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1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

225 bhp at 7,000 rpm, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber carburettors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm The eighth of nine 1956 250 GT Berlinetta Competiziones Outstanding period racing history Top 10 finishes at the 1956 and 1957 Tour de France Automobile Matching-numbers example and certified by Ferrari Classiche Original user manual, spare parts catalogue, and comprehensive history file included THE “TOUR DE FRANCE” When Ferrari’s first 250 GT Berlinetta left the factory gates in March 1956, one can only assume that the engineers that had built and designed the car had no idea of the impact the factory’s newest berlinettas would have on the future of Ferrari’s most sporting line of road cars. The first iteration of the 250 GT Berlinetta would achieve great success on race tracks across Europe, and it would lead to even more successful cars that would be derived from the same platform in the future. These berlinettas were undoubtedly the most desirable cars in the Scuderia’s stable, as they were built as dual-purpose sports cars. They combined all the luxury and performance Ferrari had to offer but in a driver-friendly package. There was nothing that these cars could not do in the eyes of their drivers. The 250 GT Berlinetta’s nickname owes itself to Alfonso de Portago, his co-driver Edmont Nelson, and their win at the 1956 Tour de France, which was the first for Ferrari’s 250 GT Berlinetta. Following de Portago’s result in 1956, Olivier Gendenbien led Ferrari to overall victories for the next three years, cementing the car’s nickname into the annals of automotive history with a compelling show of engineering and competitive dominance. The TdF also picked up an overall victory at the Targa Florio in 1957 and won the GT class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959. CHASSIS NUMBER 0563 GT: THE EIGHTH TdF Chassis 0563 GT is the eighth of only nine 1956 250 GT Berlinetta Competiziones, and it is eligible for every historic motoring event, including the Mille Miglia. Following factory completion, it was sold new to Racing Sport S.r.l, of Torino, Italy, on 10 September 1956. The car was then immediately leased to Jacques Peron, of Nice, France. It was registered on Torino plates TO 214813 on the 14th of that month, and it began its racing career just three days later, at the event that would grant this car its namesake. This TdF entered the fifth annual Tour de France Automobile wearing race number #75 and was driven by Peron and co-driver Jacques Bertrammier. Peron and Bertrammier would finish 8th overall and was the second TdF behind de Portago and Nelson, which no doubt helped to cement the nearly new car’s reputation at the Tour de France and within sports car racing in general. Peron would enter his TdF in one more race that year, the Coupes du Salon in Montlhéry, where he finished 2nd overall. The 1957 season got off to a very good start for 0563 GT when Peron won the Rallye des Forêts in March. The car and driver’s second outing for the season proved to be equally successful, and on 7 April, Peron took 1st again, at the U.S.A. Cup at Montlhéry, which was followed by 2nd overall and 2nd in class in the Rallye du Printemps. Peron and 0563 GT returned to Montlhéry in June for the Grand Prix of Paris, where he won his class once more. The car then entered the Rallye de l’Allier, where it continued its dominance with another 1st place finish. Following some mechanical issues that lead to a DNF at the 12 Hours of Reims in July, the car finished 1st at the Razal race in August before embarking on its second Tour de France the following month. The 1957 Tour de France would prove even more successful for 0563 GT than its first outing at the same event. Peron and his co-driver Georged Burggraff finished 5th overall behind a trio of TdFs: the Ecurie Francorchamps entry driven by Gendenbien and Bianchi, the Scuderia Ferrari entry driven by Maurice Trintignant and François Picard, and the 3rd place team of Garage Montchoisy, which was driven by Jean Lucas and Jean-François Malle. It is important to note that 0563 GT was just one place behind the legendary Stirling Moss in a Mercedes-Benz 300 SL, which was an incredible achievement in itself! The Coupe du Salon at Montlhéry was followed by Peron’s last event of the year, the Armagnac Rallye, in which he finished 3rd. Nineteen fifty-eight saw a more limited season for the car, but its highlights included a 7th place finish at the Pau 3 Hours and a class win at the Plainfoy hill climb. Later in the year, Peron returned 0563 GT to the Ferrari factory in Modena, marking the end of its professional racing career. The car would remain there for over a year before being sold by to Bruce Kessler on 11 November 1959 and exported to the United States. In 1960, it was sold to Ron Wakeman from California, who kept it for over a decade, and in 1973, it became the property of Larry Taylor, also of California. Ten years later, in 1983, Richard Gent Jr. bought the car from Taylor’s estate and had it restored by Joe Piscazzi’s Auto Body and Tom Selby. Following the restoration, Gent displayed the car at the 25th Annual Ferrari Club of America International Concours at Stouffer’s Pine Isle Resort at Lake Lanier Island, Georgia, where it was awarded Second in Class. In the 1990s, still under the ownership of Richard Gent, 0563 GT was fully restored by Bob Smith Coachworks in Texas, who brought the car back to the livery which it wore at the 1957 Tour de France. Gent did not show the car again until January 2001, when it attracted great interest at the 10th Annual Palm Beach Cavallino Classic. Later that year, the car won the Forza Award at the 37th Annual Ferrari Club of American National Meeting and Concours in Dallas. Chassis 0563 GT made its way to California in August 2003 for the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it placed Second in Class, which was no small achievement in a highly competitive class that year. Following Gent’s tenure, 0563 GT was purchased by its current owner in 2009, and he would campaign the car in historic racing and continue to display it at several concours events. The car, now boasting Ferrari Classiche certification, was driven in the Shell Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge in 2010, which was followed by winning the Spirit Cup, as well as a Platinum Award, at the 19th Palm Beach Cavallino Classic the next day. The car would return to the Cavallino Classic the following year and once more for the historic races associated with that event in 2012, where it placed 3rd. That same year, the car was accepted to the Mille Miglia and was driven with gusto around its native Italy whilst wearing #371. It would compete once more in the same event in 2013, again without fault. Finally, 0563GT was entered into the Tour de France rally this year and also took part in the small and very exclusive Le 250 Tornano a Casa rally. The rally started at Le Mans, where this TdF was invited to take part in the parade laps prior to the start of the race. It would then drive through France and back to the Ferrari factory in Maranello. Once again, the car performed faultlessly, attesting to the durability and reliability of these cars. In many ways, the TdF is the ultimate symbol of Ferrari’s long pursuit of perfecting the dual-purpose sports car. As a result of their extremely low production numbers and, in turn, high desirability, these cars rarely make their way to the open market. Chassis 0563 GT is a very compelling example of its breed, as it boasts two top 10 finishes in the very race that earned the car its fabled nickname. It was driven as the factory would have intended when new, and it has received the opportunity to relive its glory days through historic racing at the hands of its current owner. The car was recently repainted in Italy and is still in excellent condition, and it will be welcomed at any historic racing or concours event around the globe, including the Mille Miglia, the Tour de France, and the Le Mans Classic. Without the TdF, there would be no California Spider, no 250 GT SWB, and no 250 GTO. This is the model that started Ferrari’s most valuable series of dual-purpose sports cars and the one that brought home more silver than any other. For the individual looking to establish a collection of historically important Ferraris, this TdF is a necessity. Chassis no. 0563 GT Engine no. 0563 GT

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-09-08
Hammer price
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1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

263 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 40 DCL3 carburettors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm Recently uncovered period competition history A very early single-louvre example with covered headlights Important provenance, including ownership by Prince Zourab Tchkotoua, Steve Earle, and Richard Merritt Original engine recently rebuilt by GTO Engineering The ultimate dual-purpose alloy competition Ferrari Highly eligible for many of the world's premier historic motoring events, including the Tour Auto, Goodwood Revival, and Le Mans Classic FERRARI’S TOUR DE FRANCE The Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta is one of the most influential and impressive automobiles produced in the company’s illustrious history, as it helped to establish the marque’s dominance in racing in the GT class. With the 3.0-litre Colombo V-12 engine fitted to Ferrari’s 2,600-millimetre wheelbase chassis, numerous highly desirable Ferraris that followed in its footsteps, including the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta and the 250 GTO, can directly trace their roots to the 250 GT LWB Berlinetta. With incredible alloy coachwork that was designed by Pinin Farina and hand-built by Scaglietti, this was a car that was just as beautiful to look at as it was exciting to drive. The 250 GT LWB Berlinetta proved its worth at the Tour de France in 1956, where an early example of the model (chassis 0557 GT) raced to victory with Alfonso de Portago behind the wheel. It is worth mentioning that this was not just a few laps on a closed course, but a multi-day event consisting of 3,600 miles of all-out racing, including six circuit races, two hill climbs, and a drag race. The fact that the 250 GT LWB Berlinetta came out on top of such a gruelling event spoke not only to the performance of the car but also to the level of craftsmanship behind it. Nineteen fifty-six would not be the only year where a 250 GT LWB Berlinetta would take 1st overall at the Tour de France. Olivier Gendenbien went on to place 1st overall for the next three consecutive years, cementing the car’s reputation in not only motorsport but also automotive history and earning the nickname of “TdF” to commemorate its success over four years of racing throughout the French countryside. It is the most successful competition 250 GT Ferrari model, as it has garnered more victories than any other model, including the revered 250 GTO. CHASSIS NUMBER 0897 GT Ferrari’s production of the LWB Berlinetta is divisible into five distinct versions. This particular TdF, chassis number 0897 GT, is a classic 1958 version that has been fitted with a single louver between the rear and side windows and covered headlamps. Thirty-six such examples were produced, with this car being the fifth example built, and all were bodied in aluminium by Scaglietti and ready for competition. This example was completed in late March 1958 and sold new to F.A.S.T. SpA, of Milan, Italy. Copies of the build sheets and the engine dynamometer tests show that this car produced an incredible 263.2 horsepower at 7,200 rpm and a similarly impressive torque output. Most 250 GT LWB Berlinettas only produced around 240 horsepower at the time! Furthermore, additional research undertaken by RM Sotheby’s has uncovered that chassis number 0897 GT raced in the Gran Premio della Lotteria di Monza on 28 June 1959, under the banner of Scuderia Ambrosiana. Wearing #20, the car was driven by Carlo Leto di Priolo, yet it failed to finish. However, it did achieve the ninth fastest time in practice at that event. The car was then sold to Prince Zourab Tchkotoua in September 1959 and re-registered as MO 53102. Under his ownership, chassis 0897 GT was raced at the 1959 Cotê de la Faucille, held on 6 September, where he finished 2nd in class and 13th overall. The prince was a devoted Ferrari client and even finished 2nd in class at the Tour de France in 1959, whilst racing chassis 0503 GT. Thereafter, the car was exported from Italy to the United States and was noted as being owned by Steven J. Earle, of Santa Barbara, California, the founder of the Monterey Historic Races. Earle sold the car in the late 1960s to another noted Ferrari enthusiast of the time, Richard W. Merritt of Bethesda, Maryland. It is believed that during Merritt’s ownership, the car’s original engine was removed, and the car was later sold to Don Peak and then Bill Zierling, of Malibu, California, in 1971. The TdF was then restored by Allen Bishop, of Pacific Palisades, who fitted an engine from a 250 GT PF Coupé, number 1555 GT. Whilst passing through the care of well-known enthusiast Don Orosco, of Carmel, California, it was again restored, this time by Nino Epifani Restorations in Berkley, in 1989, and it was then sold to Engelbert E. Stieger, of St. Gallen, Switzerland. At this time, Stieger sourced and purchased the car’s original engine. The TdF also received a partial restoration by Garage Leirer in Switzerland. In 1995, 0897 GT was sold to Matthias Fitch, of Munich, Germany. Over the course of the next 17 years, the car was regularly driven and enjoyed on rallies and historic racing events across Europe. These included the Mille Miglia on five separate occasions, the Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge, and the Le Mans Classic in both 2010 and 2012. During this time, the car was driven with engine number 1555 GT, although Fitch still retained the original engine. Recently, the original engine was reinstalled following a full rebuild by the Ferrari specialists at GTO Engineering. With only test mileage since the engine rebuild, the car is reported to be in excellent driving condition, and it would make a wonderful candidate for further historic racing events and vintage rallies. Accompanying the sale are copies of the car’s build sheet, documenting its high-horsepower specification, as well as its Italian Estratto Chronologico and period photographs that confirm its early ownership and racing history. Moreover, it is accompanied by its valid FIA HTP and A/3 Class FIVA Passport. The 250 GT TdF, renowned for its incredible driving dynamics and road manners, is eager to please both on the road and track. Today, this car remains as desirable as when it was new, and it is highly valued as a competitive and successful GT car from one of Ferrari’s most successful eras of racing. As it is an ideal entrant for historic events around the globe, the acquisition of chassis number 0897 GT would not only afford its next caretaker access to some of the world’s most prestigious and selective driving events, but it would also serve as a highlight of any significant collection. As a true aluminium-bodied competition Ferrari, the TdF is one of the most successful and iconic dual-purpose Berlinettas ever to wear the Prancing Horse. Addendum ‘Please note that after the auction the car will be returned to GTO Engineering where it will receive final set up and shakedown further to the engine rebuild. The car will be transported to GTO Engineering, the works completed and then delivered to the RM Sotheby’s storage facility at the sellers cost. It is expected these works will take roughly two weeks to complete. Chassis no. 0897 GT Engine no. 0897 GT

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-09-07
Hammer price
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2005 Ferrari Enzo

