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2006 Ferrari FXX Evoluzione

860 bhp, 6,262 cc DOHC V-12 engine with four valves per cylinder, Bosch Motronic ME7 integrated digital electronic fuel-injection, F1-type coiled sump lubrication, six-speed paddle-shift F1-style transmission, four-wheel independent front and rear suspension with wishbones, coil springs, anti-roll bar and telescopic dampers, and carbon ceramic brakes with anti-lock. Wheelbase: 104.3" • Ferrari's most exclusive, highest-performance production car; one of only 30 built • Just one owner from new; always kept at the Ferrari factory’s Corse Clienti department • Factory-equipped with Evoluzione upgrades to 860 bhp; stunning colour combination Although he had many sports car-building philosophies, Enzo Ferrari’s ultimate legacy is perhaps his simplest: for a machine to best reward its driver by providing tactile feedback and blistering performance on the open road, it must have a direct link to its racing heritage. Ferrari’s Enzo It was fitting, then, that the engineers at Ferrari chose Enzo himself as the namesake for their most ambitious and advanced project ever: a high-performance, 12-cylinder, mid-engine Berlinetta so closely linked to the automaker's success in Formula One racing that it could be called a competition car for the street. Wrapped in angular Pininfarina-penned bodywork aimed more at aerodynamics than impressing show-goers, although it manages to do that, too, the Ferrari Enzo boasts technology lifted directly from the company's Formula One efforts. Building on four consecutive years of Formula One World Championships, Ferrari transitioned away from the approach it had taken with the GTO, F40 and F50 that came before it. Pininfarina was commissioned to create an angular, aerodynamic shape that would inspire future high performance Ferraris. The Enzo clearly departs from the flamboyance of the F50, the aero-inspired wedge profile of the F40 and the voluptuous curves of the GTO. It stands on its own, yet it is uniquely Ferrari and clearly linked to the latest Formula One race cars. Ferrari's engineers sought to create a driving experience and interface inextricably connected to the Formula One cars then driven by Michael Schumacher. With a top speed of 350 km/h (217 mph), it was essential that the Enzo's aerodynamics keep it properly planted to the road. Ferrari Gestione Sportiva, the automaker's competition arm, sought a high degree of downforce that would still offer flexibility for the numerous driving conditions that production Enzos would encounter. Unlike a dedicated Formula One race car, the Enzo would not come with a dedicated pit crew to help optimise the car for differing road conditions. Thus, the engineers created a series of active mechanical spoilers that would automatically engage at certain speeds and work directly with the Enzo's three-mode stability control system for maximum grip at all speeds. The Enzo's 12-cylinder engine heralded a new generation of flagship powertrains for Ferraris. Ostensibly based on the architecture of the award-winning and highly-vaunted V-8 that powers the Maserati Quattroporte, the V-12 nonetheless proved its merit on its own. The cylinder head, with its pentroof-like combustion chamber and four valves per cylinder, is clearly derived from the company's Formula One technologies. Meanwhile, the Enzo's V-12 uses a wraparound lubrication sump that incorporates the main bearings and a specific oil recovery circuit to increase lubrication efficiency. Bosch Motronic ME7 engine management helps produce an impressive 110 bhp per litre from the 6.0-litre V-12. For drivers, however, one of the most obvious Formula One connections is the car's gearbox. The semi-automatic F1 transmission tells its drivers when to select gears, thanks to LED lamps mounted on the steering wheel. Although some owners complained of “abrupt” shifting during “normal” driving, the transmission's 150 millisecond gear changes earned it a solid reputation on the track. The blistering Enzo would prove to be the gateway into a much more advanced series of engineering projects. Fully living up to Enzo's mantra, the sports car named after him has spawned a handful of variations aimed at enhancing the automaker's performance development credentials. The FXX Project Using the Enzo as its base, the FXX took the concept to another level. Just 30 were built, each kept under Ferrari's close supervision and sold only to owners who would use them at select race tracks carefully selected by the automaker. Powered by an up-rated 6.3-litre variant of the V-12 that powered the standard Enzo, the FXX was rated at 790 horsepower, and its upgraded aerodynamics package increased the top speed to 227 mph. To best take control of the power, the FXX utilised an even faster-shifting Formula One transmission aimed solely at closed course use. From Ferrari's standpoint, the FXX's most important technological innovation was its integrated data monitoring telemetry. The 30 FXX “test subjects”, including Michael Schumacher himself, were undoubtedly delighted to be included in Ferrari's product- development process. Nearly 40,000 kilometres of closed course use were logged during the FXX research period. Perhaps the best display of the FXX’s performance potential was on the UK-based television series Top Gear, where Schumacher’s own car virtually shattered the existing lap records, held by such cars as the Gumpert Apollo, Koenigsegg CCX, Pagani Zonda and others, with a stunning lap time of 1 minute and 10.7 seconds, making it the fastest car to ever lap the show’s test track in its history. The FXX Evoluzione Yet, the FXX only proved a stepping stone to the most aggressive production Ferrari ever delivered to consumers: the FXX Evoluzione. Ferrari integrated everything it learned during the FXX project into the FXX Evoluzione. Never before was Ferrari's street car development so integrated with its competition department. The second generation Evoluzione version is Ferrari's most advanced GT car ever, built with an 860 horsepower V-12, a sequential gearbox that can perform shifts in just 60 milliseconds and a curb weight of just over 2,500 pounds. The FXX Evoluzione goes from zero to 60 in 2.8 seconds – an extraordinary, virtually unbeatable time. Virtually no part of the FXX has been left untouched by the Evoluzione kit. Changes start in the engine bay, where the 6.3-litre V-12 engine now develops a staggering 860 horsepower at 9500 rpm, 1000 rpm higher than before. Shifts are even faster at 60 milliseconds, versus 80 milliseconds for the old gearbox, and new gear ratios have been optimised for the new state of engine tune. A new traction-control system also has been developed, which offers the driver on-the-fly adjustment through nine different settings, all controlled via a switch on the centre console. The system was designed to be more responsive to individual driving style, allowing the car to adapt to the driver rather than vice versa. Ferrari says another advantage to the redesigned traction control, when paired with new front suspension geometry, is decreased tyre wear. The Brembo brakes and composite ceramic material discs have also been redesigned to double pad life. The last big-ticket change is to the bodywork of the FXX. The Evoluzione kit adds a new rear diffuser and rear flaps, which increases aerodynamic efficiency by 25 percent, as well as rear downforce, both good ideas on a car capable of exceeding 200 mph. The FXX Evoluzione on offer is a one-owner example from new, and it has received the Evo factory upgrade. Used only at the Ferrari FXX-specific events and for the rest of the time, it has been kept at the Corse Clienti department of the Ferrari factory. Finished in black and fittingly accented by the Italian ‘Tricolore’ on the nose and rear of the car, this FXX has never been crashed or damaged, and it is accompanied at auction with a number of selected spares. In short, as offered, this stellar, one-owner FXX Evoluzione affords its fortunate next owner the unbelievably rare opportunity to join the limited roster of FXX owners – surely an opportunity unlikely to reoccur anytime soon. Chassis no. 145766

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
Show price

Ex-automobile de Froilan Gonzalez & Pierre Levegh,

Ex-automobile de Froilan Gonzalez & Pierre Levegh, engagée 4 fois aux 24 Heures du Mans TALBOT-LAGO BARQUETTE T26GS CARROSSERIE PAR DUGARREAU Année : 1951 Châssis No. : 110056 Moteur No. : 45160 Moteur : 6 cylindres en ligne, deux arbres à cames implantés haut et inclinés, commandant poussoirs et culbuteurs, chambres de combustion hémisphérique, double allumage, triple carburateurs, 4.482 cm3, 215 CV à 5.000 tr/min ; Boîte de vitesses : boîte à présélection Wilson à 4 rapports ; Suspensions : indépendantes avec ressorts à lames transversaux, et triangles rigides avec amortisseurs hydrauliques à l'avant, ressorts à lames semi elliptiques avec amortisseurs hydrauliques à l'arrière ; Freins : 4 tambours Lockheed à commande hydraulique. Couleur : Bleu course France ; Volant à droite. Histoire du modèle Peu d'automobiles ont été aussi versatiles et n'ont eu une aussi longue vie et une aussi brillante carrière en compétition que cette légendaire T26C d'Anthony Lago. Dans sa forme monoplace, l'automobile collectionna les victoires en Grand Prix pendant 6 ans dans le monde entier, remportant une poignée de points dans le championnat du monde de Formule 1. Encore plus remarquable est le fait qu'avec la carrosserie deux places dite barquette, dénommée T26GS, la même automobile remporta les 24 Heures du Mans 1950, un véritable exploit. L'aspect sans doute le plus remarquable de cette histoire des Talbot-Lago vient du fait qu'au cours de leurs carrières, ces automobiles furent plutôt surprenantes, fonctionnant avec une technologie à la fois innovante mais d'avant guerre, en théorie assez dépourvues face à des écuries plus riches et plus importantes. Il s'agit d'un conte fascinant, d'une détermination souvent acharnée qui permit à la marque de remporter de tels succès, dont le plus remarquable fut la victoire de Louis Rosier au Mans en 1950, ayant conduit tout seul pendant 24 heures mis à part 20 minutes. L'histoire de la fabuleuse T26C débuta au milieu des années 1930, lorsqu'Anthony Lago, un résident français, italien de naissance, rejoignit le consortium Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq au Royaume Uni. Doté d'une expérience acquise à l'époque chez Isotta Faschini, chez LAP Engineering et par la suite chez le fabriquant de boîtes de vitesses à présélection Wilson en tant que directeur général, son rôle chez Sunbeam aboutit au fait que les automobiles portaient son nom. Première étape marquante il réussit à ressusciter l'usine Talbot de Suresnes à partir des cendres de la banqueroute en Angleterre en 1935 de Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq et de Roost. Pour réussir à reconstruire la marque Talbot, il dessina à partir des meilleurs aspects existants, une gamme de modèles plutôt raisonnables, équipée de suspensions avant indépendantes et d'un moteur 6 cylindres. Il chargea son designer Walter Bechia, ancien responsable du design à l'époque des heures de gloire de Fiat en compétition, d'équiper le moteur 6 cylindres d'une culasse avec un arbre à cames incliné, d'un vilebrequin à 7 paliers, d'une cylindrée de 4 litres produisant une puissance de 160 CV à son maximum. Le calendrier de ce projet se combina avec la décision de la France de soutenir les automobiles de Grand Prix à la suite de leur écrasante défaite en face des Mercedes. Ainsi en mai 1936, Talbot était de retour en compétition. Ils engagèrent deux automobiles aux 3 Heures de Marseille, la nouvelle écurie étant dirigée par René Dreyfus en personne, débauché de la Scuderia Ferrari afin qu'il dirige l'écurie et pilote une auto. Après quelques soucis de jeunesse, la nouvelle automobile commença à faire ses preuves. En 1937, elle remporta 4 des 7 courses disputées, avec des 1e, 2e et 3e places lors du très plaisant second Grand Prix de France pour automobiles de sport. Une nouvelle formule de GP fut lancée en 1938, autorisant des automobiles équipées de 3 litres avec compresseur ou de 4,5 litres atmosphériques. Le destin voulut alors que le retour aux GP et l'arrivée des imbattables Mercedes à compresseurs valut à l'écurie allemande les 3 premières places au GP de France cette année là. Mais signe annonciateur de ce qui allait se produire, une Talbot isolée, presque une automobile de route sans ses équipements, termina 4e. Par la suite, une automobile similaire remporta les 12 Heures de Paris. Le projet compétition commença alors à prendre de la vitesse et ce peu de temps avant que les ancêtres de la T26C ne voient le jour. Sous une forte pression financière, la nouveauté n'était sans doute pas le meilleur le qualificatif pour décrire la monoplace, surtout qu'elle utilisait une version très proche du châssis des modèles de sport plus anciens, des poutres en acier embouti, des caissons avec des tubes croisés. L'arrière de l'automobile était suspendu avec des ressorts à lames semi elliptiques tandis qu'à l'avant le schéma des ressorts à lames transversaux fut employé avec l'addition de bras supérieurs en acier chromé pivotant sur une plaque sur le dessus du châssis avec des amortisseurs combinés hydrauliques et à friction Newton-Bennett. Les freins commandés mécaniquement par des câbles Bendix étaient équipés de tambours en alliage de gros diamètres avec des prises d'air destinées à améliorer leur refroidissement. Le moteur possédait maintenant une culasse et un bloc en alliage léger, équipé de triples carburateurs Zeniths-Stromberg avec une seule bougie par cylindre, tournant à un taux de compression de 10 :1 qui développait une puissance de 210 CV à 4.500 tr/min. Une pompe de lubrification, type carter sec, était utilisée avec une bâche installée sous les genoux du pilote avec des refroidisseurs à ailettes installés face à des trappes d'ouverture sur la carrosserie. La boîte de vitesses Wilson occupait la plupart de la place restant dans le cockpit tandis que l'arbre de transmission était installé à l'extérieur de l'automobile ce qui permettait une position de conduite assez basse. L'automobile était habillée élégamment avec une carrosserie reprenant les formes communes à beaucoup d'automobiles de compétition d'avant guerre. La nouvelle monoplace fit sa première apparition à Reims avec Raymond Mays au volant, qui abandonna sans gloire en raison d'une fente au réservoir. L'impression était probablement favorable quand même en raison des freins et des suspensions jugés excellents. C'est alors que survint la guerre, ce qui empêcha de procéder aux développements ultérieurs. En hommage à son amour de l'automobile et de la compétition, la France fut l'un des premiers pays à reprendre la compétition après la guerre, 3 semaines après la fin des hostilités dans un lieu public : le Bois de Boulogne. Raymond Sommer, Coeur de Lion, termina deuxième derrière Wimille sur Bugatti, offrant un aperçu du futur que les Talbot-Lago allaient rencontrer. Les succès arrivèrent progressivement pour ces automobiles, jusqu'à la victoire de Chiron lors du premier GP d'après guerre en 1947. Peu de temps après cette victoire, l'usine laissa échapper quelques indiscrétions au sujet d'une auto de Grand Prix. Après des années d'une nomenclature compliquée, les nouvelles monoplaces de Grand Prix allaient au final être dénommées Talbot-Lago, portant finalement à la bonne place le nom d'Anthony. Vingt exemplaires furent planifiés et fort de ses récents succès, les carnets de commande se remplirent rapidement. En 1948, la réglementation donna naissance au premier Grands Prix de Formule 1, les courses de voiturettes devenant alors la Formule 2. La F1 autorisait des automobiles 4,5 litres sans compresseur ou 1,5 litre compresseur, une sorte de règle globale englobant à la fois les catégories italiennes, anglaises aussi bien que françaises. La nouvelle Talbot-Lago représentait une étape en avant comparée à ses prédécesseurs, surtout en matière de mécanique avec ce moteur qui était maintenant une version double arbres à cames du moteur précédent 6 cylindres des modèles de sport, avec une implantation haute des arbres à cames dans le carter commandant des soupapes inclinées à 95 degrés les unes des autres et des chambres de combustion hémisphériques, des poussoirs courts et des culbuteurs de chaque côté. Equipée aussi de soupapes larges cette configuration permettait une carburation performante, favorisée par un nouveau montage d'une prise d'air extérieure. Le moteur possédait encore le même vilebrequin à 7 paliers, empêchant la dilatation à l'arrière mais avec un taux de compression de 8:1 et une puissance de 240CV. L'ensemble était équipé d'une boîte de vitesses à présélection Wilson à 4 rapports, permettant au pilote de garder les mains sur le volant, pouvant ainsi mieux se consacrer au freinage. L'arbre de transmission était maintenant installé à l'extérieur ce qui permettait une position du pilote plus basse dans le châssis, sous la ligne de transmission tandis que son arrivée au pont arrière était aussi décalée. La configuration arrière restait la même, l'ultime amélioration étant l'adoption de freins Lockheed avec des tambours de 40 cm. La position plus basse du pilote rendait l'automobile plus aérodynamique avec des lignes plus ramassées pour la carrosserie avec une grille de calandre frontale plus large. Peu de temps après, la première automobile entra en action avant qu'elle ne fasse ses débuts à Monaco avec Louis Rosier qui dut abandonner après 16 tours sur problème moteur. Progressivement, les trois Talbot-Lago ainsi qu'une paire de plus anciennes furent rejointes par deux nouveaux modèles livrés à Etancelin et à " Raph " et c'est alors qu'une série de résultats furent remportés. La coupe du Salon en 1948 à Montlhéry fut remportée par les trois Talbot-Lago de Rosier, Levegh et Cabantous. Engagées dans toutes formes d'épreuves les Talbot-Lago restèrent constantes jusqu'en 1952 lorsque le changement de la Formule 2 obligea d'autres développements, même si elles continuèrent à disputer différentes compétitions régionales jusqu'en 1956. L'endurance fut poursuivie avec des espoirs au Mans même si aucune ne réussit à renouveler l'exploit de 1950. Au total, ces remarquables automobiles avec leur couple fabuleux et leur consommation de carburant raisonnable remportèrent des victoires dans 5 Grand Prix majeurs, 9 dans des épreuves plus mineures, sans compter les résultats placés et la victoire au Mans. Ce qui est sans doute encore plus édifiant, c'est de savoir que Tony Lago se félicitait lui-même du fait qu'à une époque souvent fatale, aucun pilote n'avait perdu la vie au volant de l'une de ses autos. Cet exemplaire très rare que nous proposons à la vente fut sur le point de remporter les 24 Heures du Mans 1952, s'étant retiré à la 23e heure, alors qu'elle menait la course. Histoire spécifique de cette automobile Carrossée à l'origine (ce qui est avéré) en Formule 1, 110056 fut vendue en 1951 au pilote privé Henry Louveau qui n'eut jamais la chance de la piloter en raison d'une fin de carrière brutale aux Grand Prix de Suisse cette année où il perdit la vie. L'automobile revint chez Lago qui l'engagea dans plusieurs courses cette saison- là. La plus importante épreuve fut les 24 Heures du Mans où le fameux pilote argentin Froilan Gonzales (surnommé affectueusement le Taureau de la Pampa, pilote fréquent de la Scuderia Ferrari et vainqueur du Mans 1954) pilotait cette Talbot-Lago en tandem avec Marimon, sans parvenir à terminer. Cette même année, l'auto fut vendue à Pierre Bouillin alias "Levegh". Levegh espérait piloter 110056 au Mans 1952 mais la réglementation obligea à des carrosseries fermées et c'est pourquoi une nouvelle carrosserie fut réalisée par Dugarreau sur un dessin de Charles Deutsch. Levegh choisit des poussoirs plus légers et fit installer des carburateurs Weber en remplacement des Solex d'origine. 110056 conserva sa carrosserie les quelques saisons suivantes avant d'être acquise à la suite du terrible accident de Levegh au Mans 1955 au volant de la Mercedes-Benz, par un marchand parisien du nom de Francis Mortarini. Le marchand vendit l'automobile à Otto Zipper, une légende du sport automobile, installé à Los Angeles qui la conserva jusqu'en 1959 lorsqu'il la vendit à un anglais expatrié du nom de Bernard Benson. Ce dernier conserva 110056 jusqu'en 1973 lorsqu'il la céda à l'anglais grand passionné de Talbot et historien de la marque Anthony Blight. Petit détail savoureux, la transaction eut lieu au Mans ! Blight considérait la carrosserie barquette plus comme un obstacle qu'un avantage, et il décida alors d'équiper l'auto d'une carrosserie GP du type 1951 en vue d'utiliser 110056 lors de courses historiques mais afin de lui conserver son originalité, il conserva la carrosserie 1952 afin qu'un propriétaire ultérieur puisse éventuellement la réinstaller. Blight et son gendre Stephen Curtis pilotèrent l'automobile lors de manifestations historiques jusqu'en 1983, lorsqu'elle fut vendue par l'intermédiaire de Christian Huet au parisien Michel Seydoux qui chargea la célèbre carrosserie Lecoq de réinstaller la carrosserie fermée de 1952. Depuis Seydoux, deux autres propriétaires se sont succédés et 110056 fut exposée récemment au Concours d'élégance de Pebble Beach 2006. Résultats en compétition En accord avec l'ouvrage de référence de Pierre Abeillon concernant ces automobiles, Talbot-Lago de Course, 110056 possède cette histoire en compétition à l'époque : 1951 24 Heures du MansGonzalez MarimonAbandon Coupe du SalonGrignard2nd 1952 - Carrosserie barquette Coupe de PrintempsLeveghPas engagée Mille MigliaLeveghPas engagée 12 Heures de CasablancaLeveghAbandon Grand Prix of MonacoLeveghAbandon 24 Heures du MansLevegh MarchandAbandon Targa FlorioLeveghAbandon 9 Heures de GoodwoodLevegh EtancelinAbandon Coupe d'AutomneLevegh1er Grand Critérium de BariLeveghAbandon Coupe du SalonLeveghPas engagée 1953 24 Heures du MansLevegh Pozzi8ème 12 Heures de ReimsLevegh Meyrat Grand Prix de CaenLeveghAbandon Coupe d'AutomneLevegh1er Coupe du SalonLeveghAbandon 12 Heures de CasablancaLevegh Etancelin3ème 1954 - grille avant élargie en vue du Mans 24 Heures du MansLevegh FayenAbandon 12 Heures de ReimsLevegh FayenAbandon ZandvoortLeveghAbandon Grand Prix de la BauleLevegh11ème Coupe d'AutomneLevegh1er Coupe du SalonLevegh5ème 1955 Coupe de ParisLevegh Le récit de la performance du Mans 1952 est édifiant. Levegh prit le départ d'une façon favorable et plus le temps passait, plus Jaguar et les Ferrari se mirent à abandonner à la suite de différents problèmes ce qui bien entendu, ne manqua pas de profiter aux Talbot-Lago tonitruantes qui tirèrent ainsi leur épingle du jeu. A 2 heures de l'après-midi, après le retrait de la Gordini en tête et une panne de dynamo sur l'une des Mercedes, Levegh encore au volant, se retrouva en tête. Exténué et malgré la demande de son écurie, Levegh refusa de passer le volant et maintint sa position en tête devant une foule anxieuse de supporters, situation qu'il parvint à faire durer jusqu'à la 23e heure. C'est alors, à tout juste une heure de l'arrivée et avec 4 tours d'avance que le vilebrequin se brisa à une extrémité, contraignant 110056 à stopper la course et à voir se briser les rêves du pilote et de son pays tout entier. Evidemment le proverbe dit que pour finir premier, en premier il faut déjà finir mais Levegh et 110056 perdirent tout espoir à une heure de la fin, manquant une victoire d'un pilote en solo lors de l'une des plus prestigieuses courses automobile. En raison des causes pour lesquelles le moteur avait cassé, Levegh ne reçut pas les louanges qu'il aurait méritées et ce fut seulement après cet incident fatal qu'une rumeur largement partagée fit surface. Levegh avait senti une étrange vibration au niveau du moteur plus tôt dans la course, et donnant le meilleur de son pilotage et compte tenue de l'usure des autres participants, il fit le calcul à son avantage, de prendre soin de l'automobile plutôt que de risquer le possible manque de douceur avec la mécanique de son copilote Marchand. Sans comparaison l'histoire de Levegh et de 110056 au Mans en 1952 est peut être l'une des plus terribles désillusions sportives d'une victoire qui semblait pourtant si proche. Depuis la révision et le remontage de la carrosserie originale de 1952 par Lecoq, 110056 a été entretenue régulièrement par ses gardiens successifs. Elle a été engagée dans quelques manifestations de rétrospectives de compétition. Ne présentant aucune trace due à la compétition ni d'usure anormale, la peinture présente quelques traces mineures comme l'habitacle qui sans nul doute est dans un bon état suite à son usage en compétition pour lequel il est prévu. En décembre 2005, 110056 fut révisée complètement par Neil Davies Racing au Royaume Uni. Le moteur d'origine fut refait par des experts et passé au banc en 2004 par le célèbre spécialiste Auto Restoration en Nouvelle Zélande. Cette même société fut également chargée de construire une réplique de la boîte de vitesses à présélection Wilson sachant que plusieurs années auparavant elle avait été remplacée par une boîte moderne d'origine américaine. Après le Concours d'Elégance de Pebble Beach l'été dernier, cette boîte a été installée, révisée et réglée. Conclusion Cette Talbot-Lago représente une pièce à la fois importante de témoin de l'histoire de France de la compétition automobile. C'est la vedette aux plus importantes courses du début des années 1950. TALBOT-LAGO T26GS BARQUETTE COACHWORK BY DUGARREAU Year: 1951 Chassis No. 110056 Engine No. 45160 French racing blue with blue leather seating Engine: six cylinder in-line, inclined twin 'high' camshafts operated by pushrods and rockers, hemispherical combustion chambers, twin spark, triple carburettors, 4,482cc, 215bhp at 5,000rpm; Gearbox: four speed Wilson-type pre-selector; Suspension: front, independent by transverse leaf spring and solid top wishbones with hydraulic shock absorbers, rear, semi-elliptic leaf springs with hydraulic shock absorbers; Brakes: four wheel Lockheed hydraulic drum. Left hand drive. Model History There can be very few cars claiming such versatile, long lived and successful racing careers as Antony Lago's legendary T26C. In single seater form, for six years the cars amassed victories in Grands Prix across the globe, including scoring a handful of Formula 1 World Championship points. Even more remarkable is the fact that with the mere adjustment to two seater bodywork (then called T26GS), the same car won at Le Mans in 1950 - a huge achievement. Perhaps the most compelling aspect of the Talbot-Lago story is the fact that throughout their careers these cars were very much the underdogs, running with innovative but generally pre-war technology and with the barest funding in the face of competition from well-funded and far larger organisations. It is a fascinating tale, often of grim determination, that brought the marque its success, and one that can probably best be summed up by the fact that when ace team driver Louis Rosier won Le Mans in 1950, he did so having driven for all but 20 minutes of the 24 hour race! The story of the great T26C began in the mid-1930s, when Antony Lago, a French resident though Italian by birth, joined the Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq concern in the UK. With engineering experience gained from his time at Isotta Fraschini in London, LAP Engineering and later at the Wilson Self-Changing Gear Co. as general manager, his role at Sunbeam led to the cars that would wear his name. The first step to this came when he was able to resuscitate the Suresnes-based Talbot factory from the ashes of the collapse of Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq and the Rootes Group takeover of 1935. In setting to rebuild the Talbot marque, he drew on the best aspects of the existing, rather staid product range, being their independent front suspension and their six cylinder engine. He set his chief designer, Walter Becchia, the designer responsible for FIAT's great racing days, to equip the six cylinder engine with an inclined overhead valve head which, with seven bearings and four litres, produced a resilient unit with 160bhp on tap. The timing of this combined neatly with France's decision to favour sports cars over grand prix cars after their overwhelming defeat by the Mercedes, so by May 1936 Talbot was back on the racing scene. They fielded two cars at the Marseilles 3 hours, the new équipe being led by none other than Rene Dreyfus, extracted from the Scuderia Ferrari to manage and drive for them. After a few teething troubles the new sports car proved successful and in 1937 they won four of seven races, with the 1-2-3 finish in that year's second French Grand Prix for sports cars being particularly pleasing. 1938 saw a new Grand Prix formula introduced, permitting up to 3 litre supercharged or 4 1/2 litre unsupercharged cars. Fate records that the reversion to full Grand Prix and arrival of the all conquering blown Mercedes saw a 1-2-3 finish for the German team at the French Grand Prix that year. But in a taste of things to come, a lone Talbot, literally a sportscar without road equipment, finished in fourth, this being followed by a win for a similar car in the 12 hours of Paris. The racing project now began to gather momentum and it was not long before the precursors to the T26C were laid down. With a fair amount of financial constraint, 'new' was perhaps not the byword of the single seater since it used a very similar chassis construction to the sports cars that preceded it - pressed steel section, boxed and with cross bracing tubes. The rear of the car was underslung with leaf spring suspension, while at the front typically their independent transverse leaf spring arrangement was employed, with the addition of upper wishbones in chromed steel plate pivoting on the top of the chassis frame and both friction and Newton-Bennett hydraulic shock absorbers. The brakes, which were mechanically operated by Bendix cable system, had large diameter alloy drums with air scoops to aid cooling. The sportscar engine now had a light alloy block and head, which was aspirated by triple Zeniths-Stromberg carburettors, and with single spark plugs and running at 10:1 compression ratio could now bring 210bhp at 4,500rpm. Dry sump lubrication was used with a tank sitting above the driver's knees and finned coolers protruding through the bodywork at the scuttle. The Wilson gearbox filled most of the rest of the cockpit, but with the propeller shaft set to the offside of the car this allowed quite a low seating position. The car was neatly clothed in a tubular bodywork heralding the form of most post-war racing cars. The new off-set single seater was first seen at Rheims with Raymond Mays at the wheel, and although suffering the indignity of retirement owing to its fuel tank splitting, the feedback otherwise was certainly favourable, with excellent brakes and suspension. At this point, however, the war intervened and no further development or racing took place. In tribute to its love of the automobile and its competition, France was almost certainly the first country to go racing after the war with its first major race taking place just 3 weeks after hostilities ended at no lesser public venue than the Bois de Boulogne. A second place finish for Raymond Sommer, the Coeur de Lion, behind Wimille's Bugatti, offered some insight into the future that lay head for Lago's Talbots. Success came gradually for these cars, escalating to Chiron's win in the first post-war French Grand Prix in 1947. Even as the dust was settling on this victory, news of a new Grand Prix car leaked from the factory. After many years of complicated nomenclature, the new single seater Grand Prix cars were at last to be called Talbot-Lago, finally wearing Antony's name in its rightful place. 20 cars in all were planned and, hot on the heels of the recent Talbot successes, the order books filled quickly. The 1948 regulations saw the introduction of the first Formula 1 Grand Prix, voiturette racing now becoming Formula 2. Formula 1 allowed for cars of 4½ litres unsupercharged or 1½ litres blown, a sort of all encompassing rule suiting both the Italian and English racing groups as well as the French. The new Talbot-Lago represented a march forward on its predecessor, predominantly with regards to the engine which was now a tidily conceived twin cam version of the existing sportscar six cylinder, with the cams sitting high in the crankcase and operating valves inclined at 95 degrees to each other in a hemispherical head through short pushrods and rockers either side. With larger valves too, this configuration permitted excellent carburetion - helped by a new off-side mounted arrangement with external air intake vent. The motor maintained the same 7 bearing crank, negating further expense on the bottom end, but with an 8:1 compression ratio it now developed roughly 240bhp. This was mated to a Wilson pre-select four speed gearbox, allowing the driver to keep his hands on the wheel throughout, as well as to assist braking. The propeller shaft was now off-set further, which allowed the driver's position to sink further into the chassis, below the transmission line, while its arrival at the rear axle was also staggered. The rear set-up remained the same, the final improvement being the adoption of Lockheed brakes and 16 inch drums. The lower driving position allowed a more aerodynamic and compact line for the bodywork, headed by a wider mesh grille. It took a little while before the first car was seen in action, and its debut at Monaco with Louis Rosier was curtailed with engine trouble after 16 laps, but progressively the trio of a Talbot-Lago and a pair of its Talbot predecessors was joined by a pair of new cars, those now supplied to Etancelin and 'Raph' and a steady stream of placings followed. The 1948 Coupe du Salon at Montlhèry trumped all of that with a win and 1-2-3 for the Talbot-Lagos of Rosier, Levegh and Cabantous. Racing of all forms of Talbot-Lagos continued in earnest until 1952 when the switch to Formula 2 curtailed further development, although they ran after this in various regional competitions until 1956. Sportscar racing continued with attempts at Le Mans, but none bore 1950's fruit. In all, these remarkable cars, with their immense torque and frugal fuel economy, recorded wins in five major Grands Prix, nine in lesser ones, countless placings and the Le Mans win. Perhaps even more importantly, Tony Lago always credited himself with the fact that in an age marred by many fatalities, no one was ever killed in his cars. This very example we offer here very nearly won the 1952 24 Hour Race at Le Mans, having to retire in the 23rd hour with a commanding lead. Specific History Originally bodied as (what was effectively) a cycle-winged Formula 1 car, 110056 was first sold in 1951 to privateer Henry Louveau, who never had the chance to race the car due to a career-ending accident in the Swiss Grand Prix of that year. It then returned to Lago who entered it in a couple of races that season. The most notable entry was Le Mans where the famed Argentinian driver, Froilan Gonzales (known affectionately as the Pampas Bull and frequent Scuderia Ferrari team driver plus 1954 winner at Le Mans), co-drove this Talbot-Lago with Marimon but unfortunately did not finish. That same year it was sold to Pierre Bouillin who went by the alias of 'Levegh'. Levegh intended to take 110056 to Le Mans in 1952 but the regulations called for enclosed bodies, and thus an all-new body was constructed in aluminium by Dugarreau to a Charles Deutsch design. Levegh also opted to lighten the con-rods and installed triple Weber carburettors as opposed to the original Solexes. 110056 remained in his custody for the following few seasons before being purchased by Paris-based dealer, Francis Mortarini, following Levegh's unfortunate accident at Le Mans in 1955 when he was at the wheel of a Mercedes-Benz. Mortarini swiftly sold the car on to Los Angeles based automotive legend, Otto Zipper, who kept the car until 1959 when he sold it to an English ex-pat named Bernard Benson. Benson retained 110056 until 1973 when he sold it to fellow Brit and famed 'Roesch' Talbot exponent and historian, Anthony Blight. Of particular note is that this transaction happened at Le Mans! Blight found the enclosed body more of a hindrance than a benefit and thus he had a 1951 style GP body fitted for use in historic racing, but with consideration of originality in mind he retained the 1952 body should a subsequent owner wish to reinstate it. Blight and his son-in-law, Stephen Curtis, campaigned the car in historic events until in 1983 it was sold via Christian Huet to Parisian Michel Seydoux, who commissioned renowned specialists Carosserie Lecoq to return the original 1952 enclosed coachwork to the car. Two additional owners have had the benefit of 110056 since Seydoux and it was most recently on exhibit at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours D'Elegance. Period Racing History According to Pierre Abeillon's definitive reference work on these cars, Talbot-Lago de Course, 110056 had the following racing history in period: 1951 24 Hours of Le MansGonzalez MarimonDNF Coupe du SalonGrignard2nd 1952 - with Barquette body Coupe de PrintempsLeveghNot Present Mille MigliaLeveghNot Present 12 Hours of CasablancaLeveghDNF Grand Prix of MonacoLeveghDNF 24 Hours of Le MansLevegh MarchandDNF Targa FlorioLeveghDNF Goodwood 9 HoursLevegh EtancelinDNF Coupe d'AutomneLevegh1st Grand Criterium de BariLeveghDNF Coupe du SalonLeveghNot Present 1953 24 Hours of Le MansLevegh Pozzi8th 12 Hours of ReimsLevegh Meyrat Grand Prix of CaenLeveghDNF Coupe d'AutomneLevegh1st Coupe du SalonLeveghDNF 12 Hours of CasablancaLevegh Etancelin3rd 1954 - front grill widened prior to Le Mans 24 Hours of Le MansLevegh FayenDNF 12 Hours of ReimsLevegh FayenDNF ZandvoortLeveghDNF Grand Prix of BauleLevegh11th Coupe d'AutomneLevegh1st Coupe du SalonLevegh5th 1955 Coupe de ParisLevegh Of particular note is the achievement at Le Mans in 1952. Levegh started the race at a comfortable pace and as time went on, the Jaguars and the Ferraris were to succumb to a variety of maladies which of course meant that the thundering Talbot-Lago etched its way up the field. By 2am, following a withdrawal from the (then leading) Gordini team and a dynamo failure on one of the Mercedes', Levegh (still at the wheel!) found himself in the lead. Exhausted and against the wishes of the team, Levegh refused to relinquish his seat and maintained his position in front of the anxious but hugely supportive home crowd - a situation he was able to maintain until the 23rd hour. But then, with just over an hour to go and while holding a four lap lead, the crankshaft broke ending the race for 110056 and the dreams of both driver and nation alike. Sure, the old saying goes that to finish first, first you must finish, but Levegh and 110056 were just over an hour away from achieving a solo driven victory at the world's most heralded Motorsport event. With opinions aplenty regarding possible reasons why the engine failed, Levegh did not receive the credit he deserved and it was only after his tragic passing that the widely shared opinion was aired. Levegh had apparently noted a strange vibration in the engine early on in the race and, given the competitive nature of his drive and the attrition of others, he felt that it would be a calculated gamble for him to nurse the car on rather than risk the potential of co-driver Marchand's lack of mechanical sympathy. Without compare, the story of Levegh and 110056 at Le Mans in 1952 is perhaps the most heartbreaking near victory known to the sport. Condition Since the overhaul and reapplication of the original 1952 body by Lecoq, 110056 has remained regularly maintained with its respective custodians and has entered just a handful of retrospective competitive events. Whilst not showing scars of competition or over-exuberant use, the paint finish shows some aging as do the ancillaries and the interior, but by no means does the current condition deter from the use it was intended for - competition. In December 2005, 110056 was treated to a thorough overhaul and going through by Neil Davies Racing in the UK. The original engine was also expertly re-built and dyno tested in 2004 by the well renowned Auto Restorations in New Zealand. This same company was also commissioned to build an exact replica of a racing Wilson pre-selector gearbox as many years prior, the original had been replaced by a more modern American unit. Following the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance last summer, this gearbox has been treated to a thorough overhaul and adjustment. Summary This Talbot-Lago represents a wonderful and important piece of French motor racing history that was a regular sight in some of the most high profile events during the early 1950s. Opportunities to acquire great sports racing cars with established provenance are becoming few and far between and, whilst all cars are unique in terms of racing history, few have the competition record equal to 110056. From the four times it was entered at Le Mans (and so nearly claiming outright victory one year) to competing at such legendary events as the Grand Prix of Monaco, Targa Florio, Goodwood and the 12 Hour races of both Reims and Casablanca, 110056 is a well travelled leviathan. Needless to say; on grounds of rarity, originality, period history and an untarnished provenance this genuinely is eligible and would be welcomed at the cream of retrospective events such as the Mille Miglia, Goodwood Revival, Le Mans Classic and the Monterey Historics. Of added benefit to the quality of the Talbot-Lago T26GS Barquette is the assurance of rarity, since just six cars were produced by the works in contrast to the bevy of contemporary offerings from the British and Italian rivals. For 110056, the fact that the body and engine remain original to the chassis make for a highly reassuring prospect, and consideration of this important representative of French motor racing history is highly recommended.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2007-02-16
Hammer price
Show price

