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1952 Bentley R-Type Continental Fastback Sports Saloon by H.J. Mulliner

178 bhp, 4,887 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with twin SU carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with wishbones, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar; live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs; and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 120 in. Formerly of the William “Chip” Connor and Ervin “Bud” Lyon collections Originally delivered to noted American enthusiast William A.M. Burden, Jr. The second left-hand-drive example built; factory manual transmission Factory-upgraded 4.9 engine Exceptional mellowed restoration; maintained and improved by Paul Russell & Company Extensive documentation, including original build correspondence Perhaps the finest R-Type Continental available today THE MODERN MAGIC CARPET In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it attractive for connoisseur heads of state, captains of industry, as well as the burgeoning jet set. James Bond drove a version he had Mulliner re-body from a wreck in the 1961 novel Thunderball. Famously, in the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” In the words of modern BDC members: “Best car I have ever owned.” “Hope to take it to Heaven with me!” “Would not swap it for a thousand camels, even in the middle of the desert.” It was the fastest four-seat production car in the world – and the most expensive – cementing its exclusivity with only 207 made, 43 of which were built in left-hand drive. GLORIOUS BURDEN: THE STORY OF BC14LA To understand the genesis and importance of this particular R-Type Continental, one first has to understand the man who ordered it. William A.M. Burden, Jr., was a great-great-grandson of the railroad baron Cornelius Vanderbilt, founder of a prominent Wall Street investment company, one-time American Ambassador to Belgium, and a past president of the Museum of Modern Art. To describe him as a collector would be an understatement; he was a connoisseur of fine things, and bought many of them, none so avidly as automobiles. Following his passing in 1984, the files that he left behind in his estate told the story, containing correspondence with virtually every great automaker from the 1930s through the 1960s, describing various highly detailed and bespoke commissions on the best, most powerful, and luxurious chassis from Mercedes-Benz, Duesenberg, Bentley, and others. The surviving file for chassis number BC14LA, which accompanies the car today, provides an utterly fascinating window into how a gentleman sportsman of means ordered a new R-Type Continental in 1952. On 12 May, Mr. Burden wrote George Jessop, of J.S. Inskip in Manhattan: I have decided to order the 120 mile an hour, streamlined Bentley. I am ordering it on the assumption that you will be able to deliver it in London on September 2nd, which is the opening date of the Society of British Aircraft Constructors show, for which I will be in England. If you will bring this to the attention of Lord Hives, I believe he will make a special effort to meet this delivery date, as he knows the importance of the show and why I want to have the car on that date. I shall want to use the car for extensive travel around England and on the Continent and would like to have a first rate English chauffeur available for six weeks from September 2nd. I do not plan to bring the chauffeur back to the United States with me, so you would not need to worry about losing him. However, if you do happen to have a man in mind who is a good driver, a good mechanic, sober, intelligent, and anxious to have a long-term job in this country, I would be glad to take him with the car. The letter goes on to spell out the desired specifications for the “120 mile an hour, streamlined Bentley,” including finish in medium grey with grey leather upholstery, and the fitment of a Tachimedion average speed meter, a Jaeger chronometer, and “a sensitive altimeter of the aircraft type,” with further descriptions of exactly which altimeter Mr. Burden desired! Mr. Jessop kindly responded to his good customer, noting that the factory would be happy to build him the left-hand-drive R-Type Continental of his desires. Mr. Burden, in turn, notified Lord Hives personally of his order for the car, in yet another fascinating letter. The Bentley, as completed that fall, was delivered with the Jaeger chronometer (the average speed meter proving impossible to find) and a Bulova altimeter, as well as sealed-beam headlamps, dual fog lights, a rear window defroster, a shelf under the fascia with a lock (for Mr. Burden’s camera and flashlight), and no radio (Mr. Burden intending to fit his own, upon delivery); lightweight seats were also originally mounted. Unfortunately, Mr. Burden’s trip to England was delayed, as was delivery of the Continental, which was supplied to him not in England, but to his home in Mount Kisco, New York, on 26 October. Soon thereafter, the originally specified lightweight seats, having proven uncomfortable for touring, were exchanged for the latest S1-type seats, at Mr. Burden’s specific request. Mr. Burden retained the R-Type Continental until 1959, by which time he was storing it in Paris, and decided to trade it in on the latest S1 variant. This was arranged, and J.S. Inskip collected chassis number BC14LA in France and escorted it back to the United States. There it was supplied, in May 1960, to second owner Peter van Gerbig, himself a socialite from one of New York’s wealthiest families, and a longstanding Rolls-Royce and Bentley client in good standing. Mr. Van Gerbig subsequently returned the car to the factory the following year, to receive the current upgraded 4.9-liter engine, the most potent available for the R-Type Continental; it returned to the United States in 1962. The bumpers were also changed to the Wilmot Breedon type present today. In 1963 the car passed to Burgess Standley, who retained it until 1979, when it was sold to Gilbert St. Edward, Jr. It was next sold in 1985 to Nicholas Jones of Chile, who passed it in 1991 to the renowned enthusiast William E. “Chip” Connor, who maintained it at his home in London. Finally, in 1999, the car was acquired by Erwin “Bud” Lyon, the beloved collector and friend to many, whose exceptional collection it graced until its acquisition by Orin Smith. Mr. Lyon was well known for cars that were restored to the very highest of standards, with no expense spared in making them as good as they could possibly be. This was certainly true of his Continental, for which receipts on file describe extensive cosmetic and mechanical attention by the noted firm of Paul Russell & Company in Essex, Massachusetts, with special care given to the suspension, brakes, and the wood and upholstery of the interior. The same superb care has been undertaken in Mr. Smith’s ownership, and the car, finished in Circassian Blue with dove grey hides and blue-welted carpets, is utterly stunning, deserving of its Best in Class award at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2011. Further, it performs beautifully, having benefitted from the well-accepted S1 Continental cylinder head conversion by marque specialists Vantage Motorworks, which results in exceptional power and performance – thus bringing the car to its maximum potential regarding both beauty and speed. Marque authority Diane Brandon, inspecting the car for RM Sotheby’s, noted, “As it stands, I can only see perfection. It is gorgeous in every way, correct, perfectly restored, and flawless.” It is offered with not only the before-mentioned file of complete documentation from its Burden ownership, but also the framed original factory guarantee and Bill of Sale, a complete and authentic tool set (down to the scroll on the tire pressure valve), and the copy of the Bentley R-Type Continental Register that is numbered to match this particular automobile. It is common to see an automobile presented as being “the best of the best,” but few demonstrate that status as clearly as these utterly exceptional, without-stories R-Type Continentals. Treasured by great enthusiasts for virtually its entire life, it is, quite simply, glorious down to the last tiny detail, and stands alone among its brethren as perhaps the finest example available today. William A.M. Burden, Jr., a man for whom nothing but the best was acceptable, would undoubtedly be pleased. Chassis no. BC14LA Engine no. BCC4 Body no. 5476

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
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1958 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I Drophead Coupe "Honeymoon Express" by Freestone & Webb

Body Style 3243C. Est. 178 bhp, 4,887 cc F-head inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed automatic transmission, unequal-length wishbone and coil-spring front suspension, solid rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and hydraulic front and mechanical servo-assisted rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 123 in. The most extravagant, streamlined “Jet Age” design on a Rolls-Royce chassis Aptly dubbed “The Honeymoon Express”: designed for two and a week’s luggage One of only two such examples built; the only example available for sale Known history with three private, long-term owners from new Superb, award-winning concours restoration by marque specialists Arguably one of the most famous, sought-after, and romantic of all Silver Clouds THE HONEYMOON EXPRESS: TO HAVE AND TO HOLD For over three decades, Freestone & Webb of Willesden had survived as one of England’s premiere coachbuilders, especially noted for the superb quality of their work on Rolls-Royce and Bentley chassis. By the late 1950s, the company had become part of London dealer Fritz Swain’s company, and was, like many of the few surviving post-war bodymakers, suffering in business. Swain noted that survival, if possible at all, meant trying something new and audacious, and the company’s 1957 Earls Court Motor Show car was exactly that. Built on the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud I chassis, the show car featured modern styling the likes of which had never been seen on a conservative British luxury automobile. Long fenders began at the front of the car, where they formed “hoods” over headlamps set into teardrop-shaped nacelles, and descended in a curve to the rear fenders, where they drew into flared and subtly curvaceous tailfins. Below the door handle on each side, the bodywork swept gently inward, forming a “cove” reminiscent of (dare we say it) the American Corvette. All of this sheetmetal wrapped around an interior sized to comfortably cosset two full-sized adults, in thickly upholstered overstuffed armchairs. Aft of the concealed, power-operated soft top was a massive trunk, all the better to accommodate a week’s luggage for a happy pair. The car was the smash hit of the show, drawing more attention than virtually anything else on exhibit; reportedly Princess Margaret requested it delivered to her residence for a test drive, and the press flocked to it for photography. They dubbed it the “Honeymoon Express,” a nickname that stuck hard and fast, and that certainly rolled off the tongue better than Freestone & Webb’s “2-Seater Sports Concealed Hood Coupe.” Unfortunately, all that attention did not translate to additional sales for Freestone & Webb. Fritz Swain eventually dealt the show car to a friend, who bought it as a favor. Only two additional examples of the design were built, another Silver Cloud I, offered here, and a single Bentley S1, both with styling nearly identical to the original “Honeymoon Express.” All three cars survive, with the remaining two (the Bentley version and the other Rolls-Royce) ensconced together in the long-term ownership of one of America’s premiere collections, as a striking testament to the end of the custom coachwork era. CHASSIS NUMBER SGE270 The second of the two Silver Cloud Is built to the “Honeymoon Express” design, chassis number SGE270 was ordered by London dealers H.R. Owen for Arnold Moreton, a British businessman and high-ranking Mason, to whom it was delivered in June 1958. Actually the final Rolls-Royce built with Freestone & Webb coachwork, the car can easily be distinguished from the earlier “Honeymoon Express” by a black steering wheel, its only notable cosmetic alteration. It bore all the other trademarks of the original design, including the tachometer, power windows and radio aerial, “automatic hood,” and “cubbies” for cocktail accouterments. Registered in the United Kingdom as “AM 2375,” the coachbuilt Silver Cloud was a frequent sight on the streets of London until 1975, when Mr. Moreton sold it to Charles Altman of New York. Imported stateside by Mr. Altman, the car remained in his ownership until his passing in 1995, and was only sold by his family, to well-known Rolls-Royce dealer Michael Schudroff, in early 2012. Subsequently it was acquired by Orin Smith, who became the third registered owner from new. As-acquired by Mr. Smith, the Silver Cloud was complete and still impressive, but time had taken its toll on many of its mechanical components, and it determined best-suited for a total restoration. Mr. Smith’s favored firm for such work, respected marque specialists Vantage Motorworks of Miami, performed an exquisite rebuild of the car to original condition, as is documented in photographs on file. Virtually every component was properly rebuilt, including the original engine, while the body, still very solid and in fine condition, was stripped and refinished in Masons Black and Brewster Green, with an interior in Buckskin leather. Every effort was made and delivered to bring the “Honeymoon Express” back to the stunning grandeur of its original concept. Inspection shows that the work remains virtually flawless today, and exceptional in both its fit and finish, ready for international-class concours appearances which are all but assured. The “cubbies” in the rear compartment still house crystal carafes and glasses, and the proper sets of hand and road tools are fitted, as a show judge would expect them to be. The interior is particularly lush and delicious, with seats as comfortable as one would find in a living room, surrounded by beautiful darkly stained walnut. With the other Rolls-Royce and sole Bentley examples of this design out of circulation in a long-term private collection, this may well be the only opportunity to acquire this most stunning example of modern design – an extravagant, futuristic Rolls-Royce, designed to accompany all of life’s most beautiful occasions. Chassis no. SGE270 Engine no. SCI385 Body no. 1827

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
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1957 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent front coil-spring suspension, independent rear single-point swing axle coil-spring suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. The 13th production example built; displays many rare early production features One of 554 examples produced in 1957 Original matching-numbers engine Exhaustive 2002 restoration, refreshed by a marque expert in 2013 Numerous exhibition awards Meticulous documentation, including heritage certificate, restoration invoices, and factory data card At the 1957 Geneva Motor Show, Mercedes-Benz introduced a new version of the celebrated 300 SL wearing open coachwork, the 300 SL Roadster. In an early suggestion of the increasing focus the manufacturer would place on luxury cars over the ensuing decades, the new roadster was above all a more refined car than its winged predecessor. There was no denying the 300 SL’s mechanical performance, which had decidedly improved in the roadster, with the updated six-cylinder engine receiving the competition camshaft used in the NSL racing Gullwings, good for a lift of 20 horsepower. Handling also benefited from a revised rear suspension with a lower axle pivot-point, minimizing the Gullwing’s tendency for oversteer. Despite the added weight of chassis reinforcement required by an open model, the roadster was every bit the performance car that the Gullwing had proven itself to be. The roadster’s overwhelmingly luxurious character, however, generally obscured its performance capabilities. With a reclining soft-top, the model was never subject to the uncomfortably hot cabin issues that beguiled the Gullwing, and the roadster’s redesigned tube frame afforded lower door sills, facilitating far easier access than the Gullwing’s challenging ingress and egress. Upholstered in leather and usually equipped with a Becker radio and climate control, the roadster was also offered with sporty Rudge knock-off wheels, fitted trunk luggage, and an ivory or black steering wheel. The new 300 SL was an improvement on the Gullwing in nearly every capacity, at least from a road-going perspective, and it has since evolved into one of Stuttgart’s most collectible models, a darling of both concours fields and vintage rallies. This outstanding example is one of only 554 examples produced in 1957, and it claims several notable superlatives, including an extremely early position in the model’s chassis number sequence, a dormant period of at least a decade that led to a more recent barn find, and attention from award-winning craftsmen that has resulted in stunning condition. As just the 13th example of a production car recorded in the Gullwing Registry (not including the prototypes), chassis number 7500089 is one of the earliest roadsters ever built. Though there is some evidence to suggest that the car is just the fifth example imported to the United States, it is relatively conclusive that the car is at the very least one of the first 10 such roadsters to enter America. As documented by a factory build sheet and a heritage certificate issued by Mercedes-Benz Classic in Stuttgart in 2004, this 300 SL was originally finished in black paint and upholstered with red leather with white piping. The car was factory-equipped with instruments in English, sealed-beam headlamps, a rear-axle ratio of 3.89:1, and a two-piece trunk luggage set. As an early roadster, this car features many carryover features from the outgoing Gullwing, as well as several early production anomalies not found on later examples. A Gullwing-style scuff plate near the accelerator pedal, thinner gauge sun visors, and several Gullwing-style nuts and fasteners are among at least 27 eccentricities that distinguish this roadster from the majority of cars that followed. A comprehensive list of nuances can be found in the car’s file. Completing assembly on 28 June 1957, the 300 SL was delivered to its American distributor on 31 July. By the early 2000s, the car had surfaced in Ohio as a long-stored barn find, with the engine disassembled in the trunk. The 300 SL wore gold paint with matching wheels, claimed only two known prior owners, and apparently had undergone some restoration efforts in 1994. The 300 SL was then discovered and purchased in November 2003 by Jay McDonald, a collector who had become enamored by the marque and had been searching for an appropriate roadster for over a year. Mr. McDonald soon commissioned a full frame-off refurbishment by Brian Anderson of Classic European Restorations in Escondido, California. The car was completely dismantled and cataloged with photos, while the body was placed on a rotisserie for media blasting and minor shaping corrections that were followed by a deep refinish in midnight blue paint. The frame was taken down to bare metal and properly powder-coated, and the suspension, brakes, and rear-end were all rebuilt as needed. The engine and transmission were removed, disassembled, and rebuilt, and many parts were sourced from HK Engineering in Germany. Cosmetically, the interior was reupholstered in proper Parchment leather for an outstanding color contrast, and HK provided a correct set of Rudge wheels (optional equipment for roadsters when new), which were painted in matching blue. All electrical systems and gauges were reconditioned, as were the Becker radio and period ivory Bakelite wheel, while a new two-piece luggage set was sourced in the matching interior color. Completed in the summer of 2005, the restoration soon exhibited to great acclaim, with best-in-class awards bestowed at the 2006 Los Angeles and Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance, and a Best of Show at the Gullwing National Convention in San Diego. In 2008, Mr. McDonald sold the show-winning roadster to Thomas McLeod, who in turn sold the car to the consignor, a passionate collector of vintage sports cars. After conducting significant research into the Mercedes’ build history, the consignor commissioned a meticulous freshening of the restoration in early 2013 by Mark Allin of Rare Drive in Kensington, New Hampshire. A former shop manager and 14-year employee of the esteemed Paul Russell and Company, Mr. Allin is a seasoned specialist in 300 SL models, whose restorations have been awarded at Amelia Island, Cavallino, the FCA Nationals, Meadow Brook, and Pebble Beach. Mr. Allin’s attention to the roadster resulted in an exquisite level of presentation that immediately resulted in a class award at the inaugural 2013 Pinehurst Concours d’Elegance and portends continued future exhibition success. With such meticulous attention to detail and a remarkably early position in the roadster model’s chassis sequence, this breathtaking 300 SL would make an outstanding addition to any collection and an ideal candidate for the enthusiast seeking instant success on the concours field or in vintage driving events. With a 1957 build date, this roadster is also one of relatively few examples that are eligible for the Mille Miglia Storico or California Mille. Accompanied by a proper toolkit and skull pads, as well as factory documentation, chassis number 7500089 checks all of the proverbial boxes and figures to bring immeasurable satisfaction to its next caretaker. Chassis no. 198.042.7500089 Engine no. 198.980.7500117 Body no. 198.042.7500013

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
Show price

1931 Duesenberg Model J Tourster by Derham

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, beam-type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 153.5 in. One of eight genuine original Derham Toursters built Original chassis, engine, and coachwork; known history since new Formerly of the D. Cameron Peck and Dr. Joseph Murphy collections The most desirable open coachwork on the Model J chassis Auburn Cord Duesenberg (ACD) Club Certified Category 1 (D-187) THE DERHAM TOURSTER The Tourster was Gordon Buehrig’s favorite Duesenberg. There is a lot to say about this handsome automobile, but the fact is that out of all of the creations that the master designer drew up for the mighty Model J, he preferred the Tourster, which speaks loudest of all. The design was for a five-passenger touring car on the long 153.5-inch wheelbase Model J chassis, which in his 1972 autobiography, Rolling Sculpture, Buehrig described it as being “severely plain in ornamentation and [having] the unusual virtue of being equally handsome with the top in the raised position or when it is lowered.” The length of the chassis exaggerated the car’s lowered proportions, created by moving the rear seat ahead of the rear axle and the foot wells within the frame rails, which increased room for passengers while also allowing the top and sides of the body to be lower than on a standard phaeton. With the Tourster, Buehrig also sought to solve a common problem of dual-cowl phaetons of the time. They were often equipped with second windshields to give weather protection to rear seat passengers, but these windshields were mounted on a hinged metal tonneau that had to be clumsily swung up out of the way each time a passenger entered or exited the automobile. The Tourster’s solution was a rear windshield that slid up and down out of the back of the front seat with the turn of a crank handle, providing a windbreak that also looked appropriately dashing—and it stayed out of the way. The exclusive builder of the Tourster design was the Derham Body Company of Rosemont, Pennsylvania, the favored coachbuilder of the Philadelphia aristocracy. Eight original examples were built in-period; perhaps because of the great beauty of their design, all eight survive, have been restored, and remain well-cared-for in some of the world’s most prominent private collections. J-451: AN ORIGINAL TOURSTER Duesenberg chassis records published over the years in Josh B. Malks’s Illustrated Duesenberg Buyer’s Guide, J.L. Elbert’s The Mightiest American Motor Car, and historian Ray Wolff’s own notes all identify chassis number 2468 and engine number J-451 as being one of the eight original Toursters. Built on 23 March 1931, with Derham body number 2323, this car was sold new to David G. Joyce of Chicago, one of two heirs to a vast lumber fortune originally created by their grandfather. Gerald Morava of Chicago acquired the car in 1935, becoming the second owner, and subsequently traded it in on a Cadillac in 1942. It was thereafter acquired from the Cadillac Motor Car Company of Chicago by D. Cameron Peck, heir to the Bowman commercial dairy fortune, for all of $325. Mr. Peck was one of the United States’ original car collectors, amassing hundreds of rare early automobiles—many acquired from original or very early owners—in warehouses in Chicago. Mr. Peck sold his Tourster in 1948 to A.C. Baker of Michigan, who passed it a decade later to Ernest R. Mills of Indiana. Mr. Mills endeavored to restore the Duesenberg, reaching out to expert Marshall Merkes, Mr. Peck, and other sources in an attempt to document its ownership history and original specifications. He spent about 15 years on the car, restoring its coachwork, sourcing small pieces of original equipment and hardware that had gone missing over the years, and rebuilding it mechanically. The body was finished in pale green with white trim, a tan interior, and a tan top, resulting in a very striking appearance. In the mid-1970s, the restored Tourster was sold to Johnnie Basset of Arkansas, a well-known collector of the period. It passed two years later into the well-known Jerry J. Moore Museum of Duesenbergs in Houston, Texas, and subsequently through the Blackhawk Collection into Dr. Joseph Murphy’s famed collection in New Hope, Pennsylvania. While part of Dr. Murphy’s collection, the car was photographed by the noted automotive writer and photographer, Dennis Adler, and appeared in his book, Duesenberg, as well as in The Search of Excellence, the book published on the Murphy Collection in 1996. The Tourster was purchased by the present owner in 2001 and has been maintained in his European collection since. It was recently test-driven by RM Sotheby’s, and ran and drove quite well, with the abundant performance and power still evident. Its finishes are still highly presentable and would draw much attention on Classic Car Club of America CARavans and in ACD Club activities. Alternatively, the car, having such a well-known and continuous history, and having been ACD Club Certified Category 1, would be the best possible basis for a full restoration for future concours competition. Every Duesenberg collection requires a Tourster, arguably the most significant, beautiful, and desirable open body style on the Model J chassis. This car marks the rare opportunity to acquire one of the eight Derham originals—an opportunity that, for the serious connoisseur, is certainly not one to be missed! Chassis no. 2468 Engine no. J-451 Body no. 2323

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1976 Lamborghini Countach LP 400 'Periscopio'

375 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC 60-degree V-12 engine with six Weber twin-choke 45 DCOE carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension coil springs with telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95.5 in. Two Canadian owners from new, with fascinating ownership history Beautifully restored to original specifications by marque specialist Rare early Periscopio example; retains its original engine Second in Class at the 2013 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance THE COUNTACH PERISCOPIO The automotive world was turned completely upside down when the replacement of the Lamborghini Miura was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in 1971. The Countach was absolutely unlike anything on four wheels the world had ever seen before. It was a complete hit, and with it, Lamborghini proved that it was here to stay as an established manufacturer. The car garnered enough attention at Geneva to warrant full production, even though it was mostly a styling exercise and not production-ready. Lamborghini then spent the next three years revising the car for road-use before unveiling the production version at Geneva in 1974. The original Countach LP 400’s impressive bodywork remained very similar to that of the original concept, but numerous changes were made to the car’s chassis and drivetrain underneath. Lamborghini’s engineers completely redesigned the car’s tubular chassis frame to provide greater strength, and the cooling system saw a similar level of revision, as it now utilized vertically mounted radiators that funneled air through a pair of scoops and NACA ducts. One unique feature was the car’s periscope-like rearview mirror: a section of the bodywork in the roof was cut away and replaced with glass and a rear-facing scoop, to allow for some rearward visibility. While the original LP 500 concept had a 5.0-liter engine, a more reliable 4.0-liter engine with a smaller bore was fitted to production cars. Utilizing six Weber carburetors, the original Countach produced 375 horsepower at 8,000 rpm. The Countach boasted a top speed of nearly 180 mph, thanks to a curb weight of just 2,860 pounds and its incredibly slick aerodynamic silhouette. CHASSIS NUMBER 1120172 According to information sourced from Lamborghini, the Countach presented here, chassis number 1120172, is the 86th LP 400 produced. It was finished when new in the striking and desirable shade of Blu Tahiti over a Tobacco-colored interior and was fitted with air conditioning and two external rearview mirrors. The car was completed on December 22, 1975, and delivered to Carrie Eugene, the official Lamborghini dealer and importer in Canada, on January 29, 1976. The Countach’s first owner was Paul Marshall, of Toronto, Ontario. While most original Lamborghini owners are naturally very interesting people, few were more interesting than Marshall. Though a paraplegic, Marshall did not let his disability stop him from enjoying his new Countach. Marshall had hand controls installed and drove the car frequently around his native Toronto, where the spaceship-like Countach was an otherworldly sight during the waning days of disco. The car’s current custodian, also a resident of Toronto, purchased the Countach from Paul Marshall through a friend in the early 1990s. He continued to use the car regularly for the next few years. After purchasing a 1989 Countach, the current owner decided to place the Periscopio into static storage, following a full restoration. The Lamborghini was properly stored in a climate-controlled facility, with the fluids drained, and there it remained for the next 20 years. After nearly two decades of storage, the Countach was awoken from its slumber to be shown to the world at concours events. Prior to its presentation, the car was entrusted to a Lamborghini specialist in Toronto to be brought back to life. Its first concours outing was then the renowned Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2013. The owner reports that the car drove wonderfully throughout the tour, and it quickly earned the judges’ admiration. On Sunday, the Countach placed Second in a hotly contested Lamborghini class. The car returned home to Canada following the show, where it has resided to this day. More recently, the Countach was featured in an episode of Jerry Seinfeld's Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, along with fellow comedian Jim Carrey. As the earliest and rarest iteration of the iconic Countach, it is no surprise that the LP 400 Periscopio is the most desirable iteration over the model’s 16-year production run. Its design remains almost uninterrupted from that of the original concept that created such a commotion at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show. Today, the Countach still garners as much attention as it did when new, and this particular example is surely one of the finest in existence. This spectacular Countach is in incredible condition throughout, including its original engine, and there is no doubt that it is ready for both further concours events and enjoyment on the open road. Furthermore, this occasion marks just the second time this Lamborghini has changed hands, making it a truly unique opportunity. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions this vehicle will need to be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. Chassis no. 1120172 Engine no. 1120174