660 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic engine management and electronic fuel injection, six-speed electro-hydraulic computer-controlled sequential F1 transmission, limited-slip differential and traction control, front and rear pushrod-actuated double wishbones with horizontal external reservoir coil-spring damper units, and four-wheel ventilated carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in. Gifted to His Holiness Pope John Paul II by Ferrari; the 400th and final Enzo built One of very few finished in Rosso Scuderia (Scuderia Red) Fitted with unique options, Daytona seats, and a carbon fiber rear spoiler Fully serviced by Ferrari of Central Florida in December 2014 As-new condition, with just 179 kilometers from new Undisputedly the most desirable and historically important Enzo; provenance more fascinating than perhaps any other supercar Open the boot lid of this Enzo and its place in history is written in plain sight. There lies one simple sentence, in Luca Corderi di Montezemolo’s distinctive handwriting: Questa Enzo unica nella storia della Ferrari quale segno della solidarietà per chi soffre ispirata da un Grande Papa, Giovanni Paolo II. This Enzo, unique in the history of Ferrari, as a sign of solidarity for those suffering, inspired by a Great Pope, John Paul II. THE FINAL ENZO Upon Ferrari’s introduction of the Enzo, it was stated that only 349 examples would be produced, in keeping with the company’s traditional mantra of building one car fewer than what the market would demand. However, the 349 failed to placate enough of Ferrari’s best customers, so production was raised to 399. After the completion of the 399th Enzo, Ferrari built one more, to bring production to an even 400. This car, which would definitively be “the last,” was built not for any of the factory’s customers but as a gift for His Holiness Pope John Paul II. One might expect a car built for a Pope to have unique features, and this Enzo does. It is finished in Rosso Scuderia, a color seldom seen on Enzos and one that was more commonly used for the Scuderia’s Formula One cars, making it instantly discernable as something special to the most passionate of tifosi from a distance. Furthermore, its rear spoiler was crafted of bare carbon fiber, which is a one-off feature that presents a wonderful contrast of color. The cockpit features an upper dashboard and steering wheel in Nero leather, as well as seats and lower dashboard in Cuoio leather. The seats have matched Cuoio-colored “Daytona” inserts, which is an option seen on only a handful of Enzos. The car was intended to be gifted to Pope John Paul II by Montezemolo and other Ferrari executives at the Vatican in January 2005. While His Holiness thanked his visitors for such a generous gift, in typical humility, he suggested that they sell it on his behalf and donate the proceeds to the victims of a tsunami that had ravaged Southeast Asia just weeks before. Accordingly, the car was returned to Ferrari’s Maranello facility until the auction that was held there in June 2005. There it was sold, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to charity. Sadly, Pope John Paul II had passed away in April, but Ferrari honored their promise to him and returned to the Vatican to present his successor, Pope Benedict XVI, with a check of the sale funds for charity. Following the auction, the car was destined for the United States, and it has remained here ever since. It has been only sparingly driven and kept in as-new condition, showing, at the time of cataloguing, only 179 kilometers from new and appearing as if it had just left the production line. It has been properly maintained mechanically throughout its life, with an annual service last performed by Ferrari of Central Florida in December 2014. Importantly, it comes with its original tool kit and the original set of manuals. That the Ferrari Enzo is a technological and performance masterpiece is well known, and with only 400 built, each is a rarity in its own right and accordingly coveted by enthusiasts. However, it is rare that an Enzo has its own special, distinctive, and important history, making the car offered here the most important of all. As it has been gifted by Ferrari to one of the most beloved leaders of modern times, sold at his request to benefit humanity, and since preserved as beautifully as it deserves to be, it is a landmark car that RM Sotheby’s is delighted to offer at auction once more. Add to that the rarity of this car's options and color scheme, and one is left with an Enzo so important that it is as much a supercar as an invaluable historical document. It is one of the most important stories in automotive history. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions this vehicle will need to be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. Chassis no. ZFFCZ56B000141920 Engine no. 91280 Assembly No. 59050

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

260 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 38 DC3 carburetors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4 in. The second 1956 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione built; one of nine with the original-style bodywork Wonderful period racing history; competed in both the 1956 Mille Miglia and the 1959 Tour de France Brilliantly restored; Best of Show GT and Platinum at the 2006 Cavallino Classic A very early example of one of Ferrari’s most celebrated dual-purpose GT racers THE 250 GT BERLINETTA COMPETIZIONE ‘TOUR DE FRANCE’ The impact that Ferrari’s 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione left on motorsport, let alone Ferrari itself, is something that is difficult to quantify. Similarly, stating that this new model saw consistent success on race tracks around the globe would be an understatement. The new model fared quite well in its earliest outings in 1956, but it truly came into its own at the 1956 Tour de France. At that event, a notoriously grueling six-day rally that included circuit competitions, hill climbs, and even drag races, Alfonso de Portago and his trusted co-driver Edmund Nelson finished 1st Overall, marking the start of what would become a three-year winning streak for the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione at that event, earning the model the nickname of “Tour de France,” or, more commonly, “TdF.” Success was not limited to the namesake event, however; a TdF won the Targa Florio overall in 1957, another conquered the GT class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959, and a variety of others had class or overall wins at over 250 other international and local races between 1956 and 1965, making the model one of the most successful racing cars in Ferrari history. Simply put, few competition Ferraris of the company’s first full decade saw as wide-ranging success, or were as all-conquering, as the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione. It was the car that cemented Ferrari’s brand and left a legacy of victory that would carry the company’s reputation for years to come. It is no surprise, then, that the surviving TdFs – particularly those with well-known racing histories – rank among the most desirable sports cars of the period, and among the most sought-after of all Ferraris. CHASSIS NUMBER 0507 GT The car shown here is part of the first series of nine TdFs built, and in fact, as the second example, it was actually produced prior to the Tour de France victory that gave the model its famous nomenclature. Chassis number 0507 GT was delivered new to Dr. Ottavio Randaccio of Milan on 23 April 1956. Only five days later, it was entered into the Mille Miglia, wearing race number 510. It would appear that by the end of 1956, the car must have suffered some race damage, as the headlights and taillights were changed to reflect the later cars of that early series. Over the course of the 1957 and 1958 seasons, Dr. Randaccio continued to drive the car at a handful of hill climb events, mostly in Italy, but in two races in Austria in 1958, as well. Following the 1958 season, the car was passed to Angelo Roma, also of Milan. While the car would continue its competition career in Signore Roma’s ownership, rather than drive it himself, the owner selected noted French rally driver Rene Trautmann to pilot the TdF. It was a wise decision, as Trautmann secured 1st in Class finishes in his first three events with the car during the 1959 season, an incredible feat for a three-year-old racing car! In the early 1959 season, the car was returned to the Scaglietti coachworks as the result of a second shunt and once again Signore Roma chose to have its styling modernized, with a lowered nose, smaller grille, covered headlamps, and a rear spoiler. In this form, the car ran in what would be its final race in period, the Tour de France—the same event that gave the car its legendary nickname—but did not finish the race. The car remained in Roma’s ownership until 1962, when it was sold to Maria Felicita Gattori of Milan. Following two years in her care, the car left her ownership and was imported to Switzerland. By 1968, the car had passed into the ownership of the well-known Ferrari author and historian Rob de la Rive Box of Vilmergen, Switzerland, before being sold again that same year to Claus Ahlefeld of Kvaerndrup, Denmark. The mileage was noted at that time as being 52,000 kilometers (just over 32,000 miles), indicating what an impressive, albeit short, racing career it led. It would remain in Mr. Ahlefeld’s ownership for a remarkable 32 years, spending much of that time at the Egeskov Veteranmuseum, his castle and renowned private collection. Sam and Emily Mann acquired the car from Mr. Ahlefeld in 2000, and subsequently decided that chassis number 0507 GT would be fully restored back to its original configuration, as it had appeared during its second season. Accordingly, the car was shipped to Ferrari distributor Classic Coach of Elizabeth, New Jersey, who performed much of the restoration. A short while later, the car was delivered to marque specialist David Carte of Classic & Sport Auto Refinishing in Edinburg, Virginia, known for the high-quality workmanship and attention to detail it performs on Ferraris for some of the world’s foremost collectors. Carte’s facility completed some mechanical work as well as show details. As part of the work, the nose and tail were returned to their original configurations, as raced in the 1957 Tour de France. The body was refinished in a most attractive color combination, its original silver grey with a blue leather interior. Since restoration, the car has been shown, driven, and enjoyed at a selective handful of the world’s most prestigious automotive events. It was displayed for the first time post-restoration at the Cavallino Classic in 2006, 50 years after its construction, and was awarded Platinum honors and the Gran Turismo Cup for Best of Show GT. That August, it ventured here to the Monterey Peninsula, where it was awarded 3rd in Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Yet, typical of Mr. Mann’s restorations, the car has been enjoyed for its performance as much as for its dramatic beauty. The Manns drove the car on the 2008 Colorado Grand, reporting that it performed admirably on the 1,000-mile rally; it has also performed admirably on the California Mille. In many ways, the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione, a.k.a. the “TdF,” is the most important of the Ferrari gran turismo berlinettas of the company’s golden era. It is the road-and-track model that paved the way for such future successes as the 250 GT SWB and the 250 GTO; in fact, it can be contended that without the “TdF,” neither of these two models would have existed in the form in which they became legendary—nor would there have been a California Spider, a car whose drivetrain owes much to the Berlinetta Competizione’s development. Sam and Emily have enjoyed 0507 GT in their collection for many years; in Sam’s words, “In my opinion, it is one of the most elegant cars penned along lines by Pinin Farina, and while designed as a race car, it is wonderfully at home for leisurely driving or long-distance touring. Presented in highly compelling colors from a wonderful collection, 0507 GT has been enjoyed and preserved as a superb example of the breed and a must-have in any collection of Enzo-era Ferraris. It represents the proud genesis of an era.” CHASSIS NO. 0507 GT – RACE RESULTSDATEEVENTRACE #DRIVERRESULTApril 28–29, 1956Mille Miglia510Ottavio RandaccioDNFJune 2, 1957Coppa Lombarda, Monza170Ottavio Randaccio2nd OASeptember 1, 1957Garessio-Colle San Bernardo HillclimbN/AOttavio Randaccio3rd OA, 3rd ICSeptember 8, 1957Coppa InterEuropa, Monza78Ottavio Randaccio8th OASeptember 29, 1957Pontedecimo-Giovi Hillclimb326Ottavio Randaccio3rd ICOctober 6, 1957Trieste-Opicina Hillclimb158Ottavio RandaccioDNSApril 25, 1958Coppa Vigorelli34Ottavio RandaccioResult UnknownMay 15, 1958Internationales Flugplatzrennen, Wien-Aspern31Ottavio Randaccio4th OAJune 15, 1958Varese-Campo di Fiori115Ottavio Randaccio17th OA, 3rd ICAugust 17, 1958Internationales Auto- und Motorradrennen, Flugplatz Zeltweg93Ottavio RandaccioResult UnknownSeptember 7, 1958Coppa InterEuropa, Monza75Ottavio Randaccio5th OAMay 3, 1959St. Antonin Hillclimb126René Trautmann1st OAMay 7, 1959La Gineste Hillclimb126René Trautmann1st ICMay 10, 1959Tropheé de Provence126René Trautmann1st ICJune 14, 1959Macon-Solutre Hillclimb87René Trautmann2nd ICAugust 23, 1959Urcy HillclimbN/ARené Trautmann8th OASeptember 18–28, 1959Tour de France160René Trautman/GeléDNFAddendum Please note that this title is in transit. Chassis no. 0507 GT Engine no. 0507 GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1958 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series I by Pinin Farina

*Premium Lot – Bidding via Internet will not be available for this lot. Should you have any questions please contact Client Services. 240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber 36 DCL/3 carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.3 in. The 14th of 40 Series I Cabriolets built Purchased new by John R. Fulp Jr.; owned for 40 years by Robert Donner Jr. Fully restored to original specifications and color Ferrari Classiche certification in process Since the mid-1950s, Ferrari’s road-going automobiles have been integral to the longevity of the company. Founded in the pursuit of domination in international motorsport, Enzo Ferrari quickly realized that, in order to fund his racing efforts, his company would have to produce road cars alongside his racecars. Utilizing lessons learned in competition, Ferrari’s road cars were some of the fastest and most desirable automobiles on the planet, all in an effort support the company’s indomitable reputation on the track. Considered by many to be one of Pinin Farina’s most elegant designs, the Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet is the quintessential open-top gentleman’s Ferrari. Whereas the earliest iterations of the California Spider were simply long-wheelbase 250 GT Berlinettas without a roof, this was a much more refined automobile, built for touring rather than racing. The Series I Cabriolet dripped with sophistication, benefitting from smooth and unobstructed lines defined by its closed headlamps and graceful taillights artfully crafted into the rear wings. It was the gold standard for the upper class, and ownership showcased not only the owner’s appreciation of engineering and performance but also their refined and sophisticated taste in transportation. The Series I Cabriolet was always in style—no matter the time, place, or occasion. THE 14TH OF 40 The cabriolet presented here, chassis number 0791 GT, is the 14th of approximately 40 examples built. It was finished in a very fetching color combination of Bianco (MM 10019) over a Blu (VM 3315) Connolly leather interior, reflecting the model’s subtle and refined personality. It was also fitted with four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes by the factory. Shortly after its completion, it was delivered new to Ferrari dealer Parauto S.r.l. of Genova, Italy, in March of 1958. It was then sold to Luigi Chinetti Motors of New York and was subsequently shipped to the United States. Chinetti sold the car to its first private owner, John R. Fulp Jr. of Greenville, South Carolina. Fulp was a young and highly successful gentleman racer, and his garage was often home to a variety of incredible vehicles bearing the Cavallino Rampante. Fulp enjoyed much success behind the wheel of Ferraris at some of the world’s most prestigious and competitive racing events, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the 12 Hours of Sebring. However, as 0791 GT was not built for racing, it is likely that his Series I Cabriolet was enjoyed solely on public roads during his ownership. Fulp only kept the car until the fall of 1959, when it was traded back to Luigi Chinetti for a 410 Superamerica Coupe (1311 SA). After returning to Luigi Chinetti in New York, chassis 0791 GT was later sold to James Harrison, an American then living in Paris, France. Harrison had the car refinished in silver with red upholstery by French Ferrari distributor Charles Pozzi, who he also commissioned to revise the dashboard layout in a style similar to the 400 Superamerica. Harrison kept the car in the United States and was living on Park Avenue in 1969 when issues with the engine arose, leading him to source a newer, outside-plug replacement motor through Chinetti. The car was then moved to Florida in July of 1970 but remained with Harrison at his home in Palm Beach. SINGLE-FAMILY OWNERSHIP FOR 40 YEARS The following year, the car was sold by Harrison to its third owner, Robert Donner Jr., another noted gentleman racer based in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Donner was a much-admired figure in the racing world and enjoyed success racing MGs, Jaguars, and Porsche Spyders in particular. Donner further grew fond of Ferraris, and over the years, he owned a number of significant Ferraris, including a 250 GTO. In 1975, Donner rebuilt his cabriolet’s engine and refinished the car in red over red. From that point on, it became his car of choice for top-down cruising. In his ownership, 0791 GT was driven on the Colorado Grand no less than a dozen times. While the car was primarily used as a warm-weather driver, Donner did take this car to The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering in 2007, where it was displayed in a special Series I Cabriolet class. Following Donner’s passing, chassis number 0791 GT was purchased by West Coast-based enthusiasts and received a minor cosmetic restoration prior to being sold to its current and fifth custodian. The Ferrari was then shipped to Europe, where it has resided ever since. Shortly after its arrival, it was decided that the car should be brought back to its as-delivered specification, and it was sent to Ferrari specialists DK Engineering, where work began almost immediately. The car’s older outside-plug engine was replaced with a brand-new and correct type 128-C engine from Ferrari Classiche, providing the car with a powerplant that is not only factory correct but also arguably better than new. It was then refinished in its original color combination of Bianco over Blu Connolly leather, returning it to its original specification inside and out. The Series I Cabriolet showed that Ferrari could toe the line between sporting and elegant automobiles. It brought in new customers to Maranello who would not normally have been interested in racing and turned them into regular customers, instantly enamored by the Ferrari’s visual subtlety coupled with dynamic performance. Following its recent restoration and benefitting from known history from new with just five owners, this is surely one of the finest first-series cabriolets. Addendum Please note Ferrari Classiche supplied the engine block, not the entire motor, as described in the catalog and although Classiche Certification remains in progress, it has not been completed at present. Chassis no. 0791GT Gearbox no. 44C

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
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1966 FERRARI 330 P3