1966 Ford GT40 MK1

380bhp, 289 cu. in. overhead valve V8 engine, five-speed ZF gearbox, independent front suspension via double wishbones with coil springs, independent rear suspension via trailing links, lower wishbones and coil springs, four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95" Ford announced its intention to officially re-enter motor racing in the summer of 1962. Initially the company chose to compete in stock car and drag racing, forms of the sport that it felt best fitted its racing background. In 1963, seeking greater exposure, Ford decided to attack America’s greatest race – the Indianapolis 500. The rear-engined Lotus-Fords completely shocked the established US teams in their front-engined roadsters. Jim Clark surely would have won in the team’s first attempt challenging Parnelli Jones’s Watson-Offy roadster in the closing stages, but Jones’s car was leaking oil, ruining Clark’s chances of taking the win. The clerk of the course was not prepared to black-flag the local hero after intense lobbying by his team boss J. C. Agajanian. The near-win and, more importantly, the failed acquisition of Ferrari encouraged Ford along another path and it decided to extend its participation in racing to the GT category. There was very little interest in this form of racing in America, but Ford was prepared to gamble that European wins, and Le Mans in particular, would capture the country’s imagination – they were right. After the Ferrari debacle, Henry Ford II declared that he ‘wanted to win Le Mans in 1966’. Ford’s Lee Iacocca and Leo Beebe were given the job of forming Ford Advanced Vehicles. Ford’s idea was to develop a car that could be built around the 1963 Indianapolis 4.2-liter pushrod engine. The mid-engined coupe that the company had in mind was to be the very cutting edge of modern GT car design with careful attention paid to aerodynamics. A model of the initial design was made and tested at the University of Maryland wind tunnel, and subsequently a full-size fibreglass model was made and tested at Ford’s wind tunnel at Dearborn, Michigan. Ford realized that many of their plans were echoed in the Lola GT, designed and built by Eric Broadly at his workshop at Bromley in England. Broadly, too, had seen the potential of the Ford V8 as a GT racing engine, and incorporated a stock 260 cu. in. version in his car, first exhibited at the London Racing Car Show in January 1963. As it happened, the Lola GT was 40 inches high. The Ford GT would also be this height, and it is for this reason that the car was christened GT40. By the summer of 1963, Ford and Broadly had joined forces and very quickly two evaluations of the Lola were completed by Ford, one at the Goodwood circuit and another at the Ford headquarters at Dearborn. Progress was quick, as Ford hired John Wyer, General Manager of Aston Martin, to manage the program in England, and new facilities were set up at Slough. In charge of the whole project was Roy Lunn, formerly of Jowett, Aston Martin, and Ford UK. The first two prototype Ford GT40s were launched in April 1964 and the GT40’s first race was the 1,000 kilometer at the Nürburgring on 31 May. Phil Hill qualified the blue and white coupe second to John Surtees’s Ferrari 275P, and although the car retired with a broken suspension bracket, the GT40 had shown its potential. Le Mans was next with a three-car entry; the drivers were again Hill/McLaren, Attwood/Schlesser, and Ginther/Gregory. The new cars performed amazingly well and, although none finished, Ginther led at the start of the race and Hill set a new race lap record of 3:49.4 (131.7 mph). The final major event of 1964 was at Rheims on July 5th. All three cars entered, showing blinding promise, but in spite of running first and second and setting new lap records all three cars eventually retired with gearbox problems. In 1965, when the project was handed over to the Shelby-American team of Cobra fame, a total of ten cars had been built. By the end of February 1965 a number of significant changes had been made to the car under the direction of Carroll Shelby, his chief engineer Phil Remington, and Ken Miles, Shelby’s test driver. The 4.2-liter dry sump Indianapolis engine was replaced with the famous wet sump 4.7-liter, 289 cubic inch V8 that powered Shelby’s Cobras and developed 385 brake horsepower. Transaxle troubles were attacked by replacing the Colotti straight-cut gears with Ford helical gears. The drive shaft, fuel feed system, and clutch were improved, wider cast alloy wheels were utilized, and attention was paid to better ducting, improved cooling, and slicker aerodynamics. The first race the re-worked car was entered in was the 2,000 kilometre Daytona Continental Race on February 28, 1965. The car, driven by Lloyd Ruby and Ken Miles, won the race with Bob Bondurant and Richie Ginther in a second car finishing third. Suddenly, the GT40 was on the map, a force to be reckoned with. Le Mans of that year was again a disappointment with no cars finishing, but again Phil Hill broke the lap record, both in qualifying and in the race. In mid-1965, Ford decided that the GT40 had reached a sufficiently advanced state of design to manufacture the car in greater numbers. 50 cars were planned to be produced in order to qualify them for the Production Sports Car category. Among them were the cars that would win the World Championship for Production Sports Cars in 1966. With the GT40 now fully developed, Roy Lunn was given the job of overseeing production of a Mark II version of the car. Work on two new cars began in the spring of 1965 at a new Ford racing subsidiary, Kar Kraft, in Detroit. The GT40 Mark II was fitted with Ford’s mighty 7.0-liter V8. The engine may have been considered an odd choice but it was extremely reliable, developing maximum power at only 6,200 rpm. The engine had tremendous torque and a wide power band, and had been very successful racing in other formats. Other than the engine, the new cars were relatively unchanged. The seating position was modified as were the rear bulkhead members, and the gearbox was based on that used in the Ford Galaxie saloon. The Mark IIs were immediately quick, finishing first, second, and third in the 1966 Daytona 24 Hour race; this was followed by victory at the 12 Hours of Sebring and the famous clean sweep at Le Mans, where Ford GT40s once again crossed the line first, second, and third. Ford’s gamble had paid off and the GT40 would dominate sports car racing, making it one of the most successful road/competition cars ever built. The road version of the Ford GT40 was announced in January 1966. It was, the company proclaimed, ‘the most expensive Ford ever’. Only 31 road-going cars were manufactured. Chassis number 1065 was sent to the Ford Merchandising Department in Dearborn but was not delivered to its first owner, Charles Hill of Dallas, Texas, until 1967. Andy Harman from Mississippi owned the car for a short while during 1969 before it was sold to English collector Nicholas Shrigley-Fiegl in 1970. A two-year restoration was undertaken in 1980-1982, and when completed the car only showed 2,035 recorded miles. Later, in 1984, William Loughran bought 1065. GT40 chassis number 1065 has a well-documented history with a continuous chain of ownership. When Christie’s inspected the car in 1998 it still only showed 2,540 miles. In early 2000 the GT40 was sold to John McCaw and returned to America. Before purchase the car received a detailed inspection and the mileage showed 2,596. GT40 s/n 1065 has been re-liveried twice over the years but is now back to its original color of Azure blue with the complementary original black upholstery. Built to nearly the same specifications as the racing version, this example is nonetheless fitted with a fully trimmed interior, which is original and in superb condition. The car has its original engine (number SGT 27) and ZF gearbox (number NR 243). The original Borrani wire wheels have been replaced with the later Halibrands. Other updated items include 38mm Weber down draft carburetors, and the fuel pump, pressure regulator, coil and oil and fuel lines have all been updated. Ford GT40 chassis number 1065 is a beautiful example of a GT40 MKI and is certainly one of the most original GT40s in existence. The recorded mileage of just 4,500 miles may well make this car unique. While any GT40 is a rare beast with around 103 built in total and just 31 road cars, the opportunity to own one of these legendary cars doesn’t arise often. They are simply one of the most desirable sports cars in history. Denis Jenkinson, the fabled motoring journalist, wrote this in Motor Sport in 1966: ‘If you have the money to buy a new conception in road motoring, you will not be disappointed; if a Jaguar, Ferrari or Aston Martin satisfies you, then the unbelievable qualities of a Ford GT40 will probably be beyond your appreciation.' Chassis no. 1065

