars that were built were the best in the world. In a time when automobiles were exotic and often idiosyncratic creations, the products of Alfa Romeo were finely crafted works of art, elegant in conception and executed with due regard to combining function with exquisite form. Virtually every important piece was produced in house in Alfa’s fabrication shop, pattern works, foundry, and machine shop. The product of artisans, each of whom took pride in the performance, reliability, quality, execution, and appearance of his separate creation, these Alfas also reflected the overall responsibility of engineer Vittorio Jano, who continually tested, evaluated, and improved their performance until they met his high, and growing, standards. Debuting at the 1925 Milan Auto Show, the 6C 1500 set the standard for lightweight, high-performance road cars and was followed in 1929 by the 6C 1750. The next evolution of the 6C came in 1934, and although traditional in its layout, the 6C 2300 had nearly twice the displacement of the car it succeeded. Accordingly, it was a highly competent automobile capable of providing excellent performance with multi-passenger coachwork. In 1939, the 6C 2300 was replaced by the 6C 2500. Although the basic engine design traced its roots to the great pre-war racing machines, highly regarded automotive author and historian Griffith Borgeson characterized the 2500 as a “bridge to post-World War II production” due to the fact that production of the model lasted from 1939 through 1953, including the war years, albeit in limited numbers. This change was affected by an increase in the cylinder bore of two millimetres, as well as an improved cylinder head for better aspiration and increased compression, from 6.5:1 to 7.1:1. In the sport configuration, this translated into a respectable 95 horsepower, with performance aided by lightweight aluminium coachwork. CHASSIS NUMBER 915.019 According to the current owner, he discovered the 6C 2500 Sport offered here in 1993 along with Fritz Zottl di Leoben, an Austrian enthusiast, who had informed him of an interesting Alfa Romeo that he had seen in Hungary. The pair journeyed to Hungary to view the car, which the owner recounts as being a long-wheelbase 6C 2500 Sport with a triple-carburetted engine, as used in the Tipo 256 competition cars, that had been converted from right- to left-hand drive. The firewall plate, number SS17, refers to the factory upgrade of the engine to this aforementioned specification. Photographs show that the car was predominately intact and complete at the time, with the exception of some interior trim, and it had apparently been roadworthy in Budapest as late as the 1960s. Nonetheless, the current owner decided against purchasing the car, as he already owned another pre-war 6C 2500 which, in 1994, was subsequently sold to another well-known “Alfista,” Dieter Dambacher of Italy. In disassembling the car for restoration, Mr Dambacher discovered that the car had previously been finished in grey, as well as in dark red. Mechanical restoration was completed in the Netherlands and the bodywork restored in Czechoslovakia (by skilled former Tatra craftsmen) and Italy. Over the years, the original cloth-wrapped tubular steel frame had deteriorated and electrolysis had occurred between the aluminium body and the frame; accordingly, it was necessary to reskin the car during restoration, albeit very near the original style, something which is not uncommon with Touring coachwork of this era. In a recent telephone conversation with RM Sotheby’s, Mr Dambacher recounted his belief that this is the earliest-known 6C 2500 Sport chassis with open Touring coachwork, and that it was the 1939 show car, on the basis of its classic scudo flat radiator design. Mr Dambacher also firmly believes that the car retains its original chassis, engine, and gearbox, and notes that the “SS” tag on the firewall and the Touring body number are both the originals that the car wore when he acquired it in Hungary. Following the completion of the restoration, the current owner acquired the restored car from Mr Dambacher. The restoration work carried out on the body in the Czech Republic was to an excellent standard, although the owner felt it could be improved and therefore had it repainted a very dark chestnut brown, with a properly fitted green leather interior and hood by Selleria. The car has since been accepted into the Registro Italiano Alfa Romeo, with a certificate verifying the same on file, as well as the Registro Internazionale Touring Superleggera. The mechanical aspects of the car were restored by various Italian specialists, with an engine by the ex-Lancia racing mechanics Aldo Zanone and Fausto. The beautiful result has been shown successfully in Europe, including an appearance at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este on Lake Como, where it was judged 1st in Class, and at the Concorso d’Eleganza at Villa La Malpenga. The relatively few pre-war 6C 2500s that remain extant are fiercely desired by collectors and enthusiasts, few more so than original coachbuilt open examples. The car offered here, one of reportedly two extant Touring-bodied cabriolets from 1939, marks one of those rare opportunities. It would undoubtedly be as thrilling to drive along the shores of a mountain lake today as it was in 1939. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue description, this vehicle is now offered with UK V5 registration. Chassis no. 915.019 Engine no. 923.869

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2016-09-07
Hammer price
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2003 Ferrari Enzo

660 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic engine management and electronic fuel injection, six-speed automated manual F1 gearbox, limited-slip differential and traction control, front and rear pushrod-actuated double wishbones with horizontal external reservoir coil-spring damper units, and four-wheel ventilated carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,649 mm Single ownership and just under 1,900 kilometres from new Ferrari Classiche certified Recent service by Graypaul Nottingham Complete with original books and tools Coming into the 21st century, the successor to Ferrari’s F50 certainly had big shoes to fill. The 288 GTO, F40, and F50 before it were all world-class supercars that were undoubtedly the most ground-breaking and desirable supercars in the world when they were introduced, and they have proceeded to become icons of their respective eras. There was no question that Ferrari would hope to repeat this with their next supercar. Once again, Ferrari would turn to lessons learned in the crucible of motorsport through their F1 team, a team that had just taken their second consecutive Drivers’ and Constructors’ World Championships and were well on their way to a third, which had inspired them to build the most incredible car in their company’s illustrious history. The Enzo was unveiled at the Paris Auto Show in September 2002. It would be the most radical and innovative supercar the company ever produced, and it would prove to be a worthy successor to the supercars that came before. The Enzo, named for the founder of the company, was a tour de force of engineering and design, which relied just as heavily on lessons learned in the last decade of the company’s road cars as it did from lessons learned within the Formula One program. The Enzo was a car in the making, and Ferrari’s own engineers spent countless hours carefully sculpting the car’s design in order to maximise both available downforce and top speed. The interior, awash in carbon fibre, perfectly symbolised Ferrari’s attention to detail in terms of weight saving and its focus on the act of driving. Nothing inside the car’s cabin could distract the driver from the task at hand. Aside from its leather bucket seats, the car’s only luxury was a climate-control system. At the Enzo’s heart was its 660-horsepower, Tipo F140B, naturally aspirated V-12 engine, which was an all-new unit developed specifically for use in this car. This engine, coupled with the Enzo’s Formula One-derived, six-speed, sequential F1-style gearbox, made the car blast from 0–60 in 3.6 seconds, thanks in part to lightning-quick 150 millisecond gearshifts. With a stretch of tarmac long enough, the Enzo could accelerate to an astonishing 218 mph, making it the fastest road car Ferrari had ever produced at the time. Of course, the car’s carbon-ceramic brakes were on par with its performance, and the Enzo could grind to a halt from 80 mph in just 188 feet. Compared to its main rivals at the time, Porsche’s Carrera GT and the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, the Enzo boasted better performance, lower production numbers, and arguably better looks, making it the most desirable of the trio. Only 349 Enzos were produced, and buying one was indeed a privilege. As only a handful of Enzos would be produced, Ferrari invited only their best existing owners to purchase the car, ensuring that their best clients would be rewarded for their loyalty to the Scuderia and not those who just had the ability to purchase such a car. As a result, all of the 349 cars were spoken for before production began. After numerous requests from clients around the globe, Ferrari added an additional 50 invited owners and cars to that list, making for a total of 399. However, a 400th Enzo was presented to Pope John Paul II as a gift, and it was later auctioned for charity on his behalf. This particular Enzo, chassis number 132653, was produced in 2003 and then delivered to its first and only owner, who was located in the car’s native Italy. It was finished in Rosso Corsa over a Nero leather interior, the quintessential colour combination for the Enzo, and it has travelled less than 1,900 kilometres from new, making it arguably one of the lowest mileage examples in existence. Its single custodian has taken every measure to preserve its impeccable condition, and the car retains all its original books and tools, as well as its original factory car cover. It is also important to note that this Enzo has been certified by Ferrari Classiche, further authenticating the car’s mechanical conformity. Whilst normally only available for Ferraris that are more than 20 years old, Ferrari will also grant Classiche certification to competition cars, Formula One single-seaters, and limited-production road cars of any age. Recently, the Enzo received a full service from official Ferrari dealership Graypaul Nottingham in the United Kingdom to further ensure that it will be ready for road use in preparation for its next owner. The Enzo was an instant collectible when it was new, and it has only become more desirable to collectors in recent years. It is undoubtedly the most collectible Montezemolo-era Ferrari that has ever been built. Whilst production on the Enzo ended nearly 10 years ago, its performance is still considered to be world-class, and there is no doubt that it will go down in history as one of the most incredible and ground-breaking supercars ever built. Even within the illustrious history and scope of the company itself, the Enzo was constructed during what was arguably the company’s best moment in history, at a time when it was selling more road cars than ever, winning more races than ever in Formula One, and successfully incorporating technology from the Formula One team into its production cars. For the serious Ferrari collector, ownership of an Enzo is definitely a necessity, as the car combines a breath-taking design with incredible driving characteristics, and it has already proven that it will become a future classic. It would surely please the most demanding of collectors, and it would certainly be the centrepiece of any collection of modern supercars. Chassis no. ZFFCZ56B000132653 Engine no. 75378

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-09-08
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FERRARI 250 GT BERLINETTA TOUR DE FRANCE

FERRARI 250 GT BERLINETTA TOUR DE FRANCE L'ex-voiture de Carlo M. Abate et vainqueur des Mille Miglia en 1959 Année: 1959 Numèro. de série: 1333 GT Numèro. de moteur: 1333 GT Documents d'immatriculation européens Moteur V12, 2.953 cm3, 280ch à 7000 t/min, boîte de vitesse manuelle à 4 rapports; Suspension avant indépendante et semi-elliptique à l'arrière, freins à tambours. Volant à gauche. Carrosserie par Scaglietti, rouge int/aerieur cuir noir. Histoire du modèle : C'est en 1956 au Salon de Genève, année où Juan Manuel Fangio gagna le championnat de F1 pour la Scuderia Ferrari au volant d'une Lancia, qu'est présentée une nouvelle berlinette dessinée par Pininfarina. Utilisant le moteur original créé par Colombo de 12 cylindres en V pour Ferrari d'une puissance de 280ch, cette berlinette avec une caisse allégée est destinée á dominer les 3 saisons successives en championnat GT. C'est à cette période que Ferrari décide de produire deux modèles similaires mais néanmoins différents, le premier serait un modèle luxueusement équipé et destiné à une riche clientèle, le second une berlinette destinée à la course et capable par ses succès de donner à Ferrari la réputation qu'elle cherche à acquérir. Définie comme une berlinette à châssis long, on ne tardera pas à lui donner le titre non-officiel de 'Tour de France' après que le Marquis de Portago remporte l'édition du Tour de France 1956 parcourant près de 5000 km en gagnant 6 courses et effectuant de fait les meilleurs tests pour une voiture de route. Histoire spécifique de la voiture C'est avec l'immatriculation 'TO 281660' que 1333 GT est vendue le 15 avril 1959 à un jeune industriel de Turin âgé de 26 ans, qui deviendra plus tard pilote d'usine, Carlo M. Abate. Cette voiture représente l'ultime version du modèle 'Tour de France' avec de nouvelles modifications telles que les ouïes latérales afin d'augmenter la ventilation; les phares ne recevront pas de couvercles de série en Plexiglas afin de permettre une meilleure visibilité de nuit. L'auto sera également équipée d'une prise d'air sur le capot moteur et, afin de réduire son poids, des vitres coulissantes seront installées ainsi qu'un échappement spécial. D'origine et livrée ainsi par l'usine, le différentiel des rapports sera de 8 x 32 et 8 x 34. En 1958, le nouveau rallye des 'Mille Miglia' est relancé à l'image du 'Tour de France' comme une épreuve de transit sur les routes où 8 épreuves de course chronométrées sont organisées sur tout le long du trajet. Les berlinettes Ferrari gagneront avec succès les épreuves de 1958 et 1959, dont cette dernière avec Abate et Balzarini. La victoire de 1333 GT à cette épreuve représente un succès indéniable pour un modèle Ferrari à carrosserie Berlinette en aluminium. Engagé par le Comte Volpi dans son écurie 'Scuderia Serenissima', son palmarès inclut une 5e place au 'Tour de France' 1959, de nombreuses courses de côte et de circuit où elle s'honorera de nombreuses victoires en GT dont la course des 1000 km du Nürburgring en 1960 avec Abate et Davis à une moyenne de 121.4 km/h et dont le dernier tour sera couvert en 10 minutes et 45 secondes. La même année, Abate gagnera dans la classe GT la fameuse course de côte du Mont Ventoux. Lors de la Coupe Inter Europa à Monza, il remportera dans la classe GT le record de l'année sur une distance de 5 km 750 avec un temps au tour de 1 min 55 sec. et une vitesse moyenne de 180 km/h. C'est immédiatement après cette carrière pleine de succès et avec l'immatriculation 'MO 70832' que cette voiture est vendue en Angleterre en mars 1962 et immatriculée '11 DXA' jusqu'à ce jour. Elle n'aura eu trois propriétaires en 35 ans - M. Newens, M. Brookbank et M. Black (le fameux expert Alfa Roméo d'avant-guerre) - jusqu'à son acquisition en 1997 par son actuel propriétaire. Etat L'originalité et la patine de cette berlinette sont admirablement conservées avec sa carrosserie d'origine, son intérieur et son moteur d'origine. Celui-ci a été récemment restauré à grands frais par un spécialiste de la marque: DK Engineering qui est chargé de son entretien par l'actuel propriétaire. Le moteur ainsi que tous les éléments mécaniques ne peuvent être décrits que comme étant dans un état exceptionnel. Un nombre important de factures prouve les travaux effectués. Il est à signaler sa victoire en 1998 lors du concours d'élégance du 'Ferrari Owners Club of Great Britain' comme automobile d'origine admirée par de vrais connaisseurs. Avec son historique en course au début de sa carrière, 1333 GT est abondamment documentée et authentifiée par les plus grands connaisseurs de la marque tels que M. Jess Pourret en 2002 ou encore messieurs John Starkey et Marcel Massini. Dans son aspect exceptionnel aussi bien original que mécanique, cette rarissime berlinette compétition tout-aluminium est tout à fait unique. Dans ces conditions, elle est prête à prendre part à tous les événements les plus prestigieux de la planète tels que le concours de Pebble Beach dans la classe des véhicules d'origine ou participer à la rétrospective des 'Mille Miglia', le challenge historique Ferrari ou le Tour de France Automobile, dont elle porte si fièrement son surnom. The ex-Carlo M. Abate and 1959 Mille Miglia Winning 1959 FERRARI 250 GT BERLINETTA 'TOUR DE FRANCE' Chassis No. 1333GT Engine No. 1333GT EU registration documents Coachwork by Scaglietti. Engine:V12, 2,953cc, 280bhp at 7,000rpm; Gearbox: four speed manual; Suspension: front, independent; rear, semi-elliptic leaf springs; Brakes: four wheel drums. Left hand drive. Red with black leather interior. Model History: Introduced at the 1956 Geneva Show, in the year when Juan Manuel Fangio won the F1 championship driving a Scuderia Ferrari-entered Lancia, a new berlinetta designed by Pininfarina was unveiled. Using the original Colombo designed Ferrari V12, producing up to 280 bhp, this new lightweight model was destined to dominate GT racing over the following three seasons. This was the period where Ferrari clearly defined its aims by producing two similar, although in the end very different, types of model; the coupés which were luxuriously equipped and driven for pleasure by the rich and famous of this world, and the berlinettas which were competition orientated and would assure the marque's name in this very important field. Known as long wheelbase berlinettas, they were given the unofficial title of 'Tour de France' after De Portago's win of the gruelling 1956 edition of this event in such a car. The course covered 3,600 miles around France, including six races on different major race circuits and was surely the toughest test for any road car of the era. Specific history of this car: Chassis 1333GT was sold new on 15 April 1959, registered 'TO 281660' to Turin industrialist and later Ferrari Works driver Carlo M. Abate when he was only 26 years old. It represents the ultimate development of the 'Tour de France' as during the models' production run several modifications were made to the side louvres in order to improve ventilation and straight uncovered headlights were fitted, replacing the earlier plexiglass covered versions, after drivers had complained of poor visibility at night. In addition it was fitted with an air scoop on the bonnet, sliding side windows in order to reduce weight and a special exhaust system. It was also supplied new from the factory with 8 x 32 and 8 x 34 differential ratios. In 1958 the 'new' Mille Miglia Rally was reconstituted in the image of the Tour de France, with rally style transit stages over public roads and eight timed events along the way. The Ferrari berlinettas proved so successful that both the 1958 and 1959 editions were won by this model, the latter by the very car featured here with Abate and Balzarini. Chassis 1333GT went on to record what must surely be one of the most important set of competition results for any of the early aluminium lightweight Ferrari berlinettas. Campaigned under Count Volpi's 'Scuderia Serenissima' banner, its most important finishes include 5th at the 1959 Tour de France Auto in the hands of the same team, and numerous hill climb and circuit victories culminating in the GT honours and class victories at the 1960 Nürburgring 1,000km race with Abate and Davis at an average speed of 121.4 km/h and covering the fastest lap in 10 mins. and 45 seconds. In the same year Abate also managed to win the GT class on the infamous Mont Ventoux Hill Climb. In the Coppa Inter Europa, Abate went on to set the year's GT class lap record for the 5.750 km long Monza road track in 1 min. and 55 secs at an average speed of 180km/h. Immediately after its extremely succesful racing career and now registered 'MO 70832', it was brought to England in March 1962 and assigned 11 DXA, the UK registration it still bears to this day. Three subsequent fastidious owners over a period of 35 years treated 1333GT as if they did not merely own it, but moreover were custodians of its history and condition. These were Messrs. Newens, Brookbank and Black (the well known pre-war Alfa Romeo expert) from whose estate the current owner acquired the car in 1997. Condition: The originality and patina of this car is astounding and to date it retains its original bodywork, interior and of course matching numbers engine, which was recently rebuilt at great expense by a leading marque specialist 'DK Engineering', who have looked after the car ever since the current owner acquired it. The engine is barely run in and the overall mechanical condition of the car can only be described as superb in all respects. A multitude of invoices supports the work carried out. Rewarded for all of the above, it found iself among the national concours winners at the 1998 Ferrari Owners Club of Great Britain where the unmolested condition of 1333GT was appreciated by true connoisseurs. With an amazing racing history in its early days, 1333GT is supported by highly documented ownership history to date, confirmed by such great authorities on these cars as Jess Pourret in 2002 and both John Starkey and Marcel Massini in 1997. In its present original, mechanically superlative condition, this rare all-aluminium competition berlinetta is one of a kind. It is ready to take its place at the most prestigious and enjoyable events worldwide, whether on the concours lawn in the 'preservation class' at Pebble Beach or doing battle once more on events such as the Mille Miglia Retrospective, the Shell Ferrari Historic Challenge or indeed the Tour de France Automobile rerun, the event that gave it the name it proudly carries to this day.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2003-02-08
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Ex monoplace usine, Juan-Manuel Fangio, Louis Rosier, Georges Grignard, victorieuse aux 500 Miles de Rafaela