The ex-Scuderia, 1000kms of Monza and Spa-Francorchamps Winning 1966 FERRARI 330 P3 Chassis No. 0844 Engine No. 0844 (412 P3) Ferrari racing red with black interior and red seats Engine: V12, double overhead camshafts per bank, twin spark plug per cylinder, water-cooled, 3,967cc, 420bhp at 8,200rpm; Gearbox: ZF five-speed in unit with transaxle in 1966, replaced by Ferrari unit in early 1967; Chassis construction: tubular steel with aluminum sheet reinforcing (semi-monocoque); Suspension: front, upper and lower A-arms with coil spring/shock absorber units, rear, wide based lower wishbone, upper top link, twin radius arms per side with coil spring/shock absorber units; Brakes: Girling discs, outboard at the front and inboard at the rear. Right hand drive. With Ferrari's 330 P3 #0844 we visit the very heart of Ferrari history at a time when its rear engined racing prototypes truly reached maturity, the result of half a decade of experience with that configuration. Motor racing's golden era between the years of 1964 and 1971 was the era of the no-holds barred big displacement sports-prototypes in World Championship sports car racing for the Manufacturers' Championship. It was the time of such legendary race cars as the Ford GT40, the Lola T70, the Ferrari 512S and M, the Porsche 917 and, perhaps the greatest of all, the Ferrari 'P' (for 'prototipo') series. The P3 was a logical and comprehensive evolution of the P2 of 1965, itself a four liter mid-engined car, but of traditional 'space frame' chassis construction. For the P3 of 1966, Ferrari's engineers redrew the chassis, this time adding riveted-on aluminum panels to generate enhanced torsional rigidity. Furthermore the fiberglass underbody was bonded into the chassis. An all-new V12 engine using twin overhead camshafts was developed for this new P3 and fuel was no longer delivered via the long-used Weber twin or quadruple carburetors as had previously been seen on all of Ferrari's sports and sports-racing cars. In their place was the more efficient British Lucas indirect fuel injection. Another change was the switch from Marchal to Champion sparkplugs, no less than 24 of which were used for the double ignition, completed by two distributors and an impressive battery of 4 coils all by Marelli. Power was quoted as 420 horsepower at 8,200 rpm. The gearbox was a German ZF unit. The suspension featured wider tracks accomodating even wider wheels: 8.5 inches at the front and 9.5 at the rear, underlining the rapid advances in tire technology at the time. It was also, at 1,587lbs (720kgs), almost 220lbs (100kgs) lighter than its predecessor, 65lbs of which were saved on engine weight alone. The P3 then received what is recognized as one of the most pure and beautiful bodies ever created for a competition Ferrari or for any motor car in fact, one that has been painted, sculpted and rendered in numerous forms by artists for over three decades. Built by Brazilian Piero Drogo's Carrozzeria Sports Cars in Modena, this was a smooth, all-enveloping Berlinetta with gracefully curving fenders, cooling intakes and slots. It was much lower than the P2, at 37.4in. As underlined by its wide tracks, flawless design and dramatically sloped and rounded windshield, it was a shape that had come into its maturity; so much so in fact that its succesor the P4 was almost undistinguishable to all but the most expert eyes. Its sheer timeless presence was matched by its efficiency. Announced to the press on December 12, 1965, the first P3 was actually shown to journalists in February, 1966. 0846 was there with open spyder bodywork. Two months later 0844 made its debut on April 14, 1966 at Modena, looking almost identical in all respects except that the roof over the driver's head had not been removed. John Surtees conducted the testing of the new berlinetta in preparation for the forthcoming event at Monza. Because of labor disputes in Italy, only three P3's were ever built, whereas 5 P2's were made the year before. 0846 in spyder configuration was readied to take part in the Sebring 12-hour race in Florida in March, 1966. Mike Parkes, Ferrari's chief development driver, shared the car with Bob Bondurant. Parkes led for most of his stint, but when handing the spyder over to Bondurant at the final stop, warned him of a weakening clutch. Alas, a few laps later, the spyder did grind to a halt with no drive to the rear wheels, but enough had been seen of Ferrari's new car to warn Ford that in this fresh new season of 1966, Ferrari was more than ever a contender for the Championship. 0844's first race outing was in the 1000 Kilometer race at Monza where Mike Parkes was partnered by John Surtees, in his return to competition after his severe 1965 crash in Mosport Canada. The pair led from start to finish in what was mostly a wet race. Their victory was dominant, but not without some windshield wiper troubles! During the race Surtees set a new lap record of 108.67mph and depite the weather its overall average speed was some 103.06mph. The Ford GT40's, especially in small block form, did not seem to have the power to beat the beautiful Ferrari. At the Targa Florio, Ferrari's factory team entry, the singleton 0486 Spyder, was knocked out by an errant GTO whilst 0844 was readied for the infamous Spa-Francorchamps 1000 Kilometers, held on the ultra-fast eight mile long circuit in Belgium. Once again, Mike Parkes was slated to drive the big Ferrari; this time due to a date clash with the Monaco GP, Surtees was unavailable and 'Parkesi' was partnered by Lodovico Scarfiotti, the generally acknowledged Ferrari 'hillclimb' specialist. During the race Parkes set a new lap record at 139mph and despite facing a horde of Ford GT40's, 0844 trounced the opposition again, winning both races it had contested. Both the Berlinetta and the Spyder were entered for the next race, that at the Nürburgring, Germany's fearsome fourteen and a half mile circuit which snakes through the Eifel forest, just forty miles from Spa-Francorchamps. In fact it was for purposes of evaluation and comparison that 0844 had been brought along with the spyder, 0846. During pre-race testing, John Surtees assessed both and his verdict to Ferrari's new team manager, Eugenio Dragoni, was that the spyder was the more efficient and practical of the two around the 'Ring. Dragoni withdrew the Berlinetta, leaving the Spyder to race in the hands of 'il grande' John with Mike Parkes. During the race it once again suffered clutch and gearbox trouble and was retired. Thankfully for Ferrari, the NART and SEFAC Ferrari Dinos finished second and third, letting Ferrari and Ford enter the Le Mans 24-Hour race on an absolutely even points score. Le Mans 1966 was a battle of the Titans. Ford entered no less than eight of the seven-liter GT40 Mark II's. For the first time, three P3's were to be run, two of which were officially Nart entries, but for all intents and purposes were managed by SEFAC Ferrari, the factory team. 0844, 0846 and 0848 were entered. Also present were an assortment of 365 P2's, Dino Sp's and even a 250LM from Ecurie Belge. It turned out to be the quintessential David versus Goliath battle in motorsport history up to that point: Maranello's squad of 3 P3's paled with the industrial might of Detroit's eight 7 liter Fords, as did their 4 liter engine sizes, nearly half as big. Furthermore unpleasant politics saw Ferrari's team shoot themselves in the foot just before the most important race of the year. Their fastest driver, John Surtees, found himself replaced by Lodovico Scarfiotti as lead driver by team manager Dragoni and walked out. (Scarfiotti was a family member of the Agnellis, Fiat's owners, and it may be no coincidence that Ferrari was courting Fiat for financial assistance during this period). Though this has never been officially admitted, it is widely believed that the fiercely nationalistic Dragoni had arranged some funding for Ferrari and therefore had a measure of control. 0844, wearing race number 21, was to be driven by Jean Guichet and Dragoni's favorite, Lorenzo Bandini. Jean Guichet, the 1964 Le Mans winner, recalls his drive in 0844: When I drove it with Bandini at Le Mans I was under the impression that it wasn't really for Chinetti (as it was officially entered) but for Ferrari directly. I had exchanged telegrams with Mr. Ferrari so I am sure that it was in fact a factory car. I don't recall driving it before Le Mans. Bandini had pulled off a very good time in qualifying. During the race I had a big spin after the Dunlop curve, at the bottom of the hill when it began to drizzle. It was also the beginning of the night. I was lucky and just grazed one of the guardrails or earthbanks there with the back end and resumed. Well I was so annoyed at having spun that when I got onto the Mulsanne straight, just past that row of trees on the left at the beginning I gave it too much throttle and as the track was slick I had another huge spin. Somehow I stayed on track... Then because one of my rear round lights had been broken by the contact Ford went to the organizers and whined about it so I had to come in to get it changed. I guess we had them worried: in the first hours we ran really fast at 224kmh average speed. Then eventually the engine broke. Le Mans that year saw the total rout of Ferrari. Ford GT40's took the top three slots. 0844 acquitted itself well, holding fifth position in the fifth hour. It lasted longer than its two siblings but dropped out with head gasket failure in the seventeenth hour. Ferrari re-grouped for 1967. Forghieri developed the glorious P4, as noted previously a car looking very similar to the P3. Its shape, perhaps because it so perfectly combined efficiency and beauty, just could not be improved upon barring some detail differences which made it a faster car. The P3's had their bodies upgraded and their injection removed in favor of a simplified Weber carburetor set-up. Shortly after the season began, the P3/4's (now called '412P' by the factory) received new, Ferrari-designed gearboxes to replace the unsuitable and less reliable ZF units. Suspension modifications were carried out to allow even greater wheel widths. 0844 was sold to Luigi Chinetti's North American Racing Team for 1967. (The other two P3/4's plus two new cars were sold off to Ferrari's other Concessionaire Race teams). The first race was at Daytona and the new P4's dominated the race, coming in first and second. 0844, driven by Pedro Rodriguez and Jean Guichet, completed Ferrari's domination in third place. The Ford GT40's suffered gearbox failure, one after another. In perhaps the most recognized triumph in Ferrari history the three cars staged a formation finish which has since been depicted in numerous paintings and generated the 365GTB/4 berlinetta's unofficial nickname of Daytona. Jean Guichet recalls the historic occasion: At Daytona when I raced it with Pedro Rodriguez the car was rather well worn and tired. I believe he took the start. We had some gearbox problems. I had also previously raced with Muller in the Targa Florio in another of these cars for Filipinetti the Swiss team and we had a number of gearbox problems with the ZF unit. Filipinetti himself then complained to Ferrari which directly contributed to the eventual replacement of the gearbox in these cars with a new in house unit. Going back to Daytona, there were two incidents. First Pedro in a very rare event, burst both rear tires simultaneously! Also during the race, before or after that, I burst a front tire just in front of the pits so I had to drive all the way around the track with the burst tire, on three wheels, back to the pits. Then Pedro had a problem with the gearbox, got stranded and was unable to get a gear. So he got out, broke off a little bit of the armature which held the spare tire in place and he used this to jam the box in gear, without which he would not have been able to drive back to the pits. I don't remember which one of us was driving at the end. Obviously there was much rejoicing in the Ferrari pits afterwards because this was Ferrari's revenge on Ford after they had wrung Maranello's neck at Le Mans the previous year. The Ferrari factory, quite content, did not bother to try and contest the Sebring 12-Hours, leaving that to be a Ford benefit with their new GT40's Mark IV, nor did Nart enter 0844 there. At Monza, the P4's triumphed again while 0844 shared by Jean Guichet and Pedro Rodriguez charged hard from the start. In fact Pedro eventually got the lead from Parkes's factory P4 thanks to the 412P's better fuel mileage and his blinding pace until the Mexican, trying too hard, went off at the first chicane and damaged the radiator too seriously to continue. Guichet recalls that 'At Monza it ended rather quickly with Pedro driving before my turn at the wheel.' 0844 was now prepared for the return match at Le Mans. There, she was race number 25 driven by Rodriguez and Giancarlo Baghetti. Even more than the year before, a huge crowd of over 300,000 spectators had come to witness the awe inspiring battle of the Maranello racing legend against the Ford armada. It is actually Rodriguez in 0844 who led the field at the start of this classic race, but the pace of the winning GT40 Mark IV of Dan Gurney and A.J. Foyt simply left all others gasping in their wake. 0844 after showing signs of strain was eventually retired in the eleventh hour with piston failure. As in 1966 Ferrari had been overwhelmed by a rival with vastly superior means and an almost unfair advantage. The responsibility for the latter undoubtedly goes to the perennially short sighted CSI - now FIA - rules whose top category was vaguely described in the rule book as 'over 2 liters'. The CSI certainly never foresaw the potential arrival of Ford and Chaparral's seven liter engines from across the Atlantic, a dawn invading force from the west as unexpected as that which took place on the coastline northwest of Le Mans 21 years earlier. This rule was compounded by a second one, equally inane which granted larger fuel tanks, the larger the engine. There were clearly cobwebs in that rarely visited part of the rule book and this simple innocuous line of text made all the difference in favor of Ford's armada. Still Ferrari had lost a battle but won the war. At the last race of the season, at Brands Hatch, while Chaparral won, the P4 of Chris Amon and Jackie Stewart barely beat a Porsche to give Ferrari victory in the Manufacturers' Championship by just one point, thanks to their second place! Thus 0844's third place at Daytona was a direct contribution to the title, illustrating how championships are often won by points acquired early in a season. The CSI then finally and suddenly awoke. Shocked by the speed of the American 7 liter chargers, they now made the very abrupt decision to reduce the capacity of sports-prototypes to three liters and so 0844 was now, to all intents and purposes, obsolete. However, Can Am racing was proving to be extremely popular and so Chinetti wasted no time in returning 0844 to the factory where the car's bodywork was cut down into open 'spyder' shape; the engine was not modified but the opportunity was taken to replace all four uprights with P4, Tipo 603 castings. Finished in late August, 0844 was flown to America and had its first Can Am race at Bridgehampton where it was driven by Scarfiotti into seventh place; just one week later, the P3/4 showed up again at Mosport where a bad start and a puncture ended Scarfiotti's run. Chinetti had now realized that four liters of European V12 stood no chance against seven liters of American V8 on either side of the Atlantic and retired the Ferrari from active competition. RETIREMENT After being in storage for four years, Chinetti sold 0844 in its Spyder form to Major William 'Bill' Cooper of Wisconsin. Long time historic car dealer Harley Cluxton of Grand Touring Cars remembers: Bill Cooper bought the car from Chinetti in 1970, on September 12. He also bought engine 0844 and traded in engine 0838. He raced it at Road America. That was in 1971 I believe. I was there racing a 512. I remember how pretty the car was. I was behind Bill for a while. He used to race a lot in the SCCA, always bought his Ferraris from Chinetti and had some very nice cars. Then I bought the car from Cooper on June 30, 1972, trading it for a 1971 Daytona (#14147 I believe) which I had received from Chinetti. At the time I was based in Chicago and had two factory mechanics on loan. They went through the car chassis-wise, wheel bearings, halfshafts, etc. and there was really nothing that needed to be done. It had just recently been painted by Bill Cooper. Otto Bowden an attorney from Florida bought it on the 10th of September, 1972. 0844 remained in Mr. Bowden's ownership for almost ten years. Bowden: I kept it in my garage but had very little time since I was still working so I never did anything with it. I never ran it on the track. Then as time went by I became concerned about humidity and porosity of magnesium parts: there were a number of pinhole leaks and I also had to replace two or three water hoses. Eventually I sold it back to Harley Cluxton. The Grand Touring Car owner then gave the car a comprehensive restoration before selling it again to Mr. Walter Medlin of Kissimee, Florida. Cluxton: I believe that he started it up once or twice and had the usual Buckingham fountain out of the magnesium water pump case and so I bought it back from him. Wayne Beckwith then rebuilt it for me, this was after I had moved to Phoenix. I then sold it to a very good friend, Walter Medlin. He sold a lot of land in central Florida to a corporation by the name of Walt Disney. His aim was to start a Ferrari museum in the Orlando area. He picked it up, took it back home to Florida to the abandoned movie house in which he kept his cars. Wayne had done such an incredible job as he always does on restoring these cars that you could literally lean into the car, just turn the ignition on, let the pumps run, push the key and the car would start right up. When it arrived in Florida Walter wanted to really impress his lady friend so he pushed it off the trailer. He was so impressed and so happy because this was a car that really ran and was just absolutely perfect. As she came out of the house, he leaned over telling her to watch, turns on the ignition, the pumps run, he starts it...he forgot it was in gear and it promptly hit the wall! Thankfully it wasn't a hard hit; it wasn't much. He was so depressed after that that I don't think he did anything with it during those years. He had it from 1979 until 1994. It was here again that year along with 0858. We rebuilt it for the big Laguna Seca Historics Ferrari gathering since the factory was very eager to have one there. I was to drive it, drove it in practice and Brian Redman was actually sitting on the pitwall watching me and I could not believe he was not out driving something. I came into the pits, asked him what he was doing and he said, 'Oh, I am just out watching: Ferrari had no car for me to drive'. So I offered him to drive it! He was surprised but happy and accepted. He came in fourth overall having started in the back and really loved the car and enjoyed himself. In a field described as the most valuable ever raced, 0844 truly played the starring role. In starting from the back of the grid and finishing fourth, Brian beat two 512Ms and two 312 PBs. Afterwards, 0844 was returned to Harley Cluxton's shop to be cleaned, sorted and detailed and was then purchased by the Symbolic Motor Car Company of La Jolla, California in October, 1996. 0844 then enjoyed further time under the limelight as one of the honored cars at the 1997 fiftieth anniversary celebrations in Rome and Maranello. It was displayed at the capital's Stadio dei Marmeli on May 31 and thereafter, with seemingly all of Rome watching and waving enthusiastically, it took part in the Caracalla run on June 1 with Luigi Chinetti Junior at the wheel of the former NART entry. The latter then drove it on the road rally to the factory on June 3rd and in the ensuing events in and around Maranello and Modena. In late 1997/early 1998 it was decided to return the glorious warrior to its original 330 P3 berlinetta configuration. It was not in fact the first such occurrence. Many years ago none other than the World's most respected Ferrari collection, that of the Mas du Clos, had restored its 330 P4 0860, also used in the Can Am series, from that open spyder shape back into its original 330 P4 spyder body configuration. This clearly was a vast and ambitious undertaking that involved far more than the usual repaint. Rob Shanahan who was in charge of the process explains: We got some parts from [longtime British Ferrari privateer] David Piper; the roof panel is the old roof panel of his car, which we found in Scottsdale actually. Then the door, the window surrounds on the doors actually came from Piper. Those are parts from his original car, the roof of which he cut off. Then he provided us with a fiberglass copy of his car made back in 1966. He made us some extra thick body parts so that we could actually bend metal over them, like a mannequin or a buck in effect. We used 1 millimeter thick aluminum. Having these molds is what made it all possible: they were incredibly detailed, you could see the placement of every rivet, you could even see where stickers were placed, you could see the raised circle where the racing numbers had been; great information. Then of course he just had a nose and a tail, we knew our doors were original, they hadn't been modified but we needed the roof panel and window surrounds. He had the window surrounds but not the roof: the latter turned out to be with a private individual in Scottsdale: they were painted the same BP green and matched perfectly with the window surrounds and it was marked 330 P3/4. So we were able to incorporate that into it. Now we had an original roof, tail and nose. The only thing we now needed was a glass windshield, which we had made. We had it molded and did a compound curve windshield which is a little difficult; usually all you can get is plastic since it is very difficult to get glass companies to deal with a one-off; most people do not wish to spend what it actually costs anyway. There wasn't much work to do in the way the bodywork was anchored because they had originally just taken the original bodywork and quickly modified it to make the Can Am body. Then it was just a matter of aligning everything properly. The biggest difficulty was in getting all the little details right. For example the wire mesh screen for the vertical portion of the rear body had to be custom made because we could not find a screen that matched. That car's original screen had a different mesh, more closely woven than some of the other cars. There were a hundred little things like that we had to have made or make ourselves to get all the little details right. Mechanically we also went through the suspension and brakes, while the engine and transmission had already been done by Harley Cluxton. We had to re-do the interior. We restored the dashboard and all the instruments; they were all there. The only thing that wasn't there is that silly little ventilation vent right in the middle of the dashboard. We could not figure out where that came from. Finally it turned out that the part originally used by the factory came from a Renault R8! This was the first time I have run into a Renault part on a Ferrari. Finally we got hold of one, which wasn't easy in the US! The whole process took less than six months, from decision to completion. After decades hidden away in darkness the P3 would now embark on a series of shows on two continents, to the delight of countless smitten tifosi. Noted Japanese collector Hayashi then purchased 0844 in 1998. Shortly before its flight to Japan it was displayed at Concorso Italiano in August of that year. This was the first time it was seen as a berlinetta since 1967. After it crossed the Pacific, Hayashi enjoyed it at the Ferrari Club of Japan 10th anniversary celebration at Suzuka on June 5-6 1999 where it was run on the Grand Prix circuit. That same weekend it was also displayed in the FCJ's Concours in which it scored a perfect 400 points, just edging out a 312PB, also owned by Hayashi, for class 3 honors. Despite the presence of several Ferrari GP cars and an incredible array of major machinery, it unquestionably stole the show. In 1999 it once again returned to the US and was bought by the current east coast collector. Ironically it then took part in four events in Florida, the very State in which it had spent almost 25 years in a time warp. It was displayed and briefly run at the Homestead Ferrari millennium race near Miami in early December of 1999, and then shown at the concours of the Cavallino Classic IX in Palm Beach Florida on January 22nd, 2000. It was later run in Brian Redman's Targa 66 event at Moroso Motorsports Park in February and finally displayed again at Homestead in April on the occasion of the inaugural North American Ferrari 360 Modena challenge race. As one of only three 330 P3's, one of the most revered racing cars of all time, as a true factory prototype, victorious in the 1000kms races of Monza and Spa along with its third place finish in the famous Daytona 67 triumph, #0844 will forever belong in the pantheon of Ferrari history. Rarefied icons such as this tend to be sold not at auction, but very much by private sale from one cognoscenti to another, the latter having sometimes courted the former to that end for over a decade. Thus Christie's is proud to present a very rare opportunity to bypass that process and acquire what is arguably the most important motor car to come to auction in the millennium. In fact occasions when a car of this significance is sold are so thin on the ground that the World of classic cars stops and takes notice.