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-15
Hammer price
Show price

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4

Engine # 10017 Design: Pininfarina Coachwork: Scaglietti Specifications: 300bhp at 8,000rpm, 3,286cc four overhead cam 60° V-12 engine, six Weber 40DCN17 carburettors, five-speed manual rear-mounted transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs and tubular shocks, four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5 in.) V5 UK Registration Document Ferrari Classiche Certification Package. This lot is EC taxes paid and orginates from the UK. 1964 was an important year for Ferrari. John Surtees became Formula 1 World Champion and the team won the Formula 1 Constructors’ Championship, the International GT Constructors’ Championship, and the International Speed and Endurance Challenge. Racing improves the breed and Ferrari’s incredible success would heavily influence its latest production models. Unveiled at the Paris Salon in October 1964, Ferrari’s new berlinetta, the 275 GTB was an evolution of the preceding 250 GT cars such as the 250 GT “Lusso”. The 275 GTB was launched alongside its sister car, a spyder, which shared the same chassis and engine, the 275 GTS. The aggressive styling of the 275 GTB is often regarded as being among the purest and most beautiful of any Ferrari built. Certainly, Pininfarina had created a true, timeless classic of sports car design, which was beautifully executed by Scaglietti. In October 1966 at the Paris Salon, Ferrari introduced the next evolution of the 275 GTB, the 275 GTB/4. Other than an increase in track by 24mm, the chassis was unchanged. Outwardly the new car was the same other than a full-length bulge down the bonnet to clear the six downdraft Webers. The change in model designation simply reflected the single substantial difference between the GTB/4 and its predecessor; the V-12 engine was fitted with four overhead camshafts, two per cylinder bank. This revised powerplant, known as Tipo 226, was directly derived from the 3.3- and 4.0-litre engines which powered the 275 and 330 P2 prototypes of the 1965 racing season. With remarkable mid-range torque and flexibility, this formidable powerplant was capable of propelling the new 275 GTB/4 to a top speed of 160mph. Competition power levels had been made available to Ferrari’s clients right off the showroom floor. Ferrari had produced a car with perfect weight distribution that handled superbly. Perhaps one of the best summations of the GTB/4’s driving manners and performance abilities came from Grand Prix-winning, French racing driver, Jean-Pierre Beltoise. In a road test published in 1967 in L’Auto Journal he said, “I covered in complete safety and the greatest comfort… and while carrying on a normal conversation with my passenger, the 46 miles which separate the Pont d’Orléans from Nemours in a little less than 23 minutes…at an average speed of more than 121 mph – which is remarkable enough without noting that I had to stop for the toll gates.” The 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4, chassis number 10017 (build no. 074), presented here was sold new through Chinetti Motors to John Annis of Tampa, Florida. What set Annis apart from most other Ferrari buyers at the time was not the fact that he was only 21 years old, but rather that he travelled to the Ferrari factory on 7 June 1967 to pick up the car in person. After recording his visit to the factory on cine film, Annis then drove his new 275 GTB/4 on a European tour, making stops at both the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the Belgian Grand Prix. He also visited friends in Spain and on the French Riviera before returning to Maranello and arranging to have 10017 shipped to Florida, where it arrived in August 1967. John Annis used his 275 GTB/4 as his everyday car in Florida until increasing business and family commitments forced him to sell in 1968. 10017 changed hands several times during the seventies and eighties in a known and well-documented chain of ownership. In the mid-eighties it underwent a restoration and was advertised in the Ferrari Market Letter as being in concours condition. The car was then painted red with a black interior. In 1992 it was sold to Toshi Ueno in Japan and remained there until it was shipped to the UK, where in 2003 it was purchased by the Oscar-nominated film producer Eric Fellner, of Working Title Films. Fellner used the car sparingly and in 2004 it was sold via DK Engineering to the current owner, John Mayston-Taylor, Chairman of Lynx Motors International. Mayston-Taylor researched the early history of 10017, and after having made contact with the car’s original owner John Annis, he decided to carry out a painstaking restoration of the car to return it to its original dark blue (20-A-185) with Arancia (VM 3104) Connolly hide interior. Working closely with his selected group of specialists, Mayston-Taylor carried out a fastidious and carefully documented restoration and his very keen eye for detail has resulted in one of the best 275 GTB/4’s in existence. In 2005, 10017, now in concours condition, was shown at Villa d’Este, and later that year was invited to participate in the Italia Classica tour held in Northern Italy. In 2006, chassis 10017 was the first Ferrari in the UK to be granted the Ferrari Classiche Certificazione di Autenticita (no. 139F). Later during the year, it was awarded first in class at the Ferrari Owners’ Club Annual Concours at Walton Hall and also took part in a private tour of the Andalucía Region of Spain. Chassis 10017 has been the subject of numerous articles in Classic and Sportscar, Forza and Cavallino magazines. In June 2007, this 275 GTB/4 was invited to compete in Ferrari’s official 60th Anniversary Concours at Fiorano, where it was judged Best in Class – 275 GTB/4; an award that requires perfection in both restoration and presentation. The car is in showroom condition and is stunning in every respect. The car is offered with a complete set of books and tools, as well as an extensive history file that includes the factory build sheets, original purchase invoice from Luigi Chinetti, correspondence with the Ferrari factory, and a DVD version of its collection from the factory in June 1967. The car is currently UK-registered with a valid road fund licence and MOT test certificate. Chassis 10017 is not only eligible for a variety of prestigious historic motoring events, it is also elegantly poised to continue its winning streak at show. These cars are eminently usable, have spectacular performance and absolutely stunning looks – it is clear to see why they are so desirable. Jean-Pierre Beltoise summed up his thoughts: “It is, first and foremost, a serious and comfortable gran tourismo, but it retains the lineage of a race car in the response of the engine and the quality of the handling. The 275 GTB/4 is one of the greatest automobiles created in our times.” ITALIANTEXT Motore # 10017 Designo: Pininfarina Carrozzeria: Scaglietti Specifiche: Motore V-12 a 60° a quattro camme in testa, 300 CV di potenza a 8.000 giri al minuto, 3.286 cm3, con sei carburatori Weber 40 DCN17, cambio manuale retromontato a cinque rapporti, sospensioni indipendenti sulle quattro ruote con bracci trasversali superiori e inferiori, ammortizzatori tubolari a molle elicoidali, freni a disco idraulici sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2400 mm Documento d'immatricolazione britannico Certificazione Ferrari Classiche. Questo lotto é sdoganato in Europa e proviene dal Regno Unito Il 1964 fu un anno importante per la Ferrari. John Surtees divenne Campione del Mondo di Formula 1 e il team vinse il Campionato Costruttori di Formula 1, il Campionato Internazionale Costruttori GT e il Mondiale di Velocità e Durata. Le corse hanno permesso di migliorare le vetture e l’incredibile successo della Ferrari avrebbe poi fortemente influenzato i nuovi modelli in produzione. Presentata al Salone di Parigi nell’ottobre del 1964, la nuova berlinetta della Ferrari, la 275 GTB, rappresentò l’evoluzione delle precedenti vetture 250 GT come la 250 GT “Lusso”. La 275 GTB venne lanciata insieme alla gemella, una spyder con la quale condivideva telaio e motore: la 275 GTS. Lo stile aggressivo della 275 GTB è spesso considerato tra i più puri e affascinanti tra quelli mai costruiti dalla Ferrari. Senza dubbio, Pininfarina aveva creato un design unico per un’auto sportiva, magnificamente realizzata da Scaglietti. Nell’ottobre del 1966, al Salone di Parigi, la Ferrari presentò la successiva evoluzione della 275 GTB, la 275 GTB/4. Tranne che per un aumento della carreggiata di 24 mm, il telaio rimase invariato. Esteriormente la nuova vettura era identica se si esclude un lungo rigonfiamento verso il cofano necessario ai sei Weber a corrente d’aria discendente. Il cambiamento nella designazione del modello rifletteva semplicemente l’unica differenza sostanziale tra la GTB/4 e la vettura precedente; il motore V-12 era equipaggiato con quattro alberi a camme in testa, due per bancata. Questo nuovo propulsore, noto come Tipo 226, derivava direttamente dai motori da 3,3 e 4 litri montati sui prototipi della 275 e della 330 P2 nella stagione corse 1965. Dotato di una coppia straordinaria e di notevole flessibilità, questo eccezionale propulsore poteva spingere la nuova 275 GTB/4 ad una velocità massima di 260 km orari. Livelli di potenza da gara furono resi disponibili ai clienti Ferrari direttamente al di fuori del salone espositivo. La casa di Maranello aveva prodotto una vettura con una perfetta distribuzione dei pesi e superbamente maneggevole. Forse uno dei migliori risultati per quanto riguarda lo stile di guida e la performance della GTB/4 fu ottenuto grazie alle vittorie nei Gran Premi con il pilota francese Jean-Pierre Beltoise. In una prova su strada pubblicato nel 1967 sul giornale L’Auto, egli dichiarò: “Ho guidato in totale sicurezza e comfort… e mentre conversavo tranquillamente con il passeggero, le 46 miglia che separavano il Ponte d’Orléans da Nemours sono state coperte in poco meno di 23 minuti… ad una velocità media di 195 km orari – notevole se si considera che mi sono dovuto fermare ai caselli autostradali.” La Ferrari 275 GTB/4 del 1967, numero di telaio 10017 (numero di fabbrica 074), qui presentata, fu venduta nuova tramite la Chinetti Motors a John Annis di Tampa, Florida. La particolarità che distingueva Annis dagli altri proprietari Ferrari di quel tempo non era tanto dal fatto che avesse solo 21 anni, ma piuttosto che si fosse recato presso lo stabilimento Ferrari il 7 giugno 1967 per ritirare la vettura di persona. Dopo aver filmato la sua visita su pellicola cinematografica, guidò la sua nuova 275 GTB/4 per tutta Europa, visitando sia alla 24 Ore di Le Mans che al Gran Premio del Belgio. Fece, inoltre, visita a un paio di amici passando per la Spagna e la Riviera francese prima di ritornare a Maranello e imbarcare la 10017 per la Florida, dove arrivò nell’agosto del 1967. In Florida, John Annis utilizzò la sua 275 GTB/4 quotidianamente finché non fu costretto a venderla, nel 1968, a causa dei suoi crescenti impegni professionali e familiari. La 10017 passò di mano in mano durante gli anni Settanta e Ottanta, lasciando tracce ben note e documentate dei suoi proprietari. A metà degli anni Ottanta fu sottoposta ad un restauro e fu pubblicizzata sul Ferrari Market Letter come vettura in condizioni da concorso. La vettura era verniciata di rosso con interni neri. Nel 1992 fu venduta a Toshi Ueno in Giappone dove rimase finché non fu imbarcata per il Regno Unito, dove, nel 2003 fu acquistata dal produttore cinematografico candidato all’Oscar Eric Fellner della Working Title Films. Fellner utilizzò la vettura con cura per poi venderla nel 2004 tramite la DK Engineering all’attuale proprietario, John Mayston-Taylor, Presidente della Lynx Motors International. Mayston-Taylor si dedicò ad una ricerca approfondita sulle origini della 10017 e, dopo aver contattato il primo proprietario della vettura, John Annis, decise di sottoporla ad un accurato restauro per riportarla al suo colore originale, Blu Scuro (20-A-185) con interni in pelle Connolly color Arancio (VM 3104). Lavorando a stretto contatto con un selezionato gruppo d’ esperti, il meticoloso e documentato restauro eseguito con un’attenzione particolare per i dettagli portò alla rinascita di una delle migliori 275 GTB/4 mai esistite. Nel 2005, la vettura con telaio 10017, ora in edizione da concorso, fu esposta a Villa d’Este, e più tardi nello stesso anno fu invitata a partecipare al tour Italia Classica che si tenne nel nord d’Italia. Nel 2006 la 10017 fu la prima Ferrari del Regno Unito ad essere insignita della Certificazione di Autenticità Ferrari Classiche (numero 139F). Più tardi in quello stesso anno ricevette il primo premio della sua classe al concorso annuale Ferrari tenutosi presso la Walton Hall e prese parte al tour privato della regione Andalusia in Spagna. La 10017 è stata oggetto di numerosi articoli sulle riviste Classic and Sportscar, Forza e Cavallino. Nel giugno del 2007, questa 275 GTB/4 fu invitata a partecipare al Concorso per il 60° Anniversario della Ferrari a Fiorano, dove fu premiata come Best in Class – 275 GTB/4, premio che richiedeva la perfezione sia nel restauro sia nella presentazione. La vettura è in condizioni da concorso ed è perfetta da ogni punto di vista. È offerta con un set completo di libri e attrezzi e con un interessante dossier sulla sua storia che include i documenti tecnici originali, la fattura originale di acquisto della vettura da Luigi Chinetti, la corrispondenza con lo stabilimento Ferrari e una versione in DVD del filmato relativo al suo ritiro presso la fabrica avvenuto nel giugno 1967. La vettura è attualmente immatricolata nel Regno Unito e corredata da un documento e il certificato relativo al test MOT. La 10017 non è solo degna di partecipare agli eventi automobilistici più prestigiosi, ma possiede anche un elegante equilibrio che le permetterà di continuare a vincere una lunga serie di concorsi. Queste vetture sono ancora in grado di essere utilizzate, con prestazioni sorprendenti ed un look assolutamente impareggiabile. Non è difficile capire perché sono ancora così ricercate. Jean-Pierre Beltoise così riassunse la sua opinione: “È, per prima cosa, una granturismo seria e confortevole, ma conserva la tradizione di una vettura da corsa nella risposta del motore e nella grande maneggevolezza. La 275 GTB/4 è una delle più grandi automobili dei nostri tempi.” Chassis no. 10017

  • ITAItaly
  • 2008-05-18
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1930 Cadillac V-16 Roadster by Fleetwood

Model 452. Body Style 4302. 175 bhp, 452 cu. in. OHV V-16 engine, three-speed selective synchromesh manual transmission, solid front axle with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension and hydraulic dampers, three-quarter floating rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 148 in. One of the world’s finest Cadillac V-16s Formerly of the renowned Briggs Cunningham collection Multiple concours award-winning restoration by RM Auto Restoration Exceptional authenticity and presentation to original specifications A wonderful automobile, beloved by great enthusiasts since the 1950s On 2 January 1930, Floyd E. Becker sat down at his desk at Dairy Farm in Roseland, New Jersey, and placed his order for a new Cadillac to the Uppercu Cadillac Company of Newark. The order he wrote out survives, spelling out a request for a V-16 roadster with map pockets in the doors, a top made to the same shape as on the Beckers’ previous Cadillac, no trunk rack, dual rear-mounted spares, wooden artillery wheels all around, and special Cannon Smoke paint color, interior trim, and monograms, not to mention the spare parts for the carriage house. All told, the total price came to $5,750, or about $80,000 US today—roughly the cost of 12 new Fords at the time. Henry Becker accompanied his father on the trip to pick up their new car in May 1930. The Beckers retained the Cadillac until 1948, when, in the fashion of the time, it was sold upon its retirement to a longtime employee, Harry Travis of Livingston, New York, for $400. Thereafter it was acquired by S. Prestley Blake, co-founder of Friendly’s and a member of the American car hobby since its earliest days. Mr. Blake eventually traded the car in 1959 to Briggs S. Cunningham as part of a transaction on a 1914 Rolls-Royce, an automobile more in line with Mr. Blake’s collecting interests. Briggs Cunningham was, inarguably, one of the most famous American sportsmen of his time, renowned to every men’s magazine reader for his pursuits in yachting and motorsport. His collection of automobiles was large and varied, with a focus on great performance automobiles from throughout history. It was no surprise that he should seek and find a Cadillac V-16 roadster, nor, with his typical well-connected tenacity, that he procured the best, most pure one that he could find. The roadster remained in the Cunningham Museum at Costa Mesa, California, until the museum closed at the end of 1986. It passed with the remainder of the Cunningham cars to world-renowned collector Miles Collier. Seven years later, Mr. Collier elected to sell the V-16, which became one of the very few automobiles to leave what is today the REVS Institute for Automotive Research’s enviable collection. Its new owner maintained it for a further eight years before it was acquired, through RM Classic Cars, by the present owner. A longtime and valued RM client, the owner had sought an exceptional example of the Cadillac V-16 and found exactly what he was looking for in this car. It was subsequently fully restored by RM Auto Restoration to exactly its original condition, as described by the documentation that had been fortunate enough to follow the car through the years, including the original order and invoice, documents from the Becker Family, and a copy of the original build record, all of which remain with it. These allowed the car to be finished, as it was delivered to Dairy Farm in the spring of 1930. Most incredibly, the car’s wonderful original condition prior to restoration – essentially untouched aside from a 1950s repaint – meant that every piece of hardware was able to be re-used on every original body panel; with the exception only of two small pieces in the rumble seat area, every scrap of body wood is original and in fine condition. The engine has its original pistons and has never been sleeved; every nut and bolt and fastener on the chassis is original, with factory markings. The restored V-16 was shown at the Pebble Beach Concours in 2001 (3rd in Class) and 2012 (2nd in Class), the Amelia Island Concours in 2006 (1st in Class), and widely in CCCA National judging, reaching Senior status with a 98.5-point score in 2010. It has been withdrawn from judging in the last four years, thus opening up a world of new concours d’elegance exhibition possibilities for the new owner, but has been faultlessly maintained and is still an exceptional example in every important regard. In fact, in selling the John Moir Collection’s own exceptional V-16 roadster in 2013, RM Sotheby’s had the ability to contact several knowledgeable V-16 enthusiasts, all of whom were in consensus that the Moir car was the best in the world—with the exception of that which is offered here. It is often said that a collector car “ticks all the boxes,” but the ex-Cunningham V-16 roadster needs no such hyperbole. It speaks loudly and proudly for itself, in its documentation, its history, its unblemished authenticity, and its sparkling concours presentation. It is exquisite beyond measure. Engine no. 701432 Body no. 23

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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1959 Ferrari 250 GT "Tour de France"

260hp 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V12 engine, four-speed manual transmission and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2600mm (102.4") Ferrari was ready when the Commission Sportif International responded to the disaster at Le Mans in 1955 with renewed emphasis on racing gran turismo cars and the first of many attempts to slow down the sports racing cars in the interest of enhanced safety for both competitors and – most importantly – spectators. This played directly into Ferrari’s hands who had beenbuilding GTs for years – GTs different only in trim, coachwork and tune from the competition berlinettas built for long distance open road races like the Mille Miglia and Carrera Panamericana. At the 1956 Geneva show a new berlinetta styled by Pinin Farina was shown, a clean and stylish design on the 2600mm chassis. Using the original Colombo-designed Ferrari V12 now developed by Ferrari to produce 240-280hp using three downdraft Weber carburetors this new 250 GT was destined to dominate Gran Turismo racing for three years. It was supplanted as the GT racer of choice only by the development of the Ferrari 250 GT short wheelbase berlinetta in late 1959. Scaglietti, which had been building Ferrari’s racing car bodies for several years, now undertook building the lightweight Pinin Farina designed series production cars of which the 1956 250 GT was the first. Scaglietti, as much sculptor as coachbuilder, may be credited with much of this model’s aesthetic appeal, softening some of Pinin Farina’s more emphatic lines to create a deft and cohesive design. Fulfilling the destiny of this handsome and purposeful shape became the task of Ferrari’s loyal and enthusiastic clients and distributors. Olivier Gendebien early on showed the 250 GT’s competence, winning its class in the 1956 Tour of Sicily and Mille Miglia while finishing 4th and 5th overall respectively. As demanding as these events were, one of the premier competition tests of the time was the Tour de France, a much longer event that started at Nice and ended five days and 5,383 km (3,345 miles) later in Paris. Comprised of both open road rally style stages, six circuit races (Comminges, Le Mans, Rouen, Rheims, St. Etienne and Montlhéry), two hillclimbs (Mt. Ventoux and Peyresounde) and a drag race (a 500 meter course at Aix-les- Bains), the Tour de France demanded speed, reliability, regularity and stamina from both the teams and their cars. In 1956, only 37 of 103 starters finished the Tour. One of them was the stylish and quick Alfonso de Portago, who co-driver was the American Gunnar Nelson, driving an early version of the 1956 250 GT into first place overall after winning outright five of the six circuit races on the Tour. Second to Portago was none other than Stirling Moss driving a factory-backed Mercedes-Benz 300SL. In 1957 Olivier Gendebien teamed with Lucien Bianchi to back up Portago’s 1956 Tour de France win. They were followed home in 2nd and 3rd place overall by Trintignant/ Picard and Lucas/Malle, both in Ferrari 250 GTs. Having already associated the Mille Miglia with an earlier Ferrari 250 series, the sleek Pinin Farinadesigned, Scaglietti-built berlinettas of 1956 adopted these two epic victories to become known as the “Tour de France” model, one of Ferrari’s longest-lived successes in competition and most coveted models both for its great racing history and for its exceptionally attractive appearance. In 1958 Scaglietti’s design evolved slightly. Headlights were recessed into the front fenders and covered with Plexiglas fairings. Three slot front fender vents were featured. The rear fender peaks and taillights became more prominent and the greenhouse sail panel had a single vent to extract air from the closed interior. This style has become accepted as the definitive iteration of the 250 GT Tour de France, an instantly recognized form. 1958 250 GT TdFs also benefited from numerous mechanical improvements, the most important of which was a new gearbox with centrallylocated shift lever. Many internal features of the engine were strengthened and there were new valves, a new crankshaft, stronger connecting rods and revised cylinder heads and intake manifold. The appropriateness of the appellation “Tour de France” for these cars became even more obvious when in 1958 Gendebien/Bianchi repeated their overall victory, this time followed by Trintignant/Picard (again) and Da Silva Ramos/Estager in 3rd, all in 250 GT Ferraris. The magnitude of these accomplishments is apparent from the fact that in 1957 only 23 of 72 starters reached the finish line in the Tour; in 1958 it was only 21 of 60. 250 GT Tour de France Ferraris also were racking up other impressive performances in the hands of private entrants in Europe and the U.S. Stalwart Olivier Gendebien, partnered with his cousin Jacques Wascher, turned in a stunning performance in the 1957 Mille Miglia, finishing first in class, 3rd overall and barely eight minutes behind the 4.1 liter Ferrari sports racer of Piero Taruffi. Against the large capacity sports racers Gendebien even captured the Gran Premio Nuvolari for the fastest overall time between Mantua and Brescia, beating Von Trips’ Ferrari by 1.4mph and Taruffi by 2.5mph. Other 250 GTs finished 6th, 7th, 9th and 10th overall, a remarkable performance especially considering their competition included a strong factory-backed Mercedes-Benz entry. The outstanding performance of Gendebien and the 250 GT was, however, marred by the tragic accident in the 1957 Mille Miglia by de Portago whose 250 GT crashed into the crowd near Guidozzolo di Mantova killing both Portago and his co-driver Nelson along with a number of spectators, including several children. In the wake of the 1955 Le Mans disaster and the obvious fact that the GT cars, particularly the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France, were every bit as fast as the best sports racers in the world, stronger measures would be taken and the half-century tradition of racing over public roads would end. The combination of elegant Pinin Farina/Scaglietti styling and exhilarating performance kept the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France in production for an unusually long period and through a steady, detailed evolution of the model and its coachwork. Its long production is remarkable for a competition car from any manufacturer and particularly from Ferrari which had the capability to turn out new models quickly and frequently built one or two cars specifically for particularly important races. The longevity of the TdF demonstrates just how successful and satisfying it was. It is without question the pinnacle of Ferrari’s drum-braked gran turismos – and that is saying a lot. Chassis 1161 GT offered here is the last of the 1958 250 GT Tour de France Competition Berlinettas and the last TdF regularly built with covered headlights. It is in full competition configuration, with a full alloy body, covered lights, single sail extractor vent, unpainted alloy three-vane front fender vents, hood hold down claws and a roll bar. Delivered in March 1959 to Luigi Chinetti it was shortly thereafter sold to Ferrari racer and dealer Bob Grossman who in turn either sold or leased to Walter Luftman to begin its racing career in the Northeast. Records indicate it was raced by Luftman at Montgomery airport in early 1959, then won first place at Lime Rock on July 19. In September it placed second on the new permanent circuit at Bridgehampton in a LISCA (Long Island Sports Car Association) race and raced again in early October at Lime Rock where it placed first in the GT race. Back at Bridgehampton for another LISCA race in August 28-29, 1960, it was driven to victory by Bob Grossman and is pictured in the 1960 Ferrari Yearbook carrying the post race checkered flag. The next known owner is Peter Sherman, Maitland, Florida in 1962 who sold it in 1968 to John Delamater from whom it was bought in September 1969 by Ken Hutchison. Seventeen years later, in 1986, it was sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi who commissioned a long term restoration to concours standards by Michael Sheehan’s European Auto Sales, including a repaint in red and interior redone in tan leather. This was completed in 1991 after which 1161 GT was sold to two subsequent Japanese owners in 1995 and 1996. The current owner acquired this 250 GT Tour de France in 1997 and since then has frequently used it in the Shell Historic Ferrari Challenge as well as the 2004 Monterey Historics, attesting to its quality, reliability and performance. The engine has been rebuilt in the current ownership and the owner says it is “very strong.” Superbly maintained, its 15 year old restoration has matured and is in outstanding condition, ready to resume competing in the challenge. Ferrari TdF 1161GT is a beautiful example of Ferrari’s mastery of the gran turismo competition berlinetta concept in the late fifties. Chassis no. 1161GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-19
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The ex-Miles Coverdale 1938 Bugatti Type 57C Stelvio Convertible Coachwork by Gangloff Chassis no. 57748 Engine no. C51 (see text)