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1959 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II Prototype by Pinin Farina

240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 36 DCS carburetors, four-speed synchromesh manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with unequal-length upper and lower A-arms, coil springs, an anti-roll bar, and Koni hydraulic shocks, solid rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, trailing arms, and Koni hydraulic shocks, and four-wheel Dunlop hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.36 in. The very first 250 GT Series II Cabriolet built and the only prototype Numerous unique original features not seen in any other Series II Cabriolet Fitted with an updated type 128F “outside plug” engine Offered from 20 years of single enthusiast ownership Presented in wonderful driving condition THE PROTOTYPE SERIES II CABRIOLET Presented here is the very first example of the two hundred 250 GT Series II Cabriolets built by Ferrari. Astute historians will be quick to note that this car falls well before the final Series I Cabriolet (1475 GT). As such, this car was the prototype for the model and exhibits a handful of unique features not seen on Series I or Series II Cabriolets, making it stand out amongst its siblings. The body is fitted with distinctive side louvers, similar to those seen on the 500 Superfast and later on the 250 GTE and 330 GTS, and a hood scoop. Inside, the rearview mirror was fitted to the top of the windscreen rather than on the top of the dashboard, and the swing-out ashtray can be found in the lower part of the dashboard rather than on the transmission tunnel. Perhaps the most notable mechanical upgrade was the installation of Dunlop disc brakes over the drum brakes used in Series I Cabriolets. The car was originally finished in Nero Tropicale, but soon after, it was refinished in Grigio Perla Chiaro by the factory, yet it still retained its original Rosso Vivo Connolly leather interior (VM 8300) with a Nero convertible top. TWENTY-TWO YEARS IN PORTUGAL About a month after the car was completed, 1213 GT was sold new to its first owner, Maria Amelia da Silva José DeMelo, of Lisbon, Portugal, the wife of one of the owners of Mocar, the Portuguese Alfa Romeo and Peugeot importer at that time. In 1963, 1213 GT was purchased by Carlos Marcelino Correia Sabino Pereira in Lisbon. Pereira owned the car for two years and then traded it for a new Jaguar at the dealership A.M. Almeida. The car was repainted red while in the care of A.M. Almeida. It was sold again in 1966 to Luis das Neves, the brother of Portuguese racing driver Ernesto Neves, and passed later that year to André Gonçalves Pereia, a well-known lawyer. In his ownership, Pereia repainted the car white. It is believed that during this time the car was fitted with its current engine, a 128F-type Colombo V-12 sourced from a 250 GTE, chassis number 3927. This is a later “outside-plug” engine, which replaced the earlier 128D’s siamesed cylinders with six separate ports on each bank, and it is an engine generally considered to be more desirable than its earlier counterparts. In July 1968, the car was purchased by José Luís Stock and his cousin Matheus. Stock, the brother of well-known Portuguese racing driver Fernando Stock, was just 17 years old at the time. It could be argued that a Ferrari was quite powerful for a 17-year-old driver, and in March 1970, Stock had an accident with the car at the corner of the Forte do Velho Discotheque in Estoril, damaging both the passenger-side front and driver-side rear. The car was promptly repaired, refinished in blue, and sold through Ferrari dealer Palma & Morgado. Chassis 1213 GT was eventually sold to Spain and then imported from Spain into the United States by Giuseppe Risi, of Ferrari of Houston, in November 1981. The car remained in Houston with Risi until July 1982, when it was purchased by Theodore R. Peterson, of Hinsdale, Illinois. Peterson restored the car, and it was refinished in red with a brown leather interior, the same color combination it wears today. TWO DECADES OF ENTHUSIAST OWNERSHIP In 1995, Peterson sold the car to its current custodian, a resident in Palm Beach, Florida. Over the course of the next 20 years, chassis number 1213 GT has been used as a warm-weather driver, enthusiastically exercised most Sundays as long as the sun was shining. The car’s engine was fully rebuilt in December 1997 at 28,000 kilometers; following the completion of the rebuild, it was decided that this Ferrari would not be one to sit idle in a garage and would instead be enjoyed frequently on the open road. It was a regular sight throughout Palm Beach over the next two decades; over 10,000 kilometers were put on the car during this time. Needless to say, chassis number 1213 GT has been serviced on a regular basis, as necessary, to ensure it is ready to drive and enjoy at a moment’s notice. An RM Sotheby’s specialist, who recently had the opportunity to drive the car, reported that “it drives exactly as it should and is mechanically spot on, as one would expect for a Ferrari driven on a regular basis. It is very easy and comfortable to drive. Its V-12 provides plenty of power, and the car performs admirably at speed.” Additionally, it is important to note that the car is accompanied by a healthy file of documentation. This includes copies of the car’s original build sheets; correspondence with Ferrari, Pininfarina, and Giuseppe Risi; and a 250 GTE parts manual. AN UNREPEATABLE OPPORTUNITY For the enthusiast, offered here is a vehicle ready to drive and enjoy at a moment’s notice. It could easily serve as a summertime daily driver, and it is perhaps the perfect vehicle to experience the thrills of Ferrari’s legendary Colombo V-12, combined with the added delight of open-top motoring. Its current owner, and anyone who has had the pleasure of sampling the car in recent memory, has nothing but good things to say about the car’s drivability. For the historian, 1213 GT is an irreplaceable piece of Ferrari history, marking the beginning of production of Ferrari’s very well-respected 250 GT Series II Cabriolet. With a number of unique features, it proudly stands out from amongst the cars that followed in its footsteps. As such, the opportunity to acquire chassis 1213 GT also warrants a significant opportunity to undertake a complete restoration. This would make the car worthy of awards at many of the top concours events around the world due to its significance in Ferrari history as the very first example of its kind. Whatever route its new owner should choose, rest assured that when the journey involves a unique piece of Ferrari history, it will undoubtedly be fulfilling. Chassis no. 1213GT Engine no. 3927

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1931 Marmon Sixteen Convertible Coupe by LeBaron

200 bhp, 490.8 cu. in. OHV V-16 engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 145 in. The largest American engine of the Classic Era; a masterpiece One of eight known Convertible Coupes Beautifully restored by Marmon Sixteen expert Harry Sherry Fitted with Ridgley-Severn improved cylinder heads Long-term ownership by known Marmon enthusiasts Documented by Dyke W. Ridgley’s Marmon Sixteen Roster MARMON’S MASTERPIECE The Marmon Sixteen was introduced in 1931, and it represented automobile pioneer Colonel Howard Marmon’s ultimate, greatest, and most impressive vision for what a luxury car should be. With beautiful coachbuilt bodies by LeBaron and a state-of-the-art overhead-valve engine that could displace over 490 cubic inches, the Marmon Sixteen was capable of 200 horsepower and a top speed over 100 mph. The Sixteen was a triumph of pattern-making and foundry technology, as its all-aluminum engine construction was matched to a chassis that was state of the art, and the model had an unmatched power-to-weight ratio. In fact, the car was reportedly capable of out-accelerating a Duesenberg Model J, yet it cost buyers only one third as much. This was something that no doubt embarrassed Marmon’s Indianapolis neighbor. Credit for the Sixteen’s styling is often given to industrial design legend Walter Dorwin Teague Sr., but it was, in fact, his son, Walter Jr., who penned the beautiful lines that ultimately entered production. Dorwin, as he was known, was a student at MIT and a gifted designer in his father’s mold. He envisioned a sleek and graceful car that was completely devoid of gratuitous ornamentation and characterized by simple shapes, with a bold beltline, low roofline, and raked windshield. Particularly noteworthy were the fenders, which had an understated skirting in the front that served to hide the working components of the suspension and chassis. Unfortunately, Cadillac’s own V-16 beat Marmon to the market by almost two years, stealing the thunder of what otherwise would have taken the automotive world by storm. Also, Howard Marmon lacked a deep-pocketed backer like General Motors to help his company survive the Great Depression. The writing was on the wall, and the end came quietly in 1933. The Sixteen was the final production Marmon automobile, but it was also the car that ensured that this great company—the winner of the first Indianapolis 500 in 1911—would be remembered for its exploits on the road as well as the track. Dyke W. Ridgley, of the Marmon Sixteen Roster, estimates that between 370 and 375 Sixteens were produced. Of the seventy-six known survivors, only eight are convertible coupes. It is no surprise, then, that this particularly desirable and sporty body style almost never comes available for sale. CHASSIS NUMBER 16 144 705 The Convertible Coupe offered here, chassis number 16 144 705, has been thoroughly documented by Mr. Ridgley’s Marmon Sixteen Roster. It has long-term history in the Denver, Colorado, area, where it is believed to have resided in the possession of several early enthusiasts from as early as 1948. Eventually, it was purchased in 1963 by William E. Carney, of Shawnee, Kansas, but by the early 1970s, it had returned again to Colorado, this time in Yuma, where it was purchased by Oliver Kofoed from a fellow enthusiast in 1972. Mr. Kofoed began a restoration of the Convertible Coupe, but he did not complete it before selling the car to Robert Atwell, of Kerrville, Texas, in the late 1980s. Mr. Atwell was one of the preeminent Southwestern enthusiasts of his era. He was particularly fond of Marmon Sixteens and had assembled the world’s best collection of the cars, one that represented virtually every body style. Most of his cars, including this Convertible Coupe, eventually passed to his son, Rich Atwell, who continued the restoration of chassis number 16 144 705 before selling it to another well-known Sixteen aficionado, Marvin Tamaroff of Southfield, Michigan, in 1998. It was fortunate that Mr. Tamaroff then chose to have the Convertible Coupe’s restoration completed by his favored restorer, Harry Sherry of Warsaw, Ontario. Mr. Sherry, although now retired, was for many years the world’s foremost Marmon Sixteen restorer, known for his expertise and exquisite level of craftsmanship and detail. He restored this car in its present sparkling maroon and silver livery, with a contrasting maroon interior and grey soft-top. Typical of Mr. Sherry’s restorations, the car is outstanding and has aged almost flawlessly, with only the slightest signs of age. Since 2007, it has been carefully maintained in its present home in the Andrews Collection, as the last and best of several Sixteens that Paul and Chris Andrews have owned and enjoyed over the years, and it is still in superb cosmetic and mechanical condition. It wears Classic Car Club of America Senior badge number 2379. It should also be noted that this Marmon has a new set of cylinder heads installed, as part of a project undertaken by Dyke Ridgley and Gary Severns. These two enthusiasts reverse-engineered the cylinder heads and arranged to produce new ones for these cars through the utilization of the latest techniques in metallurgy. Although they are 100% correct externally and feature the best American castings by Edelbrock, as well as final machining by Carroll Shelby Enterprises, these cylinder heads are fully modern internally and have extra corrosion protection and strength. They also incorporate minor changes that add even more power to the already high-performing Sixteen. This car is a splendidly restored example of perhaps the most desirable factory Marmon Sixteen style, and it has benefitted from the ownership of some of the most prominent names in Sixteen connoisseurship: Atwell, Tamaroff, and Andrews. It is the ideal choice for any enthusiast who wishes to complete his or her collection with one of the great engineering masterpieces of the Classic Era. Chassis no. 16 144 705 Engine no. 16694 Body no. 518

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1953 Aston Martin DB2/4 Drophead Coupe by Bertone

125 bhp, 2,580 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live axle rear suspension with coil springs, and hydraulically actuated four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 99 in. The Charles A. Ward car One of two to this design; numerous bespoke features Long-term known and documented history Featured in Automobile Quarterly; three-time Pebble Beach award winner A Gentleman’s Express of singular beauty and importance A PRESENT TO THE CHIEF At one time, the Brown & Bigelow Company, of St. Paul, Minnesota, was the United States’ leading manufacturer of promotional calendars and products, distributing some 50 million calendars a year at a time when there were only about 160 million Americans, which meant that there was roughly one B&B calendar in circulation for every three people in the U.S.! The company was most famous for its pinup calendars, for which they employed a lineup of such genre-defining artists as Gil Elvgren, Earl Moran, and Rolf Armstrong, and they could be found on the walls of garages, packing sheds, workshops, and loading docks across America. Brown & Bigelow was unusual in more ways than one. Its president and general sales manager was Charles A. Ward, who had been befriended by Herbert Huse Bigelow under the most unusual of circumstances, while both were serving time in the Federal Penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas, with Ward there for narcotics possession and Bigelow there for income tax evasion. The two men struck up a friendship, and Bigelow hired Ward to work at his company. When Bigelow drowned during a 1933 fishing trip, his young protégé was elected to replace him as the head of the company. By the time of his death in 1959, Ward had built Brown & Bigelow from annual losses of $250,000 in 1933 to total sales of $55 million annually. He was a generous philanthropist who took pride in employing reformed convicts and giving back to his community, but he was also a flamboyant and decadent sort—the kind of man who would be seen behind the wheel of a bespoke, Italian-bodied Aston Martin covered in his initials. Brown & Bigelow’s 60 regional sales managers realized this, and for Christmas 1953, they got together, pooled their funds, and ordered, through Chicago importer and Bertone board member S.H. Arnolt, one of the two Bertone-bodied DB2/4 Drophead Coupes produced. These cars were brilliantly designed by Giovanni Michelotti to feature a combination of unmistakable Aston Martin design cues, including the distinctive radiator grille and curved windshield, both of which had been lightly “tweaked” to smooth their edges. Delicate Italianate features found on the car include thin and shapely bumpers, a gently curved roof line, and a subtle hood scoop. Little else about Ward’s car was subtle, as the sales managers specified a monogramed CAW hood button; a fine-quality two-piece fitted luggage set (also monogrammed), complete with china and picnic accessories; a custom picnic hamper that fit next to the single rear seat and bore a lode of barware; and a set of chrome-plated tools in a varnished wooden box. The car arrived in St. Paul bearing a large commemorative brass plaque under the hood, which had been engraved with the names of all 60 sales managers—lest Mr. Ward forget their names when it came time to assign bonuses?—as well as another plaque on the dashboard, which stated, “This motor car was especially designed and created for Charles A. Ward by S.H. Arnolt, Chicago and Carrozzeria Bertone, Torino, Italy.” The gift attracted attention even in Europe, where a brief article, “A Present to the Chief,” appeared in the November 25, 1953, issue of The Motor. In the halls of Brown & Bigelow, during those days of three-martini lunches, it was a merry Christmas. AFTER MR. WARD Mr. Ward kept and occasionally drove his flamboyant Bertone DB2/4 until his passing in 1959, at the age of 73. Reportedly, he had offered it for sale shortly before, at a price tag of $5,500, but found no takers. The car was sold by his estate back to its original dealer, S.H. Arnolt, who sold it to another prominent St. Paul businessman, William Peters Sr. of Peters Meat Products. Reportedly, Mr. Peters paid $2,000 for the DB2/4, which had a blown engine at the time. That was no problem, as the new owner dropped a Shelby Cobra engine under the hood and proceeded to drive it from St. Paul to Tampa, Florida, for his retirement. He had Mark Doins service the original DB2/4 engine in the meantime, completely rebuilding it and installing new sleeves. In 1975, Mr. Peters sold the Aston Martin to Virgil Campbell, of Omaha, Nebraska, who paid the meat magnate $250 to bring the car up to Omaha, and if he liked the car, he would pay for Peters’ return flight. Needless to say, Mr. Campbell liked the car, and Mr. Peters flew home for free, minus his DB2/4, which had 29,460 recorded miles at the time. The new owner then set about restoring the car and refinishing it in all-over red, including the paint, carpeting, and seats, which were upholstered in red Bridge of Weir leather cut from original patterns. The original top fabric had been a matte material, which was replaced with Haartz cloth that had been cut to the correct pattern. Most importantly, the original engine, having been rebuilt by Mr. Doins, was now reinstalled. On June 30, 1983, the car was sold by Mr. Campbell to Tom and Ellin Dunsworth. Mr. Dunsworth continued to work on the unique DB2/4, extensively investigating correct materials and color combinations, and he eventually completed the restoration, restoring the car back to its original condition, all the way down to its original and correct trim and tools. The completed car attracted a great deal of attention, even appearing prominently in Stanley Nowak’s article, “Aston Martin Bertone,” in Automobile Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 4. The Dunsworths were justifiably proud of their Bertone-bodied Aston Martin, which was awarded Third in Class when shown at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1987. Eventually, the DB2/4 passed into the ownership of James Vandergrift, who returned it to Pebble Beach in 1997 and also finished Third in Class. It was then sold to renowned American collector Gene Ponder. The car was offered and sold, in its present, eye-popping red livery, to enthusiast Michael Schudroff, who again displayed it at Pebble Beach, this time as part of the featured Aston Martin class in 2007, and it finished Second in Class. Later, it was acquired from Schudroff by his friends Paul and Chris Andrews, who had been the underbidders on the car at the Ponder Collection sale and had never forgotten it. Astonishingly, for a car that’s restoration is now two decades old, the Ward Aston Martin is still beautifully preserved, with nary a flaw in its beautiful crimson paint or its tight leather interior. All of the original accoutrements, including the picnic hamper, the tool set, and all the special monogrammed and engraved bits, are still intact and exactly where one would expect them. Most importantly, as a favorite in the Andrews Collection, the car has been lovingly maintained and occasionally exercised, and today, it runs and drives well. It is also accompanied by a thick file of documentation, history, and correspondence that had been compiled by Mr. Dunsworth and has passed with the car ever since. What was true in 1953 is still true today. Charles A. Ward’s sublime Bertone-bodied DB2/4 is the perfect gift, or acquisition, for the chief who has everything. Chassis no. LML/504 Engine no. VB6E/50/1230

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1964 Shelby 289 Competition Cobra

Race-prepped, FIA-legal, 289 cu. in. Ford V-8 racing engine, four Weber twin-choke carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with A-arms, transverse leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90" • Early 289 Cobra upgraded for racing by Shelby American in 1964 • Extensive privateer racing history and highly documented provenance • Driven by Chuck Parsons for J. Randy Hilton in 1964 and by Monte Shelton in 1965 • Completely restored from 1988–1991; presented in 1964 racing livery and specs • Eligible for today’s most prestigious and desirable vintage-racing events The history of Anglo-American hybrid sports cars dates back to the launch of Ford’s original “flathead” V-8 of 1932, which provided an infusion of relatively inexpensive and readily upgraded power to the elegant British sportsters of the era. Famous marques with this configuration being built between the wars included Jensen, Brough Superior, Railton, Batten, and others. Following World War II, Sydney Allard advanced the concept even further, and his various models proved devastatingly effective wherever they raced. But Carroll Shelby’s 1962 Cobra roadster marks the pinnacle of the concept. Simply put, his extensive racing experience taught him what worked and what didn’t. It was also the result of near-perfect timing. Shelby, at 37, was winding down a very successful racing career, which had peaked in 1959, when he won the 24 Hours of Le Mans race for Aston Martin. Shelby became the Goodyear Racing tire distributor for the western USA in 1961 and started his own racing school at Riverside Raceway in California. All he needed now was a car bearing his name. Shelby considered putting a V-8 engine into the Austin-Healey 3000, but Donald Healey was doing fine with his BMC factory deal and was not interested. Shelby’s Scaglietti Corvette project of 1959 begat three cars, but Chevrolet was loathe to support a Corvette challenger and Scaglietti was not willing to anger its main client, Ferrari. However, AC Cars, of Thames Ditton in Surrey, was more amenable. The company’s John Tojeiro-designed Ace roadster had been a force to reckon with in British sports car racing for six years, but the hottest motor, a prewar BMW two-liter, six-cylinder, was ceasing production. Bristol Cars had been making the engine under license, but their “Gentleman’s Express” coupes had been getting bigger and bigger, and the engine had been stretched to its limit. Bristol decided to do away with the old six and use a 331-cubic inch Chrysler V-8, which meant that AC needed a new motor. The Hurlock brothers, who owned AC, had been working with tuner Ken Rudd, who was generating as much as 170 horsepower from the 2.6-liter English Ford Zephyr OHV six-cylinder. But the higher horsepower showed up the weakness of the engine’s bottom end, leading to “light bulb” motors, which burned brightly but not for long. Shelby considered using a small-block Chevrolet V-8, but GM was very protective of its Corvette franchise and didn’t want to subsidize any competition. Instead, Ray Brock told Shelby about a new, lightweight Ford V-8 engine. Displacing 221-cubic inches, its thin-wall construction meant it weighed little more than the outgoing Bristol, and when Ford engineer Dave Evans offered Shelby a couple of 260-cubic inch high-performance variants, designed for the Falcon Sprint, the die was cast—literally. Shelby flew to England on February 1, 1962 to test drive his new Cobra. As the new cars were completed in Shelby’s California factory, many headed straight to the race track. The first 75 cars were powered by the 260-cubic inch motor, which was quickly enlarged to 289-cubic inches. In racing tune, it delivered up to 385 hp in a car weighing just 2,000 pounds—some 500 less than the Corvettes. The Cobras gave GM fits, starting with Dave MacDonald’s first victory at Riverside a year later on February 2, 1963. There, MacDonald smoked a field of Corvettes, Jaguars, Porsches, and Maseratis, and soon thereafter, every red-blooded sports car aficionado in the USA wanted to possess a Shelby Cobra. Among those buyers was J. Randy Hilton, of Carmel, California, who was an active privateer racing-team owner in America’s top-level SCCA racing classes during the 1960s. According to the Shelby American World Registry, the Cobra offered here, CSX2290, was originally built as a “street” 289 Cobra and equipped with the Class “A” option package, including white sidewall tires, a luggage rack, five chrome wheels, and antifreeze. It was billed to Shelby American on January 24, 1963, and on February 5, it was shipped to Los Angeles, California on the SS Diemerdyk. While Mr. Hilton purchased the Cobra via Monterey, California’s Leslie Motors, he elected to pick it up directly from the Shelby American facilities at Riverside instead. Soon after buying CSX2290, Mr. Hilton returned the Cobra to Shelby American for conversion into an all-out SCCA A-Production racing car. Once completed, the Cobra was re-invoiced to Mr. Hilton on June 4, 1964 for an additional $5,478.47 over the original cost of the car. Included in this conversion was a 289 Cobra racing engine, numbered D 103, a complete 4.09:1 differential assembly, 6.5-inch front and 8.5-inch rear FIA-type Halibrand six-spoke wheels, two front and two rear sway bars, a small racing windscreen, and four sets of front and rear brake pads. Finished in red with white racing stripes, the Cobra was further modified with rounded front and rear fender flares, brake-cooling scoops, a hood scoop, a roll bar, and side-exit exhaust pipes. Listed in the latest Shelby American Registry as a “full specification competition model,” CSX2290 is one of only 12 factory-prepared Cobras that were shipped to independent racers outside of the factory team. As modified, CSX2290 was driven in SCCA A-Production races during the 1964 season by fast-rising sports-car ace Charlie “Chuck” Parsons, whose prolific 14-year racing career included 19 outright wins, 8 class victories and 31 second- and third-place podium finishes over 160 starts. His success in the 1964 season earned him an invite to the ARRC Run-Offs. Results from his 1964 season with the Cobra follow: June 1964 2nd, Willow Springs, CA – SCCA Regional July 1964 DNF, Greenwood, IA – USRRC July 1964 1st, Cotati, CA – SCCA Regional Aug 1964 3rd, Kent, WA – SCCA Divisional Sept 1964 8th OA and 4th GT III, Bridgehampton, NY – FIA “Double 500” Nov 1964 DNF, Riverside, CA – ARRC Run-Offs In March 1965, CSX2290 was sold to Monte Shelton, who experienced multiple competitive events, including a stellar A-Production Class victory and First Overall at the Portland, Oregon SCCA Nationals in August 1965. In September and November, a third-place podium and a first in A-Production were earned, respectively, at the Vaca Valley SCCA national events. After the 1965 racing season, the Cobra was advertised for sale and subsequently purchased by David Phelan, who raced the car through 1966 and also earned an invite to the ARRC Run-Offs. California’s Dan Harper acquired the car after it had been repainted Guardsman Blue, and three more owners followed until February 1988, when the next owner, Chicago’s Tom Snelback, bought CSX 2290 and commissioned a restoration by Baurle’s Autosport, which was completed in 1991. During the process, CSX2290 was returned to its circa 1964 livery and specifications, as it was raced by Chuck Parsons for Randy Hilton. In August 1997, the Cobra was displayed at the Shelby Reunion during the Monterey Historics, and it was featured in print in the December 1997 edition of Motor Trend. In 2001, CSX2290 joined the collection of A. Ross Meyers, of Worcester, Pennsylvania, who competed with it in the 2003 Monterey Historics and showed it in 2005 at New York’s Saratoga Automobile Museum, where it formed part of the “Ford Connection” display. It was also depicted in The Shelby American (Number 74, page 57). Two subsequent owners were followed by the current owner, who has used CSX2290 to good effect in many historic racing events. A well-known 289 Cobra with excellent history, including much early racing success, CSX2290 is also pictured on page 90 in the book Shelby Cobra by Dave Friedman, the noted photojournalist who was also Shelby American’s official photographer in period. Fittingly, it is powered by an FIA-legal racing engine with period-correct induction via four twin-choke Weber carburetors and is eligible for entry into the finest vintage-racing events today, including HMSA events, the Le Mans Classic, the Goodwood Revival Meeting, and many more. Strikingly and authentically presented and blessed with its unblemished provenance, it continues to exemplify Carroll Shelby’s landmark original Cobra series. As such, it will continue to provide racing excitement and, of course, “blue-chip collectible” status for its next caretaker. Chassis no. CSX2290