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-08-20
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1958 Ferrari 412 S Sports Racing Car

The ex-Scuderia Ferrari, One-Off, Pebble Beach Class Winning Singular Example Chassis no. 0744 Engine no. 0744 FERRARI 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Engine: Type 141, 60 ° V-12, front mounted, longitudinal; bore x stroke: 77 X 72 mm; Capacity: 4023 cc, valve gear: DOHC per cylinder bank Carburetion: Six twin choke Weber 42 DCN carburetors Compression Ratio: 9.9:1 Max. Power: 447 bhp at 8500 rpm Gearbox: Four-speed and reverse, manual Clutch: Multi-disc, dry Chassis: Steel tubes, type 524 Front Suspension: IFS, two A-arms, coil springs, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers Rear Suspension: deDion back axle, transverse leaf spring, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers. Brakes: Dunlop hydraulic on four discs Wheels: 16” wire center-lock Borrani Tires: 6.00 x 16” front; 7.00 x 16” rear Dunlop Racing Wheelbase: 2350 mm The ex-Scuderia Ferrari, One-Off, Pebble Beach Class Winning 1958 Ferrari 412 S Sports Racing Car Chassis no. 0744 Engine no. 0744 FERRARI 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Engine: Type 141, 60 ° V-12, front mounted, longitudinal; bore x stroke: 77 X 72 mm; Capacity: 4023 cc, valve gear: DOHC per cylinder bank Carburetion: Six twin choke Weber 42 DCN carburetors Compression Ratio: 9.9:1 Max. Power: 447 bhp at 8500 rpm Gearbox: Four-speed and reverse, manual Clutch: Multi-disc, dry Chassis: Steel tubes, type 524 Front Suspension: IFS, two A-arms, coil springs, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers Rear Suspension: deDion back axle, transverse leaf spring, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers. Brakes: Dunlop hydraulic on four discs Wheels: 16” wire center-lock Borrani Tires: 6.00 x 16” front; 7.00 x 16” rear Dunlop Racing Wheelbase: 2350 mm “Mysterious, powerful, beautiful and unquestionably one of the most significant cars in Ferrari’s history.” Vintage Ferrari Magazine HERO DRIVERS IN HEROIC MACHINES SPORTS CAR ROAD RACING IN THE 1950s Today’s vintage racing enthusiasts may find modern motor racing uninspiring at times. Space-pod shaped racing cars that all look the same, except for garish sponsorship liveries, speed across our TV screens as a sort of moving billboard display, their main purpose apparently, being to promote the sale of various consumer goods. Computers that control acceleration, braking, cornering and even a mechanism that eliminates wheel-spin from a standing start are all employed by today’s most exciting race cars. Overtaking for a position during an event – once the raison d’etre of motor racing, is seldom seen, race winners nowadays often being determined by pit stop prowess, the latter having replaced the actual on- track racing as the real “sport” of auto racing. Much like the past, today’s technology combined with the correct tires and various decisions made by the team’s race engineer are significant influences on the outcome of any given race. When contrasted with all the other professional sports; stick & ball, track & field, tennis, even golf, where individuals, their skill displayed for all to see, still make the difference between winning and losing, auto racing has been largely transformed into an expensive display of the latest scientific technology. One of the most lacking aspects in today’s racing world are the gentleman drivers and mechanics who, after personally towing their factory or privateer entry to the track, acted as their own pit crews and team managers all at once. Pre and post war racing, at least until the late 1960s, when the effects of major sponsorship began to erode the ideal, was a grand and glorious International spectacle. Hero drivers with larger then life personalities, Counts and commoners alike, the well-born and the pauper, united solely by their super-human abilities to manhandle an over-powered, ill-handling sports car, often over dangerous public roads, wrote chapters in the history book of motor racing, the likes of which we shall not see again. With Richie Ginther behind the wheel, the mighty 412 S seemed like an undefeatable beast, its presence both imposing and intimidating whether stagnant in the pits or at speed on the track. In the hands of the right skilled driver such as Ginther, it was only a matter of time before it would claim the checkered flag. Ginther is shown here at the Riverside Grand Prix coming around turn number 7 in October of 1959. Photo Credit: Bob Tronolone A short list of the titans of the 1950s would certainly include Englishmen Stirling Moss, Mike Hawthorn and Peter Collins, Belgian Olivier Gendebien, Frenchman Jean Behra, Argentine champion Juan Manuel Fangio, Italians Luigi Musso and Eugenio Castellotti, Count Wolfgang von Trips from Germany, Swede Jo Bonnier, Spanish nobleman Alfonso de Portago and Americans Carroll Shelby, Phil Hill and Richie Ginther. (Amazingly, six of these international stars – Hawthorn, Gendebien, Musso, Portago, Hill and Ginther, all drove the star of this year’s Monterey Sports and Classic Car auction, the 1958 Ferrari 412 S, chassis no. 0744 or raced its engine in prior installations – but more on that later.) If we find the drivers of the era fascinating, the cars are perhaps even more so, being very much expressions of the national personas of their countries of origin. Racing in their national colors – British Racing green, German silver and Italy’s Rosso Corsa, each country seemed to focus on different design aspects in order to achieve a competitive machine. Jaguar and Aston Martin both won LeMans in the 1950s as a result of superior handling and braking, Jaguar being the first to use disc brakes in international racing. Accentuation of these positives was not only a clever but necessary concept for these Brits, since both were limited to the use of production-car based six-cylinder engines. For Porsche, Teutonic efficiency applied to its highest level was even more necessary since the German marque had to make do with a little air-cooled flat-four that was basically a hot-rodded VW engine. Minimum weight and aerodynamics became their mantra and Porsche scored many long distance race placings based on making half as many fuel stops as the faster more physically dominant cars. THE ALWAYS-DISTINGUISHABLE THOROUGHBREDS OF ITALY NEVER SUFFERED FROM AN ENGINE INFERIORITY COMPLEX By 1957, Maserati’s 450 S sports cars were pumping out 400 horsepower from their V8s, while Ferrari equaled this output with a 4.1 liter V-12 with four overhead cams and six dual-choke carburetors. From the beginning, as early as 1945, Enzo Ferrari had insisted on a V-12 engine. One of his wealthiest drivers, Count Trossi had often talked about his wonderful pre-war V-12 Packards. Ferrari also knew that no other manufacturer was likely to dare a V-12, meaning that he would garner headlines in the sports press which would attract the best drivers and in turn, guarantee racing victories. So, in effect the Italian sports car consisted of a big powerful multi-cylinder engine stuffed into a strong state-of-the-art chassis and clothed in a breathtakingly beautiful aluminum body. Independent rear suspensions or new fangled disc brakes would not be needed for a few years because Ferrari’s engines and brave drivers more than made up for these deficiencies. Would you expect less from the land of Verdi, Sophia Loren, Amaroni and a country that closed vast distances of its public roads each year in order to host the legendary Targa Florio and Mille Miglia Road Races? We think not! THE 1956 AND 1957 WORLD SPORTS CAR CHAMPIONSHIP AND FERRARI 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 Mercedes, aided by drivers like Fangio and Stirling Moss won the 1955 Championship ahead of Ferrari and Jaguar but a corporate edict cancelled further Mercedes Factory racing in response to the tragic 1955 LeMans accident. The years 1956 and 1957 however were particularly good ones for Ferrari as each season ended with a World Constructors’ Championship. In 1956, Ferrari and Maserati fought a fierce battle with Maserati making the better start by winning the Buenos Aires 1000 km race on January 29th; Stirling Moss sharing the driving with Carlos Menditeguy, won with a Maserati 300 S, ahead of the Ferrari 857 Sport, driven by Olivier Gendebien and Phil Hill. The positions were reversed at the 12 Hours of Sebring on March 24th with a 1 – 2 for the 860 Monza’s of Fangio/Castellotti and Musso/Schell/Gendebien. At the Mille Miglia on April 28th- 29th, Ferrari triumphed with their new car, the 290 MM, driven in the pouring rain by Eugenio Castellotti. The second 290 MM piloted by the master Juan Manual Fangio finished fourth. Placed between these two were the 860 Monzas driven respectively by Peter Collins, navigated by his friend/photographer Louis Klemantaski (who managed to take some great photos of this epic race) and Luigi Musso. On May 27th at the 1000 kms of Nürburgring, Piero Taruffi, Harry Schell, Jean Behra and Stirling Moss shared the wheel of the winning Maserati 300 S. The new 290 MM was third. At Le Mans on July 28th and 29th, the Ecurie Ecosse Jaguar D-Type and the Aston Martin DB3S put Ferrari back into third place. The 290 MMs took the first two places with Maurice Trintignant/Phil Hill and Wolfgang von Trips/Peter Collins/Juan Manual Fangio on August 12th at the Swedish GP. Ferrari dominated the season, gaining twice as many points as Maserati to win the World Title. It was an exciting and historic season only to be superseded by the next one. THE 1957 SEASON At Maserati, work continued on the formidable 450 S, which consequently should have been the ultimate weapon for the 1957 season. The horsepower battle however continued throughout the racing season; the eight-cylinder 4.5 liter 400 bhp 450 S had to fight against more and more powerful Ferraris resulting in the birth of some of the most brutally beautiful sports racing cars the world has seen. Aurelio Lampredi had left to join Fiat but a new and brilliant engineering team at Ferrari created such masterpieces as the 290 S, 315 S, 335 S – and the 412 S on offer here. These wizards, under the supervision of Vittorio Jano and with Luigi Bazzi taking the part of chief-tuner were Alberto Massimino, Vittorio Bellantani and the young Andrea Fraschetti. Massimino was in charge of the chassis department and Bellantani of the engines. Phil Hill, Eugenio Castellotti and Olivier Gendebien had signed again as drivers. Peter Collins and Wolfgang von Trips were recruited along with Alfonso de Portago and Luigi Musso to complete the driver package. The end of the Lampredi era resulted in a comeback of the V-12. The tipo 130 engine or 290 MM retained some Lampredi features, such as the liners screwed into the heads, but with new bore and stroke dimensions and a new design introducing a shorter block. These tipo 130 engines provided 320 bhp at 7,300 rpm, enough to hold off the Maserati 300 S, but not the 400 bhp of the Maserati 450 S for 1957. The 290 MMs were beautifully skinned by Scaglietti to a peerless Pinin Farina design. At the season opener in Buenos Aires on January 20th, Maserati brought their new 450 S, while Ferrari countered with a four camshaft version of its 290 MM, the 290 Sport. The 290 MM finished first, after the Maserati 450 S, which was leading by a large margin, failed. One of the new 290 Sports also finished in third place. The Maserati menace asserted itself again at the 12 Hours of Sebring. Jean Behra and Juan Manuel Fangio in the 450 S finished first ahead of the 300 S piloted by Harry Schell and Stirling Moss. Ferrari fielded his heavy artillery with a 290 MM and two new 315 S’, s/n 0674 and 0646 driven by Peter Collins, Maurice Trintignant, Wolfgang von Trips, Alfonso de Portago, Luigi Musso and Eugenio Castellotti. The 290 MM finished in 4th place and the two 315 S entries were 6th and 7th. At the May 11th & 12th Mille Miglia, Ferrari won a 1-2-3 victory with a 315 S s/n 0684 driven by Piero Taruffi in first; the Wolfgang von Trips 335 S s/n 0674 in second with a Tour de France Berlinetta chassis s/n 0677 in third, thanks to the faultless driving of Olivier Gendebien. Sadly, however this race will be remembered for Alfonso de Portago’s tragic accident while lying a strong 3rd overall in his 335 S s/n 0646. In the May 26th 1000 km of the Nürburgring, the Aston Martin DBR1 driven by Tony Brooks came home ahead of the 335 S s/n 0700 and 315 S s/n 0656, driven respectively by Peter Collins and Mike Hawthorn. Jaguar won Le Mans on June 22nd & 23rd with 315 S s/n 0684 finishing in a respectable fifth place. At the Swedish GP on August 11th, the victory of Behra and Moss at the wheel of Maserati 450 S ahead of the Phil Hill/Peter Collins’ 335 S s/n 0700 raised Maserati hopes for the Championship Title. However, bad luck and a row of accidents in Venezuela put Maserati out of contention and left the Ferrari 335 S’, s/n 0700 and 0674 to take the first two places, driven by Collins/Hill and Hawthorn/Musso respectively. Ferrari won the World Constructors’ Championship and Maserati retired from racing in spite of Fangio securing the Driver’s World Championship in the Maserati 250 F. The battle had been triumphant and tragic – with both marques entering the finest racing cars that had ever been built. Because of the new Sports Car Championship three-liter limit for 1958, the European careers of Maserati’s 450 S and the Ferrari 335 S effectively ended in 1957. The glory of big bore machines like these would however continue in North American racing where sports car engines were unlimited. As a result, all of the remaining Ferrari four camshaft factory sports cars went to private USA teams. 