Ex monoplace usine, Juan-Manuel Fangio, Louis Rosier, Georges Grignard, victorieuse aux 500 Miles de Rafaela TALBOT-LAGO T26C Année: 1950 Châssis No. 110051 Moteur No. 45151 Moteur: 6 cylindres en ligne, double arbre à cames en tête inclinés commandés par poussoirs et culbuteurs, double allumage, triple carburateurs Zénith, 4.482 cm3, taux de compression: 11:1, 280 CV à 5.000 tr/min; Boîte de vitesses: boîte à pré sélection Wilson à 4 rapports. Suspensions: avant, indépendantes par ressorts à lames transversaux et bras rigide supérieur avec amortisseurs hydrauliques, arrière, ressorts à lames semi elliptiques avec amortisseurs hydrauliques; Freins: 4 tambours Lockheed à commande hydraulique. Carrosserie: monoplace, bleu profond avec sellerie bleu clair Histoire du modèle Peu d’autos peuvent se targuer d’avoir eu une vie aussi longue ainsi qu’une aussi brillante carrière en compétition comme cette légendaire T26C d'’Antony Lago. Dans sa version monoplace, l’auto a récolté pendant 6 ans des victoires en Grand Prix dans le monde entier, y compris en marquant quelques points au championnat du monde de F1. Fait encore plus remarquable, l’auto en version carrosserie 2 places remporta les 24 Heures du Mans 1950, une performance exceptionnelle. Le point le plus remarquable de l’histoire de Talbot-Lago est qu’au-travers de leur carrière, ces autos furent déconsidérées, conçues selon une technologie certes innovante mais d’avant guerre, avec peu de moyens financiers, engagées à la lutte contre de riches écuries beaucoup plus importantes. Il s'’agit donc d’une histoire édifiante, reflet d’une terrible détermination qui conduisit la marque au succès. Le sommet reste sans nul doute la victoire du brillant pilote Louis Rosier qui remporta le Mans en 1950, ayant piloté tout seul pendant les 24 heures de la course mis à part 20 minutes. L'’histoire de la fabuleuse T26C débuta au milieu des années 1930, lorsqu'’Antony Lago, un résident fraçCais d’origine italienne, s’intéressa au projet Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq au Royaume Uni. Fort de son expérience d’ingénieur acquise à London lors de son passage chez Isotta Fraschini, chez LAP Engineering et par la suite chez le fabriquant de boîte de vitesses à pré sélection Wilson en tant que directeur, son travail chez Sunbeam le mena par la suite à fabriquer des automobiles qui portèrent son nom. La première étape consista à faire renaître de ses cendres l’usine Talbot de Suresnes après l’échec de Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq et la reprise du Groupe Rootes en 1935. Pour relancer la marque Talbot et remplacer l’ancienne gamme aux modèles bien sages, il conserva les meilleurs éléments existants comme la suspension avant à roues indépendantes et le moteur 6 cylindres. Il chargea Walter Becchia, responsable des grands succès en compétition de Fiat d’équiper le moteur 6 cylindres avec une culasse à soupapes inclinées, avec 7 paliers et une cylindrée de 4 litres, produisant un moteur courageux avec 160 CV. En mai 1936, ce programme combiné au fait que la France avait décidé de soutenir la compétition automobile après les cuisantes défaites infligées par les Mercedes, permit le retour sur la piste des Talbot. Deux autos furent engagées aux 3 heures de Marseille, la nouvelle équipe étant menée par René Dreyfus, en provenance de la Scudéria Ferrari, qui dirigeait le team et pilotait. Après quelques problèmes de démarrage, la nouvelle auto remporta ses premiers succès, avec 4 victoires sur 7 courses en 1937, terminant aux 3 premières places du Grand Prix de France cette année là. Une nouvelle réglementation fut introduite en 1938, autorisant d’engager des autos 3 litres à compresseur ou des 4 litrs.s1/2 sans compresseur, signe du destin qui permit le retour en Grand Prix ainsi que l'’arrivée des écrasantes Mercedes qui remportèrent les 3 premières places du GP de France cette année là. Mais en guise d’exemple à suivre, une modeste Talbot, un modèle de sport sans ses équipements de route, termina en 4ème position avant qu'’une automobile similaire ne remporta une autre victoire aux 12 heures de Paris. Le projet compétition prit alors de l'’ampleur et dès lors les modèles précurseurs de la T26C ne tardèrent pas à voir le jour. En raison des contraintes financières, la nouveauté n’était pas vraiment le mot d’ordre des monoplaces qui utilisaient un châssis à la construction très proche des modèles de sports qui les avaient précédées, avec poutres en acier embouti, caissons et entretoises tubulaires. L'’arrière de l’auto était suspendu avec des lames semi elliptiques alors qu’à l’avant était installé une suspension indépendante à lames transversales, avec en plus des triangles supérieurs en acier chromé pivotant sur le dessus du cadre du châssis, équipées d’amortisseurs à friction ainsi que d’amortisseurs hydrauliques Newton-Bennet. Les freins à tambour étaient en alliage et d’un large diamètre, avec des ailettes pour le refroidissement. Ils étaient actionnés mécaniquement par un système à câbles Bendix. Le moteur du modèle sport était équipé d’un bloc et d’une culasse en alliage léger, nourri par des carburateurs triple corps Zénith-Stromberg et d’un simple allumage avec un taux de compression de 10:1 qui produisait une puissance de 210 CV à 4 500 tr/min. Une lubrification par carter sec fut installée avec le réservoir au dessus des genoux du pilote avec des ailettes ressortant de la carrosserie à ce niveau. La boîte de vitesses Wilson remplissait la majeure partie du reste du cockpit mais l’arbre de transmission installé à l’extérieur de l’auto permettait une position du pilote assez basse. L'’auto était habillée d’une carrosserie en forme de tube, dans le style de la plupart des automobiles de compétition d’avant guerre. La nouvelle monoplace fit ses débuts à Reims, avec Raymond Mays au volant, et malgré la honte infligée par son abandon sur une fente du réservoir, les opinions furent clairement positives, les freins et les suspensions ayant été jugés excellents. C'’est alors que survint la guerre et que toute évolution en matière de compétition fut stoppée. En hommage à son amour de l'’automobile et de la compétition, la France fut sans doute le premier pays à reprendre les courses après la guerre, la première épreuve importante s’étant déroulée 3 semaines seulement après la fin des hostilités et tout simplement au Bois de Boulogne. Raymond Sommer, dit Couer de Lion, termina 2ème, derrière la Bugatti de Wimille offrant un avant goût de ce qu’allaient devenir les futures Talbot de Lago. Les victoires de ces autos arrivèrent progressivement avant la victoire de Chiron dans le premier GP d'’après guerre en 1947. Face au retentissement de cette victoire, des rumeurs de lancements d’une nouvelle monoplace de Grand Prix émanèrent de l’usine. A la suite de nombreuses années d’une nomenclature complexe, les nouvelles monoplaces Talbot Lago allaient finalement s’appeler des Talbot-Lago portant comme il se doit le nom d'’Antony. Une vingtaine d’exemplaires étaient prévus, et grâce à la vague des récents succès les carnets de commande se remplirent très vite. En 1948, une nouvelle réglementation scella le lancement de la Formule 1, les voiturettes devenant alors la Formule 2. La Formule 1 était réservée aux automobiles de 4 litres ½ sans compresseur, ou de 1 litre ½ avec compresseur, un règlement englobant toutes les catégories italiennes, anglaises aussi bien que françaises. La nouvelle Talbot-Lago représentait une évolution par rapport à ses prédécesseurs, surtout au niveau du moteur, qui était maintenant à proprement parlé une version double arbre du moteur 6 cylindres, avec les arbres installés au sommet de la culasse, commandant des soupapes inclinées à 95ème les unes des autres dans une chambre de combustion hémisphérique, grâce à des poussoirs et culbuteurs de chaque côté. Avec ces soupapes plus larges, le moteur possédait une excellente carburation favorisée par un nouveau système avec prise d’air extérieure. Le moteur était équipé du même vilebrequin à 7 paliers ne permettant plus tellement de développement mais affichant une puissance de 240 CV à un taux de compression de 8:1. Equipée d’une boîte à pré sélection Wilson à 4 rapports, cela permettait au pilote de garder les mains sur le volant aussi bien que de se consacrer au freinage. L'’arbre de transmission était maintenant extérieur, avec son arrivée en chicane sur le pont arrière, ce qui permettait au pilote de bénéficier d'’une position plus basse dans le châssis, plus bas que la ligne de transmission. La partie arrière était identique avec des freins à tambour Lockheed de 16 inch (40,64cm). La position plus basse du pilote offrait une ligne plus aérodynamique et plus compacte pour la carrosserie avec cette grille de calandre plus large. Il ne fallut pas attendre longtemps avant de voir la première auto en action. Elle fit ses débuts à Monaco avec Louis Rosier et fut handicapée par des problèmes moteurs après 16 tours. Progressivement, le trio de Talbot-Lago ainsi qu’une paire des Talbot plus anciennes furent rejoints par deux nouvelles autos, qui venaient d’être livrées à Etancelin e à 'Raph'; et une vague de bons résultats ne tarda pas à suivre. Les Coupes du Salon à Montlhéry en 1948 changèrent tout avec la victoire aux 3 premières places des Talbot-Lagos de Rosier, Levegh et Cabantous. Lors de la saison suivante, le retrait d'’Alfa, ajouté à la fiabilité et la faible consommation des Talbot-Lago accéléra les succès des 8 autos qui étaient engagées à la fois par l’usine et par des privés. Rosier grâce à son talent et à sa ruse remporta une brillante victoire au Grand Prix de Belgique. Il ne s’arrêta pas une fois en 3 heures un quart de course. En fait, la majorité des performances furent réalisées dans les mains du pilote Rosier qui adopta cette auto et fut capable d’assurer le Championnat de France cette année. Chiron succéda à la victoire de Rosier par une autre au Grand Prix de France devant une foule en délire et Sommer termina la saison avec une victoire au Grand Prix du Salon à Montlhéry. Le Grand Prix de France fut le théâtre de la première apparition de la génération suivante des Talbot Lago, l’auto d’Etancelin étant équipée d’un moteur à double allumage qui malgré quelques soucis dans cette course lui permit de remporter par la suite 2 secondes places au Grand Prix d'’Europe à Monza et au GP de Tchécoslovaquie à Brno. La saison 1950 vit apparaître une nouvelle évolution de la Talbot-Lago, équipée maintenant du triple carburateur horizontal Zénith 50HN, portant le taux de compression à 11:1, ainsi qu’un vilebrequin plus solide, et plus tard en mai un nouveau double allumage à 12 bougies qui portait la puissance à 280 CV à 5.000 tr/min. Les deux premières autos à double allumage furent les anciens châssis 110003 et 110012, rééquipés d’un moteur et rebaptisées respectivement 110053 et 110052. Les deux autos débutèrent au Grand Prix d’Europe le 13 mai 1950, la seconde pilotée par Giraud-Cabantous terminant à une excellente 4ème place derrière les Alfa Romeo revenues en compétition en 1950. En moins d’un mois, les deux nouvelles monoplaces double allumage furent mise en circulation, cette auto, 110051 la première par le numéro de châssis, la seconde étant 110054. L’auto que nous proposons à la vente débuta au GP de Suisse le 4 juin où elle remporta une 3ème place tandis que 110054 débuta pour sa part au GP de Belgique, deux semaines plus tard. Toutes les versions de Talbot-Lago continuèrent la compétition jusqu’en 1952 lorsque le changement de la réglementation de la Formule 2 empêcha d’envisager d’autres développements. Elles furent ensuite pilotées dans différentes courses régionales jusqu’en 1956. La compétition des modèles sport fut poursuivie au Mans sans parvenir au succès de 1950. En fait, ces remarquables autos remportèrent des victoires dans 5 Grand Prix majeurs, 9 dans de moins importants, sans compter les résultats placés, la victoire au Mans et fait sans doute même plus important encore, Tony Lago se vantait lui-même qu’à une époque marquée par les tragédies, aucun pilote ne fut jamais tué dans ses autos. Histoire spécifique de cette automobile 110051 a couru pour l’usine en 1950, son histoire est relatée ci-dessous. Au printemps 1951, dans le but de répondre à ses besoins financiers, Anthony Lago décida de vendre les 4 monoplaces de Grand Prix 4.5 litre. 110051 fut acquise par Georges Grignard alors que les trois autres le furent par Giraud-Cabantous (110052), Rosier (110053) et Etancelin (110054). Au milieu des années 1950, l’auto fut utilisée comme pace car par José Maeffret lors de sa tentative infructueuse de battre le record du tour à vélo de Montlhéry à la moyenne de 109mph (174 km/h). Grignard conserva l'’auto pendant 20 ans avant de la vendre à Thoms 'Bob' Roberts au Royaume Uni. Roberts la vendit en 1979 à un autre collectionneur britannique bien connu: Robert Cooper. Plus récemment, elle passa entre les mains de Peter Mullin et de Jim Hull. Elle fut acquise par son propriétaire actuel en 1991. Elle n’a donc eu que 5 propriétaires depuis l’origine. Histoire en compétition de 110051 Selon Pierre Abeillon, les archives de l'’usine témoignent pour cette Talbot Lago de Course 110051 de l'’istoirei suivater Année 1950 L'’auto débuta au Grand Prix de Suisse 1950 à Bremgarten, 4ème manche du championnat du monde, déjà dominé par Alfa Romeo et Ferrari. L'’auto fut engagée par l’usine, pilotée par Louis Rosier, portant le numéro 10 en course. 10ème meilleur temps aux essais il termina 3ème avec l'’auto. Fangio gagna sur Alfetta. Deux semaines plus tard, les 4 Talbot Lago à double allumage furent engagées au Grand Prix de Belgique. Rosier pilotait à nouveau 110051, alors équipée d’une boîte prise d’air protubérante sur le capot. Auteur du 6ème temps aux essais, il débuta la course sur la 3ème ligne. Après un tour, il tenait la 8ème place et à partir de là, commença à remonter lorsqu'’Ascari abandonna tout comme son compagnon d’équipe Etancelin au 15ème tour et Villoresi le tour suivant. Lorsque la T26C de Sommer abandonna au 20ème tour, il se retrouva à la 4ème place. Farina commença alors à rencontrer des problèmes de transmission, Rosier rattrapa rapidement l’italie qui avai d'éjà perdu laseceonde place au profit de son compagnon Sanesi. Au 34ème tour, à l'’avant dernier tour, il dépassa la combattive Alfa Romeo, pour une nouvelle 3ème place, comme en Suisse et remporta 4 points au championnat du monde avec un temps de 2 heures, 49 minutes et 45 secondes. Une semaine plus tard, léquipe usine était de retour au Grand Prix de l'ACF à Reims le 2 juillet, 110051 était maintenant revenue à sa prise dair interne style + bazooka; selon les termes de l'équipe, alors quel'lexcitation de la victoire de Rosier au sur une Grand Sport T26C privée 110055 était encore une fois de plus, l'usine engagea les 4 exemplaires T26C double allumage. 110051 démarra en 3ème ligne souffrant de surchauffe (comme GS110058) et abondonna au 11ème tour. Un mois plus tard, eut lieu le Grand Prix de Hollande et bien que ne faisant pas partie du championnat du monde, ce fut un jour marqué par une victoire décisive pour l’année suivante. 4ème temps aux essais, et bien que les Maserati des argentins furent favorites, Rosier se hissa à leur hauteur. Le 24ème tour vit le départ de Fangio et avec l’arrêt de Gonzales et de Villoresi au 28ème tour, le français était second. Lorsque Sommer se retira au 37ème tour, Rosier prit les commandes de la course. Calmement et prudemment il conserva la tête et mena la Talbot à la victoire. Pour la course suivant du Championnat du Monde à Monza, les monoplaces usine ne furent pas engagées, et Rosier pilota sa propre autos 110001 pour finir 4ème. Pour la dernière course de la saison, comme en 1949 lorsqu’ils coururent à Buenos Aires, l’usine n’engagea que trois exemplaires des T26C au 500 miles de Rafaela, les 110051, 110052 et 110054, conduites respectivement par Fangio, Gonzales et Rosier. Craignant clairement de se faire endommager les radiateurs, chaque auto portait un radiateur additionnel recouvert par une grille pour les protéger des crickets. Portant le numéro de course 2, Fangio fut le plus rapide aux essais et termina en tête, bien que Rosier donna de sérieuses accélérations aux derniers instants de la course. 1951 Les 4 T26C furent vendues par l’usine, 110051 fut acquise par Georges Grignard en mai 1951. Il déclara à l’épque: 'Comme l'usine était sous scellés lorsque les autos revinrent d'’Argentine elles furent stockées dans mon garage tout proche à Puteaux et ainsi je fus l’un des premiers avertis de leur mise en vente, et j’eus le choix, et naturellement je choisis celle avec laquelle Fangio avait gagné la course en Argentine. Les débuts de Grignard en course sur 110051 eurent lieu à la course de côte de Doullens le 20 mai, immédiatement après qu’il eut acquis l’auto. Organisée le même jour que le Grand Prix de Paris qui se tenait à Montlhéry l’année d’avant mais qui cette année avait lieu à Bagatelle, il choisit de piloter sa nouvelle acquisition dans cette course organisée par l’Automobile Club de Picardie. Bien que cette compétition ne fût pas de tout repos comme elle aurait été ailleurs, il termina 1er battant Giraud-Cabantous sur la T26C 110002 et Blanc sur l’autre T26 de Grignard la 110006. La course suivante de Grignard eut lieu le 15 juillet lors de la course de côte de Cran d’Escalles qu’il remporta comme prévu, 1er des qualifications contre la Talbot 4 litre de Fayen, la Maserati 4CL de Judet et Berte spéciale de Berte. Engagé à Albi en août 1951, Grignard ne prit finalement pas le départ. L’auto ne fut pas pilotée à nouveau avant l’Automne, lorsqu’elle disputa le 28 octobre, le Grand Prix d’Espagne la dernière course du championnat du monde de l’année. Malheureusement, ce ne fut pas un jour glorieux pour lui, avec un abandon au 23ème tour sur un total de 70, alors que les Talbot de Rosier et d’Etancelin occupaient les 7ème et 9ème place. Malgré le changement en 1952 des catégories Formule 1 et Formule 2, 110051 continua d’avoir une carrière en compétition entre les mains de Grignard les 4 années suivantes avec les résultats suivants : 1952 9 mars - Course de côte de Lapize - No. de course 1, catégorie perdue au profit de Mike Poberejsky. 27 avril - Coupe de Printemps - No. de course 70- 1ère place. 1er juin - GP d'Albi - No. de course 36, soutien de l'usine, abandon sur sortie de route au 5eme tour. 21 septembre - Coupe d'Automne -No. de course 134- 2ème place. 1953 31 mai - Coupe de Paris - No. de course 4- 2ème. 21 juin - Course de côte d'Ars - No. de course 18 - 1ère place. 28 juin - GP de Rouen - No. de course 28 - 6ème place. 27 septembre - Course de côte de Châtellerault - 2ème place. 1954 25 avril - Coupe de Paris - No. de course 4 - engagée mais n'a pas couru. 20 juin - Course de côte d'Ars - 1ère place. 19 septembre - Coupe d'Automne - No. de course 31, pilotée par Fayen- 2ème place. 1955 6 mars - Course de côte de Lapize - No. de course 12 - 1ère place. 