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-08-17
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1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder

250hp 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V12 engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent front and semi-elliptical rear suspension and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2600mm (102.3") The American market has always been vastly important to Ferrari. From the earliest days, largely through the efforts of Luigi Chinetti and importers like John von Neumann on the West Coast, Ferrari’s reputation for fast, elegant and desirable automobiles has been, at least, as strong in the U.S. as in Europe. Chinetti, demonstrating the cars’ performance with his North American Racing Team and the equips of Von Neumann, Parravano and others, exploited the fertile American market for Ferrari’s racing cars. The factoryaffiliated teams’ success generated sales both of new racing cars and recycled team cars. Ferrari developedspecific models, such as the two liter Monzas and Mondials, for the North American market and the racing classes that attracted wealthy amateur – and some professional – drivers who could afford to buy and race the very best. The success of Ferrari in America supported the factory’s Grand Prix and sports racing car teams for years, just as it does today. Ferrari’s burgeoning reputation and racing success also encouraged the market for its road cars with, again, specific models like the 375 America and Superamerica series being developed to satisfy American buyers’ desires for large engines and luxurious, longlegged gran turismos. The American dealers identified market niches and Ferrari built cars to fill them, small series of brilliantly integrated design and performance emphasizing the synergy among Ferrari and a few gifted designers and coachbuilders, notably Pinin Farina and Scaglietti. At the same time Ferrari developed, built, raced and successfully sold a middle group of automobiles, dual-purpose gran turismos that traded luxury and creature comforts for light weight and high performance. Ranging from thinly disguised race cars like the 250MM and 340 Mexico, to sparsely equipped road cars, Ferrari’s GT racers performed admirably in the long distance open road races of the fifties. The first of these dual-purpose Ferraris to achieve some semblance of series production was the second series of 250 GT Europa with three liter Colombo engine. Bodied by Pinin Farina, some 36 were built and they demonstrated their effectiveness in competition. But GT competition was becoming more intense so in 1956 Ferrari introduced two new versions of the 250 GT: the Boano/Ellena-bodied coupe road cars and the lightweight racing berlinettas built in limited numbers by Scaglietti to a Pinin Farina design. The latter earned its stripes in the Tour de France and has become synonymous with that great event which covered routes around France with competitive events at tracks and hillclimbs to determine the ultimate winner. Built on the same 2600mm wheelbase chassis as the Boano/Ellena, the 250 GT Tour de France dominated gran turismo competition and its combination of exceptional performance and good looks has made it one of the most desirable Ferraris. At the same time Ferrari and Pinin Farina cooperated to create the first series of 250 GT cabriolets, the counterparts of the Boano/Ellena coupes. These luxurious and individually custombuilt cabriolets were created for gentleman drivers who wanted open air Ferraris to cruise the boulevards of sunny resorts with style and flair. The American market, however, wanted something more than a fast, sparsely equipped berlinetta or comfortably appointed cabriolet. Americans wanted a fast, sparsely equipped convertible Ferrari sports car, the convertible counterpart of the Tour de France berlinettas. Whether it was Luigi Chinetti or John von Neumann who first pointed this out to Ferrari is immaterial, the important point is that Ferrari responded with the California Spyder. Pinin Farina based the California Spyder on the design of the Tour de France. Scaglietti rendered Farina’s design in metal and whether it is the raked windshield, or clean roofless line Scaglietti’s interpretation the California Spyder is without doubt one of the most beautiful Ferraris ever built, beauty that is matched by its performance. California Spyder production began in 1958, and some 11 examples had been built by the time it was announced as a separate model in December 1958. One California Spyder was entered by NART at Sebring early in 1959 driven by Richie Gintherand Howard Hively. It finished 9th overall (behind four Testa Rossas and four Porsche RSKs) and won the GT class. Le Mans in 1959 conclusively demonstrated the performance of the California Spyder, the NART entered, alloy bodied car driven by Bob Grossman and Fernand Tavano finishing 5th overall. Chinetti even found a way to make an impression upon American drag racers with a sub-14 second steel bodied California Spyder. The car offered here, 1217 GT, is one of just 51 long wheelbase California Spyders and was delivered in 1959 to Swiss racing great, Jo Siffert. Being an accomplished driver, Mr. Siffert immediately had the drum brake set-up replaced by a more powerful disc brake system that could better accommodate his driving style. Further to Mr. Siffert’s intentions of driving spiritedly, 1217 GT is fitted with a rare passenger hand brace. The car later traded through Rob de la Rive Box to Mr. Richard Merritt. Mr. Merritt, a passionate Ferrari enthusiast, discovered that 1217 GT no longer retained its original engine. The car was fitted with 2057, a similar engine from a 250 GTE. The next owner, a Mr. George Heiser of Seattle, Washington went on an exhaustive search to locate 1217 GT’s original engine. It was found under the hood of a 1958 Boano, No. 0815, and Mr. Heiser purchased the car so he could reunite his California Spyder with its original engine. Mr. Heiser enjoyed the car through 1987 at which time it was sold to a collector in Europe. In 1993, 1217 GT returned to the U.S. and was owned by another noted collector, Mr. John Mozart. Mr. Mozart sold the car in 1994 to another California owner who commissioned an extensive mechanical restoration at the well-respected shop of Mr. Phil Reilly & Co. The black finish and dark red leather interior are very presentable, however do show some age and wear. In 2004, 1217 GT was sold to a well-known Japanese collector who had the car fully serviced. The vendor reports it is ready for road use and enjoyable to drive. 1217 GT is one of just 106 California Spydersbuilt. This is a rare opportunity to add a wonderful open, 12-cylinder Ferrari to your collection.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-19
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2003 Ferrari Enzo

660 bhp, 5,998 cc V-12 engine with double overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, Bosch Motronic engine management and electronic fuel-injection, six-speed computer-controlled sequential gearbox, limited-slip differential and traction control, front and rear pushrod-actuated double wishbones with horizontal coil-spring damper units, and four-wheel, ventilated, carbon-ceramic disc brakes and ABS. Wheelbase: 104.3 in. • One of only 400 examples built • Reportedly one of six silver cars and the only one that exists in the United States • Just over 9,000 miles from new The Ferrari Enzo created nothing short of a media frenzy when it was first introduced at the 2002 Paris Auto Show. The design was powerful, if not polarizing, to many; it was a classic example of form following function. The outrageous silhouette was a byproduct of packaging and aerodynamic requirements. Quite literally, everything in the design would draw upon Ferrari’s Formula One experience. The magnificent automobile marked a new direction in styling for Ferrari. From the outset, Luca Cordero di Montemezolo pushed his designers and engineers to go just a little further, knowing that they could always back off a bit if necessary. Pininfarina’s design chief, Lorenzo Ramaciotti, chose to have an internal design competition stressing both aerodynamics and a shape even more aggressive than that of the preceding F50. Beginning with approximately two dozen proposals, the number was cut down to just two. Both were presented to Ferrari management in the summer of 1998. The partners, however, agreed to push the envelope further still; what resulted would become the Enzo’s signature front clip. Ferrari also asked for the rear wing to be removed, resulting in hundreds of hours spent in the wind tunnel tuning both the top and the bottom of the car in an effort to provide maximum down force with minimal drag. Twin venturi channels beneath the chassis would accelerate airflow for enhanced down force, while fins within the channels inhibit wasteful crossflow. The wind tunnel ruled and the radical shape was ultimately determined by the car’s high-performance potential. Whereas the F40 and F50 wore bodies that resembled Ferrari’s previous street models, the Enzo looked more like a machine whose sole purpose was to run the quickest lap times at the race track. Unlike many of its contemporaries who have their wheels pushed out to the corners of the body, the Enzo’s wheels are tucked back close to the cockpit. The hood flares out from the pronounced, raised nose flanked by twin air outlets, behind which rest radiators situated just ahead of each front wheel. The front fenders terminate several inches outboard of the doors, leaving additional air outlets to enable hot air to exit from the front. This ensures that undisturbed air can be directed to help clean up the turbulent flow aft of the greenhouse, and also to make the small, low-mounted rear wing work effectively. Along with these design features, inlets on the top and bottom of the rear fenders and another pair of inlets just in front of the rear wing all manage airflow, aid in engine cooling, and promote vehicle stability at speed. Between 37 mph and 159 mph, the rear wing will extend fully and the foot-wide flaps hidden underneath the two split radiators up front stow flush with the car’s underside. As speed increases, the wing will retract gradually as the front flaps are deployed, ensuring as little change as possible to the ride height and handling stability. The rear of the car is wide with bulges atop the fenders that start with large openings for the engine and terminate in four individual round taillights. A wide rear grille aids in engine cooling, with four tailpipes flanking the underbody diffusers that are so crucial to the down force necessary for high-speed stability. Like Ferraris that have come before, the engine is a styling element clearly visible through the rear window. The engine is a masterpiece of design and engineering wizardry. It marks the start of a new generation of Ferrari V-12s bringing much of the company’s F1 design technology to a road car. The 65 degree V-12, displacing 5,998 cubic centimeters, would be the largest to date for Ferrari since the 712 Can Am racer, as it produces 660 horsepower at 7,800 rpm and 484 foot pounds of torque. The engine features twin overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, and a variable length induction system first used in Ferrari’s 1995 F1 engine. It is the first Ferrari powerplant to boast continuously variable exhaust-valve timing. The telescoping intake manifold that helps to boost torque is another device right out of the F1engineer’s playbook. The engine is constructed of aluminum alloy, while the cylinder walls are lined with Nikasil, and the connecting rods are made of titanium. Valve covers and the airbox are topped with carbon fiber for light weight. Providing proper lubrication is an F1-style wraparound dry sump system. Its engine weighs just 496 pounds. In yet another nod to the car’s Formula One heritage, the Enzo would eschew Ferrari’s traditional chromed-gated, ball top shifters. The Enzo’s six-speed gearbox is electronically controlled via two carbon fiber paddles on either side of the steering wheel—just like an F1 car. The double disc clutch is blindingly fast, with gear changes taking place at 150 milliseconds, which is faster than any human can maneuver a regular transmission. The driver can select from Sport or Race modes. Reverse is engaged by pushing a steering wheel button. Inspired by the 512M Le Mans racer, the doors operate scissor-style. Aside from leather-clad Sparco racing seats, door inserts, and door handles, the cabin is all business, with an expanse of bare carbon fiber. The steering wheel is awash in buttons enabling the Enzo’s driver to perform numerous tasks without moving his or her hand from the steering wheel. Even the turn signals are buttons on the two horizontal spokes. At the top of the wheel are seven LED lights with red and yellow indicators warning you when you need to take a closer look at the instruments. Despite having a 10,000 rpm tach, the five center lights atop the steering wheel ensure that progress from 6,000–8,000 rpm is carefully monitored. The instrument panel houses the aforementioned tach, which is flanked by an LCD display on the left and a 250 mph speedometer on the right. The instrument panel, doors, steering wheel, and center console are all carbon fiber. There is no radio, but there is climate control; an Enzo is all about the business of driving. Ferrari would claim the world’s first integrated electronic control system encompassing the engine, gearbox, suspension, traction control, aerodynamics, brake force distribution, and anti-lock braking, with constant communication among all operating systems in order to deliver optimum performance. Another bona-fide first would be the Enzo’s carbon fiber vented Brembo four-wheel disc brakes with anti-lock circuitry. Electronic traction control optimizes performance by allowing just the right amount of wheel spin to achieve maximum acceleration. Power is put to the pavement by massive Bridgestone Potenza RE050 Scuderia 245/35RxZR 19-inch tires, while the fronts are 345/35xZR 19-inchers. Suspension is courtesy of a four-wheel, fully independent setup with wishbones, coil springs, anti-roll bars, and cockpit-controlled telescopic dampers both in the front and rear. Continuing the car’s F1 heritage, the entire body shell and cockpit monocoque is made of carbon fiber and aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels. Ferrari used computer-aided engineering to optimize weight by eliminating unnecessary bulk in the composite structure. In total, the car weighs just 3,009 pounds. In contemporary road tests, Road & Track editors noted that the Enzo recorded the best acceleration figures ever for a production road car: 0–60 mph in 3.3 seconds, with ¼-mile in 11.1 seconds at 133.0 mph. Testers also commented on the confident and firm braking, recording fade-free stops from 60 and 80 mph of 109 and 188 feet, respectively. Of note, the 188 foot stop was another record shared with the 360 Modena. Yet another best was the 73.0 mph run through the slalom and a skid pad reading of 1.01 grams of lateral acceleration! Other road tests would indicate a top speed of 218 mph. Perhaps most impressive of all is how easy this Ferrari is to drive in all situations. Ferrari had broken the myth that supercars could not offer exceptional performance and still be civilized at the same time. Naturally, the vast majority of the 400 Enzos produced were delivered in either classic Rosso Corsa or Fly Yellow. A smaller number, however, were delivered in other choice selections from the Ferrari palette, and these cars stand out even among other Enzos—not a terribly easy thing to do. The Enzo offered here is believed one of six finished in silver, with this particular shade being Argento Nürburgring, and it is reportedly the only one in the United States. The color contrasts nicely with the black and red interior, with its seemingly alight yellow instrument dials glowing welcomingly from the dashboard. The car was delivered new through Ferrari of Orange County, in Prancing Horse-friendly Southern California, to Jay Wilton, a onetime partner in the dealership. It was later acquired from Wilton by the present, second owner, a well-known West Coast-based aficionado of Italian sports cars, who has cared for it ever since. Driven just over 9,000 miles since new, it has, of course, been properly well looked after, with servicing as required and a recent full service before its sale here. It is supplied with the complete original tool kit and books, as the original owner would have received in 2003. A decade ago, one had to be a favored customer at Maranello to acquire the ultimate Ferrari. Today, the Enzo remains the ultimate, but all one needs is a bidder’s pass and plane fare to Arizona. Chassis no. ZFFCW56A030133923

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-01-18
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1931 Duesenberg Model J Tourster by Derham

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, beam type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 153.5 in. • A genuine, original, real Derham Tourster • “The needle in the haystack” that was found in Italy during World War II • Offered from the collection of John Pascucci The Tourster was Gordon Buehrig’s favorite Duesenberg. There is a lot to say about this handsome automobile, but the fact is that out of all of the creations that the master designer drew up for the mighty Model J, he preferred the Tourster, which speaks loudest of all. The design was for a five-passenger touring car on the long 153-1/2-inch wheelbase Model J chassis, which in his 1972 autobiography, Rolling Sculpture, Buehrig described it as being “severely plain in ornamentation and [having] the unusual virtue of being equally handsome with the top in the raised position or when it is lowered.” The length of the chassis exaggerated the car’s lowered proportions, created by moving the rear seat ahead of the rear axle and the foot wells within the frame rails, which increased room for passengers while also allowing the top and sides of the body to be lower than on a standard phaeton. With the Tourster, Buehrig also sought to solve a common problem of dual cowl phaetons of the time. They were often equipped with second windshields to give weather protection to rear seat passengers, but these windshields were mounted on hinged metal tonneaus that had to be clumsily swung up out of the way each time a passenger entered or exited the automobile. The Tourster’s solution was a rear windshield that slid up and down out of the back of the front seat with the turn of a crank handle, providing a windbreak that also looked appropriately dashing—and it stayed out of the way. Toursters were built exclusively by the Derham Body Company in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, which had catered to the carriages, motorized and otherwise, of Philadelphia high society since the 1880s. Butler Hallanan was part of that high society, and so, naturally, a Derham Tourster was in his hands. In the end, he was one of eight people to order a Tourster in the 1930s. His car was 2440/J-423. Reports that Hallanan’s Tourster, equipped with a unique metal trunk, was the New York show car have never been confirmed. Regardless, it saw regular use during the 1930s, and it is believed that Hallanan took it to Europe for grand tours at least once. The fun ended in 1939, when World War II reared its ugly head, and Hallanan apparently beat a hasty retreat from Italy to the United States, his Duesenberg, which had once more accompanied him on the journey, was left behind. Fortunately, someone apparently took pity on the Tourster, sheltering it from unfriendly eyes under a haystack in the Italian countryside, where it spent the remainder of the war in darkness. Towards the end of the conflict, an American military officer uncovered the car in the haystack, from which it was soon freed. In 1946, it was sold to Dore Leto di Priolo, an enthusiast in Milan who recognized and appreciated the car’s importance. It was somewhat casually restored and remained in di Priolo’s care for the next two decades. During this time, back in the United States, Anthony D. “Tony” Pascucci, a successful businessman from Connecticut, was making a name for himself as a collector of antique automobiles. Nowadays, this position would not be thought so unusual, but this was the late-1950s, and cars from the Classic Era and prior were beginning to gain notice. Pascucci’s foresight and thrill for the hunt enabled him to unearth, acquire, and sell truly fabulous examples of American and European automotive art, many of which are today the highlights of prominent collections. Naturally, Pascucci, the connoisseur, appreciated Duesenbergs and owned several. In particular, he sought the phaetons, which even in this era were the Duesenbergs to own. With his sights set on the most desirable body styles available, the hunt was on. The stable began with a LeBaron ‘Barrelside’ Phaeton, 2270/J-243, which Pascucci acquired, sold, and immediately missed. It was soon replaced with 2529/J-339, which was restored identically to its predecessor and, a lesson having been learned, never parted with. It was soon joined by a LeBaron ‘Sweep Panel’ Phaeton, 2336/J-487, another long-term acquisition. Nonetheless, Tony Pasucci dreamed of Derham, and in 1968, he returned home from Milan, Italy with a very large souvenir indeed. With the purchase of 2440/J-423 from di Priolo, Pascucci did more than repatriate a great American classic, he became the first man to own an example of each of the catalogued Duesenberg phaeton body styles—a Triple Crown of great American Classic Era iron. Vehicle number 2440/J-423 was taken to Ted Billing, of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, whose well-respected shop ministered to many a Duesenberg over the years. Billing’s longtime friend, Al San Clemente, recalls the car as “a solid, mostly original car, with poor paint and some incorrect pieces. The doors shut well, and the wood was original and in good shape. All the specialized Derham hardware was still there. I was impressed with the car’s presence, even with the amateur paint. I had bought my Model J Murphy from Tony and tried, in vain, to get him to sell me this car.” Pascucci was not to be moved, however, and soon Billing set about restoring the Tourster to concours condition. It was an easy task, as the body of the car was in excellent condition, including all of the original wood framework, none of which required replacement. The car was missing only the correct lights, all of which were replaced with proper units, many from Pascucci’s vast stash of Model J spares. With the restoration complete in 1971, Pascucci took final possession of his prize, moving it into a heated garage. He later transferred ownership to his son, who has since continued the four-wheeled tradition, and as a result, his Tourster astoundingly remains very much as it did at the completion of its restoration, with only minor signs of aging, largely exhibited in hairline cracks and minor chipping to the paint in a few locations, such as below the trunk and around the edges of the doors. It has been very seldom driven and only occasionally shown to the public in the last 42 years, making a few appearances at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club’s National Reunion in Auburn, Indiana and at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2010. All that is behind it now and all that lies ahead is the future. A.J. “Tony” Pascucci, the enthusiast who was there “in the beginning,” brought many a car into his caring hands during in his lifetime, but he held on to 2440/J-423. After nearly half a century, the time has finally come for this beloved Duesenberg to pass to a new caretaker, who, along with the title, will be passed the torch of maintaining one of the eight original Derham Toursters, and therefore, perhaps the most desirable of all Model Js. Chassis no. 2440 Engine no. J-423

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-01-18
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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB by Carrozzeria Scaglietti