1958 FERRARI 412 Sport Race History CHASSIS NO. 0744; 1957 – 1964. (ALSO OF 290 S, 315 S, 335 S, 412 MI / ENGINE 0646/0744) Motor Tipo 141 #3 Race Record Prior to installation in chassis 0744 DATE DESCRIPTION DRIVER RESULT Jan. 20, 1957 Buenos Aires 1000 kms. Eugenio Castellotti DNF (ignition) (mounted in 290 Sport #0646 in 3,490 c.c. form) Wolfgang Von Trips Luigi Musso Mike Hawthorn Mar. 23, 1957 Sebring 12 Hours Alfonso de Portago 7th (mounted in 315 Sport #0646 in 3,780 c.c. form) Luigi Musso Eugenio Castellotti May 11-12, 1957 Mille Miglia Alfonso de Portago DNF (crash) (mounted in 335 Sport #0646 in 4,023 c.c. form) Edmond Nelson June 29, 1958 Monza Race of Two Worlds Luigi Musso 3rd (mounted in 412 MI Grand Prix Mike Hawthorn chassis in uprated 4,023 c.c. form) Phil Hill Chassis Tipo 524 #0744 Race Record 312 Sport DATE DESCRIPTION DRIVER RESULT May 18, 1958 Spa Grand Prix (fitted with Tipo 142 3-liter engine) Olivier Gendebien DNF 412 Sport DATE DESCRIPTION DRIVER RESULT August 1958 Fitted with Tipo 141 4-liter engine #3 and becomes the 412 S Sept. 28, 1958 Watkins Glen International Formula Libre Phil Hill DNF (suspension) Oct. 12, 1958 Riverside Times GP Phil Hill DNF (fuel pump) June 20, 1959 Hourglass Field Richie Ginther 1st July 19, 1959 Riverside Kiwanis GP Richie Ginther 1st Oct. 11, 1959 Riverside Times GP Richie Ginther DNF (engine) Oct-Nov. 1959 Returned to factory for engine rebuild and conversion to disc brakes Dec. 4, 1959 Nassau Governors Trophy, 5 lap race Richie Ginther 2nd OA Dec. 4, 1959 Nassau Governors Trophy Richie Ginther DNF (used as test session) Dec. 4, 1959 Nassau Ladies Race Josie Von Neumann N/A Dec. 6, 1959 Nassau Nassau Trophy Richie Ginther DNF Oct. 15, 1960 Riverside Times GP Richie Ginther Practice (breaks own backstretch record at 173 mph) Oct. 16,1960 Riverside Times GP Richie Ginther DNF (started w/out 2nd gear) Feb. 28, 1961 Riverside Fred Knoop 3rd OA Feb. 29, 1961 Riverside Fred Knoop 2nd OA 1961-1964 Various Races Skip Hudson N/A CHASSIS NO. 0744 AT SPA On May 18, 1958, a unique prototype was entrusted to Olivier Gendebien for the Spa GP in Belgium. This 312 S featured a four-cam three-liter V-12 engine. Ferrari race department documents signed by Carlo Chiti identify this prototype as chassis s/n 0744 powered by a Type 142 engine and constructed on a Type 524 chassis. Late in 1958, the Factory re-engined 0744 to become the 412 S. CHALLENGING THE SCARABS IN THE USA In early 1958, Ferrari’s west coast distributor John von Neumann asked the Factory to come up with a sports racing car to beat Lance Reventlow’s Scarabs, the current front runners in American sports car racing. Enzo Ferrari already possessed the very powerful engine from the single seater used at the 1958 Monza Race of Two Worlds. With a Factory rating of 447 bhp, this engine, when combined with the ex-Spa tipo 524 chassis seemed ideal for von Neumann’s project. Accordingly, the 412 S (for 4-liters and 12 cylinders), was dispatched to von Neumann in August of 1958. He paid an enormous price too, reportedly $20,000 – a sum, which then would have landed two 250 Testa Rossas. Von Neumann put Phil Hill in chassis no. 0744 for the September “Formula Libre” race at Watkins Glen, but he suffered handling problems due to a malfunctioning shock absorber. The 412 S then went to California for the Riverside GP which was highly promoted by the Los Angeles Times newspaper, inviting the spectators to support either the “All American Scarabs” or the “beautiful Ferrari”, the latter again being driven by Phil Hill. Von Neumann was driving his 335 S and had entrusted a 250 TR to Richie Ginther. The Scarabs were driven by Lance Reventlow, Bruce Kessler and Chuck Daigh. Hill and Daigh made a quick start, leaving the field far behind and began a head-to-head duel, lasting over 21 laps, until a vapor lock shut down Hill’s V-12. Although von Neumann retired from racing after 1958, the 412 S chassis no. 0744 was seen again at Riverside in the Kiwanis GP in July, where Richie Ginther won. Ginther was also the star of the Riverside race in October but did not finish due to engine problems. The car was then returned to the Factory, accompanied by Richie Ginther. There are photos recording the 412 S’ Italian holiday, during which the car was fitted with disc brakes. It was returned to the USA in time to compete in the Nassau Speed Week in December 1959. The 412 S was sold to Jack Nethercutt in California, then to Fred Knoop, a gentleman-driver. It later belonged to Bill Harrah who employed Skip Hudson as a driver. Bought by Charles Pinkham, it then became the property of his widow in partnership with Steve Earle. Steve Earle created the “Monterey Historic Automobile Races”, showcasing the 412 S at the inaugural meeting. Chassis no. 0744 also won its class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Other notable U.S. owners have been Bob Donner, Carle Conway, Jarold Evans, David Livingston and Bill Bauce. 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 IN RECENT TIMES The current owner, a discerning collector and very competitive and skilled historic racing driver acquired this Ferrari in 1994. While it looked quite presentable and was totally complete, after a thorough examination, a decision was made to execute a complete mechanical restoration to vintage racing standards. This work took eighteen months and is documented in a 3” binder along with all subsequent maintenance records. This data should be required reading for prospective purchasers and is available confidentially for all those interested buyers. A new correct body was fitted during the car’s 1982-1987 restoration for owner Jarold Evans, but the complete original body sections have stayed with the car, still remaining in excellent overall condition and will accompany the Ferrari in its sale. During the current ownership, the Ferrari has been featured in various vintage races including the Monterey Historics and the Road America/Elkhart Lake vintage races. Concours showings include The Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, as well as the Cavallino Classic as late as 2004. RM Auctions is unquestionably delighted at the opportunity to offer this outstanding example at auction in North America; it represents so many aspects of the highlights of Ferrari’s heritage and when combined with the continuing enthusiasm for vintage sports car racing, it is truly peerless in comparison. The 412 S is likely the ultimate Ferrari Sports Racing Car: certainly it’s the finest and fastest four-cam racing car to be produced at Maranello, and we are not alone in our enthusiasm for this truly beautiful and untamed beast. V-12 AGONY & ECSTASY THE LEGEND OF THE FERRARI 412 S By Phil Hill For all the stories I’ve related about great Ferrari automobiles, this is the first that is really about one of Maranello’s engines…not a type, but a very specific engine. Naturally, it’s a V-12, and it happens to be one of my favorites, the dual-over-head-cam version that began service in the 290 S in early 1957 and was known loosely in those days as the “Bellentani engine”. The design was developed by Vittorio Bellentani and other engineers at Ferrari as the tipo 136, tipo 140, and then tipo 141, as its displacement and horsepower rose to compete against Maserati’s 450 S. As cars, they were known as the 290 S/315 S/335 S series and they were among the best front-engine cars made by Ferrari. Its early history is a bit fuzzy, but the engine I am referring to might very well have begun its racing life with the serial number 0646 as a 3.5 liter 290 S engine at the 1000 km race at Buenos Aires and been subsequently upgraded to a 3.8 liter engine to make the car a 315 S for Sebring in 1957. Before the Mille Miglia that year, this V-12 was modified to tipo 141 specifications, with 4.1 liters and 390 hp. Of the two 335 S and two 315 S models entered in that year’s Mille Miglia, one of the former was fitted with our engine. While Piero Taruffi led a 1-2-3 Ferrari sweep of the Italian open road race, the car in which our V-12 was installed was driven by Alfonso “Fon” de Portago with Eddie Nelson. When this 335 S crashed on a long straight not far from the finish at Brescia, de Portago, Nelson, ten spectators and the Mille Miglia all died. Ferrari may have a huge racing budget today, but things were financially tight back then, so they salvaged the V-12 from the wrecked de Portago chassis after it was returned from the government’s investigation. They put it back to work, which is when my involvement with this engine began. At the end of June, 1958, Monza hosted the second “Race of Two Worlds”, in which teams that raced in the Indianapolis 500 – which then counted towards the Formula 1 Drivers World Championship – shipped their cars to Italy to compete against the Europeans. Using Monza’a banking and racing counterclockwise – which is backward and against the natural design of the track – the left-turn-only Indy cars were pitted against specials created by such European automakers as Jaguar, Maserati, Lister and, of course, Ferrari. Italians loved having the Americans over, equating the Indy circus to their continental visions of cowboys, John Dillinger and our very different way of life. Oddly, some of the American drivers treated Masten Gregory and me somewhat as expatriates. The fact is my love of road racing came from growing up within sight of the famous Santa Monica road-racing course. “The 412 S is an absolute Time Machine and the Ferrari that inspired the creation of the first Monterey Historic Races in 1974.” David Love Cavallino Magazine The Ferrari Factory had two cars for the race. Mine was essentially a Formula 1 car with the V-6’s displacement enlarged to 3.0 liters. Luigi Musso and Mike Hawthorn were to share a Ferrari special that combined the ex-de Portago V-12 with a 1951-designed, but newly built 375 F1 chassis and was called the 412 MI, which stood for 4-liter, 12 cylinder Monza Indianapolis. (Traditionally the 4023 cc V-12s were referred to as 4.1’s). By now, the 4.1-liter V-12 had been hot-rodded with things such as altered valve timing, larger carburetors, a higher compression ratio and stubby exhaust pipes to a claimed 440-plus bhp on methanol. Even though this was at the height of the period when certain outside authorities were claiming Ferrari’s horses were little more than well-muscled ponies, it was a good chunk of power for those days. Without question, the 412 MI was a formidable vehicle, with Musso putting the car on the pole with a lap at 174.6 mph, more than 1 mph faster than 2nd place qualifier Bob Veith in the Bowes Seal Fast Special. I could manage no more than 161 mph with my 3-liter car. The 500-mile race was run in three segments. Musso and I took the initial start. Unbeknownst to outsiders, my F1 V-6 had started to seize in the final qualifying session. I caught it, coasted in and Ferrari’s mechanics managed to free it up enough for me to take the start, because the Factory needed the starting money. I was told to drive it easy, drop out at a pre-determined distance with “magneto trouble”, stop the car near the path that led back to the pits and hotfoot it back, which I did. Monza’s banking was rough and could beat you up. Worse yet, the 412 MI cockpit was so hot that new openings were being cut in it after almost every track session. Musso was wasted after 26 laps. Hawthorn took over and they finished 6th. In heat two, Musso again started, but when he pitted at lap 20, I took over and we ended up finishing 9th. Mike, nearing the end of his brilliant career and fighting for the Drivers World Championship, was in an apprehensive state that year and often had a hard time being enthusiastic. Usually, this all but disappeared with the drop of the flag, but he simply did not like this oval. He started the third heat and drove for 24 laps. Then I took over for the middle portion, expecting to hand the car back to Mike for the finish. The 412 MI’s suspension was so ill-suited to the banking that we were in the ridiculous and time-wasting position of having to change the left front tire – ironically, the one doing the least work – in the middle of each stint. This meant three extra stops. I wanted team manager Carlo Chiti and the others to limit the “drop” on the left front suspension to stop dragging this useless tire around the banking. They were, of course, horrified at the idea of three-wheeling it at those speeds. At the same time, the track was so rough that we drivers were being thrown around in our cockpits. This was the first time I ever used a seatbelt in an open race car….not for safety, just to stay anchored in the seat. Dan Gurney and I had watched Musso qualifying and could see him being all but tossed out of the car. When I came in for my last stop, expecting to turn the car over to Mike, he yelled to me. “You seem to be getting along great. Why don’t you keep going?” I readily agreed. He helped tighten my belts up even more while the mechanics did their work. Due to noise, our communications were animated and at very close range. Italian journalists apparently thought we were fighting and the Gazzetta dello Sport reported Mike and I exchanged – translated literally – “little hits and little kicks”. After some good battles in that final leg of the race, I managed to get us up to 3rd. In the final tally that put us 3rd overall, so the Ferrari special proved it was capable of as much as most of the American machines in this unusual race. When that event was over, Ferrari wasn’t finished with this very special V-12 engine. Even though Ferrari sports cars continued to be successful in most series (having won the European Constructors’ Championship again) they were in some trouble in the U.S. The Chevrolet small-block V-8 had quickly developed into a light, powerful and successful race engine. Installed in cars like Lance Reventlow’s Scarabs, they were regularly beating Ferrari’s best. Not a good situation in an important sales market such as the U.S., so the automaker’s West Coast distributor – and ardent road racer – John von Neumann, asked the Factory to create a sports car to compete against the Scarabs. Ferrari’s answer was the third form of our special V-12. Like its engine, the 412 S sports car chassis started as something else, likely Gendebien’s 312 S that he raced for the Factory at Spa in early 1958. The one thing that makes this car unique is having a transverse four-speed gearbox in unit with the differential, with the clutch and starter also mounted in back, sticking forward into the cockpit. To start the car, you turned the key on the dash, got the fuel pump clicking, reached back to your left (being a right-hand-drive car) and pushed down on what looks like a parking brake handle. The suspension back there with the transaxle is a classic Ferrari De Dion with its high mounted transverse leaf spring. At the front is an upper and lower A-arm suspension with coil springs, while both ends have Houdaille shock absorbers. As delivered the 412 S was fitted with huge drum brakes, though in November 1959 these were swapped for Dunlop disc brakes at the Factory. And, of course, there was that highly tuned V-12 – still probably cranking out around 400 bhp on gasoline – with its 9.9:1 compression ratio and a pair of 12-cylinder distributors sprouting out each side, way back against the firewall. An impressive rank of six 42 DCN/3 twin-choke Weber carburetors stood at attention down the length of the big engine, and you could hear the fuel being generously squirted into those 12 throats as you primed the engine. Push down the starting lever, and the 4.1 snapped to life with a throat clearing roar. It was enough to make you jump. Around this went a particularly beautiful Scaglietti race car body and on the engine was stamped its new serial number: 0744. I took a few laps in the 412 S at Modena even before the body was painted, then left for the U.S, linking up with the car at Watkins Glen in September for its first race. This was a rather strange event, a rare professional Formula Libra road race, sanctioned by USAC and the FIA. I was on the pole, sharing the front row with fellow Californian Dan Gurney who had a North American Racing Team (NART) Ferrari 3.5 liter 290 MM, but it was an odd field, with Jo Bonnier, for example, in 4th spot in a 250 F Maserati Grand Prix car.. No denying the 412 S was quick, and I had no trouble staying with Bonnier and Gurney… when I was on the track. The handling character of my car was diabolical – behaving like the left rear shock was not working properly – and I slid off the track five times before finally retiring the Ferrari. Owing to little time and bad weather, we had no real opportunity to properly sort out the 412 S for the Glen, but we had it right for the next race, Riverside’s 200-mile U.S. Grand Prix for sports cars. While Americans and Europeans had tried to outlast each other over 12 hours at Sebring since 1953, this was to be the first postwar sprint race shootout. And it would be in California, the west coast hotbed of the sport. “Road & Track’s” race report subhead read: “Sports car racing, at long last, comes of age in the West”. Organizers – basically the Los Angeles Times – had lured Jean Behra, Jo Bonnier and Roy Salvadori to that new, dusty, hot-in-the-day, frigid-after-sunset circuit 60 miles east of L.A. That entry list is now a roll call of legends: Dan Gurney, Richie Ginther, Masten Gregory, Pete Lovely, Lance Reventlow, Ken Miles, Max Balchowsky, Ak Miller, Sammy Weiss, Jim Rathmann and Carroll Shelby driving cars from Ferrari, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Lotus, Porsche, Scarab, Cooper, Huffaker, Maserati and OSCA. In the end, however, it came down to two pairings, Chuck Daigh in the Scarab and me in the 412 S. Chuck with the 5.5 liter Chevy-powered Scarab was on the pole for the three across front row. I was in the middle with the 4.1-liter Ferrar Chassis no. 0744