The ex-Miles Coverdale 1938 Bugatti Type 57C Stelvio Convertible Coachwork by Gangloff Chassis no. 57748 Engine no. C51 (see text) 3,257cc DOHC Supercharged Inline 8-Cylinder Engine Dual Throat Updraft Stromberg UUR-2 Carburetor 170bhp at 5,500rpm 4-Speed Cotal Pre-Selector Manual Transmission Semi-Elliptic Leaf Springs with Rigid Front Axle – Live Rear Axle 4-Wheel Lockheed Hydraulic Brakes *Long term US ownerships, including more than 40 years with Miles Coverdale *An original supercharged Bugatti *Extensively researched by marque historian Pierre-Yves Laugier *Desirable, enjoyable Stelvio Cabriolet coachwork *The quintessential Bugatti road car THE BUGATTI TYPE 57 The Type 57 Bugatti, introduced in 1934, marked Jean Bugatti's emergence as Bugatti's leader and creative force. It was the first new model built under his direction and it incorporated many features that were new to Bugatti. Its dual overhead camshaft eight-cylinder engine had dimensions of 72x100mm, offering 3,257cc displacement. The crankshaft ran in five main bearings. The camshafts were driven by a train of helical-tooth gears at the engine's rear with a further crankshaft bearing behind them. Finger cam followers minimized side thrust on the valve stems. The Type 57 also marked Bugatti's first use of a transmission fixed to the engine crankcase and a single plate clutch. The top three gears in the four-speed gearbox were constant mesh. Jean created a novel independent front suspension system using transverse leaf springs for the first two examples of the Type 57 before Le Patron spied it and insisted it be replaced by a proper Bugatti hollow tubular live axle. Thenceforth suspension was traditional Bugatti semi-elliptical front and reversed quarter-elliptical rear leaf springs with cable-operated mechanical drum brakes. Much of the Type 57's commercial success may be attributed to Jean Bugatti's sensitive, flowing coachwork, which graced the most famous of the chassis' examples. Atalante two-seat coupé, Ventoux four-seat coupé, Stelvio cabriolet and the Galibier sedan vied with the best of France's and Europe's formidable coachbuilders' creations and comprised the bulk of Type 57 production. Bugatti's clients could have the best, but overwhelmingly they chose Jean Bugatti's designs on the Type 57. Despite financial travail, development of the Type 57 continued with the introduction of a stiffened frame and rubber-mounted engine along with the supercharged 160hp Type 57C in 1936. In 1938 the nearly unthinkable happened in Molsheim, when Bugatti finally adopted Lockheed hydraulically actuated brakes and replaced the beautiful and lightweight but expensive aluminum-spoked wheels and brake drums with Rudge-Whitworth center-lock wire wheels and separate brake drums. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This incredibly beautiful Bugatti has a complete provenance from new as researched by noted historian and marque authority Pierre-Yves Laugier. The car was originally ordered by a true patron of Bugatti, Albert Brenac, who had begun his relationship with the brand with the acquisition of a Type 35 in 1926. Mr. Brenac's own story may well reflect his passion for engineering and performance as from his teenage years, he had begun his career as a test pilot for Avions Voisin and during the first world war he had been one of the first to fly a Voisin bombers on night raids. Born in a village in the south of France, Labastide Rouairoux, Brenac built a textiles business close to Toulouse after the war. By the late 1930s, his interests had migrated from the Spartan Grand Prix car to touring version Bugattis. A Type 49 was ordered, then replaced with an unblown 57 (chassis 57530) in November 1937. By the following summer on, July 29, 1938, Brenac placed a new order with regional Bugatti licensee Leyda of Toulouse for a supercharged version. His order, number 1010, provided for a 57C which left the factory a month later on August 30 destined for Gangloff to receive the Cabriolet coachwork it still wears to this day. The factory register records the car to have been completed and ready for delivery on October 21, 1938. Costing 99,840 French Francs, Mr. Brenac's new Bugatti was registered care of his textile works in the month leading up to its completion. True to form, Mr. Laugier's diligent sleuthing lead him to Albert Brenac's son, Guy, who recalled both his father and Leyda travelling to the Molsheim works to collect the car. He recalled Brenac Senior enjoying the car immensely, though the intervention of the war curtailed some of its use in the eight years he kept it. Through this period its maintenance was either with a local garagiste "Olayet" or for more serious matters it returned to Leyda's premises. Latterly, he moved his business to Cannes on the French Riviera towards the end of 1944, and it was there that he met the second custodian of the Bugatti, a Monsieur Helle. Rather sadly M. Helle did not enjoy the car for long, perhaps put off by an early mechanical failure during which the 'blower' took in water and damaged the engine. He parted with car on September 24, 1946, selling it to Charles Ehrmann of Nice, a teacher. Now being in the region of famed Nice Bugatti agent Friderich, who had been with Ettore from the company's founding, hearsay passed down through its first long term U.S. owner records that the car was taken to him and overhauled in this period. Ehrmann's custody was also brief, for by the spring of '47 the car had passed into the hands of a real sporting car enthusiast, Albert Benmussa of Lyon. Like Brenac, Benmussa was also in the textiles business, specializing in silk; however more and more in this era he began to trade old cars. Benmussa was also a key player in the popular post war Lyon-Charbonnière Rallyes, and is known to have campaigned 57748 on the 1950 edition. He is thought to have shared the driving with a Mr. Campenon. An image of the car in this period is shown on these pages and is the earliest surviving photo of the 57C, seemingly depicting its original guise of two tone blue paintwork and sporting wheel discs. For this rally it wore race number 8. Another known competitive outing came on September 7, 1952, when the car was entered on the "Côte de la Rochette" races in Hauteville, in the Ain department of France. Sometime in the period of 1952-3 the Bugatti received a complete engine rebuild in the workshops of Marcel Piottin, who before the war, had been the mechanic in chief at Bugatti agent Monestier of Lyon. Soon after, he set up his own shop and assisted many former company clients in the area. Again, Mr. Laugier's fastidious research led him to meet M. Piottin's son who worked with his father and recalled working on Benmussa's engine. At this point, perhaps to assist cooling but more likely simply to give the car the appearance of its later 57 models and 'S' series cars, the lower panels of the car's hood received the vented panels still present on the car today. At the same time, it also was fitted with a windshield washer and front shock absorbers. Benmussa retained the Bugatti until 1956, when on April 3 it was sold to François Kresser, at which point it made its first major location move to the Paris suburb of Neuilly sur Seine. It was there that it was seen first by noted American Bugatti connoisseur, Miles Coverdale. According to his own recollections he acquired the car and on December 2, 1957 registered it in Grenoble, France, where he was working at the time. It wasn't long before Coverdale returned to America and brought the Supercharged Bugatti with him to his home on Long Island, where it would become a well-known fixture in the post war Bugatti scene. As well as being used regularly by him, it also spent some time on exhibition at Austie Clark's Long Island Auto Museum in the Hamptons. Coverdale once recounted to the late Hugh Conway that after years of Benmussa's ebullient use of the car, that it had required another rebuild, this time by Henri Hauswald in Paris, Benmussa having blown the engine on the autobahn in Germany! All noted authorities attribute the absence of the expected sequence of chassis and engine number on the upper crankcase it wears today to date from this second rebuild and believe that during its rebuild of the original engine, this component was simply replaced by an unmarked new/old stock part from the Bugatti works/factory which still supplied such things in those days. Miles Coverdale is a name that resonates strongly in Bugatti circles as one of the pioneering collectors of the marque, and over the course of his life he owned numerous Pur Sang cars, including one of the Le Mans Type 50 Team cars and a Type 55. As an aside, he was directly descended from Myles Coverdale, the first person to print a fully translated English literature version of the bible in the UK in 1535. Coverdale retained the car until he passed in 2002, and was still seen to be using the car in his twilight years, the car by now having been painted a 'putty' grey color. After this it was acquired by local Greenwich based Bugatti enthusiast Desmond Fitzgerald. Upon acquisition, Mr. Fitzgerald returned the Bugatti it to its original blue livery, albeit preferring it to be in a single Royal Blue hue, and had the car reupholstered in a matched dark blue hide. On its completion in 2004 he sold the car to the current owner. Over the course of the last decade or more the car has been cherished and enjoyed by its current Bugatti aficionado owner. In 2010 it was campaigned on the American Bugatti Club 50th Anniversary Tour and it has been shown occasionally. Since that time, its use has been limited. As evidenced from its visual presentation, even among the more commonly produced coachwork designs each and every car has its own personality. In the opinion of Bonhams specialists, this is a particularly good looking example of Gangloff's late Cabriolets. Recently displayed at Bonhams Amelia Island Auction for preview, during this time it was test-driven by ace car journalist Robert Coucher for Octane Magazine and features in their June 2015 issue. He describes the car as a 'classic expression of the pur sang' and concludes 'the straight eight's vitality fizzes through the chassis and up through your feet to your fingertips via the steering wheel, and the roar from the exhaust is intoxicating – sentiments that we can only echo... With its great looks, known pedigree, and supercharged performance, this desirable late series 57C offers an eminently usable way of experiencing the Bugatti Legend.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-05-31
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1936 Mercedes-Benz 500 K Offener Tourenwagen by Sindelfingen

Class award-winner, 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance One of four extant examples of this highly sporting design Previous single-family ownership for 63 years Restoration by noted marque specialists Rakish and dramatic; the true Art Deco heir to the S and SS The grandly named Offener Tourenwagen was Mercedes-Benz’s name for, in its literal translation, a four-passenger open tourer. This design on the 500 K chassis was one of the few bodies for that model to share obvious visual DNA with the powerful S and SS models that had proceeded it in the 1920s. It had a light, sporting look, with long fenders and a low-slung beltline under its jaunty fabric top, and it is instantly, visibly a classic supercharged Mercedes in every line and curve. In many ways, even more so than the vaunted Spezial-Roadster, this was the performance model of the 500 K line, for the sporting gentleman or lady, and the true heir to the great brutes of the previous decade. By the time that this body style was introduced, open cars were steadily declining in favor, and historian Jan Melin notes that only 16 examples of the Offener Tourenwagen were produced on the 500 K chassis. Of those, four are known to have survived, all of them held in private collections. CHASSIS NUMBER 123724: THE HONEYMOON 500 K The example offered here, chassis no. 123724, was delivered by the Daimler-Benz branch in Munich on 19 November 1935, carrying engine number 123724 and Sindelfingen body number 814102, as it does today. Dr. Ralph W.E. Cox, an early American car enthusiast, aviator, and overall colorful figure, visited Munich on his honeymoon in 1951. He spotted the 500 K on a local used car lot and decided that it would make a splendid addition to his growing collection back home. It was shortly acquired from its owner, a Mr. Unholzer, and driven to Paris, then to the port at Le Havre, from which it was shipped to New York and eventually home to New Jersey. Dr. Cox eventually opened the Frontier Village Museum at the Cape May, New Jersey airport, and there the 500 K was exhibited for many years. Eventually it was transferred to the Museum of Automobiles at Petit Jean Mountain in Arkansas, where it remained on exhibit until finally being sold by Dr. Cox’s heirs in early 2014 to the consignor. While the car had received a restoration by Dr. Cox’s son in the early 1990s, it was found to be largely cosmetic, and the car remained in very original order, including what appeared to be its original 1936 leather upholstery. A comprehensive fresh restoration was undertaken by well-known Mercedes-Benz expert, Jim Friswold, in which the car was finished in this beautiful color scheme of medium oak green with a tan leather interior and corresponding green canvas top. It retains several of its most distinguishing features, including Bosch headlamps, fog light, and dual horns, and a handsome Munich-built Hopako touring trunk, which has been with the car since it was found in 1951 and perhaps earlier, and contains a two-piece set of fitted luggage. Satisfyingly, the car retains what appear to be the original engine number tag and stamping, and the original body number is still visible stamped into the body near a front frame rail, testament to its life spent in good hands as a largely unmolested machine. The owner has exhibited the restored car only selectively, including at the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was bestowed a Class award, and that year’s Forest Grove Concours d’Elegance, where it was the poster car, Best in Class, and Best of Show. It is therefore available for many further concours opportunities at the hands of a new owner, who will surely appreciate and treasure this rare 500 K just as much as the late Dr. Ralph W.E. Cox. Chassis no. 123724 Engine no. 123724 Body no. 814102

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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1991 Ferrari F40

Two owners and only 2,802 original miles One of 213 examples specified for the United States Beautifully maintained, highly original condition Accompanied by original Schedoni fitted luggage, manuals, and tools Documented with original window sticker and service invoices dating to May 1991 Immaculate example of the legendary 40th anniversary supercar This sensational example of Ferrari’s revered 40th anniversary supercar claims very low mileage and fastidious upkeep, resulting in a near time-capsule F40. Chassis number 87895 is one of approximately 213 examples specified for the United States out of a total of 1,311 cars built worldwide. This F40 was completed by the factory in January 1991, finished in rosso and upholstered with a matching cloth interior. As confirmed by original documentation, including a window sticker and a dealer inspection check-in sheet, the F40 was delivered for retail on 13 May 1991 to the well-known Ferrari dealer Lake Forest Sports Cars, in Lake Forest, Illinois. In addition to the standard F40 equipment, such as twin IHI turbochargers, a limited-slip differential, and the unique Speedline wheels with Pirelli P Zero tires, this car was fitted with air conditioning and an electrically heated front windshield. On 20 May 1991, the F40 was delivered to its first owner Dennis Ahrens, an enthusiast residing in nearby Barrington. He ordered the customized Schedoni fitted luggage option, as a pristine leather set with his name embroidered on it still accompanies the car today. A telling file of service invoices from Lake Forest Sports Cars clarifies that Mr. Ahrens considered his F40 to be a collectible, as very little mileage accrued from service to service over the next 14 years. Work during this period included a replacement of the ECU and injectors six months after the car’s delivery (under warranty), a major cam belt service in 2004, and a factory-recall repair to the lower suspension forks in 2005 (a well-known and welcome measure on any F40), as well as intermittent fluid services. Around late-2005 the F40 was stored, and in April 2014 it returned to Lake Forest Sports Cars for sale. The car was purchased by the consignor, only the second owner, later that year, and he immediately submitted it to the dealership for evaluation and sympathetic freshening as needed. In December 2014, while noting that the F40 had not run in about 10 years, the technicians at Lake Forest performed a cam belt service (including new timing and drive belts), replaced the plugs, flushed the brakes, gearbox, and cooling systems, and mounted proper new Pirelli P Zero Corsa tires. The original factory Pirelli tires showed so little use that they were retained with the car for possible exhibition purposes. In July 2016 an annual service was performed and a new battery was installed, and the Ferrari has recently been serviced again for its current offering to ensure smooth operation for the next caretaker. Currently displaying just 2,802 actual miles, this incredibly original F40 has been remarkably preserved. It is accompanied by the original Schedoni fitted luggage, manuals in the proper leather pouch, and a complete tool kit, and is documented with the original window sticker, offering a fantastic exhibition piece for FCA events, preservation-class competition, and important Ferrari gatherings. Chassis no. ZFFMN34A9M0087895

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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1990-93 Porsche Type 962 C Endurance Racing Competition Coupe Chassis no. '962-155'

The Ex-Jürgen Oppermann/Otto Altenbach/Loris Kessel Obermaier Racing – first Porsche home at Le Mans 1990-93 Porsche Type 962 C Endurance Racing Competition Coupe Chassis no. '962-155' Here we are privileged to offer a great modern-classic competition Coupe, manufactured by the renowned German marque of Porsche. It is an outstanding example of their peerless Porsche 962, the Group C and IMSA GTP-racing design which was introduced towards the end of 1984, and which was still capable of winning premier-league International endurance races ten long years later... By that time the Porsche 962 had won the Le Mans 24-Hour no fewer than three times (on the last occasion badged as a Dauer-Porsche); the FIA World Sports Car Championship twice; the North American IMSA GTP Championship every single year between 1985 and 1988; the Europan InterSerie Championship from 1987 to 1992 inclusive; and the All-Japan Sports Car Championship repeatedly, between 1985 and 1989. The Porsche 962 was a development of the preceding Type 956 and like its predecessor was intended for both IMSA GTP racing in the USA and Group C competition in Europe. An aluminium monocoque chassis was used, braced by a steel roll cage, while the engine was an air-cooled flat six. Always turbo-charged, the latter varied in capacity according to the prevailing regulations and would later be redesigned to incorporate water-cooling. One of the reasons that the Porsche 962 remained competitive for so long was the fact that it underwent extensive development by private teams. The example featured here – chassis number ' 962-155' – must today be unique in that it was sold by the factory - with a 3.0-litre works engine - to its first owner in 1990 and that self-same private owner has since retained the car over the entire intervening 25-year period until today. Campaigned as-new by Obermaier Racing, '962-155' now offered here made its public race debut on August 18, 1991, in the World Championship-qualifying 430km race at the Nürburgring, finishing a fine 4th overall. It was co-driven that day by Jürgen Oppermann/Otto Altenbach, wore race number '59' and was finished in Team Salamin Primagaz livery. On October 13, 1991, the car returned to full-blooded competition in the year's second Zeltweg-Hinterstoisser, Austria, round of the European InterSerie Championship, winning Heat Two in the hands of Jürgen Oppermann. The car's greater moment of glory was, however, surely on the weekend of June 19-20, 1993, when it was driven by the German/Swiss trio of Jürgen Oppermann/Otto Altenbach/Loris Kessel (a former F1 driver) in the Le Mans 24-Hour race – and finished seventh overall. Having qualified ninth fastest during pre-race practice '962-155' here nearly did not start the race at all. Having no sponsor for the event, its private owner decided that to have the car finish-prepared bearing the distinctive logo and colour scheme of 'Les 24H du Mans' the official organisers' livery – which created an immediate furore with the official Automobile Club de l'Ouest in authority who refused to let the car start in that livery, despite its crew's excellent qualifying time and position on the starting grid. The owner steadfastly refused to change the car's fresh livery and the matter became a confrontational stand-off between him and the ACO. Quite incredibly – considering the French Club's implacably authoritarian attitude established over so many decades of their great race's long history – it was they who finally gave in and allowed the car to start....and right they were to do so, as the German/Swiss machine ran brilliantly well to achieve that 7th-place finish overall, headed only by the three victorious factory-entered Peugeots, three works Toyotas. Thus the Obermaier Racing-entered '962-155' offered here was the first Porsche to finish at Le Mans in that 1993 24-Hour classic – a very fine achievement for any privateer. As offered here and according to Mr. Otto Altenbach the then principal at Obermaier Racing, the engine installed today is an original 3.2 litre engine supplied by the Porsche factory. It has been run for only a mere 11-12 hours since its last full factory rebuild, whereas the estimated engine life between rebuilds for these power units is fully 60 hours. Thus '155's engine as offered is estimated to be potentially 'on the button' for close on another 50 hours before it should require its next full service. The TAG electronic engine management system fitted was also only ever proposed by the works and all past services were carried out only at the Stuttgart factory. As by 1991 the model was starting to gain age, solely for this car when it competed at Le Mans, the factory fitted it with carbon fiber brakes together with the completely revised and accordingly adapted suspension. This Porsche 962 was to be the only car ever to compete at Le Mans in this 'official' 24-Hours livery. Having otherwise seen very little strenuous use in its long life beyond its brief - but actually very successful race history – having benefited from continuous maintenance within its caring single private ownership since delivery 25 years ago – the sale of this magnificent Coupe now represents a unique opportunity to acquire not only a Zeltweg-Hinterstoisser (today known as the Osterreichring) -winning Porsche, but also a unique part of Le Mans racing history. When the FIA Group C-regulation Porsche 956 Coupe was first developed in late 1981, Porsche planned parallel race programs to contest both the World Sports Car Championship and the North American IMSA GTP Championship series. However, when IMSA shelved acceptance of the original 956 design, citing safety reasons because the driver's foot pedals were exposed to crash damage ahead of the front-axle center line, Porsche extended the basic 956's wheelbase length to accommodate the pedals abaft the front axle centreline. They also took the opportunity to build-in an integral steel roll cage into the new aluminium-panelled chassis. Porsche's selected Type-935 2.8L flat-6 engine – derived from the 934 - was air-cooled and featured a KKK Type K36 turbocharger instead of the twin K27 devices specified for the preceding Group C-regulation 956, as twin-turbo systems were not IMSA GTP-accepted at that time. Subsequently, by mid-1985, a replacement 3.2-litre fuel-injected flat-6 power unit would be produced for the 962, improving the model's competitiveness against Jaguar's latest XJR V12-engined Coupes. However it would not be until 1986 that the 2.6-litre 956 engine was replaced for World Sports Car Championship use, for which a variety of 2.8, 3.0 and 3.2-litre variants were deployed, each with twin-turbocharged induction. The cars run under WSC regulations used the Porsche 962C designation to distinguish them them from their IMSA GTP sisters. The 3.2-litre unit was eventually disallowed by IMSA in 1987, but for 1988, to compete with the threat from factory-backed Nissans and to mollify the Porsche teams who threatened to abandon the American series, water-cooled twin-turbo Porsche power units were re-admitted, though with 36mm diameter induction restrictor plates now mandatory. It is understood that Porsche manufactured some 91 of these Typ 962 racing Coupes 1984-1991, of which 16 were campaigned by the factory team as true works cars, while the balance of 75 were sold to private customers. Some 956s were rebuilt with the lengthened monocoque chassis as 962s, with two being previously written off and four others simply rebuilt. Three badly damaged 962s were also rebuilt to re-emerge under new chassis number identities.] Due to the high demand for 962 parts, some aluminium chassis were built by Fabcar in the United States before being shipped to Germany for completion. Championship titles won by teams campaigning the 962 included International WSC honours in 1985 and 1986, the IMSA GTP Championship title for four successive seasons from 1985 to 1988, the European InterSerie Championship 1987-1992, all four years 1986-89 of the SuprCup series and the All-Japan Sports Prototype Championship from 1985 until 1989 inclusive. The 962 Coupes also dominated the American IMSA-series entry lists well into the 1990s, won both the 1986 and 1987 Le Mans 24-Hour races (co-driven by works drivers Derek Bell, Hans-Joachim Stuck and Al Holbert on both occasions) and in subsequent Dauer 962 configuration would win yet again in 1994. It should be noted that the car is offered with the Porsche factory bill of sale and further substantial factory invoices as well as several spare parts which include a front section, a rear wing, several sets of wheels, carbon brakes and specific carbon fibre brake accessories. Bonhams highly recommend close inspection of this 'one owner 'from new' Porsche 962. Ex Jürgen Oppermann/Otto Altenbach/Loris Kessel Obermaier Racing –Le Mans PORSCHE TYPE 962C Coupé compétition d'endurance 1990-1993 Châssis n° 962-155 Nous avons maintenant le privilège de vous proposer un prestigieux coupé de compétition classique moderne construit par la réputée marque allemande Porsche. Il s'agit d'un exemplaire exceptionnel de son incomparable Porsche 962, type homologué en Groupe C et en compétition IMSA GTP, lancé vers la fin de 1984 et toujours capable de vaincre au plus haut niveau international en endurance dix ans plus tard... À ce moment-là, la Porsche 962 avait remporté les 24 heures du Mans pas moins de trois fois (la dernière sous l'écusson Dauer-Porsche), le Championnat du Monde FIA pour Voitures de Sport deux fois, le Championnat IMSA GTP nord-américain tous les ans de 1985 à 1988, le Championnat d'Europe Intersérie de 1987 à 1992 inclus et le Championnat du Japon pour Voitures de Sport consécutivement de 1985 à 1989. La Porsche 962 résulta du développement de la Type 956 antérieure et comme sa devancière, elle fut destinée à courir à la fois en IMSA GTP aux Etats-Unis et en Groupe C en Europe. Un châssis monocoque en aluminium fut adopté, rigidifié par un arceau cage en acier, tandis que le moteur était un six-cylindres à plat refroidi par air. Toujours alimenté par un turbocompresseur, ce groupe qui affichait des cylindrées diverses en fonction des règlements applicables allait être refondu pour intégrer un refroidissement par liquide. Une des raisons pour lesquelles la Porsche 962 demeura si compétitive pendant si longtemps tint au fait qu'elle bénéficia d'un développement permanent de la part des écuries privées qui l'engagèrent. L'exemplaire proposé ici – châssis n° 962-155 – doit être unique actuellement du fait qu'il fut vendu par l'usine – avec un moteur 3,0 litres d'usine – à son premier propriétaire en 1990 et que ce même propriétaire a conservé cette voiture sans discontinuer pendant ces 25 dernières années. Engagée encore toute neuve par Obermaier Racing, « 962-155 » offerte ici fit ses débuts en public le 18 août 1991 dans l'épreuve de qualification du championnat sur 430 km au Nürburgring où elle arriva quatrième au général. Elle était copilotée ce jour-là par Jürgen Oppermann et Otto Altenbach, sous le numéro de course « 59 » et sous la livrée du Team Salamin Primagaz. Le 13 octobre 1991, la voiture revint à la grande compétition dans le deuxième Zeltweg-Hinterstoisser de l'année en Autriche, épreuve du Championnat d'Europe Intersérie où elle remporta la deuxième manche aux mains de Jürgen Oppermann Mais le plus grand moment de gloire fut sans nul doute le week-end des 19 et 20 juin 1993, lorsque pilotée par le trio germano- suisse Jurgen Oppermann/Otto Altenbach/Loris Kessel (ancien pilote de F1) aux 24 Heures du Mans, elle termina septième au général. Après s'être qualifiée avec le neuvième meilleur temps aux essais préalables des 24 Heures, « 962-155 » faillit ne pas prendre du tout le départ de l'épreuve ! Sans sponsor pour cette course, son propriétaire privé décida de présenter la voiture sous la livrée et avec le logo de l'organisation officielle « Les 24 H du Mans », ce qui déclencha aussitôt l'ire de l'Automobile Club de l'Ouest, l'autorité responsable qui refusa de laisser partir la voiture sous ses couleurs malgré ses excellents temps de qualification et sa position sur la grille de départ. Le propriétaire refusa absolument de changer la décoration toute récente de sa voiture et l'affaire tourna à la confrontation entre lui et l'ACO. Mais, fait presque incroyable quand on connaît l'attitude rigoureusement autoritaire du club français cultivée au fil de la longue histoire de cette course, c'est le club qui finit par céder et par autoriser le départ et bien lui en prit car la machine germano-suisse fit une course si brillante qu'elle termina septième au général, devancée seulement par les trois Peugeot victorieuses d'usine et les trois Toyota officielles. C'est ainsi que « 962- 155 » d'Obermaier Racing proposée ici fut la première Porsche à l'arrivée de la classique du Mans de 1993. Un beau résultat pour un « privé ». Telle qu'elle est offerte ici, nous avons été informés par Monsieur Otto Altenbach, ancien propriétaire de l'ecurie Obermaier Racing, que le moteur est bien un 3.2 litres d'origine livrée par l'usine Porsche. Nous savons que le moteur qui l'équipe maintenant n'a tourné qu'une douzaine d'heures depuis sa dernière reconstruction à l'usine alors que la durée de vie d'un moteur de ce type entre deux reconstructions est de 60 heures. Ainsi, le moteur de « 155 » est potentiellement prêt à démarrer pour environ 50 heures avant sa prochaine révision complète. L'auto est également munie d'un système de gestion moteur électronique TAG, monté uniquement par l'usine, ainsi que de freins à disques en carbone et une suspension révisée en fonction – ceci dû principalement à la fin de vie du développement du modèle en 1991 et le souhait du propriétaire de participer au 24H du Mans en 1993. Tous les entretiens depuis sa sortie d'usine ont été effectués à Stuttgart. Cette Porsche 962 devait être la seule voiture de l'histoire qui courut au Mans sous la livrée « officielle » des 24 Heures. N'ayant connu par ailleurs que peu de contraintes sévères au cours de sa longue existence après cette brève, mais très brillante carrière en course, et ayant bénéficié d'un entretien permanent et rigoureux pendant sa détention par un propriétaire privé au cours des 25 ans qui ont suivi sa livraison par l'usine, la cession de ce magnifique coupé représente une occasion unique d'acquérir non seulement une Porsche victorieuse à Zeltweg-Hinterstoisser (ensuite appelé l'Osterreichring) , mais aussi un chapitre unique de l'histoire de la course du Mans. Lorsque le coupé Porsche 956 Groupe C FIA fut développé initialement à la fin de 1981, Porsche planifia parallèlement un programme de courses en vue de disputer le Championnat du Monde pour Voitures de Sport et le Championnat IMSA GTP nord-américain. Mais lorsque l'IMSA refusa l'homologation du type 956 original en se fondant sur des motifs de sécurité car les pieds du pilote placés en avant de l'axe de l'essieu avant étaient trop exposés en cas d'accident, Porsche rallongea l'empattement initial de la 956 afin de positionner le pédalier en arrière de l'axe de l'essieu avant. Le constructeur en profita pour inclure un arceau de sécurité intégral en acier dans le nouveau châssis coque en aluminium. Le moteur flat-6 Type 935 2, 8 litres choisi par Porsche, dérivé du Type 934, était refroidi par air et alimenté par un turbocompresseur KKK Type K36 à la place des deux appareils K27 spécifiés pour la 956 précédente, homologuée en Groupe C avec deux systèmes de suralimentation qui n'étaient pas acceptés en IMSA-GTP à ce moment-là. Par la suite, au milieu de l'année 1985, un groupe flat-6 à injection de 3,2 litre de remplacement produit pour la 962 améliora la compétitivité du modèle face aux derniers coupés XJR à moteur V12 de Jaguar. Mais il fallut attendre 1986 pour que le moteur 956 de 2, 6 litres fût remplacé dans le Championnat du Monde pour Voitures de Sport pour lequel une gamme de variantes de 2, 8, 3 et 3, 2 litres fut mise en ligne, tous alimentés par deux systèmes de suralimentation. Les voitures qui coururent dans le cadre du règlement WSC utilisèrent la désignation Porsche 962 C pour les distinguer de leurs homologues de l'IMSA GTP. Le groupe 3, 2 litres fut ensuite rejeté par l'IMSA en 1987, mais en 1988, en vue de la confrontation avec les Nissan soutenues par l'usine et pour calmer les équipes Porsche qui menaçaient de ne plus participer aux épreuves américaines, les groupes Porsche à deux turbos refroidis par liquide furent réintégrés à condition de les équiper sur l'admission d'une bride de 36 mm désormais obligatoire. On admet que Porsche construisit quelque 91 unités de ces coupés compétition Typ 962 de 1984-1991 dont 16 furent engagés comme voitures officielles, tandis que le solde de 75 voitures était vendu à des concurrents privés. Certaines 956 reconstruites avec un châssis coque allongé furent redésignées 962 dont deux voitures avaient été détruites antérieurement et quatre autres simplement reconstruites. Trois 962 sérieusement endommagées furent aussi reconstruites pour réapparaître munies de nouveaux numéros de châssis. En raison d'une forte demande de pièces 962, quelques châssis en aluminium fabriqués par Fabcar aux états-Unis furent expédiés en Allemagne pour y être complétés. Les titres en championnat récoltés par les écuries utilisatrices de la 962 comprennent l'International WSC en 1985 et 1986, le Championnat IMSA GTP quatre fois de suite de 1985 à 1988, le Championnat européen Intersérie 1987-1992, quatre titres successifs 1986-1989 en série SuperCup et le Championnat du Japon pour Sport-Prototypes de 1985 à 1989 inclus. Les coupés 962 qui dominèrent aussi dans les listes d'engagement de la série américains IMSA jusque dans les années 1990 remportèrent les 24 Heures du Mans 1986 et 1987 (pilotées par Derek Bell, Hans-Joachim Stuck et Al Holbert ces deux années-là) et dans la configuration Dauer 963 ultérieure, la 962 gagna encore en 1994. Il faut noter que l'auto est proposée à la vente avec sa facture de chez Porsche, d'autres factures d'usine ainsi que de diverses pièces de rechange dont une face avant, un spoiler arrière, des jeux de roues, freins en carbone ainsi que des pièces spécifiques en accessoires pour celle-ci. Bonhams recommande une inspection de près de cette Porsche 962 avec un seul propriétaire depuis sa livraison par l'usine.