280 hp, 3,286 cc V-12 engine with triple Weber dual-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs and tubular shocks, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. • Equipped with original engine as per the factory • Award-winning restoration; superbly maintained • Ferrari Classiche certification • One of 450 built; ultimate spec, long-nose, torque tube example In many ways, the Ferrari 275 GTB is often lauded by enthusiasts and the media as the last of the “classic Ferraris.” Conceived and executed under the guidance of Enzo Ferrari himself, the 275 GTB was introduced at the 1964 Paris Auto Show and marked a natural evolution from its immediate predecessors, the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta and Lusso. It was also by far the most advanced road-going Ferrari produced at the time of its introduction, and it served as a production test-bed for several notable engineering advances. Designed by Pininfarina and executed by Scaglietti, the 275 GTB was more than just an alluring body. This Ferrari introduced many advancements in specifications for the marque’s road cars, including its first four-wheel independent suspension and five-speed transaxle gearbox. There were three major steps in the development of the 275 GTB, with the earliest cars being equipped with a two-cam V-12 engine and a “short nose,” which was lengthened to improve high speed while giving birth to the 275 GTB “long nose.” A torque tube was added to the specification at the start of 1966, and then, in the fall of that year, the final evolution arrived with a four-cam version of the 3.3-liter V-12 engine, fitted with dry-sump lubrication and six 2-barrel Weber carburetors, rated at a potent 300 horsepower. Despite their performance, they were quite civilized inside, with well-formed seats, wood-trimmed dashboards, and power windows standard. This fine example of the long nose 275 GTB, number 08697, was delivered by authorized Ferrari dealer Autotouring S.r.l., in Modena, Italy, on October 28, 1965. Interestingly, this is one of few examples delivered new from the factory with an engine (0006) numbered differently than the chassis; the originality of this unit is verified by the accompanying Ferrari Certification Book. The berlinetta was purchased by Francesco Breviglieri, of Carpaneto, Italy. Mr. Breviglieri was experienced in Ferrari 275 GTB ownership, as he had previously owned chassis 07473. Records show that the car was regularly serviced at the Ferrari Factory Assistenza Clienti through 1967. The next report of chassis 08697 appears in April 1976, when it was shown in the Ferrari Owners Club Newsletter here in the U.S., as owned by John Doonan, of Rockville, Maryland. It next passed to Neil Moody, of Evergreen, Colorado. In the mid-2000s, Mr. Moody commissioned a restoration of the Ferrari from Steven Bell’s Classic Investments in Englewood, Colorado, which was said to have cost over $400,000. It was shown at the Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in January 2007, where it unsurprisingly garnered a Platinum Award, reserved for those cars that are judged 95 points or better in strict Ferrari Club of America judging standards. In fact, this 275 GTB was one of only three cars in that event’s 275/330/400 class to be recognized as such. Mr. Moody was invited to show 08697 at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in March 2008, where it was greatly admired. Mr. Terry Price, of Gazelle, California, purchased the 275 GTB in September 2008, and it passed directly in that same month to the present owner. In his custodianship, it has been maintained superbly and used sparingly on local tours of the Checkered Flag 200 and Ferrari Club. While it has undoubtedly been driven, it remains in show condition. The car has been seen at the 2009 Newport Beach Concours d’Elegance in Dana Point, California, the 2011 Desert Classic Concours in Rancho Mirage, California, and the 2012 Palos Verdes Concours. A testament to both the outstanding quality of the now six year old restoration, as well as the fastidious care it has received since, 08697 was judged in the Palos Verdes Ferrari Class at 98.5 points. It is further accompanied by the Classiche binder, a full set of tools, and books. Still finished in the as-delivered combination of Argento over Nero, the brilliance of the underlying restoration is clear to see in the smooth reflections visible from front fender to door to rear fender and down to both of the sensuously shaped sides. The paint appears virtually unmarked, and the sparingly used bright trim is lustrous. Inside, the leather-upholstered interior shows only signs of the most gentle use and the same evident care and maintenance as the exterior. On taking delivery, the vendor had noted that Auto Gallery, of Calabasas, California, re-jet the carburetors from their high-altitude settings in order to deliver full power at sea level. Since then, Auto Gallery has regularly serviced the 275 GTB, with assiduous changes of oil and filters. The current owner confidently relates that this Ferrari indeed holds the road with the same élan with which it most certainly did when first delivered. He goes on to say that it inspires great confidence on the road, doing everything it is supposed to do and belying its age. It is reported that even the clock and the trunk light work. That the 275 GTB is one of the most desirable and iconic sports GT cars of the mid-20th century is undoubted. The next custodian of chassis 08697 will enjoy the benefits of fine design, brilliant performance, and the well-sorted and maintained quality that this Ferrari possesses in abundance. A more attractive and usable example would be hard to imagine. Chassis no. 08697 Engine no. 0006

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-01-18
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1941 Chrysler Thunderbolt

Specifications: 143hp, 324 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed Fluid Drive manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with coil springs, live axle rear suspension with leaf springs, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 127.5" Chrysler produced many outstanding designs in its prewar history – clean, refined automobiles that captured the essence of quality, elegance, and craftsmanship. Their inherent attraction, however, came not from the concepts of a talented artist like Harley Earl or even the inspiration of Edsel Ford, but rather from the subjective appeal of strongly engineered, highly functional automobiles that were complemented by understated artistic influence. Prior to the 1930s, Chrysler’s Art & Color Division had been part of the Engineering department. By 1935, however, Ray Dietrich became the first official Chrysler stylist, and was charged with restyling the ill-fated Airflow line and adding the less radical, more attractive Airstream. With an exaggerated waterfall-type grille, the Airflow’s dramatically different design had failed. As a result, Chrysler products in the late 1930s continued to offer competent, pleasing, but much ‘safer’ designs. Walter P. Chrysler might have preferred a return to his corporation’s trendsetting design philosophy, integrating advanced engineering with appropriate coachwork. Unfortunately, the health of the man who created the second largest automobile company in the world was rapidly declining. After years of service and a business acumen that helped his corporation survive the Depression, Mr. Chrysler resigned in 1938 and passed away less than two years later. The corporation that bore his name restructured and found a new leader in K.T. Keller, who had been its President since 1935. Keller recognized Chrysler’s need for exposure to draw prospective customers. In 1940, the business of building ‘show’ or ‘concept’ cars was still in its infancy. In fact, the showcasing of potential future styling and innovations was effectively pioneered just two years earlier by Harley Earl with his Buick Y-Job. Given the Y-Job’s success, it did not take long for other automobile manufacturers to recognize the need to follow Earl’s and GM’s lead. By the start of World War II, Ford was the only company not producing any ‘idea cars’. THUNDERBOLT – FROM CONCEPT TO REALITY The Thunderbolt concept was born of a thoughtful pitch in 1939 by Alex Tremulis to Ralph Roberts at LeBaron. At the time, Tremulis was a promising young designer at Briggs Manufacturing, LeBaron’s parent company, who later went on to help design the legendary Tucker Torpedo Sedan. Roberts was so impressed with the design that he organized a meeting with K.T. Keller and Chrysler division president Dave Wallace to discuss the possibility of creating these two dream cars. Keller and Wallace gave the go-ahead and Roberts and Tremulis took full advantage of their new-found opportunity. By the late 1930s, the market for custom coachwork had largely evaporated, hit hard by the Depression and the efforts of corporate stylists like GM’s Harley Earl and Ford’s Eugene Gregorie. Consequently, LeBaron was left with little work. The Thunderbolt and Newport, on the other hand, became two of LeBaron’s most interesting and final endeavors, as the onset of World War II would force the company to ultimately halt production. If the Newport was modern looking, the Thunderbolt was beyond futuristic. It utilized a full-envelope body with concealed headlights. It was also the very first convertible with a fully retractable hard top, designed, developed, and patented by Ralph Roberts. It was shorter than the Newport and seated three on a wide bench seat. The Thunderbolt had a straight-through fender line with no dip or belt molding of any kind, the front and rear wheels were covered with fender skirts and the headlights were concealed. Truly a unique design feature – there was no recognizable grille, as the air intakes were cleverly situated below the bumper. With the exception of the steel hood and decklid, the body was constructed of aluminum with an anodized metal molding wrapping almost entirely around the car. Its construction was so impressive that, upon seeing the design, Keller asked how they were going to bend it around the front end. In response, Tremulis said they would make that section of brass and plate it. Delighted, Keller replied, “Sometimes you stylists think like engineers and make sense.” The Chrysler Thunderbolt was named after the land speed record-holding car that Captain George Eyston drove at 357.53mph over the measured mile at the Bonneville Salt Flats in September of 1938. Eyston’s Thunderbolt was powered by dual twelve-cylinder Rolls-Royce aero engines, was more than 30 feet long, and weighed 7 tons. Chrysler’s Thunderbolt, in contrast, made use of a considerably shorter 127.5-inch New Yorker chassis and a 323.5 cubic inch, Spitfire L-head inline eight-cylinder engine rated at 140 horsepower and 255 foot pounds of torque. As a prototype, the Thunderbolt also employed the three-speed Fluid Drive transmission that was not to see full development until after World War II on production Chrysler models. Additionally, it featured a very rare for the time, overdrive gear ratio that permitted the car to travel at speeds in excess of 100mph and gave the driver the option of operating the car without shifting. The Thunderbolt had push-button door switches both inside and out – another groundbreaking design feature. The interior was lavishly appointed in leather and Bedford cord, while the dashboard featured design advancements all its own. It was also the first modern motor car to use back-lit, Lucite-edged illuminated gauges; inlaid into the dash, they complemented perfectly the Imperial steering wheel and vertically mounted inset radio. Without question, the Thunderbolt’s most impressive design feature was the ingeniously designed, electrically operated, retractable hardtop. The flick of one switch activated three separate synchronized operations that caused the top to retract into a space behind the bench seat. Access to the trunk was provided via a fully automatic sliding rear decklid – truly an incredible engineering task in 1941 and one that was not seen again on a production car until recent times. Each of the original five Thunderbolts produced received a different color combination and were marked by a discreet lightning bolt on the smooth, contoured aluminum doors. Subtle differences, such as the exterior wraparound trim and dashboard finishes, made each car unique from the others. The curved windshield design proved to be a serious challenge, however, as it had never been used on an automobile before and the glass companies had nothing like it ready for immediate use. Fortunately, the firm commissioned for the project produced a suitable windshield just in time, without having to revert to a contemporary split V-type piece. In fact, this single hallmark was not seen on regular production cars until the early 1950s. In order to meet the Thunderbolt’s short building deadline, aluminum side skin panels were applied over solid oak substructures, while the trunk and the hood were all made of steel. Chrysler engineers were working hand in hand with LeBaron, ensuring the integrity and quality of the cars would not be compromised under such time constraints. Following completion, the Thunderbolt and Newport cars were sent on promotional tours and were exhibited everywhere from local dealerships to the Indianapolis 500, where the Newport was used as a pace car. The Thunderbolt achieved not only its initial function of promoting Chrysler as a vanguard of styling ideas, but also exceeded it by becoming a concept car of unprecedented importance at a time when its meaning could easily have paled in comparison to the dramatic, concurrent world events. The cars caravanned across the country, stopping at Chrysler dealerships and attracting tremendous crowds. Quite frequently, showroom lights were turned off, urging visitors to leave, as they often had a tendency to linger well past midnight. A Sacramento, California Chrysler dealer even reported 8,500 visitors to his dealership on the day a Thunderbolt was in his showroom. Meanwhile, a winter weekend in Denver attracted 29,000 visitors, who braved the snow and hail to view Chrysler’s latest creation. PROVENANCE AND RARITY – THE FINEST OF THE REMAINING FOUR Chrysler Corporation documentation and research indicate that only five Thunderbolts were ever built, each with a different body and top color combination. All were produced for the show circuit. Today, only four remain and the example offered here, chassis 7807976, is considered the finest and most correct example in existence. Of the other three remaining Thunderbolts, one resides in a private collection, another is on display at the Walter P. Chrysler Museum in Auburn Hills, Michigan, and the third is in need of significant restoration. Regardless of their condition and location, each are treasured showpieces, valued by their owners, and unlikely to be offered for sale in the near future. This particular Thunderbolt is the only fully restored car with what is believed to be the original authentic color combination and original anodized metal wraparound trim. It is recorded as being the fourth Thunderbolt built and retains numerous irreplaceable parts and original components. In 1942, it was sold by Joe Levy, President of Walton Motors Inc., a Chrysler dealership in Chicago, to the Vice-President of Mexico, where it remained for over 20 years. In the early 1960s the Thunderbolt was sold to Paul Stern, with whom itremained for an equally long term before being sold to ‘Friendly’ Bob Adams. In 1980, Joe Levy Jr., son of the very first owner, purchased the car. Over the next ten years the Thunderbolt passed through several owners, finding its way into its penultimate collection in 1997. By this time, the Chrysler had been fully restored and was prepared for national concours competition. HONORS AND ACCOLADES In 1997, an invitation to compete at the 47th annual Concours d’Elegance at Pebble Beach was extended and accepted. The car so impressed both the public and the judges that it earned a remarkable 99.5 points and was a winner in its class. It should be noted that the Chrysler is also a CCCA Full Classic and is eligible for entry into the numerous CCCA CARavans and events held annually. Subsequent to its win at Pebble Beach, the Chrysler was shown at the 1998 Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance and the Chrysler Concours on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, California. Notably, while on display during its second trip to Meadow Brook, the Thunderbolt and the Buick Y-Job were featured together, displayed side by side for the first time in history. The Thunderbolt has been featured in numerous publications, graced the cover of Classic Car Magazine and has never been denied entry into any event worldwide. Perhaps one of the Thunderbolt’s greatest accolades came in 2002 when it took part in the Petersen Museum’s exhibit entitled, Million Dollar Cars, the World’s Most Valuable Automobiles. The car was placed on display in its own exhibit area along with 20 of the world’s most important motorcars. In 2006, Chrysler’s venerable concept car changed hands one last time before being recently honored by the Phoenix Art Museum, where it was put on display with 21 other autos of considerable historical significance. The first of its kind, this Curves of Steel exhibit highlighted streamlined automotive design in the twentieth century and was accompanied by a beautiful book of the same title, featuring the work of renowned automotive photographer Michael Furman. PERFECTION IN DESIGN, OPERATION, AND MOTION In its present state, the Thunderbolt is in near 100-point condition and runs and drives flawlessly. From the distinctive LeBaron script to the Thunderbolt emblem, every element on this example has been verified as original or duplicated to perfection, without regard to cost. It is nearly impossible to find fault with the Thunderbolt; mechanically and cosmetically, the car remains in true show condition. It was exercised regularly by its previous owner and frequently inspected, detailed, and serviced by noted restored Mike Fennel. The automatic convertible hard top, now 67 years old and almost entirely unchanged, remains an object of pure ingenuity and continues to be an impressive sight to this day. The Chrysler Thunderbolt exemplified the conceptual stylings of Alex Tremulis and Ralph Roberts in a manner previously unimagined. From the push button starter and fully retractable and disappearing hardtop to the backlit Lucite gauges, the Chrysler Thunderbolt was and is in a class all by itself. Above all, it remains tremendously important to the automotive tradition of concept car production and, alongside its Newport brother, is one of the forefathers of truly groundbreaking and forward-thinking design. Chassis no. 7807976

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-01-18
Hammer price
Show price

1936 Delahaye Type 135 MS

The ex-Ecurie Bleue 160hp, 3,557cc. six-cylinder engine, four-speed Cotal pre-selector transmission, independent front suspension with transverse leaf springs, live axle rear suspension with leaf springs, four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 106" (2,700mm) Delahaye’s history began well before the dawn of the automobile with the establishment of M. Brethon’s machine shop in Tours in 1845. In the 1880s or 90s, Emile Delahaye acquired Brethon’s operation and began experimenting with gasoline engines. He built his first automobile in 1895 and in 1896 he drove one of his automobiles to sixth place in the Paris-Marseilles-Paris race. In 1898, Delahaye took in two partners, Leon Desmarais and Georges Morane, and moved to a factory in Paris. To organize and manage the new operation they hired Charles Weiffenbach. “Monsieur Charles” would remain at the helm of Delahaye through two World Wars and the next fifty-five years, guiding Delahaye after Emile Delahaye sold his interest in 1901. The post-World War I recession hit Delahaye hard, exacerbated by a glut of war surplus US trucks which decimated Delahaye’s truck market. It survived, aided by a marriage of convenience with Chenard et Walcker and F.A.R. Tractor, but as the Depression took hold a few years later a change in its business plan was needed. Monsieur Charles – some say at the urging of Ettore Bugatti – initiated a drastic change in Delahaye’s product strategy to create a performance image. The vehicle for Delahaye’s new direction was the Superluxe and its sports sibling, the Delahaye Type 135. Designed by Jean François under the direction of Delahaye’s technical director, Amédée Varlet, the Superluxe and Type 135 engine, a long stroke, pushrod-operated overhead valve, four main bearing, crossflow head inline six, would become one of the most versatile, long-lived engine designs in history. The sporting history of Delahaye in the thirties is inextricably linked with Laury and Lucy O’Reilly Schell. Lucy was the only child of an Irishman who’d made millions in America. She met Laury Schell in France and the two of them cut a swath through both French society and the racing community. Their team, Ecurie Bleue, eventually became the proxy for the Delahaye factory. Their son, Harry Schell, became a noted grand prix driver after the war. It was Ecurie Bleue and its driver, René Dreyfus, who won the famous “Million Franc Prize” for Delahaye in 1937. The Schells’ Ecurie Bleue was one of the first to compete with Delahaye’s new engine, which was installed in a Type 134 for the 1934 Dieppe Rally. At the same time, Delahaye engineer Jean François was hard at work on a new chassis, the Type 135, to complement the more powerful engine. The chassis was a particularly advanced assembly for its time, with boxed rectangular rails, a central crossmember weldment and a welded-in floor that contributed additional stiffness and rigidity. The front suspension was independent, using its transverse leaf spring as the lower control arm. Introduced at the 1935 Paris Salon, Delahaye offered both single and triple downdraft carburetor induction systems in addition to two engine sizes, 3,227cc (18 CV) and 3,557cc (20 CV), giving buyers the choice of 95hp, 120hp and two 110hp configurations. The competition prospects for the Type 135 were embodied in a fifth model: the short wheelbase, 3,557cc, triple carburetor, 160 horsepower Delahaye Type 135 Special. More than just highly tuned, the Type 135 Special featured additional engine block cooling passages, a lighter and better balanced crankshaft capable of higher rpm, an 8.4:1 compression ratio cylinder head, modified valve gear and a high lift cam. It breathed through three horizontal Solex carburetors and had six exhaust ports with individual exhaust head pipes. All the Type 135 Specials were bodied with similar lightweight two-seat coachwork with removable teardrop fenders, making them acceptable in both sports car and grand prix competition. Aggressively functional, gracefully styled and effectively aerodynamic, their rugged naturally aspirated engines and dual purpose functionality made the Delahaye Type 135 Special the ideal race car for the 1936 French racing season. The Automobile Club de France had proposed a series of French races for “sport-competition” cars, designed to avoid the dominance of German and Italian marques in grands prix. Included in the ACF’s schedule in addition to the 24 Hours of Le Mans was the French Grand Prix: the proudest laurel any French auto manufacturer could win. Delahaye created its own two-car team for the 1936 season with drivers Albert Divo and Albert Perrot. Two of the sixteen Type 135 Specials built were retained for the factory team, 47188 and the car which RM Auctions is proud to offer at Vintage Motor Cars in Arizona this year, chassis 47189. The French Grand Prix was held at Montlhèry outside Paris on June 28 over a distance of 1000 kilometers. The Delahaye Type 135 Specials threw a scare into Bugatti, finishing second through fifth behind Wimille and Sommer in a envelope bodied Bugatti Type 57G. Albert Perrot, with co-driver Dhome, finished fifth just behind Laury Schell and René Carrière. Schell had finished second in the Three Hours of Marseilles held a month before on the Miramas circuit in a sweep of the top six positions by Delahaye Type 135 Specials. Two weeks after the French GP, Schell and Carrière finished third overall at the 24 Hours of Spa. Delahaye’s hopes of adding the victory wreath from the Le Mans 24 Hours to the company’s history unfortunately was frustrated by 1936’s social and labor unrest in France which forced cancellation of the endurance classic. At the conclusion of the 1936 season, Delahaye disbanded its factory team and sold this Type 135 Special to the Schell’s Ecurie Bleue where it joined two other Type 135 Specials, chassis numbers 46835 and 47193. This car was modified for 1937 regulations with the addition of doors and campaigned by Laury Schell. He recorded a number of excellent results driving Type 135 Specials including third in the Mille Miglia with Carrière, third in the Tunis GP and fifth in the GP de la Marne with Rene Dreyfus. Lucy O’Reilly Schell and a co-driver captured third overall in the demanding Monte Carlo Rally in one of the Ecurie Bleue Type 135 Specials. Drivers such as Carrière, Rene Le Bègue and Dreyfus who regularly drove for Ecurie Bleue also scored well in the 1937 season in Type 135 Specials. While it is believed that Dreyfus regularly raced chassis 47193, no satisfactory records or other evidence have been uncovered to identify race appearances specifically for Type 135 Special chassis 47189 other than the fifth place at the GP de la Marne. The Schells and Ecurie Bleue moved from Paris to Monaco at the end of 1937. Ecurie Bleue had acquired two new Delahaye Type 145 V12s which became the team’s primary cars for the 1938 season. One of the Type 135 Specials was entrusted to Jean Trevoux and co-driver Matra for the September 11, 1938 12 Hours of Paris at Montlhèry, either 47189 or 47193, the third Type 135 Special having been sold by then. The team started the 1939 season racing the Delahaye Type 145s but during the year acquired a pair of Maserati 8CTFs which Lucy O’Reilly Schell took to Indianapolis in 1940. Tragedy struck the Schell family at the end of the 1939 season when a road accident took Laury Schell’s life and seriously injured his wife Lucy. After the war, the Ecurie Bleue Delahaye Type 135 Special was raced in September 1945 in one of the first postwar events, the Coupe des Prisonniers race in the Bois de Boulogne by Roger Wormser. Later, it was exported to Argentina through Harry Schell’s friend Georges Gath where it was owned and raced by a number of owners including Ernesto Dillon, Rene Emilio Soulas, Miguel Schreler, Roberto Calise, Nicolas Dellpaine and Eduardo Salzman before ending up with “Panchi” Lezica, an amateur boxer of note. It continued to be raced until 1966 when it was acquired by Rudolfo Iriate in condition charitably described as “well-used” with a Chevrolet engine and FIAT gearbox. Iriate recalled later, however, “the original motor nevertheless remained with the car. I immediately started a complete restoration…. To do this I collected all the Delahaye pieces I could find…. I even got my hands on three motors … and managed to rebuild the original using pieces from all four engines at my disposal.” The body was rebuilt by Gallicio using the original coachwork as the templates. When completed, Iriate raced the ex-Ecurie Bleue Delahaye regularly into the 1980’s. In the late 80s he sold it to Peter Agg in England who, in 1993, sold it to Hugh Taylor. Later owners were Anthony Bamford, then Nicolas Springer in Germany. It was restored by Lukas Huni in the mid-Nineties to its present excellent condition. The history of the Delahaye Type 135 was featured in Automobile Quarterly (volume 39, number 2, July 1999) and this car was singled out for the “Coda” spotlight as a “True Bleue Delahaye.” It is believed twelve of the sixteen original Delahaye Type 135 Specials survive – ample evidence that enthusiasts recognized even in the darkest days of World War II that these were exceptional automobiles of the highest quality and rare distinction. Two Delahaye Type 135 Specials finished second and third in the 1937 Le Mans 24 Hours (Paul/Mongin in second and Dreyfus/Stoffel in an Ecurie Bleue car in third). Laury Schell and René Carrière were the first non-classified car, covering 2,604 km (more than the 12th placed Simca) but not running at the finish. Delahaye Type 135 Specials finished first, second and fourth at Le Mans in 1938. They were sixth, eighth and eleventh in 1939 (the 8th place finisher no less a personage than Rob Walker whose exploits with his Type 135 Special could fill a book of its own.) In the first postwar Le Mans in 1949, famed as Ferrari’s first Le Mans victory driven by Luigi Chinetti, a fleet of Delahaye Type 135 Specials lurked behind him, eventually finishing fifth, ninth and tenth. Although a World War had intervened, in 1949 the Delahaye Type 135 Special was still competitive at the pinnacle of international competition. The most important and best performing of all of them were the two factory cars of the 1936 season and the cars of Laury and Lucy O’Reilly Schell’s Ecurie Bleue which mounted a challenge to the Silver Arrows of Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union and the Scuderia Ferrari Alfa Romeos of Enzo Ferrari. Built from its inception as a dual purpose grand prix and sports car, Delahaye Type 135 Special 47189 is adaptable to, and acceptable in, all the most important and enjoyable events and tours. The Type 135 Special – and perhaps this very car – has scored points in grands prix, sports car and endurance events driven by legends in racing history. It is beautifully and carefully prepared and presented. The Delahaye Type 135 Special chassis number 47189 is without parallel among its contemporaries -– both Delahaye’s 1936 factory team car and one of the standard-bearers for Laury and Lucy O’Reilly Schell’s Ecurie Bleue. Chassis no. 47189

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-01-19
Hammer price
Show price