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-18
Hammer price
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1957 Ferrari 625 TRC Spider

320 bhp, 2,953 cc Tipo 128 SOHC per cylinder bank V-12 engine, six Weber 40 DCN twin-choke carburettors, alloy four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms, coil springs and anti-roll bar, nine-inch differential, live rear axle with parallel trailing arms and coil springs, and four-wheel hydraulic finned aluminium drum brakes with steel liners. Wheelbase: 2,250 mm (88.6") • One of only two stunning, factory-built 625 TRCs ever built; fully documented provenance • Bought new by famed racing driver and pioneering American Ferrari importer, John von Neumann • Successful period and vintage-racing history, including such luminaries as Richie Ginther • Single ownership in California for over 30 years; expertly restored and race-ready • Accompanied by original, very rare, matching numbers Type 625 2.5-litre Ferrari racing engine To call Ferrari’s TRC for 1957 “one of the prettiest Ferraris built”, as preeminent Ferrari historian Richard F. Merritt put it, is surely an understatement. It is a design without fault—a timeless, downright breath-taking execution of Italian motoring passion, married to one of the greatest sports racing chassis of all time, and in this particular car, complemented by an aggressively unmistakable, shiver-inducing exhaust note that the trained Ferrarista’s ear will immediately peg as that of a proper “Testa Rossa”. Ferrari Importer Extraordinaire John von Neumann’s life story was the stuff of adolescent fantasy. Born to an Austrian family, he arrived in the U.S. as a student in 1939, joining the military during wartime and promptly beginning his sports car racing career, associating with the future ‘who’s who’ of Southern California’s car culture and co-founding the California Sports Car Club. While he ramped up his dealership activities on the West Coast with his wife Eleanor, importing the most famous (and, decades later, priceless!) European sports cars from Porsches to Ferraris, he continued his successful international racing career. On the dealership side, a young Richie Ginther helped him manage Ferrari Representatives of California, and indeed, his influence on Ferrari history cannot be underestimated. 0680 MDTR The Ferrari on offer stands in a class all its own. Offered from single ownership for the past 30-plus years, its presentation at auction may very well be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. It is one of only two 2.5-litre 625 TRCs ever built by Ferrari, each specifically ordered by the larger-than-life West Coast Ferrari distributor Johnny von Neumann. According to Bill Rudd, crew chief Harold Broughton and others, the 625 TRC was von Neumann’s favourite Ferrari, partly because of its superior handling—this from a man who owned a pontoon-fendered Testa Rossa, nearly 10 four-cylinder Ferraris in all, Porsche 550 Spyders and every other imaginable world-class sports car. In fact, the December 1957 edition of Road & Track asserted, “both von Neumann and Ginther say that [the 625 TRC] is the best handling and easiest of all Ferraris to drive in a race”. Chassis 0680 MDTR is highly documented with complete history from new. It is the ninth of only 19 TRCs of all kinds built by Ferrari in total for 1957, including the Type 500 cars. Completed on 26 June 1957, it was finished in Dark Grey Metallic with a Maroon Stripe and purchased the following month, along with its sister car 0672 MDTR, by von Neumann. Although 0680 MDTR raced mainly in California, its first two outings were in Europe, after von Neumann personally collected it from the Ferrari factory. He first took it to Salzburg, Austria in August, 1957, where he competed in the famed Gaisberg hill climb (“Grosser Bergpreis von Östererreich”), winning his class in only the car’s first outing. The incredibly fast and agile Ferrari performed equally well in Switzerland, finishing second in the Grosser Bergpreis der Schweiz in Tiefencastel-Lenzerheide in central Switzerland. Extraordinary period images attest to this car’s successful early outings, as it powered up the mountain, leaving Maseratis, Porsches and other Ferraris in its wake. Having conquered its Alpine competition, 0680 MDTR was transported to California, where Appendix C rules did not yet apply. The car was modified during September/October 1957 with a single wraparound windscreen and metal tonneau cover. Its first race in the U.S. was at the very first race held at the famed Laguna Seca race track, which had been built for 1957 after the Pebble Beach road races were deemed too dangerous. Again, von Neumann skilfully piloted this car to a podium finish, 2nd, once again. It raced nine more times during the remainder of 1957 and 1958 at Pebble Beach, Pomona, Hawaii and Santa Barbara, with von Neumann scoring two victories and three podiums during this prolific period. Other notable race outings include Laguna Seca on 15 June 1958, with future Ferrari Formula 1 driver Richie Ginther winning with 0680 MDTR. Josie von Neumann, the daughter of John and Eleanor and an accomplished racer in her own right, drove 0680 MDTR at the Vaca Valley SCCA National race in October, 1958, finishing 5th overall and 1st in class. Surely the arrival of the grey-liveried, von Neumann-entered 625 TRC at any start/finish line on the West Coast must have utterly disappointed the competition. The 625 TRC was raced by John von Neumann at Pomona on 1 February 1959. On 26 April, Richie Ginther, the reigning 1958 Pacific Coast Sports Car champion, drove the Ferrari to a fifth-place finish at Avandaro, Mexico. Unfortunately, and despite all the success on both road and track, von Neumann’s marriage came to an end and the Ferrari dealership was sold. As such, 0680 MDTR was sold without an engine to successful owner-driver Stan Sugarman in Phoenix, Arizona, who had just sold his Maserati Birdcage. A Chevrolet V-8 and a Borg-Warner four-speed gearbox were installed while in Sugarman’s ownership in 1960. 0680 MDTR was often driven in qualifying races by Jim Connor and handed over to car owner Sugarman for main events. The duo frequently placed on the podium in the races they entered. In fact, the car’s provenance is well documented throughout the 1960s as its owners successfully campaigned the car in and around the West Coast. Single Ownership for Three Decades Between 1969 and 1978, the car passed through a known succession of owners until Phil Sledge sold it to Bob Taylor. In 1981, 0680 MDTR was acquired from Mr. Taylor by the current owner, who commissioned its restoration, which was performed during 1982 and 1983 by David McCarthy at Phil Reilly in Corte Madera, California, where a Ferrari V-12 engine to Testa Rossa specification was fitted, and the car was painted red and fitted with a full-width windscreen. Following its restoration, 0680 MDTR was shown at Pebble Beach in 1985, where none other than Jackie Stewart introduced the car to the hundreds of onlookers as “a car that has quite a record behind it. Many west coast races. Von Neumann himself drove it”. The roar of the V-12 engine was greeted by applause on the 18th green at Pebble Beach, from where the car resumed its competition career the same year at the prestigious Monterey Historic Automobile Races. (Extraordinary period video captures this event and is available for review by interested parties upon request or on RM’s website.) In fact, the dedicated owner has returned to Laguna Seca for this event annually ever since, except for 2002 and 2010. Notably, 0680 MDTR finished most often ahead of the pontoon-fendered Testa Rossas in attendance. In all, the current owner raced 0680 MDTR on 113 occasions during a post-restoration vintage-racing career even more prolific than the car’s extensive period racing history. What’s more, the car competed in the Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge and was entered in a number of classic touring events. In 1999, at the 25th annual edition of the Monterey Historic Races, the 625 TRC won the Chopard Award for Presentation and Performance. In 2005, the Ferrari returned to the show field with another appearance at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Most recently, the Ferrari V-12 engine was completely rebuilt and fitted with new cylinder heads by world renowned noted Ferrari expert Patrick Ottis prior to the 2011 Monterey Historic Races. The brakes were also serviced with a rebuild of the brake hydraulic system and new carbon-fibre brake-shoe linings. The car is powerful yet flexible and non-temperamental, harkening back to the long-lost era when high-performance cars were driven to the track, raced all-out and then driven back home afterward. It is most enjoyable and exhilarating in both environments today. With known history from new, 0680 MDTR has enjoyed coverage in several publications, including the 1957 Ferrari Yearbook and several editions of Cavallino, as well as such books as American Sports Car Racing in the 1950s and Antoine Prunet's Ferrari: Sports Racing and Prototype Competition Cars. Professionally maintained, both cosmetically and mechanically, 0680 MDTR is in excellent condition. As the owner stated, Every year I buttoned the car up for the winter, drained the fluids, covered it snugly and completely such that its shape did not even show. Then months later when spring came around, and I'd pull all the covers off and see the car gleaming there in its sleek curves, even after 30 years of owning it, driving it, touching it, and looking at it, I would be astounded all over again at how beautiful it was. Then I would open the door, slip into the corduroy seat, turn on the ignition and fuel pump, give the 6 Webers a few pumps of the gas pedal, and push the starter button. Blam! It jumps to life, with that gorgeous smooth ripping sound of the V12 that is never ear-splitting, while at the same instant you not only hear it, but you also feel it, as it resonates and vibrates in your chest and body as well as your ears. Perhaps most attractively, 0680 MDTR is offered at auction with its original, matching numbers 2.5-litre Ferrari Type 625 LM racing engine, which since its separation from its original chassis over 50 years ago, led an interesting life of its own, passing through Luigi Chinetti and on to Pete Lovely, who installed it in a Cooper Formula One racing car. Now, decades later, the remarkable original engine, which is exceptionally rare and desirable in its own right, has been reunited with its chassis to complement the prodigious power of the V-12 currently in the car. As such, the possibilities for this Ferrari are virtually limitless. The new owner may choose to thoroughly enjoy the V-12 engine car as is or utilize its original four-cylinder motor and with relatively little effort, refinish the car in its original grey livery with dual hood bulges, thereby returning it to its von Neumann-era appearance and surely delighting the judges and fellow drivers at future Pebble Beach, Le Mans Classic or Mille Miglia retrospectives and concours events. With an incredibly rich and highly documented provenance to match, potential interested parties should see an RM representative to view the extensive history file, containing restoration receipts, historical images, vintage magazine articles and even period video. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is eligible for import into the UK at a reduced rate of 5% VAT. Chassis no. 0680 MDTR