17 avril - Coupe de Paris - No. de course 41, pilotée par Fayen - ne termine pas. 1956 29 avril - Prix de Paris - No. de course 83, engagée par Grignard, abandon - la dernière course en Europe d'une 4.5 litre Talbot. Durant cette carrière chargée, l’auto fut stockée chez Grignard. Sa carrière en courses historiques démarra en 1971 après son acquisition par T.A. Bob Roberts. Elle fut ensuite pilotée par Martin Dean au A.v.D. GP historique du Nürburgring en 1980 pour le compte de son propriétaire Robert Cooper, au Paul Ricard en 1982. A la suite de ces courses, elle se rendit aux USA pour 10 ans avec Jim Hull. Il utilisa 110051 dont à Laguna Seca 1985, 1986, 1990 et 1991 ainsi qu’à Palm Springs en 1987. Avec son propriétaire actuel, la Talbot n’a jamais couru. L'’auto est parfaite sur le plan cosmétique malgré quelques marques mineurs aux extrémités à force de démonter la carrosserie depuis des années, sachant que sur le plan mécanique, l’auto ces 9 dernières années a subi une restauration méticuleuse de la part de Neil Davies Racing au Royaume Uni. Le but de cette restauration était de remettre l’auto en état de marche selon un standard élevé sans le moindre compromis. Lors de ces travaux, il est apparu que le moteur était en parfait état, malgré quelques détails, comme le circuit d’essence, la crépine de la bâche à huile et la ligne de commande de l’accélérateur qui ont tous été refaits. Un nouveau réservoir de carburant ainsi qu’un nouveau radiateur d’eau ont été réalisés d’après les modèles originaux. Les pièces de suspension sont passées au crack test» puis ont été révisées tout comme le système de freinage. La boîte de vitesse a été contrôlée et quelques roulements ont été remplacés. L'’auto a été testée à Mallory ark» en septembre 2005 et n’a plus jamais été utilisée depuis sauf au titre d’une maintenance préventive tandis que le propriétaire atteste qu’il n’y a aucun problème connu et fournit les factures détaillées des travaux pour toute personne souhaitant en savoir davantage. Sur une production de 20 exemplaires de Talbot-Lago, la production de monoplace ne fut que de 14 unités, 2 en simple allumage devinrent par la suite double allumage, ainsi que des exemplaires de sport mais seules deux exemplaires de la seconde génération T26C furent seulement construits, ce qui rend cette automobile si rare. 110051 est réputée avoir été l’auto de Louis Rosier dans sa victoire au Championnat de France 1950 ainsi que lors de ses deux podiums que la marque remporta ainsi que 8 points au championnat du monde en 1950, plus que toutes les autres Talbot-Lago. Cette automobile représente donc une part très importante de l’histoire de ce constructeur automobile de Suresnes. En plus, de cette fabuleuse histoire en compétition et de sa longue carrière, elle est éligible de nos jours dans la plupart des courses historiques comme la Goodwood Revival, les courses historiques à Laguna Seca où elle participa par le passé. La maison Christie'’s est fière d’offrir cette exceptionnelle monoplace de grand Prix de la plus belle époque des Talbot-Lago, dotée d’un palmarès pléthorique dont une dans les mains de l’un des plus grands pilotes de tous les temps: Juan-Manuel Fangio. The ex-Works, Juan-Manuel Fangio, Louis Rosier, Georges Grignard, 500 Miles of Raffaela Winning TALBOT-LAGO T26C Year: 1950 Chassis No. 110051 Engine No. 45151 Engine: six cylinder in-line, inclined twin overhead camshafts operated by pushrods and rockers, twin spark, triple horizontal Zenith Carburettors, 4,482cc, 280bhp at 5,000rpm; Gearbox: four speed Wilson pre-selector; Suspension: front, independent by transverse leaf spring and solid top wishbones with hydraulic shock absorbers, rear, semi-elliptic leaf springs with hydraulic shock absorbers; Brakes: four wheel Lockheed hydraulic drum. Coachwork: Deep Single seater Grand Prix Racing car, blue with light blue leather seating Model History There can be very few cars that can claim such versatile, long lived and successful racing careers as Antony Lago'’s legendary T26C. In single seater form, for six years the cars amassed victories in grands prix across the globe, including scoring a handful of Formula 1 World Championship points. Even more remarkable is the fact that with the mere adjustment to two seater bodywork, the same car won here at Le Mans in 1950 -– a huge achievement. Perhaps the most compelling aspect of the Talbot-Lago story is the fact that throughout their careers, these cars were very much the underdogs, running with innovative but generally pre-war technology and with the barest funding, in the face of competition from well-funded and far larger organisations. It is a fascinating tale often of grim determination that brought the marque its success, one that can probably best be summed up by the fact that when ace team driver Louis Rosier won Le Mans in 1950, he did so having driven for all but 20 minutes of the 24 hour race! The story of the great T26C began in the mid-1930s, when Antony Lago, a French resident, though Italian by birth joined the Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq concern in the UK. With engineering experience gained from his time at Isotta Fraschini in London, LAP Engineering and later at the Wilson Self-Changing Gear Co. as general manager, his role at Sunbeam led to the cars that would wear his name. The first step to this came when he was able to resuscitate the Suresnes based Talbot factory from the ashes of the collapse of Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq and the Rootes Group takeover of 1935. In setting to rebuild the Talbot marque, he drew on the best aspects of the existing rather staid product range, being their independent front suspension and their six cylinder engine. He set his chief designer Walter Becchia, the designer responsible for FIAT’s great racing days, to equip the six cylinder engine with an inclined overhead valve head, which with seven bearings and four litres, produced a resilient unit with 160bhp on tap. The timing of this combined neatly with France’s decision to favour sports cars over grand prix cars after their overwhelming defeat by the Mercedes, so by May 1936, Talbot was back on the racing scene. They fielded two cars at the Marseilles 3 hours, the new équipe being led by none other than Rene Dreyfus, extracted from the Scuderia Ferrari to manage and drive for them. After a few teething troubles, the new sports car proved successful, 1937 seeing them win four of seven races, particularly pleasing being the 1-2-3 finish in that year’s second French Grand Prix for sports cars. 1938 saw a new Grand Prix formula introduced, permitting up to 3 litre supercharged, or 4½ litre unsupercharged cars, fate records that the reversion to full Grand Prix and arrival of the all conquering blown Mercedes, saw a 1-2-3 finish for the German team at the French Grand Prix that year. But in a taste of things to follow, a lone Talbot literally a sportcar less road equipment, made up the finishers in fourth, this being followed by a win for a similar car in the 12 hours of Paris. The racing project now began to gather momentum and it was not long before the precursors to the T26C were laid down. With a fair amount of financial constraint 'new’ was perhaps not the byword of the single seater, it utilising a very similar chassis construction to the sports cars that preceded it – pressed steel section, boxed and with cross bracing tubes. The rear of the car was underslung, with leaf spring suspension, while at the front typically their independent transverse leaf spring arrangement was employed, with the addition of upper wishbones in chromed steel plate pivoting on the top of the chassis frame and both friction and Newton-Bennett hydraulic shock absorbers. The brakes, which were mechanically operated by Bendix cable system, had large diameter alloy drums with air scoops to aid cooling. The sports car engine now had a light alloy block and head, which aspirated by triple Zeniths-Stromberg carburettors, and with single spark plugs and running at 10:1 compression ratio could now bring 210bhp at 4,500rpm. Dry sump lubrication was used with a tank sitting above the driver’s knees and finned coolers protruding through the bodywork at the scuttle. The Wilson gearbox filled most of the rest of the cockpit, but with the propeller shaft set to the offside of the car this allowed quite a low seating position. The car was neatly clothed in a tubular bodywork heralding the form of most post-war racing cars. The new off-set single seater was first seen at Rheims, with Raymond Mays at the wheel, and although suffering the indignity of retirement owing to it fuel tank splitting, the feedback otherwise was certainly favourable, excellent brakes and suspension. At this point, however, the war intervened and no further development or racing took place. In tribute to its love of the automobile and its competition France was almost certainly the first country to go racing after the war, its first major race taking place just 3 weeks after hostilities ended. No less a public venue than the Bois de Boulogne. A second place finish for Raymond Sommer the Couer de Lion behind Wimille’s Bugatti, offered some insight into the future that lay head for Lago’s Talbots. Success came gradually for these cars, escalating to Chiron’s win in the first post-war French Grand Prix in 1947. Even as the dust was settling on this victory, news of a new Grand Prix car leaked from the factory. After many years of complicated nomenculture, the new single seater Grand Prix cars were at last to be called Talbot-Lago, finally wearing Antony’s name in its rightful place. 20 cars in all were planned, and hot on the heels of the recent Talbot successes the order books filled quickly. The 1948 regulations saw the introduction of the first Formula 1 Grand Prix, voiturette racing now becoming Formula 2. Formula 1 allowed for cars of 4½ litres unsupercharged, or 1½ litres blown, a sort of all encompassing rule, suiting both the Italian and English racing groups as well as the French. The new Talbot-Lago represented a march forward on its predecessor, predominantly in regard to the engine, which was now a tidily conceived twin cam version of the existing sportscar six cylinder, with the cams sitting high in the crankcase and operating valves inclined at 95 degrees to each other in a hemispherical head through short pushrods and rockers either side. With larger valves also the system allowed for excellent carburetion – helped by a new off-side mounted arrangement with external air intake vent. The motor maintained the same 7 bearing crank, negating further expense on the bottom end, but with an 8:1 compression ratio it now developed roughly 240bhp. This was mated to a Wilson pre-select four speed gearbox, allowing the driver to keep his hands on the wheel throughout, as well as to assist braking. The propeller shaft was now off-set further, which allowed the driver’s position to sink further into the chassis, below the transmission line, while its arrival at the rear axle was also staggered. The rear set-up remained the same, the final improvement being the adoption of Lockheed brakes and 16 inch drums. The lower driving position allowed a more aerodynamic and compact line for the bodywork, headed by a wider mesh grille. It took a little while before the first car was seen in action, and its debut at Monaco with Louis Rosier was curtailed with engine trouble after 16 laps, but progressively the trio of a Talbot-Lago and a pair of its Talbot predecessors was joined with a pair of new cars, those now supplied to Etancelin and 'Raph'’ and a steady stream of placings followed. The 1948 Coupe du Salon at Montlhèry changing all of that with a win and 1-2-3 for the Talbot-Lagos of Rosier, Levegh and Cabantous. In the season that followed, with Alfa stepping out of the frame, the reliability and lower fuel consumption of the Talbot-Lagos, was to precipitate considerable success as by now 8 cars were campaigned by privateers and the works. Rosier’s skill and cunning sealing a first major win at the Belgian Grand Prix, when he never stopped once in the 3¼ hour race. In fact many of the greatest Talbot-Lago achievements were at the hands of works driver Rosier, who made these cars his own, and was able to secure the French Championship that year. Chiron followed up Rosier's win with another at the French Grand Prix, to a no doubt ecstatic local crowd, and Sommer closed the season with a win at the G.P. du Salon at Monthlèry. The French GP had seen the first glimpse of the next generation of Talbot-Lagos in the form of a twinspark engine being fitted to Etancelin's car, which although failing him in this race perpetuated two 2nd places in the G.P. of Europe at Monza and again at the G.P. of Czechoslovakia at Brno. The 1950 season saw a further developed Talbot-Lago, now with triple, horizontal 50HN Zenith downdraft carburettors, increased 11:1 compression ratio and a stronger crankshaft, by May these were joined by new twin spark, 12 plug cars, which could avail the driver of 280 bhp at 5,000rpm. The first two twin spark cars were the earlier chassis 110003 and chassis 110012, re-engined and rebadged respectively as 110053 and 110052. Both cars debuted at the Grand Prix d'Europe on 13th May 1950, the latter, being driven by Giraud-Cabantous coming home a very creditable 4th behind the Alfa Romeos, which had returned to the running for 1950. Within the month the two brand new twin spark single seaters were in circulation, this car, 110051 the first of these by chassis number, the second being 110054. The car we offer for sale debuted at the Swiss Grand Prix on June 4th, where it immediately recorded an excellent 3rd place, while, 110054 debuted at the Belgian G.P two weeks later. Racing of all forms of Talbot-Lagos continued in earnest until 1952, when the switch to Formula 2 curtailed further development, though they ran after this in various regional competitions until 1956. Sportscar racing continued with attempts at Le Mans, but none bore 1950's fruit. In all, these remarkable cars recorded wins in five major Grands Prix, nine in lesser ones, countless placings and the Le Mans win, perhaps even more importantly, Tony Lago always credited himself with the fact that in an age marred by many fatalities, no one was ever killed in his cars. Specific History 110051 was run by the works in 1950, its racing history is noted below. In Spring 1951, in order to bring much needed funds to the business Anthony Lago sold all four of his definitive twinspark 4.5 Litre Grand Prix cars. 110051 was purchased by Georges Grignard, while the other three cars were sold to: Giraud-Cabantous (110052), Rosier (110053) and Étancelin (110054). In the mid-1950s the car was used as a pace car for Jose Méffret in his unsuccessful attempt on the cycling speed record of 109mph, at Montlhèry. Grignard kept the car for twenty years until selling it to Thomas 'Bob' Roberts in the U.K. From Roberts the car passed to another well known British collector Robert Cooper in 1979. It later passed to Peter Mullin and Jim Hull. The car was purchased by the present owner in 1991. It has therefore only had 5 owners from new. Racing History - 110051 According to Pierre Abeillon's definitive reference work on these cars 'Talbot-Lago de Course', 110051 had the following racing history: 1950 The car debuted at the 1950 Swiss Grand Prix at Bremgarten, the fourth round of the World Championship, already dominated by Alfa Romeo and Ferrari. The car was entered by the works and driven by Louis Rosier, wearing race number 10. 10th fastest in qualifying, he brought the car home in 3rd place. Fangio winning in the Alfetta. Two weeks later, the four works twin spark Talbot-Lagos were taken to the Belgian Grand Prix. Rosier would race 110051 again, now fitted with a square boxed air intake protruding from its bonnet. Sixth fastest in practice, he began the race on the 3rd line. After one lap, he held 8th place, then gradually started to rise through the ranks as first Ascari abandoned, then team mate Étancelin on the 15th lap, and Villoresi one lap later. When Sommer's T26C also failed on the 20th lap, this put him in 4th.When Farina began to experience problems with his transmission, Rosier quickly made ground on the Italian, who had already lost his second place to team-mate Sanesi. On the 34th and penultimate lap, he passed the struggling Alfa Romeo, to repeat his 3rd place finish of Switzerland and take a further 4 world championship points, his time, 2 hours, 49 minutes, 45 seconds. A week after the excitement at Le Mans, when Rosier had won in the privately entered Grand Sport Two Seater T26C 110055, the works were back in action in the World Championship for the Grand Prix de L'ACF at Reims on 2nd July, 110051 now returned to its original tubular air-intake or 'bazooka' as they refer to it locally. Once again the works fielded all four twin spark T26Cs. 110051 although starting from the third row of the grid suffered from overheating (as did GS 110058), retiring on the 11th lap. A month later, 110051 was next campaigned at the Dutch Grand Prix, and although not part of the world championship, it was a day that heralded a fantastic winning streak for the next year. 4th in qualifying, and despite the Maseratis of the Argentineans being the favourites, Rosier bided his time holding this position. The 24th lap saw the departure of Fangio, then with the stops of Gonzales and Villoresi on the 28th, he rose to 2nd. When on the 37th lap, team mate Sommer retired, Rosier took command of the race. Calmly and carefully he maintained his lead to bring the Talbot-Lago home in 1st. For the closing race of the World Championship at Monza, no works cars were fielded, Rosier driving his own car 110001, and taking 4th. For the final race of the season, as Rosier had in 1949 when they raced in Buenos Aires, the works decided to take three of the twin spark T26Cs to the 500 miles of Rafaela, these being 110051, 110052 and 110054, driven respectively by none other than Fangio, Gonzales and Rosier. Clearly reflecting the possible damage to the radiator that they might cause, each car wore an additional radiator grille cover to protect from crickets! Wearing race number 2, Fangio was fastest in practice and despite being given a strong run in the closing stages of the race by Rosier, he held 1st Place. 1951 - All four twin spark T26Cs are sold by the works, 110051, is purchased by Georges Grignard in May 1951. He commented at the time - 'As the factory was under bond when cars returned from the Argentine, they were stored in my garage in Puteaux, so I was one of the first that was aware of their sale, and had the choice, naturally I decided to choose the one that won the race with Fangio' Grignard's debut race in 110051 was at the Course de Côte de Doullens on the 20th May, just after his purchase of the car. Shunning the Grand Prix de Paris on the same day, which he had won at Montlhèry the year before, but this year was run at Bagatelle he chose to campaign his new acquisition in this race orgainsed by the Automobile Club of Picardie. Though his competition was not quite as stiff as it might have been elsewhere, he still came 1st, beating the Giraud-Cabantous in T26C 110002 and Blanc in Grignard's own T26C 110006. The next race for Grignard was on 15th July at the Course cte de Cran d'Escalles, which he comprehensively won, being first in qualifying against the 4 litre Talbot of Fayen, Maserati 4CL of Judet and Berte's 'Berte Spéciale'. Although entered at Albi in August 1951, Grignard did not start the race. The car not being raced again until the Autumn, when it was run at the Spanish Grand Prix on 28th October, the last race in the World Championship that year. Sadly, this was not to be a successful day for him, with a retirement on the 23rd lap of 70, and 7th and 9th positions being all that the Talbots of Rosier and Étancelin could manage. Despite the change from Formula 1 to Formula 2 for 1952 - 110051 continued to have an active racing career in Grignard's hands for the next 4 years, with results as follows: 1952 9th March - Course de Cte Lapize - Race No. 1, lost class to Mike Poberejsky 27th April - Coupe de Printemps - Race No. 70, 1st Place 1st June - GP d'Albi - Race No. 36, factory supported, Abandoned when the car left the track on the 5th lap. 21st September - Coupe d'Automne - Race No. 134, 2nd Place 1953 31st May - Coupe de Paris - Race No. 4, 2nd 21st June - Course de Cte d'Ars - Race No. 18 - 1st Place 28th June - GP de Rouen - Race No. 28 - 6th Place 27th September - Course de Cte de Châtellerault - 2nd Place 1954 25th April - Coupe de Paris - Race No. 4 - Entered but did not race. 20th June - Course de Cte d'Ars - 1st Place 19th September - Coupe d'Automne - Race No. 31, Driven by Fayen - 2nd ace 1955 6th March - Course de Cte Lapize - Race No. 12 - 1st Place ace 1955 6th March - Course de Cte Lapize - Race No. 12 - 1st Place ace 1955 6th March - Course de Cte Lapize - Race No. 12 - 1st Place ace 1955 6th March - Course de Cte Lapize - Race No. 12 - 1st Place