1933 Duesenberg SJ Brunn Riviera Phaeton

The Ex-Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, Factory Supercharged 320bhp 420 cu. in. four valves per cylinder twin overhead camshaft inline eight-cylinder engine with Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger, three-speed transmission, beam front axle, live rear axle and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" The story of Fred and August Duesenberg and E.L. Cord is among the most fascinating in automotive history. The Duesenbergs were self-taught mechanics and car builders whose careers started in the Midwest at the beginning of the twentieth century with the manufacture of cars bearing the Mason and Maytag names. Fred, the older brother by five years, was the tinkerer and designer of the pair. Augie made Fred’s ingenious and creative things work. The Duesenbergs’ skill and creativity affected many other early American auto manufacturers. Their four-cylinder engine produced by Rochester powered half a dozen marques. Eddie Rickenbacker, Rex Mays, Peter DePaolo, Tommy Milton, Albert Guyot, Ralph DePalma, Fred Frame, Deacon Litz, Joe Russo, Stubby Stubblefield, Jimmy Murphy, Ralph Mulford and Ab Jenkins drove their racing cars. In 15 consecutive Indianapolis 500s, starting with their first appearance in 1913, 70 Duesenbergs competed. Thirty-two – an amazing 46 percent of them – finished in the top 10. Fred and Augie became masters of supercharging and of reliability. Their engines, because engines were Fred’s specialty, were beautiful and performed on a par with the best of Miller, Peugeot and Ballot. In 1921, Jimmy Murphy’s Duesenberg won the most important race on the international calendar, the French GP at Le Mans. It was the first car with hydraulic brakes to start a Grand Prix. Duesenberg backed up this performance at Indianapolis in 1922 – eight of the top 10 cars were Duesenberg powered, including Jimmy Murphy’s winner. In 1925, Errett Lobban Cord added the Duesenberg Motors Company to his rapidly growing enterprise, the Auburn Automobile Company. Cord’s vision was to create an automobile that would surpass the great marques of Europe and America. Cadillac, Isotta Fraschini, Bugatti, Rolls-Royce, Hispano-Suiza were his targets and Duesenberg was his chosen instrument. He presented Fred Duesenberg with the opportunity to create the greatest car in the world, and Fred obliged with the Duesenberg Model J. The Duesenberg Model J was conceived and executed to be superlative in all aspects. Its short wheelbase chassis was 142.5 inches, nearly 12 feet. The double overhead camshaft straight eight-cylinder engine had four valves per cylinder and displaced 420 cubic inches. It made 265 horsepower. The finest materials were used throughout and fit and finish were to toolroom standards. Each chassis was driven at speed for 100 miles at Indianapolis. Other rolling chassis were clothed by the best coachbuilders in the US and Europe, but Duesenberg offered its own designs by Gordon Buehrig, Al Leamy and Herb Newport which were executed on commission by others and sold under the LaGrande name. The Duesenberg Model J’s introduction on December 1, 1928 at the New York Auto Salon was front-page news. The combination of the Duesenberg reputation with the Model J’s grand concept and execution made it the star of the show and the year. Duesenberg ordered enough components to build 500 Model Js while development continued for six months after the Model J’s introduction to ensure its close approximation of perfection. The first customer delivery came in May 1929, barely five months before Black Tuesday. Unfortunately, the Model J Duesenberg lacked financing and support from E.L. Cord and Auburn Corporation, which were both struggling to stay afloat in the decimated middle market. After the Model J’s introduction Fred Duesenberg worked on making it even more powerful, applying his favourite centrifugal supercharger to the Model J’s giant eight, just as he had done so successfully to his 122 cubic inch racing eights a decade earlier. He died in a Model J accident in 1932 and Augie, until then independently and very successfully building racing cars, was retained to put the final touches on the supercharged Duesenberg. The result, christened “SJ,” was the pinnacle of American luxury performance automobiles. It has never been equalled, or even realistically approached, in concept or execution. The Duesenberg SJ delivered 320 horsepower at speed while retaining the outstanding naturally aspirated performance of the J at lower rpm. Alone among the Duesenberg Js, only the SJ represented the collaboration of both Duesenberg brothers. Duesenberg built a mere 36 SJs at the Duesenberg factory, and properly converting a standard J to SJ specification was no small job, the engine requiring complete disassembly to fit stronger valve springs, high-performance tubular connecting rods and numerous other components. The SJ required external exhaust manifolding to fit the supercharger under its hood. The giant chromed flexible tubes became its signature. The effect of the Duesenberg J on America cannot be minimized. Even in the misery of the Depression this paragon of power illustrated the continued existance of wealth and an upper class. Duesenberg’s advertising became a benchmark, featuring the wealthy and privileged in opulent surroundings with only a single line of copy: “He drives a Duesenberg.” The outside exhaust pipes inspired generations of auto designers and remain, 60 years later, a symbol of power and performance. “She’s a real Duesy,” still means a slick, quick, smooth and desirable possession of the highest quality. The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom body industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the style and grace of the factory sheet metal was ideally suited for the execution of elegant custom coachwork. While most of the leading coachbuilders of the day were commissioned to clothe the mighty J, many modern observers believe it was Brunn & Company who best combined exceptional design with outstanding build quality. Brunn & Company had been established in 1908 when Hermann A. Brunn left his uncle’s carriage works to concentrate on automobile bodies. His son, Hermann C. Brunn, who had apprenticed at Kellner in Paris, later joined him at the firm’s Buffalo, New York workshops. The firm continued in business until the beginning of World War II when Hermann C. Brunn would begin a successful career in Ford’s design department. Among Brunn’s most recognized designs for Lincoln was the “Sunshine Special” created for President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1936 and used by the White House until 1951. One of the most remarkable designs of the classic era, Brunn’s Riviera Phaeton was both beautiful and practical. Although a convertible sedan by function, it was cleverly engineered and brilliantly styled. Most experts agree that the Riviera was the best looking four door convertible offered on the Duesenberg chassis. While most convertible sedans had large and complicated top mechanisms, Brunn’s Riviera Phaeton top was compact and simple to operate. It is one of the few open designs that managed to look as good with the top up as it did with the top down. This remarkable achievement was a result of an ingenious body design that allowed the entire rear body to open, hinged at the bumper, revealing a spacious compartment into which the top lowered completely. With the top down and hidden, the car takes on a very sporting appearance, with compact lines that emphasize the muscular appearance of the high performance chassis below. Just three of these Riviera Phaetons are known to have been built. SJ528 is one of the five percent of Duesenbergs delivered new in supercharged form, and one of two fitted with this remarkable coachwork. Duesenbergs were expensive cars, and only men or women of means could afford them. At a time when a perfectly good new family sedan could be purchased for $500 or so, a coachbuilt Duesenberg often cost $20,000 or more. If a full size sedan sells for $25,000 today, that is the equivalent of more than $1 million dollars now. Such extravagance was born of an era of unbridled capitalism – a time when a man with vision and ability could make and keep a fortune of staggering size. These were the men who could afford the very best, and there was absolutely no doubt that when it came to automobiles, E. L. Cord’s magnificent Duesenberg was the best that money could buy. S.J. 528’s first owner was just such a man. Lt. Col. Jacob Schick is best known today for two inventions: the cartridgestyle Schick razor, and the first electric “dry razor”. Born in Ottumwa, Iowa in 1878, Schick enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1898. After two tours of duty in the Philippines, he was commissioned a First Lieutenant when he was posted to Alaska. Drawn by the gold rush, Schick retired from the Army in 1910 to seek his fortune. During one particularly arduous trip, he was laid up by a broken ankle. A restless genius, he used the opportunity to focus his energies on designing a prototype electric razor. Unfortunately he was unable to interest a manufacturer in production before World War I intervened and Schick returned to active duty. A decorated officer, he resumed his career serving in London first in logistics and later in intelligence. Promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, in 1919 he returned to America with a new idea. Inspired by cartridge fed automatic weapons, he decided that there was a market for a cartridge-loading shaver that would eliminate the risk of handling sharp blades. The “Magazine Repeating Razor” was introduced in 1926, and was an immediate success. Schick, however, remained convinced that his future lay with the electric razor, and as a result he sold his cartridge razor company to capitalize Schick Dry Shaver, Inc. The dry shaver was introduced in 1929, and although times were difficult at first, the company turned the corner quickly and came to dominate the new electric razor market. By 1934, the company was on a roll, and in June of that year, Col. Schick rewarded himself with the purchase of SJ528. He drove the car for a little more than two years before trading it in on a new car. Duesenberg sold the car a second time in October of 1936 to C.H. Oshei of Detroit Michigan, owner of the Anderson Windshield Wiper Company. Oshei traded J107, a well-known LaGrande dual cowl phaeton. Later, likely in 1937, Virginia Schmidt of Chicago, Illinois purchased the car. Then, in 1938, SJ528 was registered to the Eddie Glatt Finance Company of Chicago, Illinois. Although dates are not known, subsequent owners included Charles A Marshall of Madison, Wisconsin; Dominic Banich of Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Krause Oldsmobile, also in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In 1941 SJ528 was purchased by noted Chicago area Duesenberg dealer John Troka, who resold the car to A. E. Sullivan of Rockford, Illinois. Sullivan sold the car to M.P. Margarite Feuer, of Rockford, Illinois, who kept the car just a short while before it was purchased by a musician named Vaughn. Vaughan sold the car back to Troka in the late 1940s, who removed the supercharger for another project before reselling the car to Art Grossman of Chicago, Illinois. Grossman intended to undertake a restoration, but instead sold the car in April of 1950 to Harry Schultzinger of Cincinnati, Ohio who immediately began restoring the car. For reasons unknown, Schultzinger decided to replace the frame with one from J551 (frame #2577), although the rest of SJ528 (including engine, body, firewall, and drivetrain components) remained with the car. Harry was an inveterate tinkerer, known for his performance improvements, and was said to have only two speeds – fast and faster! During his ownership, SJ528 benefited from a number of “improvements”, including the installation of a five-speed transmission from a truck, a set of 17 inch wheels, and an engine rebuild using components from J467. Schultzinger became SJ528’s longest-term owner, but finally, in 1975, the car was purchased by Dr. Don Vesley of Louisiana and Florida. In 1983 he sold the car to noted Florida collector Rick Carroll, who undertook a second restoration, this time in red, and in the process reinstalled an original supercharger, transmission and 19 inch wheels. After Rick Carroll’s restoration, Bob Bahre of Oxford, Maine purchased SJ528, sometime in 1986. Later, in 1988, Phoenix, Arizona based dealer Leo Gephardt advertised the car for $1.2 million. The result was a sale to the late Noel Thompson, a prominent New Jersey collector. Thompson sold the car to the Imperial Palace where it was prominently featured in the Duesenberg Room for many years before Dean Kruse of Auburn, Indiana acquired it as part of a multiple car purchase acquired it in 1999. The vendor purchased SJ528 from Kruse in 2001, and shortly afterwards, decided to commission the car’s third – and most comprehensive – restoration. Renowned multiple Best of Show winning restorer Fran Roxas was chosen to undertake the project. A complete nut-and-bolt restoration ensued, including a bare metal strip and repaint that revealed a remarkably solid and original body. All chassis components were stripped, rebuilt as required, and given show quality finishes. Every mechanical component on the Duesenberg was completely rebuilt or refurbished as necessary. The body was block sanded to perfection before multiple flawless coats of deep, rich black paint were applied, wetsanded and buffed to mirror-like perfection. The interior was trimmed in rich dark tobacco brown leather, and an immaculately tailored dark tobacco brown Haartz cloth top was fitted. Accented by perfect show chrome, the result is truly breathtaking. The author was privileged to have the opportunity to drive SJ528, and the road test revealed the car to be one of the best running and most powerful Duesenbergs he has ever driven. The engine started readily, warmed quickly, and accelerated with the kind of authority that only 320 supercharged horsepower can provide. One can feel the additional power of the Supercharger, especially given the engine’s desirable twin carbureted configuration. Even more remarkably, the car’s steering was the lightest and smoothest in this writer’s experience, indicating a low mileage chassis, an exceptional restoration, or perhaps, both. Today, Lt. Col. Jacob Schick’s magnificent SJ528 is one of a handful of original-bodied supercharged Model J Duesenbergs remaining today. It is one of three Brunn Riviera Phaetons built, and amazingly, one of two factory supercharged cars (SJ525 is the other supercharged car, and J521, now fitted with the engine from J440 is the third.) Today’s Duesenberg market is characterized by long-term ownership, and consequently it is an exceedingly rare event when a car with the specification, pedigree and provenance of SJ528 comes to market. In more than 25 years of service to the collector car hobby, SJ528 is only the second original bodied factory supercharged Duesenberg RM has ever had the pleasure of offering at auction. Chassis no. 2551

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-03-12
Hammer price
Show price

1955 Lancia Aurelia B24S Spider America by Pinin Farina

118 bhp 2,451 cc DOHC V-6 engine with Weber 40 DCZ5 carburetor, four-speed manual transaxle, independent sliding-pillar front suspension with coil springs and hydraulic dampers, De Dion rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and Panhard rod, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in. Offered from a private collection One of 181 examples built Over two decades of single ownership in Central California Comprehensive two-year restoration by marque experts in 2012 2nd in Class, Postwar Sports Open, at Pebble Beach in 2012 Refinished in factory-correct colors of light grey paint over red leather Accompanied by a correct tool kit, owner’s manual, and copies of manufacturer brochures Documented with restoration invoices, photos, and correspondence AVRELIA In May 1950, Lancia used the opportunity of the Turin Motor Show to officially introduce a new saloon internally designated as the B10. Named for an ancient Roman road from Rome to Pisa, the new model was dubbed the Aurelia. Unremarkable at a glance, the new car was actually distinguished by a host of advanced mechanical features, including front and rear independent suspension, inboard rear brakes, and a new 1.8-liter 60-degree alloy V-6 engine that would soon become known as the world’s first volume-produced V-6. By straddling the line between hand-built manufacturing like Ferrari and the rationalized mass-production processes of Fiat, Lancia was able to deliver a car that boasted the best of both worlds. Both Pinin Farina and Viotti took on coachbuilding of the B10 saloon, whose body design is often credited to Mario Felice Boano. The Aurelia platform was soon expanded to offer both a sportier GT version and a coachbuilt luxury car. The latter model was designated as the B52, and such Aurelias were dispatched as rolling chassis to the customer’s coachbuilder of choice, often resulting in stunning showcars like the Pinin Farina PF200 C. The sportier version of the Aurelia was officially introduced at Turin in May 1951 as the B20, or Aurelia GT. The B20 rode a shortened wheelbase and featured two-door fastback coachwork, with a larger 2-liter version of the V-6 and a weight-saving transaxle betraying the model’s competition aspirations. A subtly elegant performer, the Aurelia GT was an instant darling of sporting connoisseurs, and it was further championed with numerous racing triumphs, including Giovanni Bracco and Umberto Maglioli’s 2nd overall finish (1st in class) at the 1951 Mille Miglia. The Aurelia was built in six series through 1958, increasingly refined with each evolution. The seeming lack of an open version of the model was finally addressed at the Brussels Motor Show in January 1955 with the debut of the B24 Spider America. Based on the concurrent fourth-series cars, the spider actually utilized a purpose-built chassis that was 200 millimeters shorter than the standard Aurelia GT. The B24 continued to employ the Aurelia’s independent suspension and transaxle, though engine displacement was further increased to just over 2.5 liters. Even more power was available with a factory-specified manifold conversion offered by Nardi, but the B24’s obvious selling point was its indelible coachwork from Pinin Farina. Striking a perfect balance, with curved front and rear haunches, a wrap-around one-piece windscreen, and dual front bumperettes split by the classic Lancia shield grille, the B24S also lacked external door handles to emphasize its slippery lines. Tiny half-cut doors only further boosted the roadster’s unique charm. Lancia built 240 examples of the B24 spider through late 1955, with 181 cars specified as the B24S, the “S” (for sinestra, Italian for "left") denoting left-hand drive. The addition of the America suffix to the model’s nomenclature also clarified the company’s intention to market the spider to the United States. In 1956, the B24 continued on in a revised design as a true convertible, with a permanent retractable soft top, a more upright windscreen, roll-up windows, and standard door handles. These cars were also made in far greater numbers, totaling 521 examples through early 1957. Given the spider’s rarity and purer execution of design brief, as well as its superior aesthetics, the earlier model is generally preferred by enthusiasts today. As the coachbuilt road-going brother of the successful D24 sports racer, which won the 1953 Carrera Panamericana, the B24S Spider America is today regarded as one of the most collectable Italian post-war spiders, claiming competition pedigree, advanced design, and breathtaking exterior styling. SPIDER AMERICA B24S-1072 This beautiful and highly authentic B24S was domiciled on a Central California coastal estate for several decades before being re-discovered and restored by some of the country’s most noted Lancia experts. By February 1980, chassis B24S-1072 was acquired by Olof Anderson, a principal at Scandia Volvo in Seaside, California. Mr. Anderson eventually endeavored to restore the rare Spider America, and partially disassembled the car to that end. Like so many such projects, though, the dismantled Aurelia sat in an extended state of storage when the refurbishment was temporarily halted, and it remained in this state until the late 2000s. In 2009 the B24S was acquired by Mark Sange of Bolinas, California, an experienced collector and vintage racing enthusiast who has participated in the Monterey Historic Races several times, and recognized the Lancia’s potential. In November 2009, Sange sold the unrestored spider to the consignor, a respected collector in Chicago who immediately set about a full restoration. Will’s Garage of Oakdale, Pennsylvania, was entrusted to oversee the process and conduct all of the coachwork refurbishment, including a complete repaint in the correct color of light grey. Thomas Pearce of Oakdale re-trimmed the interior in proper red leather, completing a factory-authentic color combination that originally accounted for 61 cars. The late, great Lancia specialist Walt Spak was retained to completely overhaul the engine, exhaust, and ancillary mechanical elements. As demonstrated by a deep log of invoices and photographs, Mr. Spak blueprinted and balanced the engine; powder-coated the valve covers; rebuilt the radiator, starter, and generator; and installed a new flywheel, as well as numerous corresponding gaskets and guides. He also sourced proper Borrani wire wheels and a correct tool kit. In order to maximize the restoration’s authenticity, the consignor consulted with Lancia expert Franco de Piero of Montreal, Canada, who assessed the spider’s deficiencies, and helped supply numerous correct parts from Europe, including signal lenses, steering column stalks, and other myriad details. Completed in July 2012, the restoration renewed chassis 1072 to a desirably authentic and pristine state of presentation. It was then presented at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded 2nd in class in the Postwar Sports Open category. This Spider America is now ideally prepared for display at finer concours d’elegance, where the rare car will undoubtedly receive a warm welcome. Also eligible for numerous vintage rallies because of its early build date, including the historic Mille Miglia, the Lancia promises to elicit entry to some of the nation’s most prestigious events. It would make an outstanding addition to any collection, offering a wonderful opportunity for Lancia connoisseurs or enthusiasts of post-war Italian roadsters. Chassis no. B24S-1072 Engine no. B24-1184

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
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2008 Lamborghini Reventón

650 bhp, 6,496 cc DOHC 60-degree V-12 engine, six-speed, single-clutch, paddle-shift mechanical transmission, front and rear independent suspension with hydraulic shock absorbers and coaxial coil springs, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes with ABS. Wheelbase: 104.9 in. The third of only 20 examples built Fewer than 1,000 miles from new One of the rarest Lamborghinis ever produced Radical F22 Raptor-inspired design Upon its introduction at the 2007 Frankfurt Motor Show, the Reventón was the most extreme, exclusive, and expensive vehicle the company had ever produced, which is a bold statement for a company known for making extreme, exclusive, and expensive automobiles. However, it was instantly clear that the Reventón would live up to all of its promises. Just like the Miura, Countach, and Diablo before it, the Reventón coupled world-class performance with revolutionary aesthetics, as only Lamborghini could do. Although the Reventón is based on Lamborghini’s acclaimed Murcielago LP640, the Reventón carries a style and mystique all its own. It was fitted with Lamborghini’s brilliant 6.5-liter V-12 engine, and its bodywork was completely new, helping push Lamborghini’s design language to new heights. Manfred Fitzgerald, Lamborghini’s director of design, brought the design team to a European NATO air force base where they were inspired by what they decided was the most impressive aircraft to date, the F22 Raptor. Each person on the team created a design and one was selected from the competition. From the matte grey paint to the sharp and aggressive design, the F22 inspiration is clear. Slide into the driver’s seat, past Lamborghini’s signature scissor doors, and it is clear that the extreme F22 inspiration carries to the interior as well. The driver is met with three TFT liquid crystal displays that can be changed at the touch of a button from classic circular instruments to a display that has more in common with that of a fighter jet. The mentioned setting has two inward pointing lines as a tachometer that rise together as the engine revs. The exhaust note of Lamborghini’s 6.5-liter V-12, an engine which can trace its roots back to the V-12 in the Miura, keeps up with the car’s menacing appearance and creates a distinctive growl, which is funneled through its large, centrally mounted, singular exhaust pipe. Slightly uprated in power, the V12 in the Reventón has 650 horsepower compared to the 640 horsepower of the Murcielago LP640. Even the carbon fiber fins on the wheels were functional, creating a turbine effect to aid brake cooling. All 20 Reventóns produced (plus one for the factory museum) were finished in the same color combination: a matte grey with a slight hint of green and mild metallic flakes and an interior swathed in military-green Alcantara, black leather, aluminum, and carbon fiber. Although it retains all the creature comforts expected in such an exclusive automobile, the Reventón’s interior exudes a more focused and precise feeling than any of its peers from Sant’Agata. Appropriately, only Lamborghini’s most loyal customers were afforded the opportunity to purchase a Reventón, at a price of $1,500,000. All 20 examples were spoken for before the car was even announced, and 11 of these were sold to customers in the United States. This Reventón is car number 3 of 20 and has less than 1,000 original miles. Its Canadian vehicle history report shows that it was first sold to an owner in Chesterfield, Missouri, but that it has been in Vancouver, Canada, since 2010. It has had four owners from new and was most recently serviced by Lamborghini Vancouver in June 2015. The Reventón is one of the most radically designed supercars and is one of the rarest models ever built by Lamborghini. This example is in nearly new condition and would be a complementary addition to any collection of ultimate supercars. Chassis no. ZHWBU77SX8LA03148 Serial no. 03/20

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
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1952 Ferrari 212 Inter Cabriolet by Vignale

170 bhp, 2,562 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber 36 DCF3 carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and leaf springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm One of four Inter Cabriolets bodied by Vignale Unique coachwork design cues; powerful triple-carburetted engine Documented history by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini Ideal candidate for FIVA certification and major concours display Ferrari Classiche certified In 1950, Ferrari increased the displacement of its early Colombo-designed V-12 engine to over 2.5 litres, and the new 212 model succeeded the 166 and 195 models that had evolved since 1947. The 212 was offered in two configurations: a short-wheelbase version that was principally exported to the United States (the Export) and a continental-based version that rode a 2,600-millimetre wheelbase (the Inter). Later in the model?s brief three-year production run, the Inter was mechanically upgraded with triple carburettors, making the car nearly the performance equivalent of the competition-geared Export. Only approximately 78 examples of the Inter were constructed in total, and they have grown to become a highly desirable early collectible in the storied evolution of the Colombo V-12 Ferrari road car. This sensational 212 Inter is one of only four cabriolets bodied by Vignale (and one of approximately 36 total examples constructed by the coachbuilder). Vignale delivered some very unique design cues with this brief grouping of open cars, including a dual-mouth front fascia that featured a smaller elliptical opening below the standard grille location. The main grille was characterized by vertical sections that were unusually framed by a larger circular chrome piece with crossbars?the vertical element of which visually led to a raised spine along the hood. Additional distinguishing elements of the design included curved rear fenders that house recessed tail lamps and bumpers painted in the body shade, a very unusual colour design at the time. As demonstrated by date stamps, the car?s engine was completed in February 1952, while the steering box was finished in October. Painted in black, the cabriolet was equipped with a very distinct interior in red leather that featured dual glove boxes and a single rear seat behind the two front seats. Interestingly, the serial number 0227 EL was originally stamped on a right-hand drive example of the Vignale Cabriolet that was slated for customer John McFadden, an Englishman residing in Paris, France. McFadden, however, had actually intended to acquire a left-hand drive example for use on the continent, and when Ferrari attempted to deliver the original 0227 EL to him, he refused the car. The factory had one of the other four Vignale Cabriolets, 0255 EU, then in production as a left-hand drive example, and this car was re-stamped with 0227 EL and delivered to McFadden (and now offered here). The original 0227 EL was immediately re-stamped as 0255 EU in a chassis number swap that, while not altogether unusual for Maranello numbering practices, caused some degree of confusion, as each car is factory stamped with both numbers. By the late 1950s, McFadden had sold this Vignale Cabriolet, and it was soon imported to the United States by Chinetti Motors in New York. In November 1958, the Ferrari was displayed at the World Sports Car Center in Detroit, and a month later it was purchased by local resident John Thompson of Grosse Pointe, Michigan. During the 1960s, Mr Thompson relocated to Massachusetts, and before long the Inter was sold to James Kafalos of nearby Bedford. The car then passed through the possession of Gerald Jackson of Amherst, Massachusetts; during the 1970s, it was offered by Ed Waterman?s Motorcar Gallery in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and later by Steve Barney?s Foreign Cars Italia of Greensboro, North Carolina, who allegedly took it on trade against four Fiats. In March 1978, the 212 was purchased by enthusiast David Seibert of Atlanta, Georgia. During a recent conversation with Seibert, he noted that the car was remarkably original and complete, however, in tired condition after two-and-a-half decades on the road. Prior to embarking on a restoration of the car, it was shown in a precursor to the preservation class at the 16th Annual FCA meet in Atlanta in June 1978. By January of the following year, the restoration had begun, including an engine freshening, a cosmetic refurbishment that included a repaint in dark grey metallic, and a reupholstering of the interior in the original shade of red. The restoration was completed around the spring of 1980. In May, the Ferrari was purchased by Jim Francis of Roanoke, Virginia, who in turn sold the car to Alan Woodall of Columbus, Ohio. Mr Woodall retained possession for five years before relinquishing the cabriolet to well-known Southern California-based enthusiast Mike Sheehan, and by the end of 1985, a buyer was found in a Dutch consortium consisting of Pieter Boel and Sander van der Velden. The 212 was then re-imported to Europe, and in 1987, it was purchased by the consignor, a well-known marque collector in the Netherlands. The stunning Inter has remained in his possession for nearly 30 years, a period that was highlighted by a 2009 repaint in the original colour of black by Autobedrijf Jeff Schuijlenburg of Haarlem, the Netherlands. In more recent years, the unique cabriolet has been exhibited at several European car exhibitions, including the Inter Classics Show at Maastricht, the Netherlands, in January 2013, the Techno Classica in April 2015, and the Goodwood Festival of Speed in June 2015. Given its early build date, uniquely interesting design elements, and extreme rarity, the car would make an excellent candidate for FIVA registration, and it would almost certainly be welcomed at the most significant driving and exhibition events worldwide, including the Mille Miglia Storica and the prestigious Concorso d?Eleganza Villa d?Este. Ideal for the aficionado of early bespoke Ferrari road cars, this beautiful Vignale-bodied cabriolet would crown most any collection, as it is a distinguished jewel from one of Maranello?s most fascinating build periods. Chassis no. 0227 EL Engine no. 0227 EL