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
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1955 Ferrari 121 LM Spider by Scaglietti

The third of only four 121 LMs built Campaigned by Scuderia Ferrari at both the 1955 Mille Miglia and 24 Hours of Le Mans Owned and enjoyed for 40 years by two separate Californian enthusiast owners Offered from two decades of single ownership Matching-numbers engine and gearbox Evolving from one of Ferrari’s earliest four-cylinder engines, Ferrari’s straight-six, starting with the Type 114, eventually led to the potent 121 LM. With a rather hefty displacement of 4,412 cc, this provided much more horsepower and torque than its predecessors. Fitted with three side-draft Weber carburetors, the engine produced a hearty 360 bhp. These were not numbers to scoff at, as this engine was over a liter larger in displacement and over one hundred horsepower more than Jaguar’s D-Type! According to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, the car presented here, chassis number 0546 LM was originally built as a 118 LM and later converted by the factory to 121 LM specification, the specification in which it is presented today. It is one of only two examples upgraded from 118 LM specification (the other being 0484 LM), and the third of four total 121 LMs constructed. Needless to say, these new six-cylinder Ferraris were all about speed, and their outright straight-line performance certainly put the likes of Mercedes-Benz and Jaguar on notice. This example’s first outing was at the 1955 Mille Miglia. Starting three minutes (and three entries) behind the iconic duo of Sir Stirling Moss and Dennis Jenkinson, who would race to overall victory in record time just over 10 hours later, 0546 LM was piloted by the respected Italian privateer Paolo Marzotto as a Scuderia Ferrari Works entry. However, the car did not finish the race, as a result of a blown tire at 174 mph during the first stage. Immediately thereafter, it was shipped back to the factory and upgraded to 121 LM specification. 0546 LM was one of the trio of 121 LMs that raced at the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans, piloted by Maurice Trintignant and Harry Shell. Eugenio Castellotti, driving one of the sister cars, clocked the fastest lap time in practice and achieved a top speed of 181.15 mph on the straights. On the speed of the 121s, Jaguar’s Mike Hawthorne commented that “The Ferrari’s brakes were not as good as ours, and their behavior on the corners was not all it might have been; but on acceleration, Castellotti just left us both standing, laying incredible long black track of molten rubber on the road as he roared away.” Despite their immense speed, reliability proved to be an issue and the car was forced to retire in the 10th hour with engine problems. At the end of its tenure with Scuderia Ferrari, chassis number 0546 LM passed to William Doheny, the CEO of Superior Oil, who sponsored Ernie McAfee as his driver for a handful of other cars, as well as the 121 LM. Throughout 1955 and early 1956, the 121 LM put both itself and its driver atop the podium on numerous occasions throughout California, proving that while it was never quite up to snuff for longer European races, the shorter races on California street circuits and at airfields were its forte. Unfortunately, disaster struck at Pebble Beach in April of 1956. On lap 33 of the Del Monte Trophy race, Ernie McAfee missed a downshift at turn six, causing him to lose control of his car into the corner, which ended with the 121 LM hitting a pine tree on the driver’s side, killing him on impact. This would be the first death in SCCA racing in Northern California and sent shockwaves through the community; several drivers retired from racing as a result of the death of their friend, and racing at Pebble Beach was banned thereafter. Following the accident, the 121 LM stayed in the hands of Mr. Doheny, who faithfully restored the car over the course of the next two years. The car presently lacks a traditional chassis stamping, believed to be due to the work performed in repairing it for Mr. Doheny. It did and does, however, retain its matching-numbers engine with its Le Mans scrutineering stamp, as well as a matching-numbers gearbox. Thereafter, the 121 LM remained with his family for the following two decades and was raced at the very first Monterey historic races in 1974 by Doheny’s stepson, Chris Cord. That would be the 121 LM’s first and only year at the Monterey historics with Doheny and Chris Cord. With its next owner, Bill Ziering of Los Angeles, the car would appear at the event a number of times over the following 20 years, as well as at a number of other racing events and even a handful of concours, including the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1975 and 1976. Ziering kept the car until 1997, when it was acquired by its current owner, and it has remained on display in his collection. The car has been seldom seen since, with just one outing at the Ferrari North America Historic Challenge at Lime Rock Park in June of 1999, where it was driven by Todd Morici. The concluding sentence of the article on 121 LMs in the fourth issue of Cavallino sums the ethos of the model up best. “Wind and noise are what you’ve paid for. Use it.” Chassis no. 0546 LM

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione

290 bhp, 2,953 cc, SOHC V-12 engine, three Weber 40 DCE/6 carburetors, four-speed synchromesh gearbox, independent front suspension with parallel A-arms, coil springs and tubular “Koni” shock absorbers and anti-sway bar, rear solid axle, trailing arms, leaf springs and tubular shocks, limited-slip differential, aluminum body paneling as per original. Wheelbase: 94.5" - A rare early alloy-bodied SWB 250 GT offered from the renowned Skip Barber Collection - Jo Schlesser and André Simon finished third overall in its first race – the 1000 kms of Montlhéry on October 23, 1960 - Total and correct restoration to its original configuration by the Ferrari Maranello Factory in the period May 2007 – May 2008 - Issued a “Certificato Di Authenticia” by Ferrari/Classiche; “Red Book,” compact disc detailing the restoration and a Classiche metal badge FERRARI’S SHORT WHEELBASE BERLINETTA – 1960-1962 After much competition success with their long wheelbase Berlinettas in the Grand Touring category from 1956 to 1959, Ferrari engineers Bizzarini, Chiti and Forghieri designed the replacement, the SWB Berlinetta, with the prototype chassis, no. 1539 GT, being introduced at the Paris Auto Salon in October 1959. In addition to the new wheelbase, improved three-liter Colombo V-12 engine and sensuous body work by Pininfarina, the new GT also featured the marque’s first use of disc brakes, in this case supplied by Dunlop. Ferrari’s alloy Berlinetta stole the show, prompting a long line-up of frustrated enthusiasts who were not offered delivery dates unless their names were known in the world of racing! (For them, however, a new heavier steel-bodied “Lusso” version with milder performance and offering more road-ability would soon be introduced.) In both versions, “Lusso” and “Competizioni,” Ferrari constructed less than 200 SWB Berlinettas in total, these being built to three or four different specifications as to their external details – window configurations, marker lamp locations, body vents, etc. Also, one must remember that since these cars were totally hand-fabricated, in reality each SWB Berlinetta, while similar in appearance, is totally unique! Aesthetically they are unmistakably Ferraris – aerodynamic and devoid of superfluous bulk or embellishment with minimal overhangs and body corners wrapped around the polished Borranis. The general appearance of these fastback projectiles speaks of power and purpose. The SWB Berlinetta’s list of competition success is too long to catalog in detail, but worthy of mention are GT category wins at Le Mans and every other FIA-sanctioned major European, UK and US venue in 1960 and 1961 as well as Tour de France victories in 1960, 1961 and 1962 and, of course, Stirling Moss’s Tourist Trophy wins at the wheel of Rob Walker’s SWB in 1960 and 1961. In reality, the Scaglietti-built SWB is Ferrari’s last true dual purpose GT – a car that was driven by its owner to the circuit, had its luggage removed and race numbers applied and was then raced and collected trophies before the girlfriend and bags were re-installed and driven back home. Bellisimo! FERRARI 250 GT SWB BERLINETTA GT NO. 2209 GT – TRIUMPH AND TRIBULATION According to Jess Pourret’s book, The 250 GT Competition Cars, only 42 alloy competition Berlinettas were built in 1960, with chassis no. 2209 GT being the 4th from last of these. Like most competition Ferraris, no. 2209 GT has endured a chequered history – literally. Sold new to Ardilio Tavoni of Modena on October 18, 1960, this car was registered on Modena plates MO 60578. According to Marcel Massini’s research, Tavoni was likely an agent/factory mechanic acting on behalf of up-and-coming racing driver Jo Schlesser, a man known for his exuberant “on the ragged edge” driving style. Indeed just four days after delivery, Schlesser, partnered by André Simon, finished a very respectable third overall as Car # 5 in the French 1000 kms of Montlhéry. 1st and 2nd fell to the Gendebien/Bianchi and Mairesse/Von Trips SWB GTs with some 20-plus Ferraris, Aston Martin GTs and Porsches trailing behind Schlesser and Simon. Next up was the March 12, 1961 Monza “Coppa Saint’Ambroeus” with Sandro Zafferi at the wheel and the car numbered as # 197. On November 4 & 5, 1961, this SWB placed 4th in the GT Class at the Tour de Corse driven by Jo Schlesser and his wife. Tavoni sold our SWB to its second owner Gianni Roghi of Milan for Italian lire 740,000 on November 2, 1962. On February 18, 1963 Roghi had the Ferrari serviced by the factory Assistenza Clienti in Modena. Later, on June 2, 1963 Roghi placed 3rd in class at the XXV Coppa della Consuma Hillclimb. Roghi continued his competitions in 1963 with good results at the Coppa Pisa, the Monza Coppa Inter-Europa and the Coppa Cittá d’Asagio. On January 19, 1967 Roghi sold no. 2209 GT to its third owner, Tullio Lombardo, who passed it to the fourth owner, Gastone Crepaldi, both residents of Milan. (Crepaldi paid Italian lire 500,000 for the seven-year-old used car.) In 1968 Carrozzeria Piero Drogo of Modena re-bodied the car to a design by Tadini; the original engine was changed to a 250 GTE engine numbered 4291. On May 29, 1969, a Miss Maryvoure Lassus of St Vile, France purchased the refurbished car. On February 18, 1971 it was acquired by the next owner Eric Russli Birchler of Paris, France who in turn sold it to Beruard Cros-Lafage at an unknown date. Then sometime in 1978 it was either “stolen” or sold by a garagiste for a repair or storage bill owed – depending on whose history account one reads. In any case, UK resident Stuart Passey purchased no. 2209 GT from dealer Michael Lavers after the French police and the UK Fine Arts team determined that the “theft” matter was resolved, allowing Mr. Passey to obtain a clear title of ownership (1979). Now in England, Mr. Passey had the 250 GT registered on UK plates “SWB 70” before commissioning a total restoration by DK Engineering, including a 1961 type SWB body built by Grand Prix Metalcraft of London and painting to its original white with a green stripe. (Schlesser’s competition colors of Madagascar.) In the summer of 1984, Passey displayed the car at the Donnington Park Ferrari Owners Club meeting. Passey, a passionate Ferrari enthusiast, was to care for no. 2209 GT for more than two decades while driving and displaying the car in various UK-based events, including the Coys Historic Festival in 2001. In January 2003, the car was sold by Simon Kidston to racing driver Frank Synter who in turn passed it to Carlos Monteverde of London, England, who promptly re-sprayed the car to his standard colors of yellow with a green nose-band. Monteverde, a front-runner in Historic Racing, used no. 2209 GT to good effect in various international events for three or four seasons until a friend pranged the car in a race in Portugal. Repaired in England by Monteverdi’s contractor, it was re-sprayed in white with a green stripe in an attempt to return it to its original appearance. The car was consigned to the May 20, 2007 RM Auctions Maranello Ferrari Factory sale by Monteverde. However, his contractor was unable to finish the restoration in time for the auction, so it was conditionally sold complete but in a partially disassembled state to the current owner, Skip Barber, under the proviso that the Ferrari Classiche Department would complete the restoration and re-assembly for its new owner. 2007-2008 – FERRARI CLASSICHE TO THE RESCUE OF 2209 GT The Ferrari Classiche Department’s work on this car was to consume a full year as the initial plan of a “quick re-assembly” evolved into a “full restoration to original” in the Factory workshops. Under the careful supervision of Roberto Vaglietti, Head of Classiche and Corsa Clienti, absolutely every aspect of the car was restored to factory-original condition. After the total disassembly, metal testing and examination determined that the chassis frame and suspension was original to the car and as built in 1960. The same applied to both the gearbox (539/#54) and differential (# 289 F). The body was stripped to bare aluminum and re-configured to correct 1960 specification, in the process receiving new door skins as well. At the request of new owner Skip Barber, it was sprayed in the classic Ferrari “Rossa Corsa” racing color. The new Classiche-stamped engine block was reassembled using all new and correct internals. For an overview of the completeness and authenticity of this Ferrari Classiche restoration, prospective buyers are advised to review, with an RM Specialist, the extensive files which accompany this purchase. A comment from the present owner, Skip Barber, is worth repeating: “You know, I got kind of tired of waiting for this car, but when it arrived, all was forgiven – it looked sensational, sounded wonderful and drove superbly. Just as one would expect of the last true dual purpose Ferrari!” Jo Schlesser was one of those privileged individuals who could have anything he wanted, and no. 2209 GT was also his idea of the perfect Ferrari Grand Turismo. It still is, 50 years later! Reference: Jess G. Pourret: The Ferrari 250 GT Competition Cars Marcel Massini Chassis no. 2209 GT Engine no. 2209 GT Gearbox no. 54/539

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-08-19
Hammer price
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1955 Ferrari 750 Monza Spider by Scaglietti