  • FRAFrance
  • 2006-07-08
Hammer price
Show price

1962 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso "Comp"

The very first production 250 GT Lusso and one of only three known examples raced Engine # 4213 GT Design: Pininfarina Coachwork: Scaglietti Specifications: 250bhp, 2,953cc overhead camshaft alloy block and head V-12 engine, with four-speed gearbox, independent front suspension with A-arms, coil springs, and telescopic shock absorbers, live rear axle, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400mm (94.5 in.) V5 UK registration document & Swiss Carte Grise Ferrari Classiche Certification Package. This lot is EC taxes paid and originates from the UK. Introduced in 1962 at the Paris Auto Show, the new 250 GT/L – “L” for Lusso (Luxury) – was designed by Pininfarina with construction to be executed by Scaglietti. Many consider it to be a landmark design, and it has often been named one of the most beautiful cars ever built – no small feat when considering the decades-long tradition of stunning Pininfarina creations, both before and after the Lusso. A precursor to the 330 GTC, it was Ferrari’s top of the line production street car but, unlike the SWB Berlinetta or the California Spyder, was not conceived by the factory as a dual-purpose road/race car. Beginning with a nose reminiscent of the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, the Lusso’s steel and aluminum body swept back to a 250 GTO-like truncated tail capped by a delicate but effective spoiler. The greenhouse took advantage of thin pillars and a panoramic rear window to develop a sweeping curve that merged delicately into a small rear deck. Remarkably free from external adornment, even the bumpers blended cleanly into the Lusso’s shape. Only a small chrome grille at the front of the hood bulge, emulating the typical Ferrari egg crate radiator grille, broke the Lusso’s gracefully curved panels. The chassis was conventional 250 GT, although a couple of new rear suspension features were borrowed from the 250 GTO. The engine was the latest iteration of Ferrari’s spectacular Colombo V-12, a glorious overhead camshaft design with triple Weber carburettors and a shiver-inducing exhaust note. The cars were everything a street Ferrari should be – fast, nimble, and comfortable with sub-seven-second zero to 100 km/h acceleration and a top speed of 240 km/h (150mph). The well-documented, handsome example offered here is 4213 GT, is the first production Lusso and one of only three known examples that saw competitive use. This model was sold new through Garage Francorchamps SA in Brussels, Belgium, the famed dealership of Jacques Swaters. Incidentally, 4231 GT’s first owner was Léon Dernier, a Belgian who frequently raced Ferraris under the alias “Eldé” and subsequently entered his beautiful new Ferrari in various races including an event in 1963 at Spa-Francorchamps, at the Côte de Fleron hillclimb, where he placed third in the GT class, and at the Côte de la Roche hillclimb of the same year, where he finished first in his class. His final stint behind the wheel was at the Côte de Bomerée hill climb, where he once again finished third in the GT class. Despite such successful driving, Dernier sold his Lusso soon after, to one M. Fressartin, also of Belgium, before being sold once more in 1965 by Garage Francorchamps and exported to the United States. After passing through two owners between 1966 and 1968, the car was acquired by Mr. Mike Goodman of California in 1970, who subsequently sold it to Mr. Harry C. Cravatte III, also of California. In fact, the Lusso seems to have remained in California for a long period of time, as it was eventually sold to Garry Roberts of Costa Mesa in 1999 and then to David Cottingham’s DK Engineering the following year. A respected Ferrari specialist based in Watford, England, DK Engineering fully restored the car to exacting professional standards. Upon completion of the restoration, Cottingham personally raced the car in late 2001 at the Shell Historic Ferrari Maserati Challenge at Brands Hatch and Monza, before selling it two months later to Michael Willms’s KMS International in London. 4321 GT’s next owner was the enthusiast Jürgen Pyritz of Pyritz Yellow Racing in Germany who, befitting the car’s origins raced it at the Ferrari Days event at Spa-Francorchamps in April 2002. Later that year, Willms took possession of the car once more, and raced it in 2003 at the Uwe Meissner Modena Motorsport Festival at the famed Nürburgring. In 2004, Willms competed at the Trofeo Baleares, with co-driver Erwin Bach, before participating in the Kinnerton test day at Donington, England. Finally, in November 2004, the Ferrari was purchased by its current owner, a gentleman racer of Switzerland who is a Ferrari expert and enthusiast with over thirty years experience. Although the car was reportedly running and driving well, he decided to the restore it and assemble it in accordance with the latest regulations of the FIA and the Ferrari Shell Historic Challenge. Having previously restored 5367 GT, one of the other rare Lusso racing examples, his expertise was instrumental as he conducted most of the restoration work himself. Marcel Wettstein of nearby Zürich was commissioned to restore the mechanical components, including the engine, gearbox, rear axle, and brakes. Mr. Wettstein is one of the premier specialists in Switzerland for vintage racing preparation on Ferraris and Maseratis. Every mechanical element was overhauled from the bearings to the gaskets and the engine was rebuilt by Wettstein, now with an output of 275hp. In keeping with the racing regulations, the handsome Lusso’s interior was removed and in its place a roll bar and racing seats were installed in addition to a fuel cell and a central fire system. Further enhancements included the most competitive suspension, braking and exhaust components available. After initial testing, its owner entered the car in the 2005 Ferrari Challenge with considerable success, finishing in second and third places. It is reportedly as competitive as a good SWB example and, after regular use and maintenance, remains race ready for such events as the Ferrari Challenge, Tour Auto, and Le Mans Classic. In fact, it would even prove to be quite an aggressive performer on the occasional Alpine road. Furthermore, it is a matching-numbers example. The car comes with original tool roll, driver’s instruction, FIA-papers and all original interior components, bumpers and three extra competition Borranis with Dunlop racing tyres. Unfortunately, the Lusso proved to be the last of Ferrari’s long lived 250 GT series. Some 350 examples were built during its two-year production run, yet on the strength of its appearance alone it is one of the most appreciated and sought after Ferraris to date. Conceived and executed as a luxury gran turismo, its success was attributable to the seamless blend of competition racing performance and sexy Italian styling – a winning combination exemplified by this highly desirable example, the very first production 250 GT Lusso and one of only three known Competizione examples. ITALIANTEXT La primissima 250 GT Lusso prodotta in serie e uno degli unici tre esemplari ad aver corso da nuovi Motore # 4213 GT Designo: Pininfarina Carrozzeria: Scaglietti Specifiche: Motore V-12 con albero a camme in testa, testa e blocco in lega, 250 CV di potenza, 2.953 cm3 di cilindrata, con cambio a quattro rapporti, sospensioni anteriori indipendenti con bracci anteriori, molle elicoidali e ammortizzatori telescopici, asse motore posteriore, freni a disco sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2.400 mm Documento d'immatricolazione britannico & Carta di Circolazione Svizzera Certificazione Ferrari Classiche. Questo lotto é sdoganato in Europa e proviene dal Regno Unito. Presentata nel 1962 all’Auto Show di Parigi, la nuova 250 GT/L, dove “L” sta per Lusso, fu disegnata da Pininfarina per poi essere realizzata da Scaglietti. Molti la considerano una pietra miliare dal punto di vista del design ed è stata spesso giudicata come una delle vetture più belle mai costruite. Impresa notevole, se si considera la decennale tradizione di straordinarie creazioni realizzate da Pininfarina, prima e dopo la Lusso. Come precursore della 330 GTC, costituiva il modello di punta della Ferrari tra le vetture da strada prodotte in serie, ma, a differenza della SWB Berlinetta o della California Spyder, non era stata concepita come vettura dual-purpose, ossia da strada e da competizione. Iniziando dal muso che ricordava la 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, la scocca in acciaio e alluminio della Lusso terminava nella parte posteriore con una coda tronca simile a quella della 250 GTO, a sua volta coronata da uno spoiler delicato ma d’effetto. L’abitacolo era incorniciato da montanti sottili e da un ampio lunotto posteriore. Spogliata di ogni ornamento esterno, anche i suoi paraurti si fondevano delicatamente con le forme della Lusso. Solo una piccola griglia cromata posta frontalmente alla sporgenza del cofano, a ricordare la tipica griglia Ferrari, spezzava le forme elegantemente curvate della Lusso. Il telaio era un classico 250 GT, anche se furono adottate alcune caratteristiche delle nuove sospensioni posteriori della 250 GTO. Il motore era l’ultima versione dello spettacolare V-12 Colombo della Ferrari, una strepitosa configurazione a camme in testa con carburatori Weber a triplo corpo e un ruggio assolutamente da brivido. Queste vetture avevano tutto quello che una Ferrari da strada dovrebbe avere: velocità, agilità e comfort, con un’accelerazione da zero a 100 km/h in meno di sette secondi ed una velocità massima di 240 km/h. L’esemplare qui proposto, con una storia ben documentata ed un look strepitoso, telaio No. 4213 GT, la primissima Lusso prodotta e uno degli unici tre esemplari conosciuti che abbiano mai partecipato ad competizioni. Questo modello fu venduto nuovo tramite il Garage Francorchamps di Bruxelles, Belgio, il celebre rivenditore di Jacques Swaters. Fra l’altro, il primo proprietario della 4231 GT fu Léon Dernier, un belga che spesso aveva corso con le Ferrari con lo pseudonimo di “Eldé” e che successivamente iscrisse la sua stupenda e nuovissima Ferrari ad una serie di gare. Tra queste, un evento del 1963 a Spa-Francorchamps, la cronoscalata di Côte de Fleron, dove si piazzò terzo nella classe GT, e la cronoscalata di Côte de la Roche dello stesso anno, dove si classificò primo nella sua classe. La sua ultima volta al volante fu la cronoscalata di Côte de Bomerée, dove si classificò ancora una volta terzo nella classe GT. Nonostante i successi conquistati in gara, Dernier decise subito dopo di vendere la sua Lusso ad un certo Fressartin, anch’egli belga, prima che fosse venduta ancora una volta nel 1965 dal Garage Francorchamps ed esportata negli Stati Uniti. Dopo essere passata di proprietario in proprietario tra il 1966 e il 1968, la vettura fu acquistata dal californiano Mike Goodman nel 1970, che successivamente la vendette ad Harry C. Cravatte III, anch’egli californiano. In effetti, la Lusso sembra essere rimasta in California per un lungo periodo, fino a quando non fu venduta a Garry Roberts di Costa Mesa nel 1999 e alla DK Engineering di David Cottingham l’anno successivo. Una nota azienda esperta in Ferrari di Watford, Inghilterra, la DK Engineering, restaurò completamente la vettura. Una volta completato il restauro, Cottingham la guidò personalmente partecipando alla fine del 2001 alla Shell Historic Ferrari Maserati Challenge di Brands Hatch e Monza. Due mesi dopo l’auto fu rivenduta alla KMS International di Michael Willms di Londra. Il proprietario successivo della 4321 GT fu l’appassionato Jürgen Pyritz della tedesca Pyritz Yellow Racing, il quale, onorando le origini della vettura, la guidò ai Ferrari Days di Spa-Francorchamps nell’aprile del 2002. Più tardi in quello stesso anno, Willms riprese possesso della vettura e la guidò nel 2003 all’Uwe Meissner Modena Motorsport Festival al celebre Nürburgring. Nel 2004, Willms partecipò al Trofeo Baleares, con il copilota Erwin Bach, prima di partecipare al test day di Kinnerton a Donington, Inghilterra. Infine, nel novembre del 2004, la Ferrari fu acquistata dall’attuale proprietario, un pilota svizzero esperto ed appassionato di Ferrari, con un’esperienza più che trentennale. Nonostante la vettura fosse in buone condizioni di funzionamento e di guida, decise di restaurarla e di riassemblarla per uniformarla ai moderni requisiti della FIA e della Ferrari Shell Historic Challenge. Avendo già restaurato la 5367 GT, uno degli altri rarissimi esemplari di Lusso da corsa, la sua esperienza fu molto utile poiché fu lui stesso ad occuparsi della maggior parte degli interventi di restauro. Marcel Wettstein della vicina Zurigo fu incaricato di restaurare i componenti meccanici, tra cui il motore, il cambio, l’assale posteriore e i freni. Wettstein è uno dei migliori esperti svizzeri nella preparazione di Ferrari e Maserati da corsa d’epoca. Tutte le parti meccaniche, dai cuscinetti alle guarnizioni, furono revisionate e il motore fu ricostruito da Wettstein con una nuova potenza di 275 CV. Per rispettare i requisiti delle vetture da competizione, fu necessario rimuovere gli splendidi interni della Lusso e montare al loro posto una barra antiribaltamento e sedili da corsa, oltre ad una cella a combustibile e ad un sistema centrale di controllo antincendio. Tra gli altri miglioramenti apportati, ricordiamo l’applicazione di sospensioni, freni e componenti dell’impianto di scappamento tra i più competitivi sul mercato. Dopo i primi test, il proprietario iscrisse la vettura alla Ferrari Challenge del 2005, conquistando un notevole successo con secondi e terzi posti. Si dice sia competitiva come un buon esemplare di SWB e poiché è stata regolarmente utilizzata e sottoposta a manutenzione, è ancora pronta per correre in eventi del calibro di Ferrari Challenge, Tour Auto e Le Mans Classic. In realtà, sarebbe abbastanza aggressiva anche in escursioni occasionali su strade di montagna. Inoltre, si tratta di un esemplare matching numbers. La vettura è corredata di rullo porta attrezzi, manuale utente e documenti FIA; anche tutti i componenti interni e i paraurti sono originali ed è dotata di tre Bonari da competizione supplementari con pneumatici da corsa Dunlop. Purtroppo, la Lusso si è rivelata l’ultima della longeva serie Ferrari 250 GT. Nei due anni della sua produzione furono costruiti 350 esemplari e ora questa vettura, forte della sua solitaria sopravvivenza, è una delle Ferrari più apprezzate e ricercate dei giorni nostri. Concepita e realizzata come una gran turismo di lusso, il suo successo venne attribuito alla sua miscela indissolubile di prestazioni da gara e sensualità made in Italy. Una combinazione vincente incarnata da questo esemplare estremamente appetibile, la primissima 250 GT Lusso prodotta in serie e uno degli unici tre esemplari da Competizione di cui si abbia conoscenza. Addendum Spare parts are currently held by the Vendor, the Buyer will need to arrange collection. Chassis no. 4213 GT