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2016-05-14
Hammer price
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1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

215 hp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, coil-spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm Formerly owned by renowned enthusiast Ernest Stern Multiple Mille Miglia Storica participant Original matching-numbers engine Recent full engine service and detailing THE LEGENDARY GULLWING Mercedes-Benz’s 300 SL claimed 2nd in the Mille Miglia, 1-2-3 in the Sports Car Race in Berne, Switzerland, 1st and 2nd at Le Mans, 1-2-3-4 at the Nürburgring, and 1st and 2nd at La Carrera Panamericana. Yet more was to be desired. From his Frank Lloyd Wright–designed Park Avenue showroom, the company’s U.S. distributor, Max Hoffman, said that there was a market in America for a fast, sensual Mercedes-Benz coupé, and a production version of the racing 300 SL, complete with the fascinating and now legendary “gullwing” doors necessitated by the unusual, tall “birdcage” frame design, would be it. The “SL” moniker (translated to English as Sport Light) reflected the pioneering use of a welded, tubular-steel, ultra-light frame construction that weighed only 182 pounds. The car also featured fully independent suspension in addition to its fuel-injected, 3.0-litre (2,996 cubic centimetre), OHC straight-six with dry-sump lubrication, and the motor was inclined to the side in order to reduce the height of the front end. The power was rated at 215 brake horsepower at 5,800 rpm (DIN) and delivered through a four-speed manual gearbox. A 161-mph top speed and 0–60 acceleration of approximately eight seconds, depending on the rear-end ratio selected from five options, made the 300 SL the fastest production automobile of its time. The 300 SL was also raced and piloted by the top drivers of the day, such as John Fitch, Olivier Gendebien, Paul O’Shea, Prince Metternich, and of course Sir Stirling Moss, who holds the “forever” course record for his famous Mille Miglia finish in 1955. It all added to the romance of a car that seemed destined to become a legend the moment production began. It had all of the right ingredients: incredible exclusivity, incredible speed, and an incredible price. CHASSIS NUMBER 198.040.5500272 The Gullwing offered here is recorded in the Gull Wing Group Registry as having been originally delivered through Max Hoffman’s famous New York dealership, finished in White (DB 50) over Red leather (1079) interior. The original owner was reportedly Henry A. Harrell of Long Beach, New York, with whom it is recorded in the Registry. Later, it was purchased from Mr Harrell by the well-known American collector and enthusiast Ernest Stern of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, whose stable it shared with many other outstanding automobiles, most prominently the ex–Shah of Iran Bugatti Type 57. In the early 1990s, the car was sold out of the United States to an Italian collector who almost immediately passed the car to Mr Giordano Biragli. The car was then registered on Italian plates MI 8P6400. In early 1992, the car was acquired by the current seller who participated in the Mille Miglia Storica in 1993 and then again in 1999. More recently, the car has undergone a complete engine service and general re-commissioning after a period of display in the previous owner’s collection, as well as an overhaul of the brake system and proper detailing. It is offered with a set of reproduction books for the model and received its FIVA Passport in September 2015. No collection is complete without this most legendary of modern sports cars. Moteur six-cylindres en ligne, 2 992 cm3, 1 ACT, 215 ch DIN, 240 ch SAE, injection mécanique Bosch, transmission manuelle quatre rapports, suspension avant indépendante avec ressorts hélicoïdaux, suspension arrière à demi-essieux oscillants et ressorts hélicoïdaux, freins hydrauliques à tambours sur les quatre roues. Empattement 2 400 mm. • Ancienne voiture d'Ernest Stern, collectionneur réputé • Plusieurs participations au Mille Miglia Storica • Moteur d'origine, numéros concordants • Révision complète du moteur et finition récentes La légendaire 300 SL Papillon La Mercedes 300 SL a signé une deuxième place aux Mille Miglia, un triplé à la course d'endurance de Berne, en Suisse, un doublé aux 24 Heures du Mans, les quatre premières places au Nürburgring et un doublé à la Carrera Panamericana. Mais ce n'est pas tout. Depuis son magasin d'exposition de Park Avenue dessiné par Frank Lloyd Wright, l'importateur aux États-Unis Max Hoffman affirmait alors qu'un marché existait dans son pays pour un coupé Mercedes performant et sportif. Le constructeur répondait avec une version de série de la 300 SL de compétition, comportant elle aussi les légendaires portes à ouverture "papillon" rendues nécessaires par le châssis tubulaire. Les lettres "SL" (dont la traduction littérale française serait "sport légère") reflétaient l'utilisation d'un châssis tubulaire ultra-léger qui ne pesait que 82 kg. La voiture présentait aussi une suspension complètement indépendante et un six-cylindres 3 litres doté d'un arbre à cames en tête, alimenté par injection et lubrifié par un système à carter sec. Il était incliné pour permettre d'abaisser le capot avant. La puissance atteignait 215 ch DIN à 5 800 tr/mn et la transmission était confiée à une boîte quatre rapports. Avec une vitesse de pointe de 260 km/h et une accélération de 0 à 100 km/h en 8 secondes environ (en fonction du rapport de pont dont il existait cinq options), la 300 SL était la voiture de série la plus rapide de son temps. La 300 SL a d'ailleurs été utilisée par les meilleurs pilotes de son époque, comme John Fitch, Olivier Gendebien, Paul O’Shea, le prince Metternich et bien sûr Sir Stirling Moss, qui détient le record absolu des célèbres Mille Miglia, signé en 1955 au volant d'une 300 SLR. Ce palmarès s'est ajouté au prestige d'une voiture qui semblait destinée à devenir une légende dès le jour où les premiers exemplaires sont sortis d'usine. Elle détenait tous les ingrédients adéquats : exclusivité, performances et prix, tous les trois à un niveau exceptionnel. Châssis n° 198.040.5500272 La 300 SL Papillon qui est proposée ici est enregistrée dans le "Gull Wing Group Registry" comme ayant été livrée neuve par le biais du magasin célèbre de Max Hoffman à New York, de teinte blanche (DB 50) avec sellerie rouge (1079). Le premier propriétaire était un M. Henry A. Harrell, de Long Beach, à New York, tel qu'il apparaît dans le Registry. La voiture était ensuite achetée à M. Harrell par Ernest Stern, de Pittsburgh (Pennsylvanie), collectionneur américain bien connu qui possédait de nombreuses automobiles exceptionnelles, comme par exemple une Bugatti Type 57 ayant appartenu au Shah d'Iran. Dans les années 1990, cette 300 SL fut exportée des États-Unis et vendu à un collectionneur italien, par la suite la voiture fut vendu à Sig. Giordano Biragli et immatriculé MI 8P6400 En 1992 la voiture fut acheté par la propriétaire actuelle qui a pris part au Mille Miglia Storica en 1993 et également en 1999. Plus récemment, elle a bénéficié d'une révision mécanique complète et d'une vérification générale, après une période d'exposition dans la collection du propriétaire précédent. Elle a également fait l'objet d'une remise en état du système de freinage et de soins apportés à la finition. Elle est vendue avec un ensemble de manuels réédités concernant le modèle et sa carte FIVA Aucune collection ne saurait être complète sans la plus mythique des voitures de sport modernes. Chassis no. 198.040.5500272 Engine no. 198.980.5500314

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-02-03
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1990 Ferrari F40

478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC 90-degree V-8 engine with two turbochargers and Weber-Marelli engine management and fuel injection, five-speed manual gearbox, tubular steel and carbon composite chassis, independent double-wishbone suspension with Koni hydraulic shock absorbers and front and rear anti-roll bars, and four-wheel steel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm. Single-family ownership since new, with less than 1,200 kilometres recorded “Cat, Non-Adjust” example; includes books and tools Submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification Recently serviced by Rossocorsa S.r.l It was a big year for Enzo Ferrari in 1987. Not only did he celebrate his 90th birthday, but more importantly to him, it was 40 years since he built his first car. A year earlier, Enzo was reported to have said, “Let’s make something special for next year’s celebrations in the way we used to do it”. That special car would be the last one that “The Grand Old Man”, as he was affectionately known by then, would see launched from his prized stable. The name was suggested by a friend of Ferrari, Gino Rancati, who after having just left Ferrari’s office after a meeting, met with Razelli, the general manager, and Razelli showed him the new Ferrari that would be presented at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Rancati asked what its name would be, and Razelli replied that they had two or three possible names, but asked what he would call it. Rancati replied, “Since Ferrari’s biggest market is the United States, and since it is now forty years since the first Ferrari car has appeared, it should have an English language name, for example ‘Ferrari Forty’.” Rancati received a silver plaque with the inscription, “To Gino Rancati for a brilliant idea”. On the left was a black Cavallino Rampante and on the right “F40 June 1987”. An accompanying letter said, “Dear Rancati, with this plaque I want to commemorate our meeting on the 4th June, when you kindly contributed to the choice of name for the GT car we presented at the Frankfurt Motor Show. Your contribution has produced excellent results—the ‘F Forty’, based on the idea of forty years of Ferrari cars, identifies and personalises the fastest Ferrari GT. Kindest regards, G.B. Razelli”. Next to this, in slightly shaky script and violet ink, was, “To Signor Gino, Ferrari”. The F40 was introduced as the fastest road car ever built. It was as simple as that, and no one could argue. Its top speed was claimed as 201.3 mph (323 km/h), which was the first time any road car had bettered 200 mph. It could accelerate from standstill to 60 mph (97 km/h) in 3.5 seconds or to twice that speed in just 11.5 seconds. The F40 continued the great Ferrari tradition of bridging the gap between road and racing cars. The F40’s three-litre V-8 engine was derived from its predecessor, the 288 GTO. With bigger bores and a shorter stroke, the longitudinally mounted four-cam, with twin IHI turbochargers, was a screamer of an engine, as it could produce 478 brake horsepower at 7,000 rpm, redlining at a heart stopping 7,700 rpm. The influence of the Formula One program and the grand prix workshops could be seen in the cutting-edge composite materials, carbon fibre, and Kevlar that were utilised. With a cost of nearly £200,000, Ferrari expected to sell several hundred F40s. They underestimated demand for the greatest supercar ever built. The first F40s delivered demanded premiums of up to three times their cost. Around 1,500 were eventually produced, and the F40 became the most profitable car in Ferrari history. The F40 presented here has single-family ownership from new and has clocked up less than 1,200 kilometres since it was collected from Ferrari Concessionaire in Bari. Mr Patella then drove the car directly to his summer house in Bari and completed only a handful of laps around the local town to show his friends. Shortly after the car arrived at his summer house, having covered only roughly 300 kilometres on the open road, Mr Patella raised the car and put it on axle stands in his garage. As a Fiat dealer himself, Mr Patella knew the importance of regular maintenance and frequently ran the car up to temperature and cycled through the gears with the car on stands. With the tachometer taking its reading from the gearbox, this routine maintenance added significantly to the odometer reading. Chassis number 87990 has recently received new Pirelli tyres and a service at Rossocorsa S.r.l. It has also been submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification. This car presents a rare opportunity to obtain the holy grail of supercars with only single-family ownership from new and minimal mileage. Enzo Ferrari’s last great statement was the F40, and it was and still is uncompromisingly stunning. In his own words, it is “the best Ferrari ever”. Moteur V-8 à 90°, 2 936 cm3, 478 ch, deux ACT par banc, deux turbocompresseurs, système Weber-Marelli de gestion du moteur et de l'injection, boîte manuelle cinq rapports, châssis composite en acier et carbone, suspension indépendantes par doubles triangles et amortisseurs hydrauliques Koni réglables, barres antiroulis avant et arrière, freins à disques ventilés en acier sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 450 mm • Dans la même famille depuis l'origine, moins de 1 200 km parcourus • Exemplaire non catalysée, à suspension non pilotée ; comporte ses outils et manuels • Soumise à la classification de Ferrari Classiche • Récemment révisée par Rossocorsa S.r.l L'année 1987 fut une année importante pour Enzo Ferrari. Non seulement célébrait-il ses 90 ans, mais en plus—et c'était pour lui le plus important—40 ans s'étaient écoulés depuis la fabrication de sa première voiture. Un an auparavant, Enzo aurait affirmé : « Faisons quelque chose de spécial pour les célébrations de l'année prochaine, à notre façon ». Cette voiture spéciale allait être la dernière dont « il Grande Vecchio », comme il était affectueusement surnommé à cette époque, vivrait le lancement. Le nom de cette voiture a été soufflé par un ami de Ferrari, Gino Rancati. Après avoir quitté le bureau de Ferrari à la suite d'une réunion, il est allé voir Razelli, le directeur général, qui lui a montré la nouvelle Ferrari qui devait être présentée au Salon de Francfort. Rancati lui a demandé quel nom était prévu, ce à quoi Razelli a répondu que deux ou trois appellations étaient encore en lice. Mais comment appellerais-tu, toi-même, cette voiture, a interrogé Razelli. Et son interlocuteur lui a répondu, « Le plus gros marché, pour Ferrari, étant les États-Unis, et comme il s'est écoulé 40 ans depuis la première Ferrari, elle devrait avoir un nom anglais, quelque chose comme ‘Ferrari Forty’ ». Rancati a reçu une plaque en argent portant l'inscription, « A Gino Rancati pour sa brillante idée », avec à gauche un cheval cabré et, à droite, « F40 juin 1987 ». La lettre accompagnant la plaque précisait : « Cher Rancati, par cette plaque j'aimerais commémorer notre réunion du 4 juin, lorsque tu as aimablement contribué à trouver un nom pour la berlinette que nous devions présenter au Salon de Francfort. Ta contribution a produit d'excellents résultats : le ‘F Forty’, basé sur l'idée des 40 ans des voitures Ferrari, identifie et personnalise la plus rapide des GT Ferrari. Amicales salutations. G.B. Razelli ». Et à côté, à l'encre violette légèrement tremblante, « A Signor Gino, Ferrari ». La F40 était présentée comme la voiture de route la plus rapide jamais produite. C'était une affirmation d'une grande simplicité, que personne ne pouvait contester. La vitesse de pointe annoncée était de 323 km/h, et c'était la première fois qu'une voiture de route dépassait 200 mph (320 km/h). Elle pouvait accélérer de 0 à 100 km/h en 3,5 secondes et atteindre 200 km/h en 11,5 secondes. La F40 poursuivait la grande tradition Ferrari de combler le fossé séparant les voitures de course et de route. Le V8 de 3 litres de la F40 était dérivé de celui de sa devancière, la 288 GTO. Avec un alésage plus important et une course plus courte, ce moteur longitudinal quatre arbres, avec ses deux turbos IHI, était extrêmement puissant, avec 478 ch à 7 000 tr/mn et une zone rouge à 7 700 tr/mn. L'influence du programme de Formule 1 et de l'atelier de Grand Prix pouvait être détectée à travers les matériaux avant-gardistes utilisés, comme la fibre de carbone et le Kevlar. Avec un prix de vente de presque 200 000 $, Ferrari pensait vendre quelques centaines de F40, mais a sous-estimé la demande pour cette berlinette d'exception. Les premières F40 ont parfois entraîné des prix de revente allant jusqu'à trois fois le prix de base. Quelque 1 500 exemplaires sont finalement sortis d'usine et la F40 est devenue la Ferrari la plus rentable de l'histoire de la marque. La F40 que nous présentons est toujours restée dans la même famille et a parcouru moins de 1 200 km depuis qu'elle a été achetée au concessionnaire Ferrari de Bari. M. Patella a ensuite emmené la voiture directement à sa maison d'été dans la région, effectuant ensuite quelques tours du village pour montrer la voiture à ses amis. Peu de temps après avoir rallié la maison d'été et avoir donc parcouru environ 300 km sur route ouverte, M. Patella levait la voiture pour la poser sur un support spécial, dans son garage. Lui-même agent Fiat, il connaissait l'importance d'un entretien régulier et faisait régulièrement tourner la voiture, tout en montant les vitesses avec les roues tournant dans le vide. Ces exercices de routine ont contribué de façon significative à augmenter le kilométrage au compteur, branché sur la boîte de vitesses. Ce châssis n°87990 a reçu récemment des pneus Pirelli neufs et a été révisé chez Rossocorsa S.r.l. La voiture a été aussi soumise pour une certification Ferrari Classiche. Elle représente une opportunité rare d'acheter le Graal des supercars, toujours resté dans la même famille et avec un kilométrage très faible. La F40 est la dernière produite du vivant d'Enzo Ferrari ; elle était, et elle est toujours, incroyablement impressionnante. Selon ses propres mot « la meilleur Ferrari jamais construite ». Chassis no. ZFFGJ348000087990