  • BELBelgium
  • 2015-05-24
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Matching NumbersHighly Original and Preserved Condition 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS Coachwork by PininfarinaFerrari Classiche Certified

1966 Ferrari 275 GTS Coachwork by Pininfarina Chassis no. 08335 Engine no. 08335 3,286cc SOHC V-12 Engine Triple Weber Carburetors 260 BHP at 7,000 RPM 5-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Hydraulic Disc Brakes *Equipped with rare and desirable factory hard top *Exceptionally well presented example with matching numbers engine *Documented with build sheets and original purchase paperwork *With first owner for several decades, and less than 35,000 miles from new *Ferrari Classiche Certification in process THE FERRARI 275 GTS There had been open-top Ferrari road cars before the advent of the 250 series, but it was, chiefly, Pininfarina's offerings on the later chassis that established the convertible as a fixture of the Ferrari range. After the experimentation and variety which characterized the coachwork of the 250-series cars, the arrival of the 275 in 1964 brought with it bodywork being manufactured by Pininfarina themselves, with a considerably improved build quality. The chassis followed Ferrari's established practice, incorporating a multi-tubular frame tied together by oval main tubes, and for the first time on a road-going Ferrari there was independent rear suspension, this setup employing a double wishbone and coil-spring arrangement similar to that of the 250LM sports-racer. The adoption of a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle combining the now all-synchromesh gearbox and differential in a single unit helped improve weight distribution, and this feature would characterize future generations of front-engined Ferrari road cars. By the mid 1960s, Ferrari's road cars were beginning to lose some of their rougher edges and take on a more luxurious mien. The 275GTS's interior is notable for its generously sized seats and wood veneer dashboard, the latter appearing for the first time in a Ferrari. Even the most sybaritic of customers, though, would acknowledge that the driving experience is the raison d'ętre of Ferrari ownership, and in this respect the 275GTS had lost none of its predecessors' aggressive charm. Car & Driver magazine had this to say: "Since the engine is heir to a V12 tradition that's gone on for almost twenty years, it's only natural that it should be the dominating factor in the car's personality, and that the whole car should have been developed around the engine and its own unique character. You can feel it as much as you can hear it. It has a taut, powerful rush of response that comes to you through the seat of your pants, through the steering wheel rim. The instant the clutch is engaged, the chassis takes on life and begins to move as a unit with the engine, it's an all-in-one-piece sensation that you normally feel only in racing cars, one that's unique to the Ferrari among normal passenger vehicles today." THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This beautiful late-production 275 GTS benefits from a concise and well-researched chain of ownership, including a documented 20-year period of care by the original owner. The GTS also enjoyed a ten-year period of ownership by a respected collector who commissioned much restoration care with the esteemed Paul Russell & Company. Per the research of marque expert Marcel Massini, chassis no. 08335 is the 193rd of 200 examples built. While the chassis was sent to Pininfarina for Spider coachwork in early October 1965, the luxurious motorcar was not completed until 1966, after returning to the factory where chassis was officially finished in early March. 08335 is believed to have been fitted with the rarely optioned hard top from new. According to an original dealer's invoice dated in late April 1966, the GTS was purchased new from German Ferrari agent Auto-Becker by Mortimer Rosenbaum, an enthusiast based in San Diego, California. As Mr. Rosenbaum explained in correspondence to a later owner, he retained possession of the beautiful Ferrari for 20 years while esteeming to keep it highly original, modifying only the brakes for improved power. Acquired in 1986 by a California based collector, the spider was sold in 1990 to Walnut Creek Ferrari, where it remained until being purchased in early 1992 by Dennis Farrey of San Carlos, California. After bolstering the car's file by corresponding with Rosenbaum, Farrey sold the Ferrari later that year to Dr. Ervin "Bud" Lyon, the respected late collector from New Hampshire, at which point the odometer displayed 30,670 miles. Lyon began submitting the Ferrari for service to Paul Russell & Co. in Massachusetts almost immediately, but in 1997 he opted for a comprehensive refurbishment. As detailed by numerous invoices, Paul Russell substantially restored the suspension, brakes, and other chassis elements, while partially rebuilding the original V-12 engine. The interior was trimmed in proper black leather, while the coachwork was refinished in the stunning factory shade of Azzuro Metallizat. In this exquisite state of presentation, the Ferrari was enjoyed at two driving events held in conjunction with the 1999 Cavallino Classic, the track event at Moroso Motorsports Park and the Classic Tour di Palm Beach. In the early 2000s, Lyon sold 08335 to dealer Stephen Serio, who in turn retailed the car to Chris Lynch of Wayland, Massachusetts, by 2004. The Ferrari was then entrusted to Boston Sportscar over the next few years for any needed service while passing to Don Gaiter of nearby Weston by May 2011. Still displaying the rewarding benefits of the expert restoration, this outstanding 275 GTS currently displays 34,763 miles, which are believed to reflect actual use. The car is thoroughly documented with factory build sheets, original purchase paperwork, former owners' correspondence, and a stack of invoices reflecting the work by Paul Russell. A Ferrari Classiche Red book application has also been submitted at the consignor's expense so that the next owner can obtain the highly-coveted Ferrari Classiche certification once processed. Offering the visceral appeal of open touring at vintage driving events - or running with the rare and desirable factory hard top fitted - this beautiful spider would complement any collection of sports cars or open grand tourers.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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2005 Maserati MC12

630 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine, six-speed Cambriocorsa paddle-shift transmission, front and rear suspension with double wishbones, steel dampers, and coaxial coils and springs, and four-wheel Brembo cross-drilled and ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 110.2 in. Offered from the Riverside International Automotive Museum Collection Purchased new by Doug Magnon; single ownership and 6,200 kilometers from new One of only a handful of MC12s imported under the Show and Display program Driven by Derek Hill with Phil Hill at Laguna Seca in 2008 When Maserati was on the rise in the mid-2000s, thanks to the success of the Spyder, Coupe, and Quattroporte, especially in the United States market, the company decided that it was the right time to produce its own supercar. Like Ferrari, Maserati was owned by Fiat S.p.A., so it only made sense for them to utilize the platform of the incredible Enzo, the gold standard of supercars, to their advantage. It goes without saying that the engineers and designers at Maserati had a big task ahead of them. How does one improve upon what is considered to be the finest Ferrari ever built? While the MC12 may have been very similar to the Enzo in terms of mechanics, its bodywork was anything but. Designed by Frank Stephenson, the MC12 had its own dramatic look and flair. The biggest difference between the Enzo and MC12 was the presence of a removable hardtop, allowing a more visceral, open-top driving experience for driver and passenger. At the back, the MC12 had a massive rear spoiler; thanks to that and its newer proportions, the MC12 created more downforce than the Enzo. Needless to say, the MC12 caused quite a stir amongst Maserati enthusiasts when it was first announced. As it was unequivocally the greatest road-going automobile that the company had ever built, everyone wanted their hands on Maserati’s newest supercar. The company had intended for the car to make an impact, and it did so by strictly limiting the number that would be built to only 25 cars. Each of which was hand-finished, with exacting attention to detail, and finished in a brilliant two-tone blue and white color scheme. However, apparently the urging of customers proved too much for Maserati to resist. Looking to not only please their demanding clientele, but also to celebrate the car’s racing success, Maserati eventually produced a second run of 25 cars, for a total of a still very limited 50 examples. While the Enzo never took to the track in competition, Maserati was quick to realize the MC12’s potential. The MC12 Corsa was campaigned in the FIA’s GT and GT1 World Championship series, where it saw considerable success. With the MC12 Corsa, Vitaphone Racing secured five consecutive team championships and a sixth of the first season of GT1 in 2010. Furthermore, Maserati won the manufacturer’s Cup in 2005 and 2007 and six Drivers’ Championships, four in the FIA GT Championship from 2006 to 2009, one for the 2006 Italian GT Championship, and another in the newly formed FIA GT1 class in 2010. Purchased new to be a part of the Riverside International Automotive Museum, Mr. Magnon’s MC12 has been both enjoyed and well cared for since day one. Imported to the United States under the Show and Display law by Classic Coach of Elizabeth, New Jersey, the car was never registered for road use in Magnon’s ownership. Instead, it saw the majority of its mileage accrued on tracks such as Pocono Raceway and Laguna Seca during associated concours and Maserati Club events, while occasionally being driven in the industrial complex surrounding the Museum to ensure that it remained in good running and driving condition. According to a small file of invoices, the car’s windshield was replaced in January of 2008. While factory records supplied by Maserati note that this MC12 was originally fitted with engine number 000075, the car is currently fitted with engine number 000090, which is strongly believed to be its original engine. Those closest with the museum who knew this MC12 from new have no recollection of an engine replacement or major engine issues to speak of. Furthermore, no service invoices noting an engine replacement could be found at the time of cataloging to support this claim. One very interesting tidbit from this particular car’s history is that it enjoyed a lap around Laguna Seca driven by Derek Hill with his father Phil, riding in the passenger seat, in honor of his 80th birthday. At the bequest of Maserati North America, Doug Magnon generously agreed to loan them his prized MC12 for use at the Western Automotive Journalists Media Day event in April 2008. Sadly, Phil passed away that August; this is believed to be one of the last times that he was driven around a racetrack. Today, the MC12 has remained the most impactful and memorable of all Maseratis built in the 21st century. It remains just as desirable today as it was the day it was announced and is a must-have automobile for any Maserati aficionado. With just 50 examples produced, MC12s rarely come up for sale, privately or publicly, and a single-owner example such as this should not be overlooked. Addendum Please note that this car has 6,200 kilometers, not miles as noted in the printed catalogue. Due to California emissions, this vehicle must be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. This title is in transit. Chassis no. ZAMDF44B000016977 Engine no. 000090

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1953 Cadillac Series 62 Coupe by Ghia

210 bhp, 331 cu. in. OHV V-8, four-speed Hydra-Matic automatic transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 126 in. One of two such examples built by the famed Italian coachbuilder Ghia Part of its current owner’s collection for two decades Restored by the well-known Mike Fennel Italian style and American engineering at their peak Admiring the car offered here, one would be hard-pressed to predict its origins as anything but Alfa Romeo in the early 1950s. Only its very American size and presence belie it roots, as do the subtle Cadillac script and badging. Underneath its design, the creation of Ghia principal Luigi Segre, is the same Series 62 the average neighborhood banker drove to work in 1953. Such is the power of a coachbuilder to make over a car’s entire personality, transforming a staid Cadillac into something of sensual flash and dash. Copies of original build sheets on file indicate that a pair of 1953 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible chassis were ordered through the New York distributor; convertible chassis were often chosen by custom coachbuilders for their work, regardless of the intended body style, as they were more rigid and lent themselves to a wider range of designs. Both of these cars were bodied by Ghia to Segre’s dramatic design, with pontoon fenders curved at the front and flared into a slight fin at the rear and headlights and driving lights tucked into rounded “pods” on either side of the traditional upright radiator shell. Long chrome “ribs” were tucked into a subtle Corvette-style “cove” fit into each flank, running the length of the car and accentuating its appearance of low, smooth style. Greenhouse glass was expansive, with both a wrap-around windshield and backlight and narrow chrome pillars twixt the two. No surprise, then, that the two Ghia Cadillacs are shrouded in romantic mystery. One was apparently delivered to John Perona, owner of Manhattan’s fabled El Morocco and a longtime Ghia customer. Yet another persistent rumor places Rita Hayworth behind the wheel. Virtually no period photographs or documentation for either car survive, other than a press photo of one, taken by Ghia in Italy. The Cadillac offered here, chassis number 536253053, is distinguished from its sister Ghia coupe by its front-end design, which features a unique grille with thin vertical bars finished in gold-anodized aluminum, as well as no front fender parking lights, different taillights and rear license plate holder, and two half “bumperettes” rather than a full front bumper. It was acquired by Don Williams of the Blackhawk Collection for its current owners some two decades ago; Williams recalls it as a solid original car that was then restored by the late Mike Fennel, the well-known restorer from Santa Clarita, California. Following its restoration, the car was featured in several memorable magazine articles, including in Exotic Cars Quarterly (Summer 1991) and as the cover feature of Collectible Automobile (December 2008). It was also displayed as an exhibition-only entrant at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1989 and 2002, being reunited at the latter with its sister car, today in the Petersen Automotive Museum. Maintained in its owner’s collection since, the car remains in good condition, with its engine bay thoroughly detailed in preparation for the sale and only minor age and wear to the golden tan leather interior; similarly, the paint still has a good shine with only minor scratches. Much of the trim throughout the car is finished in gold-anodized aluminum, including that on the decorative chrome “ribs” on the body, badges, and grille bars, matching the Cadillac “sabre” wheels. The dashboard carries a sporting LeCarra wood-rimmed steering wheel, surrounded by gauges, detailing, and hardware with a wonderful futuristic 1950s bent; 34,320 miles show at the time of cataloguing. The combination of great 1950s American chassis, engineering, and build quality with breathtaking Ghia design is a showstopper. Desired by socialites of the era and wrapped in an air of romantic intrigue, this car ranks as one of the great coachbuilt creations of its age. It needs only a Hollywood starlet wrapped in mink and Givenchy to complete its appeal. Chassis no. 536253053

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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1934 Delage D8 S Cabriolet by Fernandez et Darrin

120 bhp, 4,050 cc OHV inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid axle and semi-elliptical leaf-spring front suspension, live rear axle and semi-elliptical leaf-spring rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulically actuated drum brakes. Wheelbase: 130 in. An outstanding example of French Art Deco design One of the great performance chassis of its time Formerly owned by Robert Friggens and Noel Thompson One of only two known examples CCCA Full Classic Howard Darrin was an American-born stylist who came of professional age in Paris, working at first with fellow American Thomas Hibbard and later, during the great Art Deco era, with a financier backer named Fernandez. His instinctive talent for dramatic design is exemplified in the powerful image of this dramatic Delage, one of his all-time great creations and one that was, in 1933, beguilingly ahead of its time in its proportions and styling. While in many ways classical in its long-hood, short-deck proportions, Darrin’s design is visually lengthened by the dual spares moved to the rear of the car, freeing up the full sweep of the sensuously curved fenders. Use of a long front fender curve that ends at a rather short rear fender gives a “tucked under” appearance to the rear wheels and also emphasizes that half of this automobile’s length is in its hood, which extends all of the way back to the short, raked vee’d windshield and then angles forward to move parallel to an angled cowl. Similar styling treatments were employed by stylists Alexis de Sakhnoffsky and Raymond Dietrich on Packards, but Howard Darrin was there first with this design on the Delage D8 S chassis. Research indicates that chassis number 38229 is one of only two known extant examples of this body style on the D8 S platform. Photographs of one of the two in Europe when new have been published in both the Winter 1968 and June 1993 issues of The Classic Car, copies of which are on file; the same car was also photographed at a concours d’elegance with screen actress Betty Spell, who was featured in numerous period advertisements for Delage. Examination of the photographs shows the use of metallic paint to the fenders and upper moldings, in which the traditional Fernandez et Darrin beltline extends as it meets the cowl and flows into a pointed “spade” that tapers to the radiator shell. In one of several retrospective articles he published, Howard Darrin noted, “The top was of a silken material laminated into the canvas. This material, which was manufactured in France and first used by Hibbard & Darrin, had a sheen and was impervious to water marks.” The period photographs also show the optional disc-style wheel covers and Darrin’s trademark door handles, features that are retained on chassis number 38229 today. After completion, this car was most certainly sold to its first private owner through Delage’s U.K. distributors, Smith & Company; its original British registration plates, number BLM 633, are retained on the car today. According to information provided by Peter Jacobs of the Delage Register, chassis 38229 was discovered in 1978 by Tim Eaton. It was in the ownership of Colonel Geoffrey Sparrow, a platoon commander during World War II, who had returned to become managing director of his family’s textile business. At that time, it was reported that the car had not been used since suffering from transmission issues during the war; however, a recent phone call with Mrs. Elisabeth Sparrow indicates that her husband may not have purchased the car until the immediate post-war years. In 1983, the Delage traveled to the United States, where it joined the well-known collection of longtime enthusiast Robert Friggens in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It then passed, around 1986, to Noel Thompson of New Vernon, New Jersey, who is well known among CCCA members for his automotive connoisseurship, including such notable marques as Delahaye, Auburn, Bugatti, and Stutz. Thompson entrusted his new acquisition to Stone Barn Automobile Restoration, which performed a complete restoration of the paint, upholstery, and chrome, as well as some mechanical repair work. Its previous two-tone black-and-red paint treatment was changed to a spectacular lilac shade in the upper and lower panels, as well as the fenders, with the accent beltline and hood “sweep panel” finished in bare polished aluminum. The top was reproduced in a fabric similar to the original Darrin-patented material, and the interior was outfitted in lilac leather. Befitting the car’s grand and flamboyant appearance, the radiator mascot chosen was a Lalique crystal Tete de Paon, or peacock’s head! Following the completion of the restoration, the Delage was displayed at the 1991 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded 2nd in Class. It went on to appear successfully in competition with the Antique Automobile Club of America, achieving a National First Prize in 1991, and with the Classic Car Club of America, scoring its Primary First at the 1992 Eastern Grand Classic in Pennsylvania and its Senior First at the 1993 CCCA Annual Meeting in Maryland, both with perfect 100-point scores. The car was then photographed by automotive photographer Michael Furman for a self-published booklet on the Thompson Vintage Automobile Collection. These photos also appear in Mr. Furman’s book Motorcars of the Classic Era, as well as in Richard Adatto’s marque reference, Delage Styling and Design. A gorgeous example of Fernandez et Darrin design at its flamboyant best, this spectacular automobile marks the beginning of a grand turning point in European styling, as streamlining met sophisticated curves. Unseen at concours d’elegance in recent years, it is unforgettable in its visage, colors, and sheer drama, just as Howard Darrin would have wanted it. Chassis no. 38229 Engine no. 131