  • ITAItaly
  • 2008-05-18
Hammer price
Show price

THE EX-TULLIO MARCHESI TARGA FLORIO CLASS WINNING 1967 AND 1968 ITALIAN NATIONAL GT CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING

THE EX-TULLIO MARCHESI TARGA FLORIO CLASS WINNING 1967 AND 1968 ITALIAN NATIONAL GT CHAMPIONSHIP WINNING 1966 FERRARI 275 GTB/C COMPETITION BERLINETTA COACHWORK DESIGNED BY PININFARINA, BUILT BY SCAGLIETTI Chassis No. 9007 Engine No. 9007 Silver with black interior Engine: V12, single overhead camshaft, dry sump, two valves per cylinder, three Weber 2-throat carburetors, 3286cc, 320hp at 7700rpm; Gearbox: five speed manual transaxle; Suspension: front, independent by unequal A-arms and coil springs; rear, independent by unequal A-arms and coil springs; Brakes: four wheel discs. Left hand drive. A perhaps apocryphal story ascribes Ferrari's motivation in replacing the 250GT Lusso with the 275 GTB to his belief that the Lusso was too beautiful to convey properly the image of Ferrari. Like many Enzo Ferrari stories, it is perhaps less than fully accurate, but contributes to the myth that surrounds the marque. Its logic, however, is supported by the judgement of history: the aggressive 275 GTB is today more coveted by collectors than the Lusso, even though the Lusso's design has endured the test of time to be generally agreed as among the most pure and beautiful products of the collaboration between Ferrari and Pininfarina. The 275 GTB has other distinctive attributes, not least its place as the first fully independent suspension Ferrari road car and the power and tractability of its 3.3 liter 600 V12 engine developed from the 1 = liter Colombo 'short block' originally designed in 1947. During the mid-sixties Ferrari was in a constant adversarial position with the FIA over production homologation of the marque's racing cars. Ferrari had taken advantage of interpretation and loopholes in the FIA's regulations for years, not least with the all-conquering 250 GTO, and was frustrated when in 1964 his firm's optimistic attempt to homologate the mid-engined 250 LM as an evolution of the front-engined 250 GT was (understandably) rejected by the FIA. Ferrari's stance was not strengthened by the fact that all 250 LMs, after the first example, in fact had 275-series 3.3 liter engines. It took Ferrari until 1966 to produce enough 250 LMs to convince the FIA they were sufficiently within the 'production' parameter to compete against in the same classes as the overwhelming mid-engined competition. During this time, series production of road Ferraris continued with the 275 GTB, first with 2-cam engines and later with 4-cam versions, as the mainstay of the marque. The 275 GTB proved itself competent on the race track as well as on the street and was offered from its inception with a choice of steel or alloy coachwork. Obviously Ferrari knew this highly evolved berlinetta with its improved rear suspension and the balance permitted by its rear-mounted transaxle would, like all good Ferraris, be driven from showroom floor to race track paddock. Ferrari racers, in common with competitors using other marques, always want 'more' and Ferrari had built a successful business meeting these desires. Thus, in addition to lightweight alloy coachwork, Ferrari created 275 GTBs more closely adapted to the requirements of racing, the 275 GTB/C (for 'Competizione'), one of the least known, but most important and successful, Ferrari subtypes. The first iteration of this variant were Le Mans specials raced by the factory and then sold on to privateers. One of these cars, looking like a cross between a 275 GTB and a 250 GTO, was driven by Charlie Kolb to win the Nassau Tourist Trophy in 1965. The three carburetor dry sump engine was tuned to deliver over 320hp. The chassis was stiffened with an extra cross member and special Borrani wire wheels were provided to handle the extra cornering stresses of serious competition. The Le Mans specials were succeeded by a more sedate series of 275 GTB/Cs assembled with competition in mind but far from an all-out race car. These so-called 1st series 275 GTB/Cs had wet sump engines and were effectively only a slightly modified alloy body production 275 GTB. Then in 1966, as the 275 GTB aged, Ferrari responded to heightened sports car and endurance racing competition with the 2nd series 275 GTB/C, a production car in name only, for under its skimpy 1mm thick alloy skin there was the heart of a true race car. A mere twelve chassis were built and they represent the most exceptional and effective examples of all the 275 GTB series. Conceived as tools for serious private competitors, from the first example (chassis 9007 offered here) the 2nd series 275 GTB/Cs were for serious competitors. To retain at least the semblance of a production origin, the Type 213/Competizione engines were tuned to deliver over 320hp using three Weber dual choke downdraft carburetors. Dry sump engine lubrication was provided to meet the oil capacity needs of long distance races, reduce ground clearance and ensure consistent engine lubrication during cornering. Bodies were even lighter than production alloy 275 GTB coachwork. Chassis were stiffened. Glazing, except for the windshield, was of lightweight plastic. Gearboxes and drivetrain were more rugged. Front and rear wheel arches were widened for wider wheels and tires, nominally 5.50/7.00 x 15 front/rear but generally even larger in actual competition. Interestingly, the 275 GTB/C reverted to the open driveshaft of the earliest production cars, even after the torque tube drive of later cars had proven more reliable in road use. The open drive shaft of the GTB/C proved effective, however, in the stiffer chassis, and was aided by thorough maintenance and frequent rebuilds characteristic of the competition cars. The 2nd series 275 GTB/C weigh more than 400 pounds less than the standard production alloy-bodied 275 GTBs. With their high output competizione engines their performance is exceptional. Of the twelve 2nd series 275 GTB/Cs built, 9007 is the first of the line, and is commonly regarded as one of the finest of the twelve GTB/Cs. Completed on May 3, 1966 it was sold new to Silvio Tullio Marchesi who, in the best Ferrari tradition, raced it in the Targa Florio only five days later, winning the GT category driving with Sinibaldi. Two months later Marchesi/Lessona finished 8th overall and 2nd in class at Mugello. Marchesi went on to compete, and win, in numerous other events in Italy in 1966 and won the 1967 Italian national GT championship with this car. (The Italians base the '1967 Championship' on 1966 race results). Marchesi backed up this result in 1967, scoring sufficiently well to repeat as the 1968 Italian champion. In 1968, 9007 was sold to J.S. Hanrioud in France who continued to campaign the car in national events, including the Tour de France. In 1970, 9007 was sold to Mr. Cauwet, then to renowned collector Pierre Bardinon, Frederick Chandon and finally to Mssrs. Hanrioud and Marin, all in France. In 1992 Hanrioud and Marin again entered 9007 in the Tour de France, before selling it in 1993 to the United States where it has remained since in two significant Ferrari collections. Even more than the fabled 250 GTO, the 275 GTB/C is the pinnacle of production-based front V12 engined competition cars. With less than a third of the GTO's 39-unit production, the 275 GTB/C is much more rare. It also is lighter, more powerful and better balanced due to its rear-mounted transaxle and independent rear suspension. All together, 275 GTB/C 9007 is a worthy addition to any collection of Ferrari or important competition cars and a welcome and competitive entrant in numerous historic races and tours including the Shell Historic Ferrari Challenge.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-08-29
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1932 Packard Twin Six Coupe Roadster