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-04
Hammer price
Show price

1958 Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype

256 bhp, 3,785 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder Jaguar engine, four-speed manual synchromesh transmission, coil-spring front suspension with parallel equal-length wishbones, coil-spring rear suspension with de Dion tubular axle and four trailing arms, and Girling four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,305 mm Recognised as the original Knobbly prototype Purchased new by Briggs Cunningham Campaigned by 1958 SCCA champion Walt Hansgen Numerous 1st overall finishes Featured in Autosport and Hemmings magazines Sold with a spare, original, Momo-prepared 3.75-litre engine and FIA papers The zenith of Lister dominance Englishman Brian Lister used the facilities of his father’s Cambridge wrought iron shop, George Lister & Sons, as the basis for a career in race car engineering, which then blossomed into one in sports cars during the early 1950s. Starting with an MG platform in 1954, Lister soon graduated to two-litre Bristol engines, which he stuffed into low-weight chassis that were packaged with aerodynamic open-nosed bodywork. Famed racer Archie Scott-Brown drove one of these Lister-Bristols to 5th overall and 1st in class at Silverstone in 1954, where it stunned a field of Jaguar C-Types. In 1957, customer Norman Hillwood insisted that Lister install a 3.4-litre Jaguar XK engine into his car. This marked the beginning of the engine-chassis mating that bore Lister his greatest acclaim. At the British Empire Trophy at Oulton Park on 6 April 1957, Scott-Brown’s Lister-Jaguar roared to a 1st overall finish, notably besting Roy Salvadori’s Aston Martin DBR1. Lister-Jaguars were well on their way to great success, but one more major innovation remained for the car’s legend to truly take hold, and that would lie in the forthcoming coachwork. In February 1958, Lister introduced his latest model to the motoring press, which is the very car offered here. The new Lister-Jaguar exaggerated the prior car’s gently bulbous, Maserati-like wings, which now converged into a hugely sloping bonnet that cleverly masked the tall XK block. Just behind the engine compartment was a lowered cowl that reduced the windscreen’s overall profile, enabling the top of the glass (required to be a certain height by FIA rules) to peer just over the engine compartment and drastically reducing the car’s frontal profile and corresponding drag coefficient. Unlike Lister’s previous cars, which were largely built in-house, the new model’s body panels were shaped under contract by Williams and Pritchard, and they were offered to customers in either aluminium or magnesium. Mechanical innovations to this model included inboard Girling disc brakes and a larger fuel tank. With the new Lister’s bulging, knoblike proportions, it was little wonder that the car quickly became nicknamed the “Knobbly”. The success of Brian Lister’s designs had not gone unnoticed by famed American privateer Briggs Cunningham, who brought his technical director, Alfred Momo, with him to Lister’s shop in early 1958 and promptly ordered two cars that had already been earmarked for the Ecurie Ecosse (explaining this car’s chassis designation of “EE”). The car offered here, chassis number BHL EE 101, is the first of these cars, and it is, therefore, recognised as the bona fide Knobbly prototype. BHL EE 101 was delivered in time for the 12 Hours of Sebring, which took place on 22 March 1958, and it, along with Cunningham’s other new Jaguar-powered Knobbly, was prepared for competition by Momo, with particular attention to the FIA-mandated three-litre displacement limit, which necessitated using a shortened-stroke version of the basic XK block. Both Listers and three D-Types entered at Sebring that day, but BHL EE 101 retired early due to piston failure, marking an unusual failure for a Jaguar racing engine. Future three-litre FIA races would be run with a bored version of Jag’s 2.4-litre block, which proved to be far more reliable. In SCCA competition, however, Formula Libre class rules set no limit on displacement, and the wide-angle 3.8-litre engine from Jaguar’s successful D-Type was sourced and used in American races, as was as an experimental 3.75-litre Jaguar racing engine that was personally tuned by Momo. Following the disappointment at Sebring with Scott-Brown behind the wheel (which involved a dramatic incident with Olivier Gendebien’s Ferrari Testa Rossa), this car was mostly driven for the Cunningham Team by the famed Walt Hansgen, who piloted the car in dominating fashion to a 1958 SCCA Championship. Hansgen’s impressive litany of wins began with a 1st overall at the President’s Cup in Marlboro, Maryland, on 20 April, after which Vice-President Richard Nixon personally awarded him the President’s Cup Trophy, as captured in a period photograph. First overall finishes continued at the Virginia International Raceway on 4 May, Cumberland on 18 May, Bridgehampton on 1 June, Lime Rock on 15 June, and Road America on 22 June. A number of 2nd overall and 1st in class finishes were also peppered throughout this period, which concluded with a resounding 1st overall at the season’s ultimate contest at the VIR on 5 October, securing Hansgen the 1958 Class C Modified Championship. In 1959, Cunningham again fielded his two Lister Knobblies, also adding one of the new Costin-bodied Listers to the team. Unfortunately, the Knobbly’s ability to remain competitive against the evolving technology faded, particularly with the advent of Lance Reventlow’s Scarabs and the rear-engine Cooper-Monacos. Despite the inevitable, Hansgen and BHL EE 101 still managed to take 2nd overall at Montgomery on 9 August 1959. During the Knobbly’s use by the Cunningham Team, Momo revised the car’s front bonnet to a sweeping short-nose style, which was a modification that was often conducted by teams running Listers in order to negate the original design’s inherent front lift at high speed. Cunningham retained possession of the Knobbly until well after he used it competitively, but he eventually sold it in the mid-1960s, to well-known collector Herb Wetanson, along with one of his Lightweight E-Type racers. Wetanson, essentially only interested in the E-Type, soon sold the Knobbly to British driver and dealer Chris Drake, who raced the car at historic events during the early 1970s. The Lister was then acquired by collector Roger Williams in the early 1980s, and it was finally treated to a thorough bout of sympathetic freshening. This rare prototype Knobbly has more recently been owned by American collector Terry Larson, and it still benefits from its 1980s restoration, which included the refurbishment of many of Momo’s original preparations, such as the rear jacking points, the roll bar, and the oil tank cover, as well as the original 42-gallon fuel tank and rear bodywork. The car is currently fitted with a 3.8-litre D-Type racing engine, and it is still accompanied by the original Momo-tuned 3.75-litre Jaguar engine, as well as FIA papers. As this muscular Lister-Jaguar Knobbly Prototype is an incredibly rare cornerstone of a racing legend, it will surely draw acclaim at major international concours d’elegance, and its history and provenance make it eligible for numerous high-profile historic racing events and Jaguar Club functions. BHL EE 101 boasts outstanding provenance, including first-hand associations with the great Briggs Cunningham and 1958 SCCA champion Walt Hansgen, and it would make an unparalleled addition to any collection of 1950s sports racers or road racing specials. Moteur six-cylindres en ligne Jaguar, 3 785 cm3, 265 ch, deux ACT, boîte manuelle synchronisée quatre rapports, suspension avant par triangles parallèles et ressorts hélicoïdaux, suspension arrière avec essieu de Dion tubulaire, ressorts hélicoïdaux et quatre bras tirés, freins à disques Girling sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 305 mm. Reconnu comme le prototype Knobbly d'origine Acheté neuf par Briggs Cunningham Piloté par le champion SCCA 1958 Walt Hansgen Nombreuses victoires au classement general Présenté dans les magazines Autosport et Hemmings Vendu avec un moteur 3,75 litres d'origine de rechange, préparé par Momo, et des papiers FIA Le summum de la domination Lister L'Anglais Brian Lister utilisa l'atelier de forge de son père, George Lister & Sons à Cambridge, comme base pour une carrière tournée vers la conception de voitures de course, qui déboucha au début des années 1950 sur la réalisation de machines de sport. Commençant ses travaux en 1954 avec une plateforme MG, Lister évolua rapidement vers le moteur Bristol, l'installant dans un châssis léger habillé d'une carrosserie aérodynamique dotée d'une prise d'air avant. Au volant d'une de ces Lister-Bristol, le célèbre pilote Archie Scott-Brown signa une cinquième place au général et une victoire de catégorie à Silverstone en 1954, semant le désordre dans une meute de Jaguar Type C. En 1957, Norman Hillwood, client de Lister, lui demanda d'installer dans sa voiture un moteur Jaguar 3,4 litres. Ce choix marqua le début de l'ensemble châssis-moteur qui allait apporter à Lister ses plus beaux succès. Au British Empire Trophy, à Oulton Park le 6 avril 1957, la Lister-Jaguar de Scott-Brown remporta une victoire éclatante, devant l'Aston Martin DBR1 de Roy Salvadori. Les Lister-Jaguar étaient en route vers le succès, mais une dernière innovation devait encore voir le jour pour que la légende de la voiture s'épanouisse complètement. Cette nouveauté, c'était la carrosserie spécifique. En février 1958, Lister présenta à la presse son dernier modèle, qui est la voiture que nous présentons ici. La nouvelle Lister-Jaguar exagérait le galbe des ailes style Maserati qui convergeaient vers un capot doté d'un bossage abritant le haut moteur XK. Juste derrière le compartiment moteur se trouvait un décrochement qui permettait de réduire la surface du pare-brise (avec une hauteur imposée par le règlement FIA) : il dépassait à peine du capot et participait à une réduction importante de la surface frontale de la voiture et donc à une optimisation du coefficient aérodynamique. Contrairement aux Lister précédentes, presque entièrement produites au sein de l'atelier du constructeur, les panneaux de carrosserie de la nouvelle voiture étaient fabriqués par Williams & Pritchard, et proposés aux clients soit en aluminium, soit en magnésium. Les innovations mécaniques comportaient des freins à disques Girling inboard et un réservoir d'essence plus gros. Avec les nouvelles proportions un peu bulbeuses de la voiture, il n'est guère étonnant qu'elle ait écopé rapidement du surnom de « Knobbly » (noueux). Le succès des voitures conçues par Brian Lister n'avait pas échappé au patron d'écurie américain Briggs Cunningham, qui se rendit au début de l'année 1958 chez Lister avec son directeur technique Alfred Momo. Il prit rapidement commande de deux voitures qui étaient initialement prévues pour l'Ecurie Ecosse (ce qui explique le numéro de châssis « EE »). La voiture que nous proposons ici, n° de châssis BHL EE 101, est la première des deux et elle est donc considérée comme l'authentique prototype de Lister Knobbly. BHL EE 101 a été livrée à temps pour les 12 Heures de Sebring, prévues le 22 mars 1958. Avec l'autre Knobbly à moteur Jaguar, celle-ci a été préparée pour la course par Momo, avec une attention particulière pour la limite de 3 litres de cylindrée prescrite par le règlement FIA, ce qui imposait l'utilisation d'une version à course plus courte du moteur XK. Les deux Lister et deux Type D étaient engagées à Sebring ce jour-là, mais BHL EE 101 fut contrainte à l'abandon à la suite d'un problème de piston, défaillance inhabituelle pour un moteur Jaguar de course. Pour les compétitions FIA 3 litres suivantes, c'est une version réalésée du bloc Jaguar 2,4 litres qui sera utilisée et qui se révèlera beaucoup plus fiable. Mais en compétition SCCA, le règlement Formule Libre n'imposait aucune contrainte de cylindrée, et le 3,8 litres Jaguar wide angle utilisé avec succès sur la Type D était adopté pour les courses américaines, de même qu'un moteur Jaguar de course expérimental 3,75 litres, mis au point par Momo. A la suite de la déception de Sebring alors que Scott-Brown était au volant (et qui incluait un incident dramatique avec la Ferrari Testa Rossa d'Olivier Gendebien), cette voiture était ensuite confiée par l'équipe Cunningham au fameux Walt Hansgen. Son pilotage brillant lui permit de remporter le titre SCCA 1958 au volant de cette voiture. L'impressionnante suite de victoires de Hansgen commença avec celle obtenue à la Presidents Cup, à Marlboro, Maryland, le 20 avril. C'est d'ailleurs le vice-président Richard Nixon qui lui remit personnellement le trophée de la Presidents Cup, comme en témoigne une photo d'époque. Les victoires se sont poursuivies au Virginia International Raceway le 4 mai, à Cumberland le 18 mai, Bridgehampton le 1er juin, Lime Rock le 15 juin, et Road America le 22 juin. Plusieurs deuxièmes places et victoires de catégories se sont glissées parmi ces victoires, la saison se concluant le 5 octobre par une dernière victoire au VIR, permettant à Hansgen de décrocher le titre 1958 en catégorie Class C Modified. En 1959, Cunningham engageait à nouveau ses deux Lister Knobbly, ajoutant à l'équipe une nouvelle Lister carrossée par Costin. Malheureusement, la Knobbly n'était plus aussi compétitive en face des concurrentes à la technologie plus avancée, en particulier les nouvelles Scarab de Lance Reventlow et les Cooper-Monaco à moteur arrière. Malgré cette évolution inévitable, Hansgen and BHL EE 101 réussissaient tout de même à terminer deuxièmes à Montgomery, le 9 août 1959. Au cours de son utilisation par l'écurie Cunningham, Momo modifiait le capot avant de la Knobbly pour lui procurer un nez plus court, ce qui correspondait à une modification fréquemment apportée par les équipes faisant courir des Lister, pour neutraliser la tendance de la voiture se délester à haute vitesse. Cunningham restait en possession de la Knobbly plusieurs années encore après ses saisons de course, mais il finissait par la céder au milieu des années 1960 au collectionneur bien connu Herb Wetanson, avec une de ses Jaguar Type E Lightweight de course. Wetanson, qui était intéressé surtout par la Type E, vendit rapidement la Knobbly au pilote et marchand anglais Chris Drake, qui l'engagea en courses historiques au début des années 1970. La Lister fut ensuite acquise par le collectionneur Roger Williams au début des années 1980. La voiture faisait alors l'objet d'une sérieuse remise en état. Plus récemment, ce rare prototype Knobbly a appartenu au collectionneur américain Terry Larson. Il bénéficie encore de sa restauration des années 1980, qui avait inclut la remise en état de nombreuses préparations d'origine effectuées par Momo, comme les supports de crics arrière, l'arceau de sécurité, le couvercle de réservoir d'huile, le réservoir de carburant de 159 litres et la carrosserie arrière. La voiture est aujourd'hui équipée d'un moteur 3,8 litres compétition de Jaguar Type D, et elle est encore accompagnée du moteur Jaguar d'origine 3,75 litres mis au point par Momo. Elle comporte des papiers FIA. Ce prototype Lister-Jaguar Knobbly à l'allure musclée représente la pierre angulaire d'une légende du sport automobile et, en tant que tel, il attirera sans aucun doute toute l'attention lors des concours d'élégance internationaux les plus importants. Par ailleurs, son origine et son palmarès lui ouvrent la porte d'événements historiques majeurs, et de rassemblements du Jaguar Club. BHL EE 101 présente un historique hors du commun, qui inclut une association avec le grand Briggs Cunningham et le champion SCCA 1958 Walt Hansgen, et constituera un apport sans égal à toute collection de voitures de sport-compétition des années 1950, ou de machines de course spéciales. Chassis no. BHL EE 101

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2014-05-10
Hammer price
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2011 Ferrari 599 SA Aperta

4,300 km from new Desirable and seldom-seen Bianco Fuji over blue colour scheme One of just 80 examples built Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche In homage to the 80th anniversary of Pininfarina, Ferrari decided to produce just 80 examples of the new, limited edition 599 convertible, the SA Aperta, for its very best clients. At its heart was the 6.0-litre V-12 engine sourced from the 599 GTO, capable of producing 661 bhp, which was at the time Ferrari’s most powerful street engine offered to date. Even though the car shares many of the components of the hardcore 599 GTO, it is slightly softer and more comfortable to drive, making it more liveable on long journeys and giving it a more friendly personality overall – ideal in the drop-top companion to the 599 GTO. Exceptionally well outfitted by its original owner, this 599 SA Aperta boasts a number of desirable options to make it stand out from its fellow Apertas. In addition to its stunning colours of Bianco Fuji over a blue leather and Alcantara interior, the car is outfitted with blue wheels, windshield trim and rear buttresses, along with a blue roof to match the interior. Inside, driver and passenger are greeted by blue-painted sill plates, with matching blue-painted dashboard trim. Trimmed in blue leather with matching Alcantara seat inserts, the interior theme is carried through to the cabin with white seat piping, thin-line inserts and further white trim on the dashboard. In addition to the white tachometer, the car also boasts the optional fire extinguisher, along with carbon fibre trim on the centre console and steering wheel with LED shift lights Offering 599 GTO levels of performance along with the thrills of open air motoring, the 599 SA Aperta is a wonderful driver’s Ferrari, boasting all the performance and comfort that one would expect from a modern grand tourer. Having travelled just 4,300 km from new, this well-equipped example is an excellent addition to any collection not only for its rarity, but also for the sublime driving experience it provides. • 4.300 km totali • Carrozzeria Bianco Fuji con gli interni blu, abbinamento attraente e inusuale • Uno dei soli 80 esemplari costruiti • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche In omaggio all'80° anniversario della Pininfarina, Ferrari decise di produrre solo 80 esemplari numerati della sua nuova 599 cabriolet, la SA Aperta. Una serie limitata dedicata ai suoi migliori clienti in cui il pezzo forte era il motore 6 litri, V-12, proveniente dalla 599 GTO che, con i suoi 661 cavalli, all'epoca è stato il motore Ferrari più potente di sempre. Nonostante condivida molti componenti con la GTO, l'Aperta risulta leggermente più morbida nel complesso e offre una maggior comodità di guida, ciò la rende più piacevole nei lunghi viaggi. Caratteristica che le dà una personalità meno estrema e rende, questa scoperta, una perfetta compagna della 599 GTO. Superequipaggiata dal primo proprietario, questa Ferrari vanta una serie di optional che la rende unica rispetto alle altre Aperta. Oltre ai colori straordinari, Bianco Fuji con interni in pelle e Alcantara blu, l'auto ha cerchioni, montanti anteriori e posteriori blu, oltre al tettuccio blu che fa pendant con gli interni. Nell'abitacolo, conducente e passeggero sono accolti dai batticalcagno verniciati in blu, che richiamano gli inserti della plancia. Interni rivestiti in pelle dello stesso colore, con riporti di Alcantara in tinta, l'abbinamento cromatico nell'abitacolo è completato dai fili che disegnano i sedili, ma anche da inserti sottili e dettagli della plancia, tutti rigorosamente bianchi. Anche il tachimetro è bianco. Fornita anche di estintore, che era optional. Non mancano inoltre gli inserti in fibra di carbonio sulla consolle centrale e al volante, con le spie del cambio a LED. La 599 SA Aperta offre prestazioni equiparabili a quelle della GTO, ma con l'emozione unica della scoperta. Una meravigliosa Ferrari per veri piloti, ha tutte le qualità sportive e di comfort che ci si aspetta da una granturismo moderna. Dopo aver percorso appena 4.300 km, questo esemplare, molto ben equipaggiato, rappresenta un'eccellente aggiunta per qualsiasi collezione. Non solo per la sua rarità, ma anche per la sublime esperienza di guida che offre. Chassis no. ZFF72RDB000182288 Engine no. 176151

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
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1967 Shelby 427 Cobra

425 bhp, 427 cu. in. Ford V-8 engine with dual four-barrel carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. Documented in the SAAC World Registry Believed to be just 12,000 miles from new Features original Sunburst wheels and Blue Dot tires THE ULTIMATE ROAD GOING COBRA If there was ever a car that truly embodied the phrase “there is no replacement for displacement,” the Shelby Cobra is it. Fitting a 427 under the Cobra’s hood was an idea credited to Shelby American driver Ken Miles, as he believed it would help the Cobra stay competitive against Chevrolet’s big block Corvettes. The 289 Cobra proved to be an excellent and highly competitive racer, but the competition was slowly catching up, and Carroll Shelby needed something that would keep the Corvette in his rearview mirror. Ford’s 427-cubic inch engine was the perfect solution, and shoehorning that engine into the Cobra created a car with simply stupefying performance figures. With Ken Miles behind the wheel, a 427 Cobra completed a 0–100 mph sprint in an incredible 13.2 seconds, which was a performance car benchmark that would become the industry standard for years. In order to keep the car somewhat civilized on normal roads, a host of modifications were made to better suit the car’s larger engine. A state-of-the-art chassis that utilized a coil-spring suspension rather than the earlier leaf springs was developed specifically for the 427 Cobra, while the existing 289 body was modified to fit on the new chassis and address the car’s wider tires and airflow needs with a wider mouth and scoop below the nose. Further testing would reveal that the 427 produced a massive amount of heat, making the car almost unbearable in traffic, so additional ventilation was added for the engine and passenger compartments and the car’s cooling system was upgraded. Numerous other modifications were made during development, and some running changes were made during the production run, turning the 427 into a surprisingly excellent street car over time. Handling was responsive, and the interior also benefitted from more room over the 289 Cobras. Just over 260 road going examples of the 427 Cobra were produced by the end of 1966, making them some of the most desirable American automobiles ever produced, not only for their rarity but also for their impact on car culture and the sports car in general. CHASSIS CSX 3279 According to the Shelby American World Registry, CSX 3279 was billed to Shelby American on June 10, 1966, and is noted as being originally finished in Green acrylic paint with a black interior. It was also fitted with the 428-cubic inch Police Interceptor engine; this was an engine that found its home in roughly one hundred 427 Cobras following CSX number 3200. It was then billed from Shelby to Ron’s Ford Sales, of Bristol, Tennessee, for a total cost of $6,386.50. Geoff Howard, of Danbury, Connecticut, would become the Cobra’s first known owner, after acquiring it in 1975 and fully restoring it in 1975 and 1976. It was at this time that the present 427-cubic inch, side-oiler engine with medium rise heads and dual quads was installed, replacing the original 428-cubic inch engine. This was a common practice for the Cobras that were initially outfitted with the 428-cubic inch powerplant at the time. The car was refinished in dark green, and following the completion of its restoration, it was offered for sale in early 1977 by Howard. The car’s next owner would be Ken Brenneman, of Clerendon Hills, Illinois. Brenneman, looking to race the car but clearly realizing its value and importance, built a clone of CSX 3279 to full SCCA racing specifications, but it is not to be confused with the car on offer. Meanwhile, CSX 3279 would see limited street usage by Brenneman, and it was well preserved in his custody. In 2000, it received a cosmetic and mechanical freshening to the tune of $30,000, and during this time, it was finished in blue with a single silver stripe and chrome side pipes and a competition fuel filler was added. Shortly thereafter, it was acquired in early 2002 by Donald C. Fort, of Jacksonville, Florida, and it is believed that the car was finished in its current shade of green with a single white stripe during his ownership. Chassis CSX 3279 was purchased from Fort in 2008, and it has held a place of honor in Mr. Pack’s collection ever since. It still retains its original and highly valuable Sunburst wheels with Blue Dot tires, and it also comes with a set of Halibrand-style wheels that are shod in Goodyear Eagle tires. It is further accompanied by a Shelby American parts and accessories catalogue and 427 Cobra owner’s handbook. Since its inception, the 427 Cobra has been considered to be one of the America’s greatest automotive creations, and it has proved to be an automotive icon. In particular, the 427’s performance and power was nothing short of legendary in its day, and its performance figures still compare favorably with the current crop of sports cars. This is a Cobra to be treasured and enjoyed by its next caretaker, as it is a proud example of one of the most iconic sports cars. Chassis no. CSX 3279

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-14
Hammer price
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1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II by Pinin Farina

240 bhp, 2,953.2 cc SOHC 60-degree V-12, triple Weber 40 DCL/6 two-barrel downdraught carburetors, all-synchro four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal length upper and lower A-arms, coil springs, anti-roll bar, and Koni hydraulic shocks, solid rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, trailing arms, and Koni hydraulic shocks, and four-wheel Dunlop hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4 in. Desirable Series II Cabriolet with disc brakes Featured in Forza Displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance By the time the Cabriolet II was introduced in 1960, the 250 lineage was thoroughly, if confusingly, established as the world’s foremost range of sports cars, with six variants in production at once. Even counting both series of Pinin Farinia Cabriolets as one model, there were 10 major versions by the time the 250 GTO and GTL (Lusso) appeared in 1962, plus racing specials and coachbuilt models. Ferrari was not about to build a car for the masses by that name then, but, as Sergio Pininfarina pointed out, “We were convinced the only way to survive was to make more cars for our clients.” This was not necessarily to be a car for new customers, but rather, they hoped every existing Ferrari owner would add it to their collection. It was the company’s first true road car. Thus, the 250 GT had to offer both luxury and performance. In the U.S., it sold at around $15,000 in 1960, which would buy a Jaguar XK150S and a fuel-injected Corvette, both offering comparable power and speed. One would still have enough change left over for a Nomad for shopping trips and to tow a Corvette to the race track. The Ferrari, then, had to capture all of the elements of the competition, execute them flawlessly, and offer one thing more, the mystique accrued over the past decade of increasingly visible racing. Ferrari considered this their top-of-the-line car, supplanting the more affordable California Spyder as their de facto road going GT. The mechanicals were similar to most of the cars in the 250 line. “The easiest car in the world to drive,” as Road & Track called it, has the 128 F version of the all-alloy Colombo V-12, a racing engine freshly redesigned for road use. New heads derived from the Testa Rossa help it to produce 240 horsepower. Four-wheel, 12-inch power disc brakes and a new four-speed transmission with Bianchi (Laycock de Normanville under license) electric overdrive give it both long legs for extended high-speed use and instill confidence in one’s ability to stop from triple-digit speeds. A relatively long 102.2-inch wheelbase and independent front suspension produce excellent ride quality. While the car is not designed to be raced, its predictable behavior allows it to be steered with the throttle, if one cares to indulge in such unseemly behavior in a sophisticated car. Even in more sedate conditions, it’s impossible to resist the lure of peak power at 7,000 rpm, where six-into-one exhaust collectors amplify the unmistakable sound of a carbureted Ferrari V-12. However, it is the cabin that truly sets it apart. It is both perfectly of the era and timelessly elegant. As in all truly great interiors, there is more to discover and enjoy the longer one lives with the car, inlucing the sculpted and chromed top latches, the fillip of the dashboard line to the left of the driver, and the Ferrari crest on the ashtray lid. When driving, one only touches pleasing materials, such as leather, metal, and wood. It is an environment that practically defines what a GT should be. Ferrari number 1939 GT was originally delivered in pale green Grigio Conchiglia over a tan leather and vinyl interior to its original owner in Milan. But, by 1974, it had been exported to America and disassembled. It traded hands around 1980, still apart, before being brokered by a West Coast Ferrari specialist to collector Richard Cole in 1987. Cole’s restoration consumed the next 13 years, with major bodywork performed by Dave McLaughlin’s Automotive Art, in Capistrano, and an engine from Bruno Borri, in Los Angeles. The exterior was changed to a very rare but appropriate dark blue Blu Scuro, over an all-leather white interior. Cole himself did further work, finally completing the car in time to show it at Pebble Beach in 2000, where it reportedly received 94.5 points. Cole’s epic and thorough restoration of 1939 GT was documented in the August 2005 issue of Forza. In preparation for sale, the car has been cosmetically freshened by Brian Hoyt’s world-renowned shop, Perfect Reflections, and the consignor’s team has dialed it in mechanically. The coveted series of factory build sheets has also been obtained from Ferrari for this car, including the Foglio Montaggio Motore engine assembly sheet, the Relazione Sala Prova dynometer tests, the Foglio Montaggio Cambio transmission assembly sheet, the Foglio Montaggio Ponte rear axle assembly sheet, and the Foglio Montaggio Autotelaio chassis assembly sheet. These confirm the car’s completeness and originality today, and they include such delightful details as the identity of the various technicians who built the car. Chassis 1939 GT has seldom been exhibited since its 2000 Pebble Beach appearance, emerging only briefly to win its class in two subsequent showings. Now freshly refurbished in a distinctive and rare color, and with fine provenance, it is correct for any sunny day on any stretch of blacktop in the world. The original Ferrari GT is the car that gave the company the resources to continue on and prosper for good reasons: it’s wonderful to look at and to drive. For the same reasons, it is recognized as one of the most elegant and entertaining cars of the era. Chassis no. 1939 GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
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1931 Duesenberg Model J Dual Windshield ‘Barrelside’ Phaeton by LeBaron