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
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1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 bhp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-cam inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transition, coil-spring independent front suspension, and coil-spring single point swing axle rear suspension. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Single-family ownership from new until 2009 Only 42,312 original miles since new A First in Class and People’s Choice Award at the 2012 Mercedes-Benz National Starfest Concours d’Elegance Fresh restoration in original Ivory with Green leather interior Full matching-numbers example accompanied by original factory and title documentation and ample restoration documentation This example, chassis 7500229, is a 1957 U.S.-specification example. It was dispatched by train to the seaport of Hamburg, Germany, on September 27, 1957. Its first destination was Studebaker Packard, of South Bend, Indiana, which was Max Hoffman’s distribution center. According to the specifications provided by a copy of the original build sheet, this car was delivered new in Ivory (608) with a Green leather interior (1073) and green cloth top. It was specified as having a Becker Mexico radio, sealed beam headlights, U.S.–specification instrumentation with English inscriptions, and a final drive ratio of 1:3.89. From South Bend, it was delivered to Burklein Motors, of Beverly Hills, which was a Rambler dealer that also sold Mercedes-Benz. The car remained unregistered with Burklein Motors until March 28, 1963, when the franchise was dissolved; at that point, this Roadster was registered in the name of Mr. Burklein. The original California “pink title” from this transaction survives and is included with the sale of the car, as is the original 1963 California “black plate,” which notably only had one registration renewal sticker on it, for 1964. In 1967, Mr. Burklein and his family moved to Tucson, Arizona, and the Mercedes went with them. It was driven sparingly and always well maintained, being resprayed in white sometime in the 1980s. It remained in Mr. Burklein’s Tucson estate all those years, until its purchase by the second owner, Mr. Mischler, of Scottsdale, Arizona, in 2009, ending the original ownership chain that had remained intact for half a century! At this point, the car had less than 42,000 original miles on the odometer, for an average of less than 1,000 miles per year. Mr. Mischler commissioned famed 300SL restorer Bill Richardson, of Richardson Restoration & Machine Werks in Phoenix, Arizona, to perform a full, no-expense-spared, four-year restoration, at a cost of several hundred thousand dollars. Originality was Mr. Mischler’s prime interest, and it was decided that the car would be restored to its original color combination and specifications, down to the last detail. The restoration was one of the most comprehensive ever performed under Bill Richardson, who confirmed that, when he removed the paint, the condition of the car was one the best he had ever seen in the over one hundred 300SLs he has restored in the past four decades. All the mechanical work was either performed or directly supervised by Bill. At the owner’s direction, every nut and bolt was restored at great expense, in order to retain all of the original numbered parts whenever possible, including the axles, A-frames, generator, and a long list of other items. As such, it is believed to be one of the purest restored examples available today. Further, this California/Arizona car has never had any damage or rust of any kind, and, except for the passenger door, it still retains all its original body panels. The only modification that was made from the factory card was the upgrade to the expensive and more desirable European-specification headlight assemblies and bumpers, which were sourced as NOS units. Accompanying the spirited Mercedes is the original jack and an original owner’s manual, as well as the aforementioned pink title and California black plate. Complete records of the restoration are included on a CD, which contains over 300 photographs of the complete restoration. Finally, itemized billing, which comprises approximately 40 pages from Richardson Restorations & Machine Werks, is also included. Finished in its original livery of Ivory and Green, the result of the work was such that it won both a People’s Choice Award and First in Class at the September 2012 Mercedes-Benz’s factory-sponsored Starfest National Concours d’Elegance at the Biltmore Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona. The chain of ownership is amazingly intact, having remained in the Burklein family until 2009, when the title was established in the name of the current owner, Mr. Mischler, making the next owner of the car only the third in its 56 years of existence. Presented in stunning, show-ready condition, it is ready to grace the fields of concours around the globe, and the stable of its next owner. Chassis no. 198.042.7500229 Engine no. 198.980.7500107 Body no. 198.042.7500131

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
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1933 Duesenberg SJ Riviera Phaeton by Brunn

320 bhp, 420 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine with dual overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger, three-speed manual transmission, beam front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs front and rear, and vacuum-assisted, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" - From the estate of Mr. John M. O'Quinn - Ex-Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, famed industrialist and razor pioneer - A factory-supercharged Model SJ - Original Phaeton body - One of three built, beautifully restored and Amelia Island class-winner After the landmark introduction of the majestic Duesenberg Model J on December 1st, 1928 at the New York Auto Salon, Fred Duesenberg immediately set to work at making it even more powerful. His favorite centrifugal-type supercharger was beautifully adapted to the Model J’s giant eight, just as he had done so successfully to his 122-cubic inch racing eights a decade earlier. Fred died in a Model J accident in 1932, and his brother Augie, until then independently and very successfully building racecars, was retained to put the final touches on the supercharged Duesenberg. Without a doubt, the resulting SJ marked the pinnacle of American luxury automobiles. Even today, it remains unparalleled in concept and execution. The SJ delivered 320 horsepower at speed while retaining the outstanding naturally aspirated performance of the J at lower rpm. Alone among the Duesenberg Js, only the SJ embodied the input of both Duesenberg brothers. Just 36 SJs were produced, and conversion of a standard J to SJ specification was no small job, as the engine had to be completely disassembled to fit stronger valve springs, high-performance tubular connecting rods and other specific components. Since the SJ required external exhaust manifolds to accommodate the supercharger under its hood, the giant chromed flexible exhaust pipes became its signature feature. The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom body industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the style and grace of the factory sheet metal was ideally suited for the execution of elegant custom coachwork. While most of the leading coachbuilders of the day bodied the mighty J, many modern observers believe that Brunn & Company best combined exceptional design with outstanding build quality. One of the most remarkable designs of the classic era, Brunn’s Riviera Phaeton was both beautiful and practical. Although a convertible sedan by function, it was cleverly engineered and brilliantly styled, with most experts agreeing that the Riviera was the best-looking four-door convertible offered on the Duesenberg chassis. Whereas most convertible sedans had large and complicated top mechanisms, Brunn’s Riviera Phaeton top was compact and simple to operate. It was one of the few open designs that were equally attractive in open or closed form. This ingenious design allowed the entire rear body to open, hinged at the bumper, revealing a spacious compartment into which the top lowered completely. With the top down and hidden, the car has a very sporting presence, with compact lines emphasizing the muscular appearance of the high-performance chassis below. Just three of these remarkable Brunn Riviera Phaetons are known to have been built, with SJ528, the car offered here, also representing one of the five percent of Duesenberg Js delivered new in supercharged SJ form. The first owner was Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, best known today for two inventions: the cartridge-style Schick razor and the first electric “dry razor.” In June 1934, Schick purchased SJ528, driving it for a little more than two years before trading it in on a new car. Duesenberg sold the car a second time in October of 1936 to C.H. Oshei of Detroit, Michigan, the owner of the Anderson Windshield Wiper Company. Oshei traded J107, a well-known LaGrande dual-cowl phaeton, in the transaction. In 1941, SJ528 was purchased by noted Chicago-area Duesenberg dealer John Troka, who resold the car to A. E. Sullivan of Rockford, Illinois. Sullivan sold the car to Margarite Feuer, of Rockford, Illinois, who kept the car just a short while before a musician named Vaughn purchased it. Vaughan sold the car back to Troka in the late 1940s, who removed the supercharger for another project before reselling the car to Art Grossman of Chicago, Illinois. Grossman intended to undertake a restoration but instead sold the car in April 1950 to Harry Schultzinger of Cincinnati, Ohio, who immediately began restoring the car. For reasons unknown, Schultzinger decided to replace the frame with one from J551 (frame #2577), although the rest of SJ528, including engine, body, firewall and drivetrain components, remained with the car. Harry Schultzinger was an inveterate tinkerer, known for his performance improvements and said to have only two speeds – fast and faster! During his ownership, SJ528 received a number of “improvements,” including the installation of a five-speed transmission from a truck, 17-inch wheels, and an engine rebuild using components from J467. Schultzinger became SJ528’s longest-term owner, but finally in 1975, Dr. Don Vesley of Louisiana and Florida purchased the car. In 1983, he sold it to noted Florida collector Rick Carroll, who undertook a second restoration, this time in red, and reinstalled an original supercharger, transmission and 19-inch wheels. After Rick Carroll’s restoration, Bob Bahre of Oxford, Maine purchased SJ528, sometime in 1986. Later, in 1988, Phoenix, Arizona-based dealer Leo Gephardt advertised the car for sale, before it passed on to the late Noel Thompson, a prominent New Jersey collector. Thompson sold the car to the Imperial Palace, where it was prominently featured in the Duesenberg Room for many years before Dean Kruse of Auburn, Indiana acquired it as part of a multiple-car purchase in 1999. The next owner to purchase SJ528 commissioned the car’s third – and most comprehensive – restoration. Renowned multiple Best of Show-winning restorer Fran Roxas was chosen for the project. The complete, “nut-and-bolt” restoration included a bare-metal strip that revealed a remarkably solid and original body. Every mechanical component was completely rebuilt or refurbished as necessary and completely refinished. The body was block-sanded to perfection before multiple flawless coats of deep, rich black paint were applied, wet-sanded and buffed to mirror-like perfection. The interior was trimmed in rich, dark tobacco brown leather and an immaculately tailored matching Haartz cloth top was fitted. Accented by perfect show-quality brightwork, the result was truly breathtaking and remains so today. Prior to acquisition by the O’Quinn Collection in early 2005, SJ528 was road tested and revealed to have been among the best-running and most-powerful Duesenbergs the RM tester had ever driven in his experience. One can feel the additional power of the supercharger, especially given the engine’s desirable twin-carburetor intake system. Even more remarkably, the car’s steering was the lightest and smoothest in the tester’s experience, indicating a low-mileage chassis or an exceptional restoration, or perhaps both. Today, Lt. Col. Jacob Schick’s magnificent SJ528 is one of a mere handful of original-bodied supercharged Model J Duesenbergs remaining today. It is one of three Brunn Riviera Phaetons built and, amazingly, one of two such factory-supercharged cars. In 2006, SJ528 was shown at the prestigious Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded Best in Class. As expected, it is an exceedingly rare event when an original-bodied Duesenberg with the specification, pedigree, provenance and rarity of SJ528 comes to market. For the confirmed collector of the finest custom-coachbuilt cars of the Classic Era, SJ528 is very likely the finest example available today. Chassis no. 2551

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
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1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Disappearing Top Convertible Coupe

320 bhp, 420 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine with four valves per cylinder, dual overhead camshafts and Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger, three-speed manual transmission, front beam axle, live rear axle, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" From its introduction, the mighty Duesenberg Model J has long been regarded as a true masterpiece of the Classic Era. In fact, the announcement of its long anticipated launch was accompanied by a trading halt on the New York Stock Exchange in 1929. Priced from $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America and when fitted with its coachwork, the delivered price of many Duesenberg models escalated to $20,000, a truly staggering sum at a time when the typical family car only cost around $500. Nonetheless, few argued that the engineering excellence and abundant features of the Model J did not support its lofty price. Indeed, the Model J’s impressive mechanical specifications remain impressive today, including dual overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and power-assisted hydraulic brakes. Power output ranged from 265 horsepower in naturally aspirated form, rising to 320 horsepower with an optional Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger in the case of J-527, the incredible example offered here. From the outset, the new Duesenberg chassis was tailor-made for the needs of the diverse yet robust custom coachbuilding industry of the era, with the power, strength and sheer presence to carry the most imposing yet elegant coachwork. With an abundance of lightweight aluminum components, weight was carefully managed, allowing the Model J to achieve truly staggering levels of performance while remaining quite docile and easy to drive at low speeds, thanks to accurate and surprisingly light steering and responsive, power-assisted hydraulic brakes. Despite some conjecture, Duesenberg’s power ratings were quite accurate indeed, supported by speeds of 89 miles per hour in second gear en route to a top speed approaching 116 miles per hour for the J, while the SJ could easily exceed 125 miles per hour. While many of the finest custom coachbuilders of the era offered a truly stunning array of the finest bespoke coachwork to suit virtually any customer need or taste, the Walter M. Murphy Company of Pasadena, California is generally recognized today as the most successful coachbuilder on the Duesenberg Model J chassis. At once simple and elegant, Murphy-built bodies were distinguished by their trim lines and undeniable sporting character, seeming all the more so when compared to contemporary East Coast designs, which were generally heavier and more ornate in their concept and execution. The trademark of Murphy body design was the “clear vision” pillar. On the convertible coupe, the windshield pillars were designed to be as slim as possible, creating a sportier, more open appearance. In fact, Murphy advertised that their windshield pillars were “narrower than the space between a man’s eyes”; a design feature that they also claimed eliminated blind spots. Without doubt, the Convertible Coupe is generally considered the best looking of Murphy’s designs and indeed, it was one of the most popular body styles for the Model J chassis. The story of J-527, the engine now installed in Chassis 2406, begins in November of 1933 when socialite Isabel T. Pell purchased it new from the Duesenberg Factory Branch in New York. Built as a show car, J-527 (LWB chassis 2556) was originally supercharged and featured a beautiful Convertible Coupe body by Rollston. Miss Pell drove her new Duesenberg for a little more than a year before deciding to trade it in. Returning to the New York branch in 1935, she found another new Rollston-bodied Duesenberg on the showroom floor. This car, J-550 (LWB chassis 2576), carried Convertible Victoria coachwork. Miss Pell, however, loved her original Rollston-bodied Convertible Coupe, so on February 15th, 1935 she purchased J-550 and instructed Duesenberg to move her beloved original convertible coupe body to the new (normally aspirated) chassis. The result was that Miss Pell’s original used Duesenberg chassis now wore brand-new Rollston Convertible Victoria coachwork. H. T. Ames purchased this car on March 25, 1935 and then in October that year, George A. Spiegelberg purchased it. Less than six months later, in March of 1936, William Randolph Hearst, the legendary publishing magnate, bought the car. Some time later, the car was stolen and damaged. Next, Mr. Shirley D. Mitchell purchased it during the late 1930s. At this time, Mitchell also owned J-401, chassis 2406, a short-wheelbase Murphy Convertible Coupe, whose engine had been used in the restoration of a Castagna-bodied Convertible Sedan. As a result, while restoring the now-engineless Murphy Convertible Coupe, Chassis 2406 in the late 1930s, Mitchell decided to install the supercharged engine from J-527, with the car remaining in this configuration ever since. At this point, the car was sold to Cuban diplomat Norberto Angones Quintana, who took the car with him to Cuba and then in 1939, Quintana accepted a post as First Secretary of the Cuban Embassy in Paris, bringing J-527 with him. In September 1940, he was issued a certificate from the German Military Occupation Administration, permitting him to drive his Duesenberg on holidays and weekends! (A copy of this certificate accompanies the car today). As these operating permits were available only to diplomats, J-527 was accordingly registered during this period on French diplomatic plates bearing the number CD 355X. In 1941, Quintana was transferred to Cuba’s Spanish Embassy in Madrid, and once again, J-527 accompanied him. At some point after his arrival in Madrid, he sold the car to two brothers, Miguel and Jose Maria Arechavala of Spain. Next, the car was purchased by Pericao Gandarias, a wealthy businessman from Bilbao, Spain. While the timing cannot be established precisely, it is well known that during its time in Spain, the original supercharger was removed from J-527 and replaced with a standard intake manifold. In a further twist worthy of a Hollywood script, John Ward, a retired U.S. Marine Sergeant who had married a Spanish girl and was running a bar in the resort area of Palma de Mallorca, became the next owner. According to a letter from Nicolas Franco, he and Rafael Estavans learned that Ward had cash flow problems caused by a number of large unpaid bar tabs that were incurred by U.S. Navy sailors. In a remarkable story, one night Franco and Estavans struck a handshake deal with Ward to buy the car for the total of all the unpaid bar tabs – which, when tallied up, amounted to $2,800! Later, in the early 1960s, Estavans sold his half-interest in the car to Nicolas Franco, Jr. An extensive file of correspondence with Duesenberg historian Ray Wolff documents Franco’s efforts to correct some errors contained in a story on the car published within the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club newsletter. While Franco owned J-527 for several years, he apparently became interested in selling the car in 1971, when he was asking $35,000. By 1975, he still owned the car, when Jerry Whittaker, an A-C-D club member, wrote to Ray Wolff and reported visiting Madrid in an unsuccessful attempt to buy the car. Finally, on December 5, 1976, Franco sold the car to Archie Meinerz, who undertook a comprehensive restoration and retained J-527 for nearly 15 years before selling it to Al Webster, a noted Canadian collector, in February 1990. Webster recalls that the car was in very good condition and during his ownership, he corrected only small flaws and details, although he did commission Duesenberg expert Brian Joseph of Detroit to perform a full engine rebuild. During the rebuild, the internal upgrades required for supercharging were found to be present and accordingly, the engine was rebuilt with the intention that a supercharger would be reinstalled. After showing J-527 at the Meadow Brook Hall Concours d’Elegance in August 1992, Webster sold the car to Robert Gottlieb in November that same year. Gottlieb entrusted the maintenance of the car California-based Duesenberg restorer Randy Ema and on November 11, 1993, A-C-D Level 1 Certificate number D-074 was issued. Gottlieb kept J-527 until March 2000, when New York-based collector Piers MacDonald acquired it. During MacDonald’s tenure, he commissioned the well-respected, award-winning Stone Barn firm of Vienna, New Jersey to repaint the body and fenders, trading the previous two-tone red paintwork for a single shade of Dark Garnet Red. New brakes, a new top and new 19-inch chrome wheels were also installed and then J-527 was shipped back to Brian Joseph in Detroit to have the transmission rebuilt and the car prepared for the 2002 Fall Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club meet. In August 2003, J-527 was sold to Chris Gruys, who decided to return the engine to supercharged form, with the necessary work performed by RM Auto Restorations. A new and correct supercharger, one of 10 precise reproductions of the original units, was obtained from Leo Gephardt and Brian Joseph, complete with the ultimate high-performance “ram’s horn” manifolding. During the supercharger installation, the RM team fabricated all of the required brackets, lines and drive assemblies, removing the oil plugs that were added to the engine block and cylinder head when the original supercharger was removed during the process. Once the supercharger installation was complete, the engine was tuned and the mechanical systems were inspected and serviced while the cosmetics were freshened. Next, the Duesenberg was sold through RM Classic Cars to collector Steve Schultz, who later sold J-527 to the current owner, an East Coast-based private collector. Today, the Duesenberg continues to be highly presentable throughout, complemented by many period correct features including side mounted spare tires, dual Pilot-Ray lamps, cowl lamps, dual “Sport Light” spotlights, dual trumpet-style horns, dual taillights (one optional) and a polished aluminum luggage rack. With its stunning open Murphy coachwork, fascinating history and powerful supercharged engine, this well-sorted and extremely rare automobile stands ready to write a new chapter with a new owner. Chassis no. 2406