Series 905. 160 bhp, 445.5 cu. in. modified L-head V-12 engine with a single Stromberg downdraft carburetor, three-speed manual transmission with finger control Free-Wheeling, live front and rear axles with semi-elliptic front and rear leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5 in. Long regarded as the Clark Gable Twin Six Formerly owned by Jack Passey, C.A. Leslie, and Tom Moretti Best in Class at Pebble Beach, Amelia Island, and Meadow Brook An outstanding 12-cylinder Packard of quality and rich provenance Indisputably pure, authentic, and correct More than just “The King of Hollywood,” Clark Gable was a passionate motorhead who in the 1930s occupied the same position in California socialite automotive circles that Steve McQueen would hold three decades later. Like McQueen, Gable owned the best that money could buy and also enjoyed working on the cars himself. His preference before the war was clearly for the top-of-the-line offerings by Packard, with the occasional distractions by Duesenberg. Vehicle number 579-64 was the 54th Twin Six coupe roadster built during 1932’s Ninth Series, the first year of the second-generation Packard V-12, and may well have been the last example of this body style made. Originally dispatched to Los Angeles, it was sold new on November 14, 1932, by the famous distributor there, Earle C. Anthony, Inc., long the largest-volume dealer of new Packards in the world, with Mr. Gable believed to be the original owner. Gable was photographed in the early 1930s with his Twin Six Coupe Roadster, which had been accessorized with wheel discs, Pilot-Ray driving lights (made in Los Angeles), and a rear-mounted trunk, all of which are present in the famous publicity photograph. It is believed that Gable sold the car in 1934 to make way for a new 1106 Twelve Runabout Speedster, which would receive similar Bohman & Schwartz touches. This car’s known ownership history picks up with another Los Angeles owner, C. Jewell. By 1949, it was owned by D.H. Korntved of Cambria, California, later making its way to the town of Greenfield, where, in the late 1950s, it was discovered in a local backyard by renowned enthusiast Jack Passey. After tracking down the owner, Mr. Passey paid $75 for the Packard and towed it home, becoming its first enthusiast owner, at a time when the Passey stable was one of the largest and finest on the West Coast, known for its vast collection of superb unrestored original cars. In the early 1960s, the Twin Six was bought from Mr. Passey by early West Coast Packard V-12 enthusiast George Petrusich, who owned it several years before selling it to C.A. Leslie Jr. of Oklahoma City. The foremost expert of his time on this model, Mr. Leslie kept extensive records, as well as his own collection of Twin Sixes and their associated parts, with which he aided numerous fellow owners over the years through articles in magazines and books. The coupe roadster was the pride of his collection for most of the rest of his life. In 1989, the car was acquired from Mrs. Leslie by Don Wohlwend of Camano Island, Washington, a longtime CCCA member and active restorer and enthusiast. Mr. Wohlwend kept the car for eight years before passing it to its next notable owner, the late Tom Moretti. One of the most respected of modern Packard connoisseurs, Mr. Moretti was noteworthy in many ways. He collected only the best of the best, selecting solid original cars with good, well-known histories, and proceeded to restore them himself in a fully equipped home shop, with painstaking attention to accuracy and detail. A Moretti Packard was, in its finished form, authentic, well researched, and second to none. In his lifetime, Mr. Moretti restored seven Packard Twelves. All of them won Best in Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance—an unprecedented and virtually unmatched achievement by a private owner-restorer. Most special of all, this Twin Six not only won its class at Pebble Beach in 2009 but also matched the honor the following year at Amelia Island and Meadow Brook, making it a rare winner of the “triple crown” of great American concours d’elegance. It was also awarded its First Primary award, with a perfect score of 100 points its first time out, in CCCA judging, and it was Best of Show at the 2010 CCCA Museum Experience at Hickory Corners. The judges had spoken, and clearly: this was one of the best Packards in the world. PROVENANCE That this Twin Six coupe roadster was Clark Gable’s is strongly backed both by the opinions of Packard historians and by first-hand recollections. Among these was Major Conrad Clough, a Leslie contemporary and fellow Packard collector in Oklahoma City, who had earlier resided in Santa Monica in the 1930s. Major Clough recalled to Mr. Leslie that he had known Clark Gable, that he recalled seeing this car at Earle C. Anthony’s when it was in for service, and that it was painted a very dark Packard Blue, the same color found on the car when it was stripped by Mr. Wohlwend at the beginning of restoration. The Major was convinced that the car he eventually came to know in the Leslie stable had been Gable’s. Similarly, Ted Davis, a roster keeper for Ninth Series Twin Sixes, regards this as being the Gable car, as did the late collector Jim Weston and, most certainly, Tom Moretti, a man who did his research and knew his facts when it came to Packards. Its history aside, the car is almost unrivaled in its purity and accuracy. It retains the original body, engine number 900481, frame number 900471, front axle number 900473, and steering box number 900479, all of which, being numbered within 10 digits of one another, confirms their originality to this car; the firewall data tag is also original. Exhaustive research by Mr. Moretti at the Detroit Public Library allowed the recreation of the original finish, down to the proper width and pattern of pinstriping! With its whitewall tires, Goddess of Speed radiator mascot, and beautifully tailored interior, the result is still fresh, stunning, and show ready in all regards, a credit to the long-lived integrity of a Moretti restoration. It is often said that the best car is one restored by a knowledgeable owner for him to keep, and indeed, that was true of this Twin Six, which, after completing, Mr. Moretti owned until his untimely passing. For the past several years, it has been part of a renowned collection, continuing to enjoy the best of possible care and maintenance, which has left it very much the same today, with 604 miles traveled, as when Mr. Moretti completed it. The current owner notes the Finger Control Free-Wheeling feature is fully functional. Indisputably rich in history, exquisitely and authentically restored, and recognized as one of the best by historians and judges alike, this is a Packard that rings all the bells and remains firmly in the ranks of the greatest extant. It is as much a legend as Clark Gable himself. Chassis no. 900471 Engine no. 900481 Vehicle no. 579-64

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-03-12
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1952 Cunningham C3 Coupe by Vignale

220 bhp, 331 cu. in. OHV Chrysler Hemi V-8 with four Zenith single-barrel carburetors, three-speed Cadillac manual transmission, independent front suspension, live rear axle, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 105 in. One of 19 Cunningham C3 Coupes; the third Vignale-bodied car The only Vignale-bodied C3 to be actively raced in period Numerous unique and one-off features Pictured with Briggs Cunningham in promotional photography Concours restoration by RM Auto Restoration Like many sportsmen of the 1950s, Briggs Cunningham dreamed of winning at Le Mans. However, unlike many of them, Cunningham had the virtually limitless funds required to enable such efforts as heir to the Swift meatpacking fortune. After finding that production American cars, such as Cadillacs, were “close but no cigar,” he turned his fortune and energy toward developing his own all-new automobile, one that could compete at Le Mans and emerge victorious but also be, at its core, American. Cunningham’s cars were smooth, low-slung designs that had strong tubular chassis, independent coil-spring front suspension, and tuned Chrysler Hemi V-8 power. The racing models evolved throughout the early 1950s, winning at Road America and Watkins Glen in 1951, but the Le Mans organizers threw Cunningham a curve ball when he started his preparations to enter their 1952 event. They specified that at least 25 road-going cars had to be built in order to qualify the entrant as an automobile manufacturer. Cunningham gave it some thought and concluded that a road-going version of his racing car would not be such a bad idea; in fact, it would actually help to offset the astronomical expenses being incurred by his racing team. Production of an entire car in Cunningham’s West Palm Beach facility would have been cost-prohibitive, so the maestro contracted Italian coachbuilder Alfredo Vignale to build him coupe and cabriolet bodies, which were based on a design that had been penned by Giovanni Michelotti and had obvious Ferrari influences. The C3, as it was known, was not cheap, as it was based on a modified racing chassis and still had a Hemi V-8. It was essentially a larger, hotter Ferrari, albeit with American grunt under the hood, and it cost about $9,000. However, no one could argue that the power was not worth the cost, as the C-3 was capable of sprinting from 0–60 mph in around 7.0 seconds and could hit a top speed of nearly 150 mph. Cunningham had limited production of the C3 underway by early 1953, but the project was hindered by delays. While his shop could build a chassis every week, it took Vignale, working with time-honored handcraftsmanship, almost two months to complete the rest of a car. Ultimately, C3 production wound to a close with five cabriolets and twenty coupes produced. Although the Cunningham team never won at Le Mans, he did finish 3rd overall in both 1953 and 1954, and he would continue to race with ever-modified versions of his own design, along with a staggering roster of Jaguars, Listers, Maseratis, and Corvettes, until 1963. The C3 was as close as he ever came to building a true production model, and it was the only Cunningham ever built for the public. CHASSIS NUMBER 5208 The third Vignale-bodied C3 built, chassis number 5208 demonstrates the continuous detail changes made to the cars, both as the result of customer desires and ongoing design improvements. It was fitted with flat side windows with rear quarter windows, bumper overriders, and a checkered flag badge on the engine cover, features used on all C3s from this point forward. The wheelbase was 105 inches, a change made from the previous chassis (number 5207) forward, and the car was equipped with a 20-gallon fuel tank, a Ford radio, and a heater. The body was finished in three shades of silver-blue, a distinctive and unique tri-tone color scheme believed to have been used only on this car. So much is known of this car’s original appearance because it was photographed by the famous motorsport photographer Ozzie Lyons outside Alfred Momo’s premises in New York, in the company of Briggs Cunningham at the wheel of his C4-R racer. This wonderful photograph clearly shows the original color scheme in detail, with its colors “popping” brightly and vividly. The car was originally delivered to Alvin R. Jones of Indiana, in whose ownership it was displayed at the Henry Ford Museum’s Sports Cars Internationale in 1953 and again at the 1955 event under the ownership of Art Stuart of Highland Park, Michigan. Photographs of the car were published in period in both Sports Cars in Action by John Bond and Sports and Classic Cars by Borgeson and Jaderquist. Most famously, however, this was the only Vignale-bodied C3 to be actively raced and used for competition in period, a status it gained by being returned to the Cunningham factory in West Palm Beach. It was driven by the Cunningham team at MacDill Air Force Base at Tampa, Florida, on February 21, 1953, piloted by Phil Stiles in the 12-lap, 50-mile second race of the day for novice drivers in modified cars of all classes. Stiles and the C3 finished 17th overall. He then ran the car in the feature race of the day, the 6-hour, 492-mile, 120-lap Collier Memorial handicap race. Stiles raced again at the same venue in January of 1954, now with a hotter engine. It was track-tested during practice and then driven by Stiles in the third race of the day, the 60-lap, 200-mile Governor Dan McCarty Memorial Race, but he failed to finish due to a suspension failure. The car was divested by the B.S. Cunningham Company in 1955 to Tony Olivero of Texas and made one last sporting appearance at the Fiesta del Pacifico race in San Diego in 1956. It spent many years in the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles before joining the stable of its present caretaker, under whose ownership a full restoration was commissioned with the goal of absolute authenticity to the car’s original specifications. Accordingly, chassis number 5207 was graciously loaned to RM Auto Restoration by its owner, Tom Cotter; this wonderful, original, and unrestored car was built immediately prior to the C3 shown here and is the one closest to it in specifications and details. Use of this important reference car allowed the numerous original details of this car to be restored as faithfully as possible. Correct bumpers were remanufactured by RM to the original designs, using Cotter’s car as a pattern. The original color scheme was recreated to match the Lyons photograph, and most interestingly, the faces of the original instrumentation match the body color as they did originally. Even new glass was made to the original design and fitted in all the windows. Exhaustive research was performed into the correct designs of the cowl ventilator and hood scoop, as well as the original design and fitment of the chrome trim. Original and correct Borrani wire wheels were fitted, an upgrade made to the car during its Cunningham team use. Most importantly, the originally fitted Chrysler Hemi V-8, with its longtime aspiration setup incorporating four single-barrel Zenith carburetors, is installed under the hood. Today, finished as near as possible to its original Cunningham specification, this car is the only Vignale-bodied C3 to have raced in period and is now one of the finest its existence. Certainly one of the most familiar C3s in period, it is ready to enjoy the care of a new owner—and to entertain on the road or perhaps even the track. Chassis no. 5208

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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1960 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-cam inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension and coil-spring single-point swing-axle rear suspension, and servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Just over 34,000 miles and four owners from new Fully matching numbers; an excellent example of its kind Full restoration by Mercedes-Benz specialists Incredibly well maintained and preserved since new Never before offered at public sale To say that the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL was ahead of its time would be an understatement. The 300 SL heralded a new era for Mercedes-Benz road cars; it utilized an innovative space-frame chassis coupled with a race-bred, fuel-injected engine, the first of its kind fitted to a production car, and was clothed in breathtaking bodywork. It was conceived by American Mercedes-Benz importer Max Hoffman, who believed that a road-legal version of the successful W194 racer would be profitable in the United States and that the power and styling of such a car would appeal to the American market. Mercedes-Benz took Hoffman up on his idea, and it was only natural that the new 300 SL would premiere at the New York Auto Show in 1954. The 300 SL Coupe quickly earned the nickname “Gullwing” for its distinctive roof-hinged doors, and the public fell in love with the car, not only for its breathtaking design but also for its earth-shattering performance. Of course, the best way to keep customers coming back to Mercedes-Benz was to create a drop-top version of the 300 SL. A prototype model of a convertible 300 SL was first spotted by the German magazine Auto, Motor und Sport in 1956, and the production version would first be shown at the Geneva Motor Show one year later. By the end of 1957, the final 300 SL Gullwings had left the production line and production began on the 300 SL Roadster. The roadster offered a host of improvements over its gullwinged predecessor. In an effort to improve entrance and egress, Mercedes-Benz lowered the central section of its space-frame, crafted smaller sills and fitted larger doors to the car. Strength was maintained, nonetheless, with the addition of diagonal struts, which braced the lowered side sections to the rear tubular members. Engineers also revised the suspension to create a more comfortable ride and improve handling. At the rear, the spare tire was repositioned below the trunk floor, necessitating a smaller fuel tank but also maintaining reasonable luggage space. These revisions to the roadster added some 250 pounds to the total weight of the car, mostly due to the convertible top. However, the car remained quite quick nevertheless and boasted a factory-claimed top speed of 137 mph. Following the lead of the coupe, the 300 SL Roadster proved to be just as popular with the well-to-do as its predecessor. Ownership of a 300 SL implied an exquisite taste in engineering and aesthetics, and it was the ultimate automotive statement. Naturally, many found homes in the garages of celebrities, racing drivers, and other financially successful individuals with an appreciation for fine automobiles. At an $11,000 list price, it was worth every penny. Purchased new by Robert C. Borwell, of Chicago, Illinois, on April 20, 1960, this 300 SL Roadster was delivered new in Fire Brigade Red (DB 534) over a tan leather interior and was fitted with both a tan soft-top and black-painted hardtop. At that time, Borwell had just been promoted to senior vice president of Marsh & McLennan, an insurance brokerage firm that was, at that time, based in Chicago, and his new 300 SL was no doubt a prized acquisition and a fitting automobile for such a high-ranking individual in the firm. Borwell would go on owning his 300 SL Roadster for the next 34 years, and by the time he sold it Eric Applebaum, of Spring Green, Wisconsin, in 1994, the car had only accumulated 30,000 miles and had never rusted or been hit. Shortly after purchasing the 300 SL, Applebaum decided to commission restoration work by a marque specialist. This restoration took no less than two years, and it goes without saying that the Roadster was exquisite by the time it returned to its second owner. Seeking to preserve and display the impeccable restoration, Applebaum allegedly constructed a custom-built tower to store the car in following the restoration! In 2002, the 300 SL Roadster was purchased by a friend of Mr. Applebaum’s, Paul J. Roller, of Elmgrove, Wisconsin, who would own the car for the following nine years, continuing to improve the quality of the car before selling it to its fourth and current owner in 2011. Still in incredible condition, this Roadster is a truly wonderful example of its breed. It comes equipped with all five original wheels, fitted with correct Dunlop tires sourced through the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center; its original Becker-Mexico radio; original owner’s manuals; a copy of the factory build sheet; a complete tool set, including its original tire pressure gauge still in its original Mercedes-Benz branded box; and a full set of Bausch fitted luggage that beautifully matches the car’s color combination. It is further documented by invoices, receipts, and photos from the restoration, as well as its original books and records. Following completion, it has been maintained by marque experts without regard to cost and always kept in a climate-controlled garage. An icon of German engineering, the 300 SL is perhaps the most memorable car ever produced by Mercedes-Benz. The open-top roadster that replaced the iconic Gullwing proved to be an improvement on an already incredible car. This example, after having spent the majority of its life within a 200-mile radius, is in incredible condition following a meticulous restoration and subsequent careful preservation. It has never before been offered at public sale, including at auction, marking this as a fresh “first-time offering.” It would surely garner much interest at any concours event and is a wonderful example of German engineering and design. Chassis no. 198.042.10.002552 Engine no. 198.980.10.002603 Body no. A198.042.00063

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Fastback Sports Saloon by H.J. Mulliner

Body Style 7277. 153 bhp, 4,566 cc inlet-over-exhaust inline six-cylinder engine with twin SU carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent wishbone front suspension with coil springs and an anti-roll bar, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic front and mechanical rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 120 in. Originally delivered to Aristotle Onassis Desirable early A-series Continental Lightweight seats, rear fender spats, and manual gearbox Formerly owned by J. Heumann and Kent Wakeford Well-maintained restoration by marque specialists Even after becoming the “Silent Sports Car” in the mid-1930s, Bentley held tight to its performance heritage. Later in the decade, the company began experimenting with aerodynamic designs, eventually evolving the Georges Paulin-designed Corniche prototype of 1940. The Corniche did not survive World War II, but its spirit did, and after the war, it evolved into H.I.F. Evernden and J.P. Blatchley’s R-Type Continental, “a car which would not only look beautiful but possess a high maximum speed, coupled with a correspondingly high rate of acceleration, together with excellent handling and roadability.” H.J. Mulliner was contracted to design and build the prototype Continental, which was based on the frame, suspension, steering, and braking components of a standard R-Type. The body, window, and seat frames were built of light alloy, resulting in a four-passenger body that weighed only 750 pounds, totaling less than 4,000 pounds when mated to the chassis. After extensive road tests in France, the prototype’s gearbox overdriven top gear was found to be unsuitable for the rpms offered by the engine, so it was replaced by a direct-ratio top gear and lower axle ratio, which was a combination that proved best for both high-speed touring and well-spaced gear changes for city driving. Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. The Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental Fastback created a space for itself that was unique. It combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” CHASSIS NUMBER BC25A: THE ONASSIS CONTINENTAL Initial owners of the R-Type Continental read like a “who’s who” of important world figures, including many of the wealthiest and best-known enthusiasts. Not least among these was Aristotle Onassis. Perhaps best-remembered today for his stormy long-term relationship with opera diva Maria Callas and his late-in-life marriage to Jacqueline Kennedy, Onassis built his family’s shipping firm into the world’s largest privately owned fleet. In his time, he was one of the world’s richest men and a flamboyant, larger-than-life society figure whose holdings included his own private island and a 325-foot yacht converted from an anti-submarine frigate. Onassis ordered and took delivery of his R-Type Continental, an early A-series car, through Paris dealership Franco-Brittanic Autos. His original ownership of chassis number BC25A is recorded in the Bentley R-Type Continental Register and in the records of the Rolls-Royce Foundation, detailing the car’s original build specifications and copies of which are on file. The Continental was equipped with French-specification features; most importantly of all, this is one of the desirable “seats and spats” cars, having been originally ordered with both rear fender skirts and lightweight bucket seats. The car was delivered in April 1953 and remained with Onassis until 1959. Following four years of ownership by George Cahan, of France, it was exported to the United States in 1963 by famous California exotic car dealer Peter Satori, who sold it to Jules Heumann, of San Francisco. Known simply as “J” to his many friends in the hobby, the long-time co-chairman of the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance drove the Continental regularly in the Bay Area for two years, until an unfortunate accident forced him to part with it. It was fully repaired and sold to James Dunbar, of San Mateo. In 1972, it passed to renowned Hollywood cinematographer and car enthusiast Kent Wakeford and then, in 1974, to Charles Anker, of Santa Monica. In 1988, the car returned to England, only to be acquired that year and repatriated by its present owner, an avid Bentley connoisseur, in whose stable the car has now remained for over a quarter-century. It was restored in 1989 by the renowned Miami, Florida, firm of Vantage Motorworks, which refinished the car in Tudor Grey with Maroon leather interior, the original color combination used for Mr. Onassis. As part of the restoration, a period-correct air-conditioning system was added, ducted below the rear window, to ensure driving comfort. The car has been regularly maintained by its owner’s professional staff and has been kept in excellent overall order; it scarcely shows the age of its restoration. However, as this R-Type has been used sparingly since being acquired, further minor mechanical sorting would be advised. It is offered here as one of few available early A-series Continentals and one of fewer still that benefitted from ownership of one of the illustrious names that made the Continental famous. It is bold, fast, and exciting—much like Aristotle Onassis himself. Addendum Please note this vehicle is titled as a 1954. Chassis no. BC25A Engine no. BCA24 Body no. 5489

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1966 Shelby 427 Cobra

Est. 410 bhp, 427 cu. in. “side-oiler” V-8 engine, Ford Toploader four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length upper and lower wishbones, coil springs, and telescopic dampers, independent rear suspension with unequal-length upper and lower wishbones with additional lower trailing links, coil springs, and telescopic dampers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. Known ownership history; documented in the SAAC World Registry Formerly owned by Frank Sytner Recent cosmetic restoration to original condition by Cobra expert Mike McCluskey An outstanding road going 427 Cobra The odyssey of the Shelby Cobra is defined by the contributions of many people, marked by many important cars and by even more important moments. They weave a rich fabric of creativity, determination, and persistence in the face of limited resources and epic challenges. With Shelby’s leadership, the era’s top drivers, and a “dream team” including Ken Miles, Phil Remington, Pete Brock, and many other racing luminaries in the background, the Ford-powered, AC Ace-derived Cobra was brutally quick and dead reliable, earning its stripes and winning virtually everywhere it appeared. The Cobra won the U.S. Manufacturers' Championship three years running in 1963, 1964, and 1965, and with the sleek Pete Brock-designed Daytona coupe, Shelby American Inc. won the hotly contested 1965 FIA World Manufacturers' Championship. THE 427 COBRA Although the 289 Cobra was proven and immensely successful, more power was needed to stay competitive. Since Ford’s 289 V-8 reached its reliability limit at 385 horsepower, Shelby’s stalwart driver and engineer, Ken Miles, surmised that an even bigger engine might work within the trim confines of the Cobra. If there was any doubt about the need, it evaporated when the Shelby team went to Nassau for the 1963 Speed Week, where Chevrolet’s new Corvette Grand Sports were lapping more than nine seconds quicker than the small block Cobras! However, while Shelby was initially promised a new aluminum-block version of Ford’s 390 FE engine, internal resistance from the NASCAR faction within Ford forced a switch to the heavier cast-iron 427. Although powerful, proven, and reliable at 500 brake horsepower and beyond, it was heavier and therefore necessitated a redesign of the Cobra’s chassis to ensure proper handling. The new chassis measured five inches wider, with coil springs all around, and with development help from Ford’s engineering department, the 427 Cobra was born. The cars were fiercely quick. Driving one continues to be a mind-bending experience. One of the most memorable stories about the 427 Cobra involves a test arranged for Sports Car Graphic magazine by Shelby’s Ken Miles. A few years earlier, Aston Martin claimed that their DB4 was capable of accelerating from zero to 100 mph and back down to zero in less than 30 seconds. Miles had the idea to restage the test using the new 427 Cobra. The result, according to SCG Editor Jerry Titus, was an astounding 13.2 seconds! CSX 3259 The 427 Cobra presented here, chassis number CSX 3259, is a stunning, genuine street Cobra that enjoys both excellent history and outstanding preparation. According to the Shelby American World Registry, it was originally billed by AC Cars to Shelby American on April 12, 1966, before being invoiced to Stark Hickey Ford, of Royal Oak, Michigan, in suburban Detroit, for $6,275 on June 30. It was sold to its original owner, Jim Rayl, of Kokomo, Indiana, in August 1966 and proceeded to remain in the United States until the 1970s. It is known to have accumulated only 21,700 miles by 1979. It appeared at the First Annual Brown County, Indiana, Shelby American Automobile Club meet in 1978. In 1979, the car was exported to England and was sold in 1982 to Michael Burgel, of Germany, who registered it in that country as BO-W8. While mostly street-driven, it was also raced occasionally in European Cobra events. Later, it was acquired by Frank Sytner, the 1988 British Touring Car Champion, before its return to the United States. In 2003, the car was acquired by Doug Johnson, and the chassis was prepared for entry into the Monterey Historics. Unfortunately, it made contact with a guardrail in competition. Following the incident, the Cobra was completely restored and has since been shown numerous times. Photo-documentation of the accident damage and repair is available for review upon request, as part of a documentation file that also includes an old California pink slip, numerous California state inspection receipts dating back to 1970, a copy of the original invoice from AC to Shelby America, photographs of the body stamp in various locations, and receipts from the car’s European ownership period in England and Germany. In its present ownership, the Cobra has undergone a comprehensive cosmetic restoration by noted Shelby guru Mike McCluskey, of California. It has been finished to its original “street car” configuration in red over black (as when new), with proper Smiths gauges in a stock dashboard and correct new seat upholstery and carpeting. The 427 “side-oiler” under the hood, described by an RM Sotheby’s specialist as being “extremely powerful,” has been fitted with proper Holley “side-winder” intake and exhaust manifolds, as well as correct carburetors and exhaust pipes. All of the under-panels and the gas tank are correct as well, and the car still rolls on its original Halibrand wheels shod in proper BF Goodrich tires. This is an exceptional opportunity to acquire an outstanding 427 Cobra with excellent documented history, invoices dating back nearly 40 years, and presentation to the highest standards. Chassis no. CSX 3259

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1988 Porsche 959 'Komfort'

450 bhp, 2,849 cc air- and liquid-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin two-stage turbochargers, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel drive, independent double-wishbone front and rear suspension with electronically adjustable ride height and shock absorber control, and four-wheel hydraulically ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 89.4 in. The most technologically advanced, mold-breaking supercar of its time Three owners and just over 21,100 kilometers from new Very well preserved and maintained, with fully known history Accompanied by a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity One of only 337 built; all original, without aftermarket changes Three-and-a-half seconds…count it out loud. “One-one-thousand, two one-thousand, three one-thousand….” And there you have it! The Porsche 959 just sprinted from a dead stop to 60 mph, with its hyper-advanced boxer six howling through each gear, pulverizing the tarmac below it with 450 brake horsepower via two monstrous intercooled turbochargers. All of this occurred exactly three decades ago, at a time when the most competitive sports cars on the road would be hard pressed to hit the same mark in less than five seconds, and also at a time when most car enthusiasts had barely heard of carbon fiber. Even a full decade later, in the mid-1990s, machines that cracked the 180-mph mark were rare and ultra-sophisticated supercars. Even Porsche’s final air-cooled 911 Turbo in the late 1990s hadn’t bested the 959’s 0–60 times! The 959 was packed with technology never seen before in a road car, making it easier to compare with aircraft than other road going automobiles. According to its Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, this particular 959 Komfort was delivered new with silver paint over its super-lightweight body panels and a burgundy leather interior with contrasting seat inserts in tri-tone silver and grey. The car was originally delivered to Spain in 1988, and its first owner was a well-known industrialist, clearly an individual who could have afforded the car’s mind-numbing $300,000 price tag. He owned the 959 for nearly 20 years before selling it to its second Spanish owner in 2006. This individual relocated the United States in 2011 and the 959 traveled with him. It was imported by Autosport Designs Inc. in Huntington Station, New York, on his behalf, under the Show and Display law, which was championed by Bill Gates and Paul Allen so they were able to enjoy their own 959s in the United States. Upon its arrival at Autosport, the car received a full engine-out service, which totaled to nearly $40,000, bringing it to its current, freshly maintained, and outstanding driving condition. Furthermore, its adjustable suspension with rear hydraulic and tire pressure sensors would have brought the driver both great comfort over long trips and great feedback when necessary. While with its current collector, this 959 has been stored in a climate-controlled facility and has seen minimal use following its major service. As such, it remains in remarkably well-preserved and original condition, with its odometer currently showing just under 21,100 kilometers (13,111 miles), which is commensurate with the lack of wear both inside and out. The fact that it has an original interior and no aftermarket upgrades or changes should definitely contribute to its lasting value. This wonderful driver presents incredibly well throughout and would certainly be a welcome addition to any Porsche Club of America event. It is also important to note that due to the fact that this 959 is now over 25 years old, it is no longer restricted in terms of annual mileage under the Show and Display rule, making vehicles of its kind all the more valuable to collectors. Additionally, this 959 retains its original books, tools, first aid kit, jack, air compressor, and extra keys, as well as its Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. A 959 is a rare sight in the United States, as they were never originally offered for sale here, and the availability of a properly imported and well-sorted example is all the more rare. Only 337 examples were built in total worldwide. It is obvious why the 959 is in such high demand by collectors, as the car, in its heyday, was light years ahead of its competitors in terms of technology, engineering, and performance. Many would argue that it set the stage for the technology-laden supercars of the 21st century, showcasing features that would become the industry standards in years to come. This particular example is surely one of the finest, as it is presented in spectacular original condition and is ready to hit the open road following its comprehensive service. With the Porsche market heating up tremendously in 2015, astute collectors are closely watching the marque's most iconic models, of which the 959 is clearly the most celebrated. More than merely break the mold, it utterly shattered it, and in so doing, it has secured a place in the history books as one of the most sought-after cars in the world. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions this vehicle will need to be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. Chassis no. WP0ZZZ95ZJS900154 Engine no. 65H00150

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1955 Lincoln Indianapolis Exclusive Study by Boano

225 bhp, 341 cu. in. overhead-valve pushrod V-8 engine with a single four-barrel carburetor, four-speed automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs and tubular shock absorbers, live rear axle with leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 123 in. A sensation at the 1955 Turin Motor Show Formerly owned by Henry Ford II and Thomas Kerr Exquisitely restored by Jim Cox in its original colors Always an attention-getter and crowd favorite Once seen, never forgotten On his deathbed, Giacinto Ghia instructed his wife to call Felice Mario Boano and have him save the company. It is indisputable that without Boano’s skill and management, Ghia would not have survived to become one of the great coachbuilders of the post-war era. Before that, in the thirties, it was Boano who quietly, and without fanfare, executed many of the great designs of Farina, Castagna, Ghia, Viotti, and Bertone. However, the names affixed to his work were those of the designers. When relations with Luigi Segre at Ghia grew untenable, Boano, a quiet man, surrendered his interest in the company to Segre and his backers. Yet, Boano’s presence continued among the elite Italian coachbuilders, and it is no surprise that Pinin Farina chose Boano to execute the first design, which he created for series production for Ferrari. It was with Batista “Pinin” Farina that Boano first gained coachbuilding experience, and it was Boano whom Farina chose as one of the small cadre who followed him when he left Stabilimenti Farina to set up his own namesake firm. A few years later, Farina became one of the F.M. Boano Company’s first clients when Boano, in turn, set out on his own. Boano’s steady, long-term view was evident, as he began to teach his son, Gian Paolo, the family craft. Gian Paolo studied at the Liceo Artistico and then apprenticed in the classic style of skilled artisans at his father’s company. His ideas carried many of the characteristics of contemporary American design, yet they had been softened and refined with Italian style and flair. It is no surprise that, as Boano was on his own, he kept his son on as a full-fledged counterpart and collaborator. “IS THIS THE NEXT LINCOLN?” After World War II, Henry Ford II took control of the Ford Motor Company, and he began mentoring projects to bring Ford’s design into the modern era. His interest in European design was well-known, and numerous Italian coachbuilders dreamed of securing a lucrative contract with Ford. Boano was no exception, but he had a secret weapon, an “inside man,” who ended up being a friend that just happened to work for Ford. As the tale is told, the friend said that if Boano would create a dramatic, exciting, and futuristic design on a Ford Motor Company chassis, the friend would serve as a go-between and introduce it to Ford management. Boano agreed, took up a Lincoln chassis, and gave it to his son, who embarked on a fast-track project to complete the car in time for display at the 1955 Turin International Automobile Show, which was, at the time, the preeminent showcase for Italian coachbuilders. The Indianapolis was a typical Italian coachbuilder’s project of the era, as it began with little more than some large-scale sketches, a chassis, sheet metal, and tubing. Boano gave it an extended nose, which had no visible cooling air intake and was flanked by vertical quad headlights. The front fenders reached back into the doors, to end in three shrouded chromed faux exhaust pipes, which were balanced by tall air intakes in the forward edges of the rear fenders and five chromed exhaust splitters. The front wheels nearly disappeared under the orange flow of the fenders, and the wraparound windshield was complemented by a huge rear window that had streamlined C-pillars in the roof. Its body was finished in a bright shade of orange—all the better to draw eyes in a show crowded with coachbuilt confections—and it had an interior that was patterned in checkered black and white cloth, in a nod to the famous “checkered flag.” The completed Indianapolis was every bit the showstopper that Boano had dreamed it would be, even garnering a cover feature in the November 1955 issue of Auto Age magazine, which asked, “Is This the Next Lincoln?” In what must have been a glorious moment for the Boano family, they were offered a contract by Ford, but in a rather odd move, Mario Boano let the offer be known to Fiat, becoming the lever that moved Fiat to commit to establishing their Centro Stile Department and the Boanos as its leaders. As a result, rather than taking up the Ford contract for which they had worked, the Boanos parried it into a new business, running Fiat’s first in-house styling department. With all the sound and fury done, the Indianapolis itself seemed to have been left behind in the fray. THE BOANO EXCLUSIVE STUDY Following its appearance at Turin, the Indianapolis was shipped to the United States and consigned not to Ford Motor Company but directly to Henry Ford II. The car’s history in his hands is not known; however, persistent “word of mouth” suggests that he eventually gave it to his friend, famous swashbuckling actor Errol Flynn. Reportedly, it was later shown in Boston, Massachusetts, where it sustained damage to the interior. In the 1960s, the car was acquired from an owner in Boston by Felix Duclos, of Manchester, New Hampshire. It sat, unrestored, until 1972. At this time, it passed through a series of short-time East Coast owners and then joined the important collection of Thomas Kerr, who, after acquiring some parts from previous owners, stored it for nearly 20 years, as his personal passion for 1930s Packards took precedence. Eventually Kerr came to recognize the car’s importance, and he handed it over to his favored restorer, Jim Cox, to be returned back to “the way Gian Paolo Boano would have built in 1955, had he had the time.” The work took over two years to complete, and the result remains breathtaking, as the car is finished in its original nuclear shade of orange, with the correct, eye-popping “checkered” interior. The instruments and power steering, which were originally nonfunctional, were rebuilt to working order. The restoration was extensively covered in Automobile Quarterly, Vol. 41, No. 3, in a feature by the legendary Beverly Rae Kimes, who, as Cox’s wife, had first-hand experience with the work. The completed restoration marked the beginning of the Indianapolis’s return to the show circuit, after nearly 50 years. As the car was forgotten by many, it astonished at its debut at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2001, where it completed the Tour d’Elegance and won top honors in the Postwar Custom Coachwork class. It continued to garner awards at the Amelia Island Concours, the Burn Prevention Foundation Concours, and the Bethlehem Concours, as well as at Greenwich in 2003, where it received the Most Outstanding Lincoln award. In the Andrews’s ownership, the Indianapolis made a grand reappearance at the Pebble Beach Concours in 2013, where it again completed the tour and this time won the Lincoln Trophy. This was a significant honor, as this was the year in which the Lincoln was a featured marque at Pebble Beach and the finest examples of all eras could be found lining the coast of Monterey. Today, the Boano Indianapolis stands as one of the most creative, imaginative, and unrestrained designs from a golden age of Italian coachwork. Gian Paolo Boano’s sole purpose was to attract attention with it, and a half century after it was built, it still does exactly that. Its charm and appeal is accentuated by its restoration, which does things “right” rather than resorting to the whimsical expediency that accompanied Boano’s five-month odyssey from sketch to finished object. This car is flamboyant, exuberant, enthusiastic, and fanciful. It is eye candy, a feast of details, and a feat of unbridled creativity. Chassis no. 55WA10902