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine with Stromberg downdraft carburetor, three-speed manual transmission, beam-type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5 in. • From the collection of Ray Bowersox • Winner of the epic 1932 race at Lake Muroc • Single ownership since 1985 • One of only seven examples built According to Phil Berg, the original owner of the Duesenberg offered here and agent to numerous stars and producers of Hollywood, it all started like this, “Leila and I were at Al Jolson’s home on Sunset Boulevard one evening, playing bridge with a number of friends. Zeppo and Chico Marx arrived in a sleek SSK (sic) Mercedes, which they had purchased jointly. My Duesenberg was parked in front and soon enough the conversation turned to these powerful looking machines and which of them was the faster.” The story, which unfolded during interviews conducted by noted racing historian and author Griffith Borgeson with Berg and other witnesses, is the stuff of legend. The conversation recounted by Berg quickly developed from casual banter to a bet proposed by Chico Marx for “several thousand dollars.” Leila Berg should arguably be credited for the events that unfolded, because that evening, she put a stop to the race that the gentlemen intended to happen then and there—from Jolson’s home to the beach in Santa Monica. Due to Mrs. Berg’s aversion to a race at midnight, the stakes were entrusted to a friend while the competitors organized a proper race, resulting in what Borgeson described as “sort of an automotive gunfight at the O.K. Corral, a showdown between two of the biggest, baddest glamour wagons of all time.” Between that evening and the day of the race, the wager ballooned to 25,000 Depression-era dollars. It was the kind of money that the vast majority of Americans might only dream of amassing after a lifetime of work and which, at the time, was only possessed by those involved in the Hollywood film industry. To Berg, however, there was nothing wrong with a friendly wager and he didn’t consider it to be gambling because he thought he could win. A phone call to the Indianapolis Speedway referred Berg to a man right in his own backyard: Eddie Miller. Miller began an association with the Duesenberg Automobile & Motors Company, Inc., back in 1915, when he was a team driver and brilliant mechanic for Fred Duesenberg through 1922. He later set up a repair shop in Hollywood and serviced automobiles for many entertainment personalities. His shop became a hangout for his racing buddies when they were in town, and he later came to the attention of E.L. Cord, who arranged to harness Miller’s talents in the nascent field of engine tuning by creating a racing department in the renamed Duesenberg, Inc., and giving him a free hand to express his art and his genius. Miller accepted the offer and his subsequent association with Cord’s empire would bring him into contact with the dry surface Lake Muroc and head-to-head with the supercharged Mercedes many times before the bet made by Marx and Berg. As it so happened, Cord was also Phil Berg’s neighbor at the time and he gladly put him in touch with Miller, who agreed to participate in the race. A week before the race, a program of tuning and test driving was begun. The heavy LeBaron phaeton was stripped of any parts deemed unnecessary, including the fenders, bumpers, running boards, headlights, top, trunk, and windshield. Other preparations included last minute carburetor adjustments and staying up until 3 a.m. to whittle away the treads on a set of brand new tires to help improve gearing. What started out as a casual wager over a game of cards ended up surprisingly well organized, with a couple hundred invited guests bussed in and others who flew personal planes to the site. Among those in attendance were Clark Gable, Gary Cooper, Al Jolson, Carole Lombard, Mae West, and many others. Hollywood-based Mercedes specialist Joe Reindl was chosen to drive the Model S Mercedes. At 6:30 in the morning, the two cars lined up on a circular track at Muroc. The Mercedes took the shorter inside line and Miller gladly took the outside line, which he knew was firmer because it was raced on less. Rounding out the star-studded list of attendees was the official starter, legendary race car designer and builder Harry Miller. When the flag was dropped, the two cars took off. As Eddie Miller described, “We had the muffler off, of course, and you can believe that that thing roared. They must have heard it in Barstow.” As expected, Reindle had faster acceleration and pulled into an early lead. By the time the cars reached the three mile point, the cars were side-by-side and Miller knew that he could easily take the Mercedes in top speed. Miller overtook Reindl after the first lap, “pouring on the coal pretty hard.” He reported his speed to be 108 or 109 miles an hour, still holding some power in reserve in case the Mercedes caught up. “As I came by the pole, where the people were waving and cheering, I looked back but could see no sign of my competition, swallowed up somewhere in my dust cloud.” A number of photos documenting the race show the two incredible stripped-down brutes poised and ready to prove their mettle in the crucible of motorsport. Subsequent to Phil Berg’s ownership, the phaeton traveled through a succession of owners from California until passing to Herman Zalud, of North Platte, Nebraska. Later, it was with early collector and pioneer Tiny Gould, of Pennsylvania. An article published in Sports Illustrated on May 10, 1971 documents Gould’s rejection of an offer that would have shattered the previous $45,000 world record for an antique car, which was held by a T-head Mercer. So important was the car, and Gould’s faith in it, that he held on until finding the right home. J-299 was eventually acquired by The Craven Foundation in Canada before coming into the ownership of Mr. Bowersox in November 1985, where it was thoroughly restored. The restoration included a full engine and mechanical rebuild, which has been meticulously maintained since. It has been driven and enjoyed regularly for the last quarter century, aided by the high-speed rear end, and has participated in many tours and ACD meets. Finished in an attractive combination of sand beige with red fenders and accents, it is further amplified by a tan cloth top and side curtains by Al Prueit, and a sumptuous brown leather interior, which appears comfortable and worn in, like a favorite armchair. The interior is complemented by brown carpeting and accented by a Duesenberg eagle molded into the leather-upholstered panel behind the driver’s seat. Also highly attractive is the contrasting hood sweep, which starts at the peak of the radiator shell and spreads outward toward the cowl to the beginning of the complex belt molding; it then comes down the sides of the cowl and splits in front of the front door handle, continuing down the body until it joins back together behind the rear door handle and wraps around the rear of the body. Other features include the interesting windshield, which cants forward and then rakes back at 45 degrees, Pilot-Ray driving lights, wind wings, chrome wire wheels, dual side-mounts with pedestal mirrors, a brown leather trunk with Duesenberg script, and a rear folding windshield with wings. The folding windshield is a period accessory and it is notable because J-299 was the only one of the seven LeBaron ‘barrelsides’ built without a rear cowl. It is further equipped with dual rear taillights and modern driving lights and seat belts for safe touring. With the fading of memory and the passing of the legendary personalities that created the rolling sculptures so enthusiastically cherished today, so too have passed many great tales of automotive daring and folly. Collectors, historians, and enthusiasts are forever indebted to Borgeson for the many works he published documenting the early history of many automotive firms and pioneers. J-299 lives on as well, existing as a not-so-silent reminder of glory days passed. The car and the mythical race are superlatives in automotive lore and the well-crafted recounting is so aptly named: Madness at Muroc. Chassis no. 2318 Engine no. J-299 Body no. LB-4068

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-10-11
Hammer price
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1956 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

215 hp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,992 cc SOHC six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, coil-spring and swing-axle rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. The 1956 Turin International Automobile Salon car Equipped from new with Rudge wheels A beautiful, recent restoration Mercedes-Benz’s 300 SL claimed 2nd in the Mille Miglia; 1-2-3 in the Berne, Switzerland, Sports Car Race; 1st and 2nd at Le Mans; 1-2-3-4 at the Nürburgring; and 1st and 2nd at La Carrera Panamericana. The company’s U.S. distributor, Max Hoffman, decided, from his Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Park Avenue showroom, that there was a market in America for a fast, sensual Mercedes-Benz coupe, and a production version of the racing 300 SL, complete with the fascinating gullwing doors, which were necessitated by the unusual frame design, would be it. Fuel injection replaced the race car’s carburetors, and the Bosch mechanical unit would be the first for a production car. After the 11 prototype W194s, including the so-called “Hobel,” were made in all-alloy, the new Karl Wilfert-designed body was largely made of steel; it also retained an aluminum hood, doors, and trunk lids, and it included bumpers (with over-riders for U.S.-spec cars, but optional for the rest of the world) and numerous creature comforts, including a tilt-wheel for ease of entry and a sumptuous interior, which is a requisite for road use. The SL (translated to English as “Sport Light”) moniker reflected the pioneering use of welded tubular-steel ultra-light frame construction, which made it only 182 pounds. The car also featured a fully independent suspension, in addition to its fuel-injected, 3.0-liter (2,996-cubic centimeter) OHC straight six with dry-sump lubrication; the motor was inclined to the side in order to reduce the height of the front end. The power, rated at 240 brake horsepower at 6,100 rpm (SAE) and 215 brake horsepower at 5,800 rpm (DIN) with the factory-optional or dealer-installed “sport” camshaft, was delivered through a four-speed manual gearbox. With a 161-mph top speed and a 0–60 acceleration of approximately eight seconds, depending on the rear-end ratio, which could be selected from five options, the 300 SL was the fastest production automobile of its time. It took practice to elegantly climb into a Gullwing, with its wide door sills and low-set seats, but once one was seated and the door swung down, all was right. The pedals are exactly where one’s feet wants to find them, the steering wheel and shifter are at a comfortable level, and the entire car seems to wrap around one’s body like a Savile Row suit. The result was a comfortable, snug place in which to carry oneself and a loved passenger to ridiculously high speeds while negotiating mountain passes, seaside highways, and the like. Long before other manufacturers advertised racing cars for the road, the 300 SL truly delivered it to those who could afford it. Appropriately, for an automobile that Max Hoffman had almost single-handedly willed into being, the production 300 SL made its debut in the United States, not in Germany, which was a Mercedes first. More than 1,000 of the 1,400 cars produced between 1954 and early 1957 where delivered through Hoffman, to whose showrooms the rich and famous flocked. The 300 SL was as much a status symbol in its time as it is today, as it has been favored by everyone, from Hollywood stars—Clark Gable took one on location for his films—to racing legends and genuine royalty; the kings of Jordan, Belgium, and Greece all became owners within the first year of production. Argentinean dictator Juan Peron had been a racing driver before finding his true course in politics, and he, too, owned a 300 SL. The 300 SL also raced, and it was piloted by such legends as John Fitch, Olivier Gendebien, Paul O’Shea, Prince Metternich, and, of course, Sir Stirling Moss. It all added to the romance of a car that seemed destined to become a legend the moment production began. It had all the right ingredients: it was incredibly expensive, incredibly exclusive, and incredibly fast, and any red-blooded human who had ever pushed a clutch pedal would’ve sold his or her soul for the feeling of 161 mph behind the wheel. “A thoroughbred in every sense of the word,” advertising boasted, “and a car which will be recognized by all enthusiasts as the ‘last word’ in sporting automobiles; a car which puts indescribable pleasure into driving!” CHASSIS NO. 198.040.6500052 The car offered here, chassis no. 198.040.6500052, is documented by noted 300 SL historians as having been built for display at the 1956 Turin International Automobile Salon. According to its Mercedes-Benz Classic Center data card, an English translation of which is in included in the file, it was originally displayed in Silver Grey Metallic (180), with a special-order red leather interior (1079) and arguably the most desirable factory option, Rudge wheels. In the late 1960s, the 300 SL was discovered in West Nyack, New York, by avid Mercedes-Benz enthusiast Jan Fraser. In a recent telephone conversation, Mr. Fraser happily recalled the car, stating that, when he found it, he was told that it had been raced in Italy, and, indeed, it still showed signs of its time in competition. It had been refinished in red with a light beige interior, but it retained a silver dashboard, which was a nod to its original livery. “You didn’t have to take your hat off to anyone in that baby,” Mr. Fraser recalled. “It was a wonderful automobile.” Mr. Fraser eventually sold his 300 SL to Dr. Leon Levine, who would keep it for decades. It was acquired from Dr. Levine by its present owner, a noted collector from the western United States, in whose care it has been body-on restored by California specialist Tom Drummond in its original, iconic Silver Grey Metallic shade, as it had been shown in Turin. Importantly, many components of the car, such as the silver dashboard, were in such good original condition that they were able to be preserved. The interior boasts comfortable 300 SL roadster-style seats that have been reupholstered, utilizing factory-correct materials and patterns, in blue leather, which is a more subtle accent to the sparking finish. The chassis underneath is covered by belly pans, and importantly, for the discerning enthusiast, the original Rudge knock-offs remain on the disc wheels. Every collector has to own and drive a 300 SL Gullwing once in his or her life. This example is an ideal opportunity to capture one of fine quality and one that has been preserved, enjoyed, and restored by great enthusiasts. It is finished in an iconic color, it bears original Rudge wheels, as it has since new, and, most importantly, it is perhaps the only original factory 300 SL auto salon car available for sale today. Jan Fraser describes his beloved 300 SL best: “It’s had a wild beginning, a mild middle, and it’s now ready for new excitement.” Please note that this car is offered with a set of fitted luggage, which has been added since photography. Chassis no. 198.040.6500052

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
Hammer price
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1960 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

One of the finest 300 SL roadsters available Immaculate, documented restoration by West Coast 300 SL experts Three-time concours Best in Class winner Original matching-numbers drivetrain Includes correct tool set, owner’s manual, and set of matching fitted luggage At the 1957 Geneva Motor Show, Mercedes-Benz introduced a new version of the celebrated 300 SL wearing open coachwork, the 300 SL roadster. In an early suggestion of the increasing focus the manufacturer would place on luxury cars over the ensuing decades, the new roadster was above all a more refined car than its gull-winged predecessor. There was no denying the 300 SL’s mechanical performance, which had decidedly improved in the roadster, with the updated six-cylinder engine receiving the competition camshaft used in the NSL racing Gullwings, good for a lift of 20 horsepower. Handling also benefited from a revised rear suspension with a lower axle pivot-point, minimizing the Gullwing’s tendency for oversteer. Despite the added weight of chassis reinforcement required by an open model, the roadster was every bit the performance car that the Gullwing had proven itself to be. The roadster’s overwhelmingly luxurious character, however, generally obscured its performance capabilities. With a reclining soft top, the model was never subject to the stuffy cabin issues that beguiled the Gullwing, and the roadster’s redesigned tube frame afforded lower door sills, facilitating far easier access than the Gullwing’s challenging ingress and egress. Interestingly, the Mercedes-Benz data card, which is on file, notes that this particular car was originally delivered on 18 July 1960, to the distributor in Panama! It was equipped to American specifications with English instruments, sealed-beam headlights, a removable hardtop, black soft top, and Becker Mexico radio with a Reims III adapter. Previous owners are noted in the Gull Wing Group’s Roadster Registry as Fred Di Girato, in 1974, and Ronald Kellogg of Whittier, California, in 1975. Later it was acquired by John Sorrell of Santa Barbara, then by the current owner nearly a decade ago. In its current tenure the car was fully restored by Classic European of Vista, California, with extensive mechanical work by longtime Gull Wing Group member Steve Marx of Costa Mesa, who rebuilt the brakes, valvetrain, cooling system, transmission, rear axle, and clutch. Cosmetic work was performed by the noted Hjeltness Restoration in Escondido, including a refitted top, panel gap adjustments, and new show-quality chrome. The body is finished in Medium Blue (DB 350), with a matching factory-correct hardtop and blue soft top, and a correct beige interior. Inspection of the numbers notes that gearbox and engine both match the Mercedes-Benz data card. “Euro” headlights, widely considered more attractive than the U.S.-specification versions, were fitted. Since completion of the restoration, the car has been very well maintained, with light driving about once a month to maintain it in good running order. A consummate showpiece, it has been exhibited three times, at the Palos Verdes Concours in 2013 and 2016, and the Los Angeles Concours d’Elegance in 2009, winning Best in Class at all three events. No expense was spared in making the car one of the best 300 SL roadsters in existence, and then to keep it that way. Further, the car is accompanied by thorough documentation of the restoration work, detailed down to receipts for many of the necessary parts. It is also complete with a correct tool set, owner’s manual, two catalogues, a tonneau cover, and a two-piece set of matching fitted luggage. An exceptional 300 SL roadster, this car is deserving of the most distinguished collection. Chassis no. 198.042.10.002607 Engine no. 198.980.10.002663 Body no. 198.042.10.00118

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1933 Chrysler CL Imperial Dual-Windshield Phaeton 'Ralph Roberts' by LeBaron

135 bhp, 384.8 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 146 in. The one-off personal car of LeBaron designer Ralph Roberts Believed to have been the final Imperial dual-windshield phaeton built Best in Class at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Known history from new; formerly of the Otis Chandler and Milhous collections Spectacularly restored in its original color scheme A Full Classic Chrysler of immense significance CHRYSLER’S “Y-JOB” Shortly after the formation of coachbuilder LeBaron by Raymond Dietrich and Thomas Hibbard in 1920, the pair took in recent Dartmouth graduate Ralph Roberts as a partner. LeBaron was soon supplying bodies for all of the great Classic Era chassis, supplied by New York dealers. Roberts and LeBaron prospered, and in 1927, Walter Briggs, of Detroit’s vast Briggs Body Company, approached Roberts with a generous buyout offer. Roberts wisely accepted, and LeBaron and its chief moved, lock, stock, and barrel, to Detroit. LeBaron became Briggs’ in-house design studio and its most prestigious nameplate, as Briggs was a major body supplier to the fledgling Chrysler Corporation, also Chrysler’s de facto “Art and Color Studio.” In an era when Ford had Bob Gregorie, drawing Edsel Ford special speedsters and the original Continental, and General Motors had Harley Earl, breaking the styling mold with the advanced Cadillac V-16 Aero-Dynamic Coupe and Buick Y-Job, Chrysler had Ralph Roberts. Roberts’ definitive design statement—his Continental, his Y-Job—was the car offered here. Based upon the last of 36 CL Imperial Dual-Windshield Phaetons built by LeBaron for Chrysler in 1933, it was drawn to Roberts’ own special design, with the intention of being a gift to his wife. As Chrysler’s design considerations were, frankly, not considered on this “one off,” Roberts was able to make his personal Imperial look as he wanted it to, as he told author Dennis Adler in a 1985 interview. There were a number of unusual or experimental ideas tried on this car. One was the extended fender skirt and fender skirts on the rear. The radiator was painted, instead of chromed, the headlights were also different from those on the standard CL series bodies, and instead of having the spare wheels in the fender well, I had them moved to the back of the car. It is worth expounding upon Roberts’ comments. The headlights were relocated much lower, between the crowns of the fenders and the radiator shell—a very modern position. The reworked fenders with the full “skirts” over the rear wheels clearly look toward the future Chrysler Airflow and Chrysler Airstream. A mounted bracket from an old Locomobile was used to mount the dual spares on the rear, clearing the fenders and increasing the clean visual length of the car. The result was a long, sleek greyhound of a car, accentuated by its unique Moon Glow Blue polychromatic finish. More than beautiful, it looked a decade ahead of its time and foretold future Chryslers, created both with and without Roberts’ influence. THE MODERN LIFE OF A GREAT IMPERIAL Mr. and Mrs. Roberts retained the unique phaeton until 1942, when they relocated from Detroit to California. Not willing to drive the car cross-country in the depths of gas rationing, they sold it in the Motor City. Ironically, however, the car then wound up in the Golden State, as it was purchased shortly thereafter by Bob Harrison of San Francisco, who would own it for the next 18 years. He thus ensured its survival and integrity, well into the era of the collector car. In 1960, the car was purchased from Harrison by Bob Burkholder, also of San Francisco, who performed its first, largely authentic restoration. It was next acquired by longtime California Chrysler Imperial enthusiast Douglas O’Connell, and then in 1969 by Jerry Lindler of Fresno, who maintained it until the early 1980s. Renowned enthusiast Otis Chandler was, at the time, building his esteemed collection of Full Classic automobiles, focusing on open phaetons of the finest quality. Naturally, when it came to selecting the right CL Imperial, the Roberts car fit the bill, and Mr. Chandler had soon picked it up from Mr. Lindler. It remained a feature of the Chandler Vintage Museum until the early 1990s and was then sold to Joe Morgan, the renowned Imperial expert in New Hampshire, who over the years has owned many of the surviving cars. The next owner, Neil Wynn of Hillsborough, Florida, commissioned a complete restoration by Curt Austin, including finish in the original and correct Moon Glow Blue, and great care taken to restore the original, Roberts-ordered features, including the skirts adorning the long fenders, and the wheel discs, which are complemented by B.F. Goodrich Silvertown whitewalls. The completed restoration was exhibited at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1997 and was judged Most Elegant Open Car. Shortly thereafter, the Imperial was added to Paul and Robert Milhous’ spectacular Florida collection, where it was the centerpiece for over a decade. Acquired from the Milhous brothers by its current owner, a respected East Coast collector, in 2012, it was subsequently consigned to RM Auto Restoration for sorting and detailing. This included making new metal covers for the dual rear-mounted spares, installing a new top and carpeting of a more complementary color, and extensive mechanical work, including new bearings in the powerful CL Imperial straight eight. Today, the restoration of this car appears as fresh and spectacular as ever, and the judges still adore it. It was judged Best in Class at the 2013 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance and the 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, and Most Elegant Open Pre-War Car at the 2016 Elegance at Hershey. Most prominently, it won Best of Show at the Concours d’Elegance of America at St. John’s in 2012, and at the Radnor Hunt Concours d’Elegance in 2014. Simply put, few, if any, Imperials have been such a showstopper in recent years, with many more chances for trophies available to a new owner. Further, the owner notes that the car is in superb mechanical condition, as well, having completed the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance. As that career on the show field demonstrates, the presence of this car, one of the most significant Chryslers of its era, is overwhelming. Such is only fitting for an automobile that demonstrated the future for its manufacturer as clearly as the Continental did for Ford and the Y-Job did for General Motors. With few other Classic Era designers’ personal automobiles remaining, and fewer still in private ownership, it can be safely counted as the most significant American Classic to have come to market in recent years. That would undoubtedly please Ralph Roberts, for whom this Chrysler, built by what he called “the right men in the right place at the right time,” was always more than just his wife’s car. Chassis no. CL 1357 Serial no. 7803657 Engine no. CL 1357 Body no. 172-50

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
Hammer price
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1952 FERRARI 225 SPORT SPYDER

The ex-Scuderia Ferrari and Roberto Bonomi 1952 FERRARI 225 SPORT SPYDER COACHWORK BY VIGNALE Chassis No. 0160ED Engine No. 0160ED Dark red with tan leather interior Engine: V12, 2,715cc, 210bhp; Gearbox: five speed manual; Suspension: independent, double wishbone, transverse lower leaf spring front suspension, live axle, double semi-elliptical longitudinal leaf spring rear suspension; Brakes: four wheel hydraulic drum. Right hand drive. To this day, few vehicles entice more excitement and passion than that of Ferrari's mid-50s, big engined sports racers. Developed during a period of triumph and passion, they personify every aspect of Ferrari's road racing legend. Often designed and built with a single purpose in mind, Ferrari churned out arguably the finest cars of the day, a position maintained today in both racing and street cars. Christie's is very pleased to offer 0160ED which began life on January 10, 1952 with a special Tipo 340 Tuboscocca chassis (internal #37 A) rear axle. It featured a newly introduced 'limited slip' design and had a 9 x 42 inch, or 4.66:1 final drive ratio. Further, records indicate that this was the only such designed 225 Sport with double parallel springs fixed to the rear axle. Most likely this was a function to compensate for the Tipo 340 rear axle and the nearly 40 gallon fuel tank, the largest used in the 1950s. Very quickly, a testament to the speed at which the Ferrari factory moved, the chassis was completed on February 2nd, and two weeks later the engine was assembled by mechanics Storchi and Leopardi supervised by Foreman Franchini. Meanwhile the gearbox, noted to be a Tipo 212 Export (internal #156 E) was completed by mechanic Beltrami and fitted to 0160ED. Days later the car was returned to the Vignale body shop where work was completed and on March 2, 1952 the engine was first dyno tested. The following day the car was subjected to the factory road test and then on March 9, 0160ED was race ready and entered in the XII Tour of Sicily by Piero Taruffi and co-driver Mario Vandelli on behalf of Scuderia Ferrari wearing race number 443 which it proudly displays today. While posting the fastest overall time a blown head gasket sidelined 0160ED with a DNF. Records then indicated the car was sold by the factory to Count Bruno Sterzi of Milan who raced the car in the XIV Aosta-Gran San Bernardo Hillclimb to a result still unknown. Later wearing #78 it was raced on September 28th at the Gran Premio di Bari and then tested at Imola on October 19th by Alberto Ascari and motorcycle champion Umberto Masetti. By the end of 1952 it was sold to Mrs. Piano of Buenos Aires who in turn sold it to Roberto Bonomi also of Buenos Aires. Shortly thereafter on February 1st 1953, sporting light blue paint Bonomi placed 1st overall at the Gran Premio Ciudad de Buenos Aires. This was to be the first in a number of successful outings by Bonomi with 0160ED in South America. Notable success include 3rd overall at the 1953 Premio Verano at Mar del Plata, a 4th at the 1953 Grand Prix Governardor Carlos Evans at Mendoza (driven by Adolfo Schwelm Cruz), and the 1954 Mil Kilometros de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires by Bonomi and Carlos Menditeguy. Sporting a color change to red in late 1954 it was prepared once again for the Mil Kilometros driven this time by Alcaro Piano, Miguel Schroder and Carlos Alcorta finishing 18th. From here the trail of 0160ED goes dark until 1971 when it was sold to Lucio M. Bollaert of Buenos Aires and then repainted medium blue. Then passing to Kerry Manolas of Point Piper, Australia in 1982 it was treated to a complete restoration and repainted to red. After work was completed, 0160ED began its show career including the 1984 Ferrari Concours in Carmel and the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. Later it was sold to noted Ferrari collector Mr. Anthony Wang of Long Island, New York who kept the car in his impressive stable until 1989 when it was sold to Mr. Len Immke of Columbus, Ohio. Mr Immke, a high ranking officer with Wendy's Hamburger's as well as a noted Ferrari and vintage sports car collector, owned the car when it was featured in Cars & Parts magazine by Lee Beck in January 1992. By 1995 the car had traded to another noted Ferrari collector Mr. Chris Cox of North Carolina who immediately presented the car at the Cavallino Classic. 0160ED was then passed to the collection of Mr. Skeets Dunn of Rancho Santa Fe, California who eventually sold the car to Mr. John Sullivan of Palm Beach, Florida. It is under the care of Mr. Sullivan that 0160ED was again restored by Motion Products in Neenah, Wisconsin to the immaculate condition as it appears today. Repainted in burgundy with tan interior and wearing it's original Scuderia Ferrari number of 443, the car won the 1997 Judges Cup at the Cavallino Classic and a visit to Meadowbrook Hall in August of the same year. 0160ED was purchased in 2001 by Michael Yedor of Bel Air, California who in turn sold it to the current gentleman owner. Having now spent two years in a cherished environment being exercised routinely and surrounded by equally sporting cars (and most recently accepted as an entry to the 2006 Mille Miglia), the time has come for 0160ED to find another home. By all accounts this is the most complete, original, correct and verifiable 225 sport spyder in existence. Accompanying the car are an impressive set of binders cataloguing its complete history as well as the ever sought after tools. This is an opportunity not to be missed. Christie's would like to thank Marcel Massini for his invaluable assistance in the research of 0160ED.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-17
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