260 bhp, 2,999 cc DOHC inline four-cylinder engine with two Weber 58 DCO/A3 carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front suspension with coil spring, De Dion rear axle with parallel trailing arms and semi-elliptical leaf springs, four-wheel drum brakes, and a tubular steel frame. Wheelbase: 88.5 in. Offered from the Jim Hall Collection Took the checkered flag at the 1955 12 Hours of Sebring, later re-classified as 2nd place Winner of both the 1955 and 1956 Del Monte Trophy, Pebble Beach Road Races Driven by such legends as Phil Hill, Carroll Shelby, and Jim Hall himself Piloted to victory by Jim Hall in his very first road-race in 0510 M at Fort Sumner, New Mexico Owned continuously by Mr. Hall, its last racing driver, since 1956 One of the finest 750 Monzas in existence; an unrepeatable opportunity In the mid-1950s, sports car racing took America by storm. Almost every weekend at tracks around the country, both professional and gentleman drivers could be found pushing their machines to the limits, all for a chance to stand atop the podium. So often, these race cars were driven hard, put away wet, damaged in accidents, and often modified for the sake of performance, as their drivers sought to extract just one more race behind the wheel. It was extremely rare for a racing car to enter the crucible of motorsport and leave unscathed and unmolested. It was even rarer for one of these racing cars to be retained by its racing driver after it retired from competition. Furthermore, it is almost unfathomable that one of these drivers would hold onto their cherished racer for the next 60 years. Yet, such is the story of this Ferrari 750 Monza. HILL AND SHELBY’S CLOSE SECOND AT SEBRING Chassis 0510 M was sold new to Allen Guiberson of Dallas, Texas, a manufacturer of drilling and refinery equipment, who owned and campaigned several early Ferraris. The car was finished in a distinctive color combination of white with a dark blue triangle, stretching from the car’s nose to its windshield, and mimicked on the tail. The 750 Monza would retain this distinctive color scheme for the 1955 season, where it would see great success at the hands of some of motor racing’s great drivers. The first event for the new 750 Monza was the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1955. With Phil Hill and Carroll Shelby behind the wheel under race #25, the Monza was initially crowned the overall winner at the end of a hard-fought 12 hours against the Jaguar D-Type of Mike Hawthorn and Phil Walters that was entered by Briggs Cunningham. Both teams argued that their car had crossed the line first. Upon a final review of the lap charts, well after the race, the Jaguar was declared to be the winner. It had crossed the line just 25.4 seconds ahead of Guiberson’s Ferrari, an incredibly slim margin over the course of just 12 hours. However, Hill and Shelby still managed to clinch the Index of Performance trophy. The car’s next outing with Phil Hill would be more fruitful. Chassis number 0510 M raced to a hard-fought 1st place finish for the Del Monte Trophy at the Pebble Beach road races in April. The car’s third and final event for the season was at Palm Springs on 3 December, where it finished in 2nd with Phil Hill behind the wheel yet again. This would be the final event for the car under Guiberson’s name. At the end of the season, it was sold to Richard “Dick” Hall and his brother, Jim. Perhaps they did not know it at the time, but the Ferrari would remain in the hands of the Hall family, only the car’s second owners, for an incredible 60 years. FURTHER SUCCESS WITH HALL AND SHELBY Chassis number 0510 M would find its way back to Pebble Beach for the first event of the 1956 season with Carroll Shelby behind the wheel, repeating its overall victory from 1955. The next week, Shelby and the 750 Monza travelled to Dodge City, Kansas, where they took first place yet again. Chassis number 0510 M would rack up 1st place finishes at Eagle Mountain, Texas, with Carroll Shelby and Fort Sumner, New Mexico, that year. Fort Sumner would be the very first time that Jim Hall drove the Monza, and he recalled it as being a hard-fought battle. Not only would this be Hall’s first race in the car, but it was his very first win. Finishing in 1st place against the Porsche 550 Spyder driven by Jack McAfee, who was that year’s SCCA National Champion and is considered to be one of the SCCA’s greatest drivers, this was a clear highlight in what would become a very successful motorsport career for Jim Hall. In a recent conversation with RM Sotheby’s Research & Editorial department, he commented, “I remember driving it for the first time and was amazed by it. It had lots of torque and you had to shift through the gears quickly, but it had lots of go. The brakes were fantastic, even though they were drums. I thought it was a fabulous race car.” During the race in Dodge City, the car’s engine had picked up some debris on the track and the car was subsequently shipped to Maranello to be serviced. In addition to the engine service, the factory fitted chassis number 0510 M with a door on the left-hand side and a full-width windscreen in order to conform to FIA Index C regulations. It was refinished in red by the factory prior to being shipped back to Jim Hall, where it would resume racing. Purchased outright from his brother prior to the 1957 season, Jim Hall continued to campaign the Monza. The car was raced in a handful of sports car races, mainly in Hall’s home state of Texas. Hall raced his Ferrari in at least one event in 1958, finishing 3rd overall and 2nd in class at the Mansfield Spring Sports Car Races in Louisiana. POST-RACING YEARS Following its retirement from racing, the car remained in storage with Jim Hall for nearly 40 years, preserving its unmolested condition at a time when other Ferraris of similar ilk were often modified and upgraded in pursuit of continued racing careers. No such fate would await 0510 M. In the mid-1990s, Hall decided that his 750 Monza should be restored to its former glory and entrusted it to Troy Rogers, former chief mechanic for the Chaparral racing team. At this time, the engine’s bell housing and starter were replaced, but all of its other mechanical components were retained. Finished in its recognizable blue and white livery, Hall’s 750 Monza was first displayed at the Monterey Historics in 1997 as part of a tribute to Carroll Shelby. Following its initial appearance at Monterey, it was shown at the 2005 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as part of a special display of cars honoring Phil Hill and Stirling Moss. In 2011, it was part of an exhibit honoring Phil Hill at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles. Since then, the car has remained well-preserved in Jim Hall’s care in his native Texas. After its restoration, it would be started occasionally and gently driven around Hall’s test track to make sure that everything was in running order. Prior to the passing of both Carroll Shelby and Phil Hill, Jim Hall had both Shelby and Hill draft letters detailing their experiences with 0510 M. Copies of those letters and the originals are on file and will be passed along with the car. The provenance and importance of chassis number 0510 M is irrefutable and second to none. Following a highly successful racing career with three of America’s greatest drivers, its careful preservation, restoration, and custodianship, in the hands of Jim Hall (one of those very drivers) for over 60 years, has put it in a class of its own. While many four-cylinder Ferrari sports racers fell to the crucible of motorsport or general neglect following their racing careers, this particular 750 Monza persevered and remains today as perhaps the finest example in existence, offered from the man who raced this very car 60 years ago. Chassis no. 0510 M

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1958 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series I by Pinin Farina

The 14th of 40 Series I Cabriolets built Purchased new by John R. Fulp Jr. Owned for 40 years by Robert Donner Jr. Fully restored to its original colour combination The iconic gentleman’s Ferrari Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche The 14th of 40 Series I 250 GT Cabriolets built, chassis 0791 GT was delivered new to its native Italy through Parauto S.r.l of Genova in March 1958. Finished in a very attractive colour combination of Bianco (MM 10019) over Blu (VM 3315) Connolly leather, its colour scheme perfectly suited the car’s personality as a fashionable open-top Ferrari. The car did not remain in Italy for long, and was sold to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York. First owner John R. Fulp Jr. of Greenville, South Carolina, was a young and highly successful gentleman racer with respectable showings at both Sebring and Le Mans; he raced and owned a number of incredible Ferraris throughout the 1950s. However, as 0791 GT was not built for racing, it is likely that his Series I Cabriolet was enjoyed more modestly on public roads. Fulp kept the car until the fall of 1959, when it was traded back to Luigi Chinetti for a 410 Superamerica (1311 SA). The Cabriolet returned to Paris, France, when it was sold by Chinetti to James Harrison, an American living there. In Paris, it was refinished in silver over red by Charles Pozzi, and at that time the dashboard layout was also revised to be similar to that of a 400 Superamerica. Harrison kept the car in the United States and was living on Park Avenue in 1969 when issues with the engine arose, leading him to source a newer, outside-plug replacement motor through Chinetti. The car was then moved to Florida in July of 1970, but remained with Harrison at his home in Palm Beach. By 1971, the car was sold by Harrison to its third owner, Robert Donner Jr. He was also a noted gentleman racer and a much-admired figure in American sports-car racing circles who owned and raced a number of significant Ferraris, including a 250 GTO. In 1975, Donner rebuilt the engine and refinished the car in red over red and it quickly became his go-to warm-weather driver. A resident of Colorado Springs, Colorado, Donner drove this car in the Colorado Grand no less than a dozen times. As an aside to its warm-weather driver duties, it appeared at The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering in 2007, where it was displayed in a special class of Series I Cabriolets. Following Donner’s passing, the car was purchased by enthusiasts on the West Coast and received a minor cosmetic restoration, before being sold to its fifth owner who returned it to Europe. At that time it was returned to its as-delivered specification of Bianco over Blu, and fitted with a correct type 128 C engine, sourced from Ferrari Classiche. After being acquired by its current owner, the car was entrusted to RM Auto Restoration of Blenheim, Ontario, for further sorting in an effort to bring the car to show-ready condition for display at concours events, where it certainly would be most welcome. Today, the car presents in excellent condition throughout, thanks to not only its recent detailing, but also to its gentlemanly colours, seldom seen on a Ferrari of this type. With fascinating ownership history, including two very notable figures in American sports car racing, chassis 0791 GT is a wonderful grand touring Ferrari in all regards, and would be an astute addition to any collection. • Esemplare numero 14 di 40 prima serie costruite • Tra i proprietari figurano anche John R. Fulp Jr. e Robert Donner Jr., che l'ha tenuta 40 anni • Riportata alla sua colorazione originale • Considerata unanimemente la Ferrari dei gentlemen • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche La quattordicesima 250 GT Cabriolet delle prima seria, telaio 0791 GT, viene venduta nuova, in Italia, dalla Parauto Srl di Genova (marzo 1958). Verniciata in una combinazione molto elegante, carrozzeria Bianco (MM 10019) e interni in pelle Connolly Blu (VM 3315), ha un abbinamento che si sposa perfettamente con lo stereotipo di auto aperta e alla moda, di cui questa 250 è un perfetto esempio. La Ferrari non rimane in Italia molto tempo, però, visto che presto viene venduta alla Luigi Chinetti Motors di New York. John R. Fulp Jr. di Greenville, Carolina del Sud, nonché primo proprietario, è un giovane gentleman driver di talento, con piazzamenti di tutto rispetto sia a Sebring che a Le Mans. Negli anni '50, Fulp ha corso con un'incredibile quantità di “rosse”, alcune delle quali anche di sua proprietà. Tuttavia, siccome la 0791 GT non era stata costruita per le gare, è molto probabile che il pilota l'abbia goduta fuori dagli autodromi. Fulp tenne l'auto fino all'autunno del '59, quando Luigi Chinetti gliela ritirò, permutandola con una 410 Superamerica (1311 SA). La cabriolet torna nuovamente in Europa quando Chinetti la vende a James Harrison, un americano a Parigi. Ridipinta in argento (con interni rossi) da Charles Pozzi, nello stesso periodo la plancia viene ridisegnata per assomigliare a quella della 400 Superamerica. Ancora una volta negli Stati Uniti, visto che Harrison ha una casa in Park Avenue, New York, è proprio qui che nel '69 si verifica un problema al motore che lo costringe a cercarne uno più recente, ma a candele esterne, dal solito Chinetti. Infine, nel luglio del 1970, decide di portare la cabriolet nella sua casa di Palm Beach, Florida. Nel '71 l'auto passa al terzo proprietario, Robert Donner Jr., altro gentleman driver molto ammirato negli ambienti sportivi americani per le Ferrari che aveva avuto modo di possedere o di guidare, tra cui addirittura una 250 GTO. Nel '75 Donner ne ricostruisce il motore, la ridipinge di rosso, in tinta con gli interni e la utilizza come auto per le sue vacanze al caldo. Residente a Colorado Springs, con questa “scoperta” Donner partecipa almeno a una dozzina di Colorado Grand, per poi iscriverla addirittura al The Quail, il raduno automobilistico in cui viene esposta nella categoria Cabriolet Prima Serie (2007). Dopo la scomparsa di Donner, l'auto viene acquistata da alcuni appassionati della West Coast e, dopo un piccolo restauro estetico, passa di mano per la quinta volta. Il nuovo proprietario la porta in Europa per l'ennesima volta, ora però con la sua colorazione originale e un motore tipo 128 C, finalmente quello giusto, proveniente direttamente da Ferrari Classiche. Dopo essere stata acquisita dal suo attuale proprietario, la 250 è affidata a RM Auto Restoration di Blenheim, Ontario: l'ultimo sforzo per renderla pronta a partecipare a nuovi concorsi, dove sicuramente non sfigurerà. Oggi l'automobile si presenta in condizioni eccellenti, per le recenti migliorie, certo, ma anche per i suoi colori da vero gentleman, visti molto di rado su Ferrari di questo tipo. Con uno storico di proprietari di tutto rispetto, tra cui due corridori noti per le loro partecipazioni in gare americane e non, quest'auto, con telaio 0791 GT, è una meravigliosa Ferrari sotto tutti i punti di vista. Oltre che un pezzo pregiato da aggiungere alla propria collezione. Chassis no. 0791 GT Engine no. GP 07 Gearbox no. 44 C

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
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1959 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series I by Pinin Farina

240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber 36 DCL/3 carburettors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm The 1959 New York International Auto Show car The 36th of 40 built; the final factory covered-headlamp car Built on the superior 508D chassis Formerly owned by Bob Grossman, William McKelvy, and Glenn Mounger Ferrari Classiche certified as a matching-numbers example Former Cavallino cover car The Pinin Farina-bodied cabriolet that Ferrari introduced at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1957 was not only a triumph in design, with its elegant rear haunches, covered headlamps, and long centrally ventilated bonnet, but it was also the car that marked an auspicious milestone in Maranello history as the company’s first series-produced open-top model. Whilst the first four examples were essentially prototypes that visibly varied, sometimes referred to as the Pinin Farina Spiders, the next thirty-six cars were far more uniform in design. However, despite being the first series-built Ferrari convertible, many experts still consider the Series I Cabriolets to be virtual one-offs, as they were constructed in Pinin Farina’s custom shop rather than on the coachbuilder’s factory floor. Each varied significantly enough from example to example to support such a contention. In total, only 40 examples of the Series I Pinin Farina Cabriolet were built before the model gave way to a mid-1959 redesign that was intended to further differentiate the Cabriolet from the California Spider. Shortly before the brief run of first-series Cabriolets came to end, the cars benefited from the introduction of a stronger and much stiffer chassis that simultaneously came into use with the rare competition 250 TdFs. These new chassis were also utilised on the 250 GT LWB California Spiders. Ever a work in development, Ferrari’s V-12 road car chassis was now dubbed the Tipo 508D, succeeding the 508B and 508C. This Ferrari, chassis 1181 GT, was the 36th of 40 Series I PF Cabriolets built, and it is the very last to feature covered headlamps. It was built with the stronger 508D chassis and equipped with the latest version of Gioacchino Columbo’s short-block engine design, the 128D (prized for its twin rear-mounted Marelli distributors), which gave this car the same exquisite handling as the later 250 California Spiders. This car entered Pinin Farina’s custom shop for body work on 28 November 1958, and it was completed on 12 March 1959. Whilst at the hands of Pinin Farina’s renowned craftsmen, the Cabriolet was finished in traditional Rosso Corsa and appointed with a less than traditional white Connolly leather interior, resulting in a striking colour combination. Two days later, the car was shipped to New York City for display on Ferrari’s stand at the third International Automobile Show at New York’s Coliseum, where it shared the platform with a California Spider and a 250 Testa Rossa, as indelibly depicted in the 1959 Ferrari Yearbook. Following the auto show, 1181 GT was delivered to Luigi Chinetti Jr., and a copy of the original factory order sheet confirms his guarantee of delivery on 11 September 1959. The Cabriolet was then sold in 1960 to preferred Ferrari customer William McKelvy, the famed principal of the Scuderia Bear team (and also the buyer of the first 250 GTO, chassis number 3223). It was returned to Chinetti Motors a year later and then sold to Bob Grossman, the well-known New York-based dealer, Briggs Cunningham team driver, and two-time SCCA champion who helped propel the California Spider to stardom. In 1965, the Cabriolet was purchased from Grossman by Baltimore, Maryland, resident John Freund, who traded in a 1957 Jaguar XK140 MC