  • USAUSA
  • 2009-08-13
Hammer price
Show price

1967 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra Roadster

One of Only 30 Semi-Competition Cobras Built, the ex-John Mozart Collection 427, a Genuine and Fully Documented Example 427 cu. in. “medium-riser” overhead valve V8 engine, 10.4:1 compression ratio on 1 x 4v Holley carburetor and developing approximately 485 bhp, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension; upper and lower A-arms on coil spring. Koni tubular shock absorbers and anti-sway bars, rack & pinion steering and four-wheel alloy caliper Girling disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90" A LEGEND AND HIS COBRAS In 1960, racing driver Carroll Shelby, aged 37, was diagnosed with a heart condition. After only eight years of successful motor racing, including a first overall for Aston Martin in the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans, Shelby was forced to think about retirement. One more race beckoned before he would hang up his helmet – the LA Times-Mirror Grand Prix at Riverside, in which he scored a fine third place. Shelby’s self-enforced “cold turkey” was hard to take after the glamour and personal challenge of an international racing career. Pursuing new interests, he tried drilling wildcat oil wells and started a Texas trucking company. In 1961, still bored, he became the West Coast Goodyear Racing tire distributor and formed a motor racing school at Riverside Raceway in California. Now with a steady flow of cash, Shelby was at last positioned to pursue the long held dream of building his own sports car. Carroll Shelby’s many years of racing had taught him what worked and what did not, and the idea of a hybrid sports car fascinated him. Since the Brits had styling, road holding and superb brakes and the Yanks held the horsepower advantage, why not combine these traits for a “best of both worlds” concept? Of course, Shelby did not originate the idea – postwar Allards, Cunninghams and Nash-Healeys come to mind, but he did it better than anyone before, or thereafter, for that matter. After considering Austin Healey, Jensen and Bristol, he heard that AC, builders of the stylish and sturdy Ace-Bristol Sports Cars, had lost their engine supplier when Bristol ceased production. Timing was everything – in September, 1961, Shelby wrote Charles Hurlock of AC Cars to propose a hybrid car using the AC Sports Car body and chassis. “I’m interested”, wrote Hurlock, “if a suitable V8 could be found”. Shelby moved quickly when editor Ray Brock of “Hot Rod” magazine told him of Ford’s new lightweight V8 and soon had an early 221 cubic inch example installed in a stock AC Ace. The V8 weighed only a few more pounds than the six-cylinder Bristol. Ford engineer Dave Evans offered Shelby more good news - a high performance 260 cubic inch version was already in production for Ford’s Falcon and two engines would be on the way to him soon. These were immediately sent by airfreight overseas and on February 1, 1962, Carroll Shelby flew to England to test drive the new Shelby Ford “Cobra”. The rest is, as they say, history. THE S/C 427 COBRA – “THE FASTEST PRODUCTION CAR EVER MADE” Although the 289 Cobra was well proven in competition, by the mid sixties, it was becoming clear that something else was needed. Every year, more power was required to stay competitive, and Ford’s 289 had reached its reliability limit at around 380 or 390 horsepower. In many respects, the father of the 427 Cobra was racing driver and development engineer Ken Miles who thought the idea of a bigger engine might work for the Cobra, especially if winning in SCCA’s A Production Class was the aim. If there was any doubt about the need, it was eliminated when the Shelby team went to Nassau for Speed Week in 1963 where they were confronted with Chevrolet’s new Corvette Grand Sport, which was more than nine seconds a lap faster than the Cobras. Although Shelby had been promised a new aluminum block version of Ford’s 390 engine, internal resistance developed from the NASCAR faction inside Ford and Shelby was forced to make do with the cast iron 427. Reliable at 500 hp, the engine was so much heavier that a complete redesign of the chassis was required to ensure that the car would handle properly. The result was a new larger chassis, five inches wider, with coil springs all around. With the help of Ford’s engineering department, the necessary work was done, and the 427 Cobra was born. As with all his cars, Shelby intended to see that they were winners on the track. In order to qualify as a production car under FIA rules for the GT class, manufacturers were required to produce a minimum of 100 examples. With Shelby’s strong relationship with privateer racers, he was confident he could sell that many, and as a result, a competition spec version of the new 427 was announced. Competition features included an expanded body to accommodate wider wheels and tires, an oil cooler, side exhaust, external fuel filler, front jacking points, roll bar, and a special 42-gallon fuel tank. Anticipating FIA approval, Shelby placed an order with AC for 100 of these competition 427 Cobras. Each was finished in primer, with a black interior, and air shipped to Shelby’s facilities upon completion. Unfortunately, on April 29th 1965, when the FIA inspectors arrived they found just 51 cars completed and denied Shelby the homologation he needed. Oddly enough, the same fate befell Ferrari; his 250 LM, which was intended to replace the GTO, was also denied approval. As a result, both of these archrivals were forced to return to the previous year’s cars for the upcoming season. Once Shelby knew that the FIA was not going to allow the new 427 Cobra to compete in the GT class, he cancelled his order for the remaining competition cars, and AC reverted to the production of street cars. Meanwhile, in June of 1965, the FIA decided to juggle its classification system, and a new class called “Competition GT” was created as the production requirement was lowered to 50 – coincidentally, one less than the number of 427 competition cars built at the time of the FIA inspection. The rule change created another problem for Shelby – it put his Cobra in the same class as Ford’s GT40. Since Shelby was running that program for Ford, there was a clear conflict of interest, not to mention a disparity in performance. To resolve it, Shelby agreed not to campaign his own car, leaving it in the hands of the privateers. By this time, 53 competition chassis had been completed by AC (Chassis # CSX 3001 through CSX 3053), and of those, 16 had been sold to private teams. The first two were retained as prototypes, and one chassis (CSX 3027) was sent to Ford Engineering. The remaining 34 chassis were something of a problem for Shelby. Parked outside Shelby’s L.A. warehouse, they were proving difficult to sell. Seeing the cars prompted Shelby’s east coast representative, Charles Beidler to suggest that they be painted and completed as street cars, and marketed as the fastest street car ever built. The idea worked, and the 427 S/C, or Semi-Competition was born. While the cars were being converted for street use, three more orders were received for Competition Cars, for a total of just 19 full Comp 427 Cobras. The cars were brutally fast, and driving one was an exhilarating experience. One of the most memorable stories about the 427 Cobra surrounds a test that was arranged for Sports Car Graphic magazine by Ken Miles. A few years earlier, Aston Martin had bragged that their racing cars were capable of accelerating from 0-100 mph to zero in less than 20 seconds. Miles had the idea to restage the test using the new 427 Cobra. The result, according to SCG editor Jerry Titus, was an astounding 13.2 seconds. THE HISTORY OF “SEMI-COMPETITION” COBRA # CSX 3045 A well known and fully documented, no stories S/C, CSX # 3045 is actually pictured three times in the Shelby American World Registry – in 1967, then with early owner Peter Bayer on page 252; page 251 shows a nice on-track shot (Car # 288) with early 1980s owner Jere Clark at the wheel and again in the present owner’s driveway, shortly after taking delivery in 1995. The Cobra presented here was invoiced to Shelby American on February 23, 1965 and completed to S/C specification under Work Order # 15103. On April 21, 1966, Shelby American received an order for an S/C model including a request to install a modified race exhaust system to be delivered to the customer, a Mr. Hall, on May 31st. Likely “Mr. Hall” did not actually take delivery or kept the Cobra on its MSO since the next recorded owner, Peter Bayer, acquired # 3045 as payment for promotional work done on behalf of dealer Larsen Ford of White Plains, NY and was the first to register this car in 1967. Doug Carsen of Rimersburg, PA who is believed to have raced this particular S/C in several SCCA events, became the next owner. In the mid-1970s, John Parlante of Whitestone, NY began some restoration work prior to passing the S/C to Geoff Howard in 1978 who completed the work including the Guardsman Blue paint scheme. By 1979 it was offered for sale with 10,400 miles: “Fresh restoration, all competition options, polished Halibrands – expensive!” Well known historic and Cobra collector Jere Clark of Phoenix, AZ bought the car, installed Arizona plate “427 S/C” and went vintage racing. At SAAC-5 in Dearborn, Michigan, # 3045 won first place in the Competition Shelby Popular vote category, after which Dick Smith gave a white-knuckled Rick Kopec an on-track demo-drive at 185 mph! In the spring of 1983 the car was sold to European Coachworks and then on to Cobra aficionado George Stauffer of Blue Mounds, Wisconsin who advertised it as “A real S/C, has run at Laguna Seca several times and ready to win more historic races. Guardsman Blue, fuel cell, not for the timid”. Bob Jordan of Investment Motorsports bought the S/C before passing it, in 1986, to Carl Schwartz of Grand Blanc, MI. For the next eight years, beginning in 1988, # 3045 resided in the famous John Mozart Collection where it was subjected to a full restoration carried out to his impeccably high standards. It was contracted to Mike Giddings of Robin Automotive in Northern California who refurbished the suspension, braking systems, rear end and transmission as well as doing all of the final assembly and detailing. The original engine was rebuilt and dynoed by Elgin Cams and Tech Craft, with the paint work handled by Scott Veazie Restoration Services of Los Angeles, CA. In December of 1994 the current owner assigned Cobra expert Dave Dralle of Redondo Beach, CA to carry out an inspection prior to his purchase of the car from John Mozart in early 1995. Although the car was then, as it is now, in show condition, much post-purchase detail work as well as meticulous servicing was carried out by both Cobra Restorers Ltd. (GA) and Conover Racing & Restoration Inc. (PA) during the next decade. A dossier of invoicing for this work, totaling $23,013 will accompany the sale of the car. This proved to be money well spent as # 3045 won a Gold at the 1998 SAAC Convention in Charlotte, NC plus Best Cobra and Best Comp Cobra at SAAC Ann Arbor, MI in 1999 in addition to many regional SAAC Show First Place Awards. With only 30 Shelby 427 Semi-Competition Cobras built, these raucous roadsters are seldom offered for public sale. It is even more unusual to find a genuine, 17,000 mile S/C with this car’s perfect provenance and stunning appearance, providing here a very tempting purchase consideration for a serious collector of American racing history. Chassis no. CSX 3045

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-01-19
Hammer price
Show price

1953 Ferrari 250 MM Competition Berlinetta

The Ex-Franco Rol and the Prototype 250 MM PF Berlinetta COACHWORK BY PININ FARINA 240bhp at 7200rpm, 2,953 cc Colombo type V12 single overhead cam, 9.0:1 C/R with triple four-barrel down-draught Weber carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with double wish-bones and single transverse leaf spring, rear suspension by rigid axle on semi-elliptical leaf springs and Houdaille hydraulic lever-action shock absorbers and four-wheel hydraulic alloy/steel drum brakes with dual master cylinders. Wheelbase: 2400 mm (94.5") GENERAL HISTORY OF THE 250 MM As with most Ferrari race lore, the tale of how the immortal three liter V12 and the 250 MM model came to be is fascinating. It involves a miraculous overall victory in Italy’s most famous open road race by an unknown amateur driver in a new Ferrari for which the bookmakers offered few odds of winning. The classic Ferrari V12 engine had originally been designed by Gioacchino Colombo in 1948 as a supercharged 1500 cc unit, which soon gave way to the two liter “166”, the 2,340 cc tipo 195, the 2,544cc “212”, and finally the 2.7 liter as found in the 225 sport models. When the Factory’s well-worn cylinder-boring machine “lightened” the 225 S to its final form as a three liter of 2,953 cc’s, it instigated a tradition of Ferrari Sports and GT racing supremacy that was to last more than a decade. The first three-liter thusly created was installed in a Vignale Coupe (0156 ET) which was entered for veteran “Gigi” Villoresi at the 1952 Mille Miglia. However, it was not Villoresi who was destined to initiate the three liter legend, but an unlikely individual by the name of Giovanni Bracco. Brash and wealthy, Bracco had leased his textile factory in 1947 for 12 years in order to be able to concentrate entirely on racing. “I will win the Mille Miglia or die in the attempt,” he declared, an attitude that did not endear him to other drivers who said he was too old, too reckless and too overconfident. In short, a man Enzo Ferrari could love, especially in view of the fact that Bracco could write a good check for one of his latest racing cars. In 1951 he had earned the grudging respect of his contemporaries when he finished second at the Mille behind Villoresi’s 4.1 liter Ferrari in a little Lancia two liter sedan! When the latter was injured in a road accident less than a week before the start of the 1952 Mille Miglia, Enzo Ferrari allowed Bracco to take over his 250 Sport in order to enter the race as a privateer, although no one expected too much from the Commendatore’s gesture. Over 25 Ferraris were entered including the big 4.5 liter sports car of Taruffi/Biondetti as well as factory cars for such fast rising stars as Castellotti and the Marzotto Brothers – not to mention the might of Mercedes, Stirling Moss in a C-Type Jaguar and three factory Porsches. Team manager Alfred Neubauer had prewar legends like Carraciola, Karl Kling and Herman Lang in no less than three of their new Gullwing prototype cars. As the old adage goes – legends die and legends are born – and it was Bracco’s turn to create his own. From Brescia to the first checkpoint in Verona, Bracco had the lead with a 93mph average, in the pouring rain, ahead of Kling’s Mercedes. However by Racenna, the fourth checkpoint, he was forced to slow down because he had exhausted his inadequate supply of spare tires. (As a private entrant with little chance of winning, no one had thought to arrange stocks of tires along the route for Bracco). By the time he reached L’Aquila he had lost 13 minutes to the 300SL, and was now driving on bald rear tires of two different sizes scrounged from a garage along the route. Kling’s Mercedes set the pace into Rome with Taruffi’s big 4.5 liter factory Ferrari Barchetta in second place, but Bracco arrived in third, 12 minutes behind the 300SL and five minutes in arrears of Taruffi. At Siena, on the northward leg of the 1952 Mille Miglia, Taruffi passed the Mercedes only to have his transmission break. By this checkpoint Bracco had reduced his deficit to eight minutes and by Florence he was only four minutes behind the 300SL. Now began Giovanni Bracco’s legendary drive over the treacherous Futa Pass on the final leg of the race. Chain-smoking cigarettes and knocking back brandy he drove like a man possessed until he caught and passed the Mercedes. When he reached Bolongna at the foot of the pass he was four minutes ahead of Kling’s 300SL, a lead he maintained to the finish, arriving in Brescia in 12 hours, 9 minutes and 45 seconds, averaging 79.9 mph, much of it on tires worn to the cords and through torrential rainstorms! At the finish several empty bottles were seen in the back of the 250 and Bracco could hardly stand unaided. Whether this was due to sheer exhaustion, or brandy, or both, has never been satisfactorily answered. Whatever the case, Bracco is remembered as the fearless amateur who beat the might of the Mercedes team - a feat he was to almost repeat in 1952 when he again led the 300 SL’s in the Mexican Road Race until his differential broke. On the way to victory in the Mille Miglia, Bracco’s reception, as he flew through Modena was quite hysterical. Not only was the underdog winning in a Ferrari but the first victory of a new and untried three liter V12 Ferrari engine was about to enter the record books. In honor of this triumph, Enzo Ferrari wasted no time announcing a new three liter model; the 250 Mille Miglia, first shown at the Paris Auto Salon in September, 1952. Thirty-one of these wonderful sports cars were built in 1953, 19 of which were Pinin Farina coupes like the MM here offered; 11 bodied as Vignale Spyders and one further coupe thought to be by Vignale. The first 250 MM, a Vignale Spyder, was sold to movie director Roberto Rossellini who promptly entered it in the 1953 Mille, but most went to privateer racing drivers of means as the factory concentrated on its fledgling Formula One program and the racing of the larger Lampredi-based sports cars. 250 MM factory entries for Villoresi, Farina, Marzotto and Trintignant did produce several wins in international competition, while in America Phil Hill won a number of races in his Vignale 250 MM Spyder. PERIOD HISTORY OF 250 MM CHASSIS NO. 0250 MM The historic Pinin Farina MM coupe offered here, chassis number 0250 MM, is actually the prototype of this small series of 19 cars and has an interesting history. Owing to an amazing and hitherto unrecorded coincidence, its chassis and model numbers are one and the same – 0250 MM! According to information supplied by the current owner number 0250 was delivered to Carrozzeria Pinin Farina as a chassis and drivetrain on January 23, 1953 emerging as a complete car on March 1, 1953 after having the first of the new PF Berlinetta bodies fitted. The original owner Signore Franco Rol of Venice immediately entered the 250 MM in the XIII Giro di Sicilia where he co-drove with a Sig. Macchieraldo on April 12, 1953. A mishap during this race resulted in damage to the front of the car, however, it was returned to Pinin Farina for repairs. At the request of the owner, a more attractive covered headlamp nose with a wider and lower air intake, similar to Pinin Farina’s 375 MM Berlinetta’s 0322 AM and 0354 for instance, was installed, this work being completed as job number 12248 in November of 1953. The 1954 competition season produced some excellent results for new owner/driver Salvatore Ammendola as follows: Jul. 4, 1954 – Bolzano-Mendola Hill Climb Jul. 11, 1954 – Coppo D’Oro delle Dolomiti (Race No. 105) – 4th overall, 2nd in class. Jul. 25, 1954 – San Bernardo Osta-Gran Hill Climb (Race No. 160) Oct. 24, 1954 – Sass-Supera Hill Climb – 1st SUBSEQUENT HISTORY OF 0250 MM The next owner sold number 0250 to an enthusiast in England who added air outlets to the front fenders. In late 1964 it was overhauled and serviced by Merchiston Motors in the UK, being sold by Ian Sutherland of Angus, England to BOAC air steward Barry Ward who made an excellent adventure by driving our 250 MM from New York City to Atlanta, Georgia. In 1966 it went to George Sterner of York, Pennsylvania who eventually passed the car to Richard Gorman’s Competition Motors of Brooklyn, New York where somehow the original engine was separated from the chassis. One of the next two owners, either Walter Hagstrom or Ed Williman of Briarcliffe Manor, New York had the foresight to reunite the original engine with the car prior to the latter’s sale to Hartmut Ibing of Dusseldorf, Germany in 1989. The next owner, Dietrich von Botticher of Munich decided to treat the still original but very tired PF 250 MM to a total mechanical and cosmetic restoration that was carried out in UK marque expert DK Engineering’s shops. Four years later in 1995, after an expenditure of £150,000 pound sterling the restored Ferrari emerged, resplendent in Rossa Corsa, its body configuration as specified by Pinin Farina’s job number 12248 of November 3, 1953. In the summer of 1997, 250 MM Berlinetta was sold to the present owner through a west coast dealership. On April 20, 1998 ACCUS/FIA Papers were issued to 0250 that, of course, accompany the sale. After a major check over by Savannah, GA based Andy Greene Sports and Vintage Racing Cars, the Ferrari was accepted for the 1998 Mille Miglia Retrospective in which it competed with distinction. In 1999 it won a first place trophy at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in the R2 (1946-1969 racing cars) class. In preparation for the 2005 Mille 1000 the 250 MM Berlinetta has again been thoroughly prepared by Andy Greene SVRC – particularly worthy of mention is the recent engine refurbishment that included new cylinder liners, cylinder rings, rod bearings and a clutch assembly. According to the owner it has also been accepted for the 2005 version of the Mille Miglia Retrospective. The 250 MM series is one of Ferrari’s greatest early creations, possessing all the most desired attributes of the fabled marque; power, performance and a purposeful beauty, as well as eligibility for all the world’s most respected vintage events. It is rare for such a thoroughly documented and historic Ferrari competition car to be offered at auction. Chassis no. 0250MM

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-01-28
Hammer price
Show price

1964 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS

185 bhp, 1,966 cc DOHC air-cooled flat four-cylinder engine with two Weber 46 IDM 2 carburettors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with shock absorbers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,300 mm Originally owned by Frazer Nash Works driver and Porsche privateer Dickie Stoop The first example imported to England Only 904 finished in Irish Green Beautifully restored; only three owners from new Recent engine rebuild by four-cam specialist Bill Doyle The 904 Carrera GTS, one of Porsche’s most captivating sports racers of all time, was borne of the company’s disappointments in Formula One during the early 1960s. Seeking a return to its stock-in-trade sports car racing, Porsche commenced work on a new coupé in late 1962, with Butzi Porsche designing a light-weight fibreglass body that was mounted to a box frame for a semi-monocoque structure. Porsche was keen to utilise their new flat-six, the forthcoming 901 engine, but the motor was still not tested enough for a car that was intended primarily as a customer-based racer, so the proven Type 547 Carrera four-cam flat-four was chosen instead. The breath-taking 904 first appeared in the spring of 1964, and it went on to dominate the unfolding season, with class wins at Sebring, Spa, Nürburgring, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Between the remarkable successes of select factory efforts and numerous privateers, the Carrera GTS rather easily secured the 1964 two-litre championship for Porsche. The story of 904-045 begins with Richard “Dickie” Stoop, one of the RAF’s Spitfire pilots during World War II. Whilst stationed at Westhampnett Airbase, Stoop and fellow pilot Tony Gaze would often spend their R&R on the nearby track at Goodwood, racing their respective sports cars. By some accounts, it was they who eventually convinced the Earl of Richmond to more regularly utilise Goodwood for racing events, and after the war, Stoop soon became active in the amateur sports car races held on British circuits. By the late 1940s, the pilot had gained employment as a Works driver for Frazer Nash (AFN), even winning the two-litre class at the 1950 24 Hours of Le Mans with a 9th overall finish. AFN had begun importing BMWs to England prior to the war, and by 1954, the company was also importing Porsches, with a few of which eventually being acquired by Stoop for his private racing endeavours. Whilst these generally consisted of various 356 Carrera models, on 6 March 1964, Stoop acquired 904-045, the very first example of a 904 GTS to cross the English Channel. Period photos show him taking delivery of 904-045 from company principal W.H. Aldington at the Frazer Nash factory. As the first example of a 904 seen in the UK, the car was reportedly highly scrutinised by the motoring press, who were undoubtedly also struck by the unusual Irish Green paint finish. This car is believed to be the only 904 finished in the colour. On 2 May, the Porsche debuted on the British racing scene with a 12th place finish at the Silverstone International, whilst a month later, it placed 15th at the Rossfeld Hill Climb, followed by an 8th place at Brands Hatch on 11 July. The 904’s competition zenith truly arrived eight days later, at the Scott-Brown Memorial at Snetterton, where Stoop piloted the car to a 1st in class and 5th overall finish. On 1 August, career highlights continued with a 4th place at the DARM GT at Nürburgring and a 2nd place at the Tourist Trophy at Goodwood on 29 August. Stoop’s season in the 904 concluded on 26 September, at Snetterton, where the car roared to a 6th place finish. On 3 March 1965, chassis 904-045 was entered one more time, with Stoop scheduled to drive, but it apparently never arrived at the Senior Service GT event at Silverstone. Following Stoop’s tragic death at the wheel of his Porsche 911S road car in 1968, the 904 GTS was sold from his estate to John Wean, a well-known collector of important Porsches who was based out of Fox Chapel, Pennsylvania. This 904 had been beautifully maintained during a long period of ownership, seeing occasional use, and it enjoyed the company of such legendary Porsches as a 1970 911 ST, a 1970 908/3 Spyder, and a 1974 RSR. The current owner acquired the car in 1997 and has used it on numerous road rallies. Since acquiring the Carrera GTS, he has also treated the car to a beautiful sympathetic restoration. The engine has been freshly rebuilt by renowned Porsche four-cam specialist Bill Doyle in California, at a cost of over $20,000. This spectacular 904, now being offered publicly for the first time in 17 years, checks all of the boxes in terms of provenance, as it has had a well-documented racing career against some of the era’s best known competitors, and it has received the dedicated care of just three owners since new. Furthermore, 904-045 is the only example of the model originally finished in the unique Irish Green paint, and it was the very first 904 GTS to have been imported to Great Britain. This beautiful Porsche is the paragon of sports car design, with its ground-breaking mid-rear engine layout and arresting fibreglass bodywork. It will command the respect of sports car aficionados far and wide, and it would surely be the toast of marque events and premium concours d’elegance. Competition history for this car can be found in both our print and digital catalogues. Moteur quatre cylindres à plat à 2 ACT par banc, 1 996 cm3, 185 ch, deux carburateurs Weber 46 IDM 2, boîte-pont manuelle à cinq rapports, suspension à quatre roues indépendantes et quatre freins à disque. Empattement: 2 300 mm. Propriété à l’origine du pilote d’usine de Frazer Nash et privé de Porsche Dickie Stoop Premier exemplaire importé en Angleterre Seule 904 peinte en Irish Green Superbement restaurée ; trois propriétaires en tout Moteur récemment refait par le spécialiste Bill Doyle Une des Porsche sport compétition les plus passionnantes de toute l’histoire, la 904 Carrera GTS naquit des déceptions de Porsche en Formule 1 au début des années 1960. En quête d’un brillant retour en catégorie sport, sa spécialité et sa raison d’être, Porsche commença à travailler sur un nouveau coupé en 1962 quand Butzi Porsche conçut une caisse très allégée en fibre de verre qui fut installée sur une plate-forme en caisson formant ainsi une structure semi-monocoque. Porsche avait souhaité utiliser le nouveau moteur six cylindres, le futur 901, mais le groupe n’avait pas encore été suffisamment testé pour propulser une voiture destinée avant tout à être un modèle compétition client. Le bien connu et très au point quatre cylindres à plat Type 547 Carrera à 4 ACT fut donc choisi en attendant. Apparaissant au printemps 1964, l’étonnante 904 allait dominer toute la saison en remportant sa catégorie à Sebring, Spa, au Nürburgring et aux 24 Heures du Mans. Avec autant de remarquables victoires signées par des voitures officielles et des écuries privées, la Carrera GTS remporta assez facilement pour Porsche le championnat mondial en catégorie deux litres. L’histoire de 904-045 commence avec Richard « Dickie » Stoop qui fût pilote de Spitfire dans la RAF pendant la guerre. Alors stationnés sur la base de Westhampnett, Stoop et son camarade pilote Tony Glaze passaient souvent leurs permissions sur la piste voisine de Goodwood avec leur voiture de sport personnelle. D’une certaine façon, ce sont eux qui, par la suite, persuadèrent le comte de Richmond d’utiliser plus souvent le circuit de Godwood pour y organiser des épreuves sportives. Après la guerre, Stoop courut souvent en amateur sur les circuits britanniques. À la fin des années 1940, l’aviateur recruté comme pilote officiel par Frazer Nash (AFN) remporta la catégorie deux litres aux 24 Heures du Mans 1950 en terminant neuvième au général. AFN avait commencé à importer les BMW en Angleterre avant la guerre et, en 1954, la firme importa les Porsche dont certaines furent achetées par Stoop comme voitures de compétition personnelles. S’il s’agissait généralement de diverses 356 Carrera, le 6 mars 1964, Stoop acheta 904-045, tout premier exemplaire de 904 GTS à franchir la Manche. Des photos d’époque le montrent prenant livraison de la voiture avec le directeur de la société, W. H. Aldington, à l’usine Frazer Nash. En tant que premier exemplaire de 904 jamais arrivé au Royaume-Uni, la voiture fit l’objet d’examens attentifs de la part de la presse automobile qui fut aussi frappée par la teinte Irish Green. Cette voiture serait été la seule 904 de cette couleur. Le 2 mai, la Porsche fit ses débuts en Grande-Bretagne avec une 12e place au général dans la course Silverstone International , se classant 15e un mois après à la course de côte de Rossfeld, puis 8e à Brands Hatch le 11 juillet. La 904 connut son apogée en course huit jours plus tard au Scott-Brown Memorial à Snetterton où Stoop remporta sa catégorie avec une cinquième place au général. Le 1e août, les bons résultats continuèrent avec une quatrième place au DARM GT au Nürburgring et une 2e place au Tourist Trophy à Goodwood le 29 août. La saison de Stoop avec la 904 s’acheva le 26 septembre à Snetterton où la voiture prit la 6e place. Le 3 mars 1965, 904-045 fut encore engagée avec Stoop comme pilote déclaré, mais apparemment, elle ne termina pas l’épreuve Senior Service GT à Silverstone. À la suite de la tragique disparition de Stoop dans un accident de la route avec sa Porsche 911S en 1968, la 904 GTS fut vendue à John Wean, collectioneur bien connu d’importantes Porsche résidant à Fox Chapel en Pennsylvanie. Excellemment entretenue pendant une longue période, la 904 était en bonne compagnie avec des machines aussi légendaires qu’une 911 ST 1970, une 908/3 Spyder 1970 et une RSR 1974 tout en étant pilotée de temps à autre. L’actuel propriétaire a acheté la voiture en 1997 et participé à de nombreux rallyes. Depuis cette acquisition, il a aussi soumis la Carrera GTS à une sympathique et belle restauration. Le moteur a été refait récemment pour un coût supérieur à 20 000 dollars par le réputé spécialiste des Porsche « 4 arbres », Bill Doyle en Californie. Proposée ici pour la première fois en vente publique depuis 17 ans, cette spectaculaire 904 cumule les bons points en matière de provenance avec une carrière en compétition bien documentée, face aux meilleures machines de son temps tout en étant la voiture favorite de trois propriétaires seulement. De plus, 904-045 est le seul exemplaire fini en Irish Green et le premier exemplaire de 904 GTS importé en Grande-Bretagne. Machine emblématique de la catégorie sport moderne avec son moteur central arrière et sa remarquable caisse en fibre de verre, cette Porsche admirée et désirée par tous les passionnés de voitures de sport ne peut que devenir la star des événements concernant la marque et même des plus importants concours d’élégance. Addendum Please note that this car is not currently registered in Australia as stated in the catalogue; it will be offered on a Bill of Sale. Chassis no. 904-045 Engine no. P99034