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1957 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension and coil-spring single-point swing axle rear suspension, and servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Proudly offered by its owner of 40 years Driven and enjoyed over 100,000 happy miles Extensively documented, with its original engine One of a handful originally finished in Strawberry The beloved possession of an enthusiast Certain cars and their owners do not need a writer to tell their story. They tell it themselves, better than anyone else, as they know one another better than anyone else could. It is the symbiotic relationship between man and machine, in which each is taught and learns to love the other’s idiosyncrasies over decades spent together on twisting roads and wide-open highways. On the lakeside roads in the industrial town of Sarnia, Ontario, a lifelong enthusiast can be found behind the wheel of his 300 SL Roadster. It is one of the few original 300 SLs to be found “north of the border,” and it is perhaps the last that is still regularly used and enjoyed. For nearly 40 years, through two restorations and over 100,000 miles, Bill Martin and his Roadster have always been on the road to some new adventure. In the fifties, I used to go to Elkhart Lake to the races, and of course I saw people racing Gullwings and Roadsters, but I didn’t have any money in those days. I sold my business in 1975, and in 1976, I went sort-of looking for a car. I had called Gullwing Service in Boston, and they had a Roadster but said it wasn’t very good. One of the classic mistakes of my life was when they said they had an aluminum Gullwing there, with the NSL engine and all that, and they wanted a grand less than $30,000. I had the money but said no. I figured that if I paid $30,000, I’d have to buy my wife a new kitchen! Shortly thereafter, I went to Carlisle with a friend of mine, and this car was there. The guy wanted $11,000 and turned down my offer of $9,000. When I got home the phone was ringing, and they had accepted the offer. I went down to Baltimore, Maryland, and picked it up on the side of the road. Even though it had a blown head gasket, I drove it home to Sarnia and soon began taking it apart. It took me about 10 years to get it all back together. I researched the car’s history and know it back to the time it was purchased by Rooster Bush, who was the largest Oldsmobile dealer in the United States, operating out of a town called Lenore in North Carolina. He was a great guy. He had seen the car at an auction sale for a Studebaker dealership in Charlotte and bought it out of their basement for, I think, $2,000. His daughter, who now runs the family dealership selling Buicks, wanted a Corvette instead, so he kept the car for about 10 years before he sold it. I have never been able to find out the original owner, but the rumor was that it had been owned by a general and titled in a woman’s name. At the time I restored it the first time, I had a great friend in Detroit, Lynn Yakel, who was one of the earliest members of the Gull Wing Group and had a barn full of cars and parts. His wife, Roberta, was an engineer at Ford and had her own white Gullwing. I could call Lynn and he would know every part on the car by part number, and he hardly had to look in the book! Myself, the Yakels, Mark Dutton with his Roadster, and Gordon Black with his Gullwing from Ohio, once headed for California. You know, you kind of observe the speed limit until you get to St. Louis, and then you get the urge to go a little faster. We got to a place called Tucumcari, west of Oklahoma City, where we stopped for lunch and then headed for the Gull Wing Group’s convention, which was being held north of Albuquerque. We were running at about 110 mph when we got behind an ambulance and he wouldn’t move over. Two semis passed by, also going about 110 mph! We thought, what the hell, we’ll pass on the right! The ambulance driver was furious. We wound up doing about 170 miles in two hours and figured we would at least have a lot of company if we went to jail. Now that I think about it, we did 170 miles in two hours a few more times! We once ran into a state trooper who saw us coming over a hill, and then, when we saw him later at a gas station, the attendant told us, “He’s unhappy because he can’t catch you. They took away his big engine!” They were great trips, every one of them. My wife preferred to fly, and that’s okay, because when you travel like that, we would go for an hour or two without a break, running at 100 to 110 mph, it was great to be with people who all thought along the same lines, and you don’t need to be with someone who’s not happy with the way that you’re driving—it just destroys the whole trip. Far, far better to go alone. I have driven the car at least 100,000 miles. I do most of the repair work myself, good or bad. I’ve driven to California two times in the last 10 years, and both times the speedometer cable broke on the return trip. But I have tools, and I have spares, so I am not afraid to hit the road. There are likely 3,000 Gullwings and Roadsters, but I doubt if over 100 of them are still driven on a regular basis, and I am probably one of the last owners who does his own maintenance, so this is sort of the end of an era. I feel that I’ve been there, done that, and at 78, the time has come to sell it. It’s been enjoyable; in fact, it’s been amazing. Here is an opportunity to acquire an incredible 300 SL Roadster that is important not for its awards or its laurels but for the man who has owned and loved it for most of its life. Its history is engrained in every one of those 100,000 amazing miles. Addendum Please note that this car is matching numbers and the title is in transit. Chassis no. 198.042.7500552 Engine no. 198.980.7500661 Body no. 198.042.7500476

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1933 Auburn Twelve Custom Speedster

The enduring design legacy of styling genius Alan Leamy Original, authentic, and matching numbers Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club Category One certification A multiple-concours-award winner It is said that a great artist never becomes truly famous until after his death. That is certainly true of Alan Leamy, of the Auburn Automobile Company. When Leamy passed away in 1935, he left behind 33 brief years of startling innovation in body contours—a portfolio that was appreciated in his time, but it never became legendary until decades later. The lines he created matched the man in personality. Formerly of Marmon, he had achieved his job at Auburn by sending a letter to E.L. Cord, offering his services, and he soon impressed his way into a studio. He was boisterous and a lady’s man; he was a true-blue car guy, and he had an eye for simple elegance. Leamy’s finest design at Auburn was the company’s second generation “boattail” speedster. The original model, introduced in 1928, had been a smash sensation, with its angled door lines, two-tone color scheme, and swept-back pointed tail that practically commanded the owner to test its 100 mph top speed. Leamy’s successor model featured more rounded, graceful lines with a blunted tail, creating a sensuous curve that wrapped around the rear of the car. Character lines through the hood provided a natural place to divide color schemes, as they traced the “vee” of the windshield. Most prominently and famously, Leamy made no attempt to hide the length of the Auburn’s hood, using the stretch of painted metal to emphasize the Lycoming power beneath it. It was Art Deco at its technical best. The speedster body was offered on eight- and twelve-cylinder chassis. Naturally, it was the Twelve that became the prestige item. The price was slightly higher in Custom trim, which added chrome sidelights, headlights, and taillights; wire wheels; and the “Dancing Lady” hood ornament. Nonetheless, it was an astonishing performance bargain for an automobile. Nonetheless, it was not abundant power that made the Auburn Twelve Speedster an icon of its age, it was Alan Leamy, the man who made beauty out of a beast. The present owner acquired this Speedster as a restoration project from the late David Robinson, of Massachusetts. Importantly, it was accompanied by a 1936 New York State registration, dated May 27th, recording this Auburn, chassis number 2119E, as being in the ownership of Theodore Kilpert, of Jamaica, New York. As “E” was the prefix used by Auburn to identify speedster chassis, the registration was an important suggestion that this was an original, accurate car. A later transfer of the title document records Kilpert as having sold the car to Pye’s Motor Sales, of Frankfort, New York, in 1963. Three years later, Everett Pye joined the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, noting that he was “an Auburn fancier, having two convertibles and a speedster.” When he died in 1994, the Speedster was stored inside an old school bus, from which it would eventually be retrieved and sold to Mr. Robinson. Its image would be etched on Mr. Pye’s gravestone. Auburn produced only 20 Eight and Twelve Speedsters of all types, including the Standard, Custom, and Salon models, in 1933. Even with the possession of a 1936 registration and this car’s known, long-term history, it was very important that the Speedster’s authenticity be established without a shadow of a doubt, and for that, the owner turned to the experts. During the Auburn’s restoration, it was submitted to the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club for certification as a Category One car, meaning that it retains a body, engine, frame, and all other major components of the same model series. Happily, the certification report, which is available for inspection, notes not only that all of the parts in this car are of the correct model series, but also that the engine, frame, and body all belong to this very Auburn. “This is an original factory-built speedster on the original speedster chassis,” noted Certification Supervisor Paul Bryant. “All numbers match!” Writing to the owner later, Bryant noted that the production tally of 12-161A Speedsters in 1933 amounted to only three cars, two in January and one in April. The original wood sill found in this car, stamped U47-108, indicates that this particular car was the eighth body produced in 1933, and that it was one of the two Speedsters assembled in January. With confirmation of the Speedster’s originality, its rebirth to concours condition continued. The Auburn was disassembled down to the last nut and bolt, with each component identified, cleaned, and then carefully inspected before being restored to the highest standards of fit, function, and finish. Any imperfections in the bodywork were remedied, and hundreds of hours were dedicated to careful block sanding and preparation for painting. The finish, a bold combination of Cord Red and Yellow, was color-sanded and buffed, to provide a superior shine and quality finish. While the drivetrain was complete, every component was completely and mechanically rebuilt and cosmetically refurbished. An intensive program of research was undertaken, ensuring that each detail was faithful to the original materials and finish. The interior trim and upholstery are identical in their form and pattern to the originals, and the top and upholstery were painstakingly cut and fitted to match the original pattern. Each instrument was restored, and a new wiring harness was fabricated for the complete car. Each light, bezel, and lens was carefully rebuilt and reinstalled. The completed restoration has been proudly shown all over the country. It earned class awards at the ACD Club National Reunion in 2000 and 2002, as well as at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance during the special Auburn Cord Duesenberg feature year of 2007. In 2009, it was recognized as the American Best in Show at the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance, followed by a win of Best in Class at the Concours d’Elegance of America at St. John’s in 2011, proving that the restoration has only become better with age. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, but in the final analysis, it is the original that everyone wants. Presented here is an Auburn Twelve Speedster with matching numbers, bearing ACD Club Category One certification without excuses, and it has been exquisitely restored without object to cost. Chassis no. 2119E Engine no. BB 1901 Body no. U47-108

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
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1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports Saloon by H.J. Mulliner

178 bhp, 4,887 cc overhead inlet and side exhaust valve inline six-cylinder engine with twin SU carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with open helical springs and hydraulic shock dampers, semi-elliptic rear suspension with controllable hydraulic shock dampers, and servo-assisted hydraulic front and mechanical rear brakes. Wheelbase: 120 in. The 1953 Geneva Salon show car Factory “seats and spats,” with manual gearbox Numerous bespoke special-order items Original engine and factory tool set Rolls-Royce Enthusiasts' Club documentation THE R-TYPE CONTINENTAL: “A MODERN MAGIC CARPET” In the early 1930s, Rolls-Royce began to experiment with aerodynamic designs, often based on the chassis of the Bentley, “The Silent Sports Car.” After World War II, streamlined prewar prototypes such as the Mk II (“Scalded Cat”) and Corniche were revisited, and H.I.F. Evernden and H.J. Mulliner designer J.P. Blatchley conspired to create a lightweight, aerodynamic Bentley capable of carrying four adults in the highest comfort. They aimed “to produce a car which would not only look beautiful but possess a high maximum speed, coupled with a correspondingly high rate of acceleration, together with excellent handling and roadability.” Body, window, and seat frames would be built of light alloy, resulting in a four-place body that weighed only 750 pounds, less than 4,000 pounds together with the chassis. Frame, suspension, steering, and brake components were shared with the Mark VI series and the later standard R-Type, with final modifications and tuning at the Rolls-Royce Lille Hall service depot in Earls Court, London. While coachbuilt bodies were being built and fitted, Bentley representatives reportedly visited the panel-beaters, ensuring that all work was being done in a workmanlike manner, and Bentley Motors thoroughly tested and inspected the cars prior to delivery to their original owners. The resulting R-Type Continental, the first production Bentley to wear that now-famous name, is perhaps the most desirable postwar Bentley, combining superior performance with glorious design and advanced aerodynamics. Memorably described by Autocar as being “a modern magic carpet, annihilating great distances,” it was best remembered with the streamlined H.J. Mulliner bodywork that Blatchley had originally penned for the chassis. This streamlined fastback Sports Saloon became the iconic coachwork for the R-Type Continental, and of the 207 chassis built between May 1952 and April 1955, 193 were bodied by Mulliner. CHASSIS NUMBER BC20A The R-Type Continental was produced in five series, A through E, with the A cars representing the earliest and purest version of the design. Chassis number BC20A was the 19th car produced in the A series, and therefore, the 19th R-Type Continental produced. (Superstitious in the charming way that British automakers often are, Bentley skipped chassis number 13.) Original build information supplied by the Rolls-Royce Enthusiasts' Club, copies of which are on file, record this car’s well-equipped custom specification. Like most of the Mulliner fastbacks, it was equipped with full “spats” over the rear wheels; desirably, it was also equipped with the lightweight adjustable seats, making it one of the rare early “seats and spats” examples. Other special-ordered equipment included flashing-type turn indicators with amber glasses, double-filament headlamps with convex lenses, high-frequency horns with a muting switch, a speedometer in kilometers, and two fog lamps! Heavier front shock dampers and a special steering gear were specified, to improve handling, and a 17-inch high-speed engine fan and unique radiator were ordered to improve cooling. A radio was fitted; this was included in the R-Type Continental’s standard price, but in an effort to save weight, would only be installed at the owner’s request. According to the RREC, the car was shown at the Geneva Salon in the spring of 1953, shortly after its delivery on February 19th to Louis Schneiter, Esq., a resident of Villa “Bois-Fleuri” in Coffet, Vaud, Switzerland. It remained in Europe until January 1, 1960, and was then acquired by its first American owner, Lamont Haggarty. Eventually the car was acquired by the late Anthony “Bud” Korteweg of River Edge, New Jersey, founder of The Coachworks, a well-regarded Rolls-Royce and Bentley restoration facility that won numerous awards over the years in national competition. He remains the only person to have won the Rolls-Royce Owners Club Best in Show award three times. A man who believed in what he restored, Mr. Korteweg collected Rolls-Royce and Bentley himself, eventually amassing seven well-kept automobiles in the imposing Tudor-style garage of his home. The R-Type Continental was completely restored from the wheels up to its original appearance in Mr. Korteweg’s capable care, and it was the final automobile restored for his personal use. Not merely a well-kept show car, this R-Type Continental is also a splendid driver. Recently test-driven by an RM Auctions specialist, it was reported to “idle smoothly, with a soft burbling exhaust note at speed, with brakes that work well. It rides and handles as well as any automobile I have ever been inside!” Offered with original tools and owner’s manual, it remains the perfect high-speed tour car for today, a testament to the greatness of the Bentley tradition. Offered today as it stood at Geneva in 1953, this car assures its next owner of many proud years of ownership, as well as invitations to the most prestigious car events and concours in the world—events that can be reached quite swiftly and comfortably behind the wheel of the original Continental. Chassis no. BC20A Engine no. BCA19

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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