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-05
Hammer price
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1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. four valves per cylinder twin overhead camshaft inline eight-cylinder engine with hemispherical combustion chambers, three-speed synchromesh transmission, front suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and beam axle, rear suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and live rear axle, vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" The Model J Duesenberg has long been regarded as the most outstanding example of design and engineering of the classic era. Introduced in 1929, trading was halted on the New York Stock Exchange for the announcement. At $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America. With coachwork, the delivered price of many Duesenbergs approached $20,000, a staggering sum at a time when a typical new family car cost around $500. The Mighty Model J The story of Fred and August Duesenberg and E.L. Cord is among the most fascinating in automotive history. The Duesenbergs were self-taught mechanics and car builders whose careers started in the Midwest at the beginning of the twentieth century with the manufacture of cars bearing the Mason and Maytag names. Fred, the older brother by five years, was the tinkerer and designer of the pair. Augie made Fred’s ingenious and creative things work. The Duesenbergs’ skill and creativity affected many other early American auto manufacturers. Their four-cylinder engine produced by Rochester powered half a dozen marques. Eddie Rickenbacker, Rex Mays, Peter DePaolo, Tommy Milton, Albert Guyot, Ralph DePalma, Fred Frame, Deacon Litz, Joe Russo, Stubby Stubblefield, Jimmy Murphy, Ralph Mulford and Ab Jenkins drove their racing cars. In 15 consecutive Indianapolis 500s, starting with their first appearance in 1913, 70 Duesenbergs competed – thirty-two, an amazing 46 percent of them, finished in the top 10. Fred and Augie became masters of supercharging and of reliability. Their engines, because engines were Fred’s specialty, were beautiful and performed on a par with the best of Miller, Peugeot and Ballot. In 1921, Jimmy Murphy’s Duesenberg won the most important race on the international calendar, the French GP at Le Mans. It was the first car with hydraulic brakes to start a Grand Prix. Duesenberg backed up this performance at Indianapolis in 1922 – eight of the top 10 cars were Duesenberg-powered, including Jimmy Murphy’s winner. In 1925, Errett Lobban Cord added the Duesenberg Motors Company to his rapidly-growing enterprise, the Auburn Automobile Company. Cord’s vision was to create an automobile that would surpass the great marques of Europe and America. Cadillac, Isotta Fraschini, Bugatti, Rolls-Royce and Hispano-Suiza were his targets and Duesenberg was his chosen instrument. He presented Fred Duesenberg with the opportunity to create the greatest car in the world, and Fred obliged with the Duesenberg Model J. The Duesenberg Model J was conceived and executed to be superlative in all aspects. Its short wheelbase chassis was 142.5 inches, nearly 12 feet. The double overhead camshaft straight eight-cylinder engine had four valves per cylinder and displaced 420 cubic inches. It made 265 horsepower. The finest materials were used throughout and fit and finish were to toolroom standards. Each chassis was driven at speed for 100 miles at Indianapolis. The Duesenberg Model J’s introduction on December 1, 1928 at the New York Auto Salon was front page news. The combination of the Duesenberg reputation with the Model J’s grand concept and execution made it the star of the show and the year. Duesenberg ordered enough components to build 500 Model Js while development continued for six months after the Model J’s introduction to ensure its close approximation of perfection. The first customer delivery came in May 1929, barely five months before Black Tuesday. Unfortunately, the Model J Duesenberg lacked financing and support from E.L. Cord and Auburn Corporation, which were both struggling to stay afloat in the decimated middle market. The effect of the Duesenberg J on America cannot be minimized. Even in the misery of the Depression this paragon of power illustrated the continued existence of wealth and upper class. Duesenberg’s advertising became a benchmark, featuring the wealthy and privileged in opulent surroundings with only a single line of copy: “He drives a Duesenberg.” The outside exhaust pipes inspired generations of auto designers and remain, 60 years later, a symbol of power and performance. “She’s a real Duesy,” still means a slick, quick, smooth and desirable possession of the highest quality. Duesenbergs were expensive cars, and only men or women of means could afford them. At a time when a perfectly good new family sedan could be purchased for $500 or so, a coachbuilt Duesenberg often cost $20,000 or more. If a full-sized family sedan sells for $30,000 today, that is the equivalent of more than $1 million dollars now. Such extravagance was born of an era of unbridled capitalism, a time when a man with vision and ability could make – and keep – a fortune of staggering size. These were the men who could afford the very best, and there was absolutely no doubt that when it came to automobiles, E. L. Cord’s magnificent Duesenberg was the best that money could buy. The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom body industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the style and grace of the factory sheet metal was ideally suited for the execution of elegant custom coachwork. The Murphy body company of Pasadena, California is generally recognized as the most successful coachbuilder on the Duesenberg Model J chassis. The Walter M. Murphy Company Associated initially with Packards, Murphy built bodies which suited the California tastes of the time. They were simple and elegant, with trim lines and an undeniable sporting character. Murphy bodies seemed all the more revolutionary when compared to their contemporaries from the east coast, who built heavier, more ornate designs. The trademark of Murphy body design was the “clear vision” pillar. On the convertible coupe, the windshield pillars were designed to be as slim as possible, creating a sportier, more open appearance, while improving visibility for the driver. In fact, Murphy advertised that their windshield pillars were “narrower than the space between a man’s eyes”, a design they claimed eliminated blind spots. The convertible coupe is generally considered to be the best-looking of Murphy’s designs, and indeed, it became one of the most popular bodies for the Model J. J142/2165: The Roster of Keepers The wonderful Duesenberg presented here, J142, has a well-known ownership history from new. Originally sold to Jarvis Hunt, Jr. of Chicago, J142 went to its second owner, Joe Neidlinger of Chicago, IL in January of 1933. Sometime in the mid-1930s, Neidlinger sold the car to William E. Schmidt, but by 1936 the car was in the hands of Eddie Glatt, a Duesenberg enthusiast and owner of Chicago-based Edwards Finance Company. Obviously unable to resist the appeal of J142, Neidlinger bought the car a second time from Glatt. Within a year, however, he sold the car to a Mr. Lacey of Oak Park, Illinois who traded it to Duesenberg dealer John Troka against the purchase of SJ515. In 1938, Troka sold J142 to a Chicago-area physician, Dr. J. Phister. Later the same year, Troka bought the car back, reselling it to Tom L. Grace, who became the first long-term owner, keeping the Duesenberg for nearly 12 years before selling it to Louis A. Ostendorf of Berwyn, Illinois. A year later, in 1951, Troka bought J142 again – for the third time – reselling it to Nathan R. Swift. Four months later, Swift sold the car to John Herriott. In May of 1957, Herriott was enroute to the Indianapolis 500 when the car broke down, and he left it by the side of the road where it was discovered by enthusiast James Thorton. Thorton tracked down Herriott, and a deal was made. Thorton kept the car for 11 years before he sold J142 to Russell Kenerson (of Jamestown, New York and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) on October 28th, 1968. It was in his hands that the car underwent its first major concours quality restoration in the early 1970s, which garnered the car a Classic Car Club of America National First Place award in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1974. In October of 1978 – after ten years – Kenerson sold J142 to E. B. Jeffries of Carefree, Arizona. Six years later, in 1984, J142 was purchased by the Blackhawk Collection. It was later sold to Tenny Natkin of Riverwood, Illinois, who in the early 1980s had the interior refurbished by noted specialist Steve Gundar of Topeka, Kansas. Around the same time, well-known restorer Fran Roxas repainted the car. In 1982, the car was awarded a National First Place prize by the Antique Automobile Club of America. By the mid-1980s, after having been invited to the prestigious Pebble Beach concours, the car was sold to Jack Denlinger, before joining the well-known Imperial Palace collection of Duesenbergs in July of 1990. In 1999, J142 was purchased by Charles Cawley, CEO of the MBNA bank. About a year later, in September of 2000, the car was sold at RM’s New York Auto Salon and Auction to Dale Walksler of Maggie Valley, North Carolina. While in Walksler’s collection, J142 was driven regularly, and just recently, underwent a complete engine rebuild by his museum staff. Having enjoyed a long history of meticulous maintenance and caring ownership, the car remains complete and correct. Light tan leather covers both the interior and rumble seat. The dashboard gauges, which include temperature, speedometer, brake, amperes, fuel, altimeter, oil, and chronometer all appear to be correct and in good working order. J142’s exterior appointments include original TwiLite headlights, Pilot Ray driving lights, scripted sidelamps, chrome wire wheels and a rear-mounted trunk. Summary In recent years, Duesenbergs have enjoyed healthy appreciation as more and more collectors pursue a dwindling number of the best examples. They are without a doubt the ultimate American-made automobile. They are also rare, powerful, sporting, sophisticated, and beautiful. J142 is all of these things and more. It has a continuous ownership history from new. Unlike many, it has never deteriorated, and it retains all of its important original components, from coachwork to engine and chassis. Many cars have been lost; of those that remain, few offer the provenance and the appeal of J142. Chassis no. 2165

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-15
Hammer price
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1997 Ferrari F50

520 bhp, 4,698 cc V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic 2.7 engine management, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and unequal-length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,580 mm The 266th of only 349 examples produced Complete with book, tools, car cover, and roof storage box Matching numbers throughout; Ferrari Classiche certified The goal of Ferrari’s F50, which was built on the culmination of four years of development and fifty years of success in motorsport, was to offer customers an experience as close to a Formula 1 car as possible but on a road-legal platform. The car was presented to the public for the first time at the 63rd annual Geneva Motor Show, and Luca di Montezemolo, Piero Lardi Ferrari, Sergio Pininfarina, and Niki Lauda were all on hand at the unveiling, illustrating the monumental importance of this new model to the history of Ferrari. The F50 was propelled by a 4.7-litre normally aspirated V-12 with five valves per cylinder, which was a first for a road-going Ferrari V-12. It was derived directly from the powerplant used in the 1990 F1 season, and it produced 520 horsepower at an earth-shaking 8,000 rpm, though the 436-pound engine was capable of reaching over 10,000 rpm. The six-speed longitudinal gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine, between which the oil tank was mounted for the dry-sump engine lubrication system. This layout was reminiscent of the one used in Ferrari’s contemporary Formula 1 cars. The interior of the F50 featured few creature comforts, as Ferrari wanted the driver to fully concentrate on handling the most powerful machine to ever leave their factory. The instrument panel featured a tachometer and speedometer, as well as fuel, oil, water temperature, and oil pressure gauges, which were all controlled by a microcomputer and displayed to the driver by LCD. The throttle, brake, and clutch pedals were all fully adjustable and drilled to further maximise weight reduction. The gated gearshift was traditional Ferrari, although, in the interest of weight savings, even the gear knob and lever were made of lightweight composite materials. Of course, Ferrari’s fanatical attention to detail and weight reduction meant massive dividends in terms of performance. The F50’s top speed was purportedly 325 km/h, and the 0–100 km/h dash required just 3.7 seconds. Keeping one’s foot on the accelerator pedal would bring the F50 to a standing mile time of 30.3 seconds. However, all this performance would not be available to every person with the appropriate funds to purchase Ferrari’s newest supercar. Only 349 examples were made, one less than what Montezemolo believed the market demanded and just over a quarter of total F40 production. The beautiful example offered here, chassis 106825, was sold new to Elicar S.r.l in Italy through the Verona Ferrari concessionaire, Ineco Auto S.p.A., on 19 February 1997. The car was finished in the sporting combination of Rosso Corsa (FD80-31ZR) over Nero (8500) with red seat inserts. Registered AN 599 LJ, the F50 was regularly serviced, the first of which took place on 24 November 1997 at RAM Ferrari Service in Vicenza, Italy. Two years later, it again visited RAM, and once more in 2005. In 2006, the Ferrari was sold to a Frenchman who registered it on license AB 166 ZH. The car was then displayed at the XVI Sport & Collection 500 Ferrari Contre le Cancer at Le Vigeant in Southern France. In 2007, the dashboard with LCD display (including the tachometer) was replaced by Modena Sport in Toulouse. It was next seen in the Le Mans Classic paddock in 2010 and 2012. It again received a service at Auvergne Moteurs of Philippe Gardette in July 2012. The F50 is undoubtedly one of the most iconic vehicles created in the 1990s, as it celebrates 50 years of Ferrari’s continuous development and integration of road and racing technology. It was the supercar that gave Ferrari’s most loyal customers the opportunity to experience the same levels of performance and exhilaration previously reserved for Formula 1 drivers. This stunning example, Ferrari Classiche certified, has covered little more than 30,000 kilometres. The F50 is a car that can introduce you in style to the very exclusive club of supercar owners, and it will allow you to enjoy the fantastic sound of Grand Prix–derived 12 cylinders, with manual gearbox. Who would dream for more? Moteur V12, 4 698 cm3, 520 ch, injection Bosch Motronic 2.7, boîte de vitesses manuelle à six rapports, quatre roues indépendantes par triangles inégaux et ressorts hélicoïdaux et quatre freins à disque à commande hydraulique. Empattement : 2 580 mm • La 266e sur seulement 349 exemplaires fabriqués • Complète de ses manuels, outillages, housse et coffre de rangement du toit • Tous numéros concordants certifiés par Ferrari Classiche L’objectif de la F50 de Ferrari, construite à l’issue de quatre années de développement et de cinquante années de succès dans le sport automobile, était de donner aux acheteurs une expérience de conduite la plus proche possible de la Formule 1, mais au volant d’une voiture homologuée pour la route. La voiture fut dévoilée au public au 63e Salon de l’Automobile de Genève en présence de Luca di Montezemolo, Piero Lardi Ferrari, Sergio Pininfarina et Niki Lauda afin de bien souligner l’importance monumentale de ce nouveau modèle dans l’histoire de Ferrari. La F50 était propulsée par un moteur V12 atmosphérique de 4, 7 litres à cinq soupapes par cylindres, une première pour une Ferrari V12 de route. Ce moteur qui découlait directement du groupe utilisé lors de la saison 1990 de F1 délivrait 520 ch au régime élevé de 8 000 tr/min, mais ce moteur de 197 kg pouvait atteindre 10 000 tr/min. La boîte à six rapports montée en long et complétée d’un différentiel à glissement limité était placée en arrière du moteur et, entre les deux, se trouvait le réservoir d’huile du système de graissage à carter sec. Cette architecture rappelait celle des Ferrari de F1 contemporaines. L’intérieur de la F50 offrait peu d’éléments de confort aux occupants car Ferrari voulait que le conducteur fût totalement concentré sur le pilotage de la machine la plus puissante jamais vendue par l’usine. Le tableau de bord comprenait un compte-tours et un compteur de vitesse ainsi qu’une jauge de carburant, des thermomètres d’huile et d’eau et un manomètre de pression d’huile, tous contrôlés par un micro ordinateur et transmis au pilote par écran LCD. Les pédales d’accélérateur, de frein et d’embrayage étaient toutes réglables et perforées pour gagner du poids. La grille du sélecteur de vitesse était typiquement Ferrari, mais, toujours pour réduire les masses, le levier comme son pommeau étaient fabriqués dans des matériaux composites ultra légers. Naturellement, le soin apporté aux détails et à la réduction du poids se traduisait par des gains massifs de performances. La vitesse maximale de la F50 était de 325 km/h et l’accélération de 0 à 100 km/h demandait 3, 7 secondes seulement. Maintenir le pied sur l’accélérateur lançait la F50 sur un mile parcouru en 30, 3 secondes. Mais toutes ces performances n’étaient pas à la portée de toute personne même assez fortunée pour acquérir la plus récente supercar de Ferrari. Seuls 349 exemplaires furent produits, soit un de moins que ce que le marché demandait selon Luca di Montezemolo et un peu plus seulement que le quart de la production de la F40. Le bel exemplaire proposé ici, châssis n° 106825, fut vendu neuf à Elicar S.r.l. en Italie via le concessionnaire Ferrari de Vérone, Ineco Auto S.p.a., le 19 février 1997. La voiture était finie en Rosso Corsa (FD80-31ZR) et noir Nero (8500) avec empiècements de siège rouges. Immatriculée AN 599 LJ, la F50 fut régulièrement entretenue, le 24 novembre 1997 pour la première fois chez RAM Ferrari Service à Vicenza (Italie). Elle y revint deux ans après puis une fois en 2005. En 2006, la voiture fut vendue à un Français qui l’immatricula AB 166 ZH. Elle fut ensuite exposée au XVIe Sport et Collection - 500 Ferrari contre le Cancer au circuit du Vigeant dans la région Poitou Charentes. En 2007, le tableau de bord LCD incluant le compteur a été change par Modena Sport à Toulouse. On la vit ensuite dans le paddock du Mans Classic en 2010 et 2012. Elle bénéficia d’un entretien chez Auverge Moteurs de Philippe Gardette en juillet 2012. La F50 est indubitablement un des modèles les plus emblématiques créés dans les années 1990 car il célébrait 50 ans de développement continu et d’intégration des technologies de F1 sur des véhicules routiers. C’est la supercar qui donna aux plus fidèles clients de Ferrari l’opportunité d’expérimenter les mêmes niveaux de performance et de plaisir de conduite jusque-là réservés aux pilotes de Formule 1. Ce très bel exemplaire, certifie par Ferrari Classic, a parcouru un peu plus de 30.000 km. Une F50, est la seule Ferrari qui peut vous faire entrer en majesté dans le club très fermé des propriétaires de supercar de la marque, et vous faire profiter au grand air des vocalises du 12 cylindres étroitement dérivé de la Formule 1 combiné à une boite manuelle. Que voulez-vous de plus ? Chassis no. ZFFTA46B000106825 Engine no. 45134 Gearbox no. 380 Body no. 210

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-02-03
Hammer price
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1939 SS 100 Jaguar 2½-Litre Roadster by Van den Plas

102 bhp, 2,663 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with dual SU carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front and solid-axle rear suspension with semi-elliptical leaf springs and friction shock absorbers, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in. Believed to be the final 1939 SS 100 2½-Litre chassis built One-off Figoni-inspired bodywork by Belgium’s finest coachbuilder Displayed at the 1948 Brussels Motor Show Offered from long-term ownership A unique coachbuilt SS 100 of considerable flair! The name Vanden Plas is most frequently seen in conjunction with Bentleys and, yes, Jaguars, but the Jaguar offered here is a “Vanden Plas” of another country. It was bodied not by the famous British coachbuilder but by its Belgian ancestor, Carrosserie Van den Plas of Antwerp, originally established in 1870 to build carriage axles and wheels. Eventually, the firm had progressed to the building of entire carriages and, by the 1930s, was reigning supreme as Belgium’s foremost builder of custom automobile bodies that, in the words of The Times of London, “had an air of distinction lacking in many of the products around them.” Yet, World War II had its effect on the firm, as it did with all other European coachbuilders. Van den Plas would survive through its own strong will and lived long enough after the war to build several further interesting bodies, with the fuller-figured curves and broad chrome embellishments that were coming into style. Evidence from these designs shows that Van den Plas looked for inspiration in this period to France, particularly the “teardrop” creations of Figoni et Falaschi, which had set the styling world on its ear in the late 1930s. According to history that has long accompanied this car, SS 100 Jaguar chassis number 49064, the last 2½-Litre chassis built in 1939 per the Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust, was purchased by Van den Plas as a basis for a custom body prior to World War II. The war prevented the project from continuing, and the chassis managed to survive the conflict. Thus, when it came time for Van den Plas to return to coachbuilding, they looked to the only chassis they had readily on hand as the basis for their first show car, an all-important creation that would hopefully attract new business during the lean immediate post-war period. However, post-war plans were that Jaguar would assemble automobiles in Belgium using part of the Van den Plas works, indicative of an increasing partnership between the two firms. This was one of two Van den Plas–bodied Jaguars displayed at the 1948 Brussels Motor Show, the other of which was even used on the back of the Belgian Jaguar distributor’s brochure for the Mark IV in 1948. Rather than chosen because it was the only chassis available, the SS 100 was likely a conscious choice, designed by the coachbuilder to show the British automaker what amazing (and highly profitable) things could come from a Jaguar and Van den Plas partnership. The completed creation nonetheless shows the juxtaposition of post-war expediency and lavish pre-war Figoni-inspired design. Sweeping fenders follow the original basic lines of the factory SS 100’s lavish curves but are fully and deeply skirted, wrapping down to the chassis frame. Broad sweeps of chrome trim reach from the front bumper up around the arches of the wheels, drip seductively down into the fenders, and then extend back to a flared droplet-shaped embellishment on the rear-wheel spat. Further delicate bright metal trim surrounds the steeply raked windshield and the upper beltline of the body; indeed, the stunning effect of the brightwork is derived from its judicious application throughout the car rather than being focused on a few moldings. Yet, close examination shows that both the SS’s original headlamps and radiator shell remain intact. They have simply been blended into the lines of the body so successfully that they look as if they were always meant to be there. As previously mentioned, Van den Plas displayed their completed creation, with considerable pride, it can be imagined, at the Brussels Motor Show of 1948, an appearance which merited mention in the February 20, 1948, issue of Autocar (p. 167) and the February 18, 1948, issue of The Motor (p. 66). The latter writer described the car as being “a really remarkable example of fine lines and good proportion. The aluminum facia [sic] panel was engine-turned in traditional style.” An interesting comment in the same Motor article reiterates the news of the planned Jaguar and Van den Plas partnership that the car was intended to signal. The SS 100 is believed to have subsequently been displayed in at least one post-war concours d’elegance, most probably in France, as a surviving black-and-white photograph shows it with an entry number taped to the front bumper. It was listed in the SS 100 Register as being with a Mr. S. Falise of Brussels, Belgium. Falise’s ownership was certainly in the ’80s and for some unknown period prior, as it is known that the Jaguar was owned by Frans van den Heuvel, who had the car for three or four years before it migrated to the United States. Photos on file taken at that time show it appearing to be largely original, although by that time, the body had been two-toned to better showcase the dramatic styling. Subsequently, the Jaguar made its way to the United States and was restored in the early 1990s by the late and well-respected California restorer Mike Fennel, in its present stunning scarlet and ebony livery, with a red leather interior and black cloth roadster top. It was displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1991 as an exhibition-only entrant, which is believed to have been its most recent show appearance. It has been maintained since in the climate-controlled facility of its long-term owner and, today, presents as a well-kept older restoration, still spectacular in its details and in its fierce and ambitious curves. One of the most significant surviving examples of Belgian coachbuilding, the Van den Plas SS 100 is joyfully something more. It was the announcement at the end of war that glorious new things were to come, carried out in sporting engineering and fluid curves. Chassis no. 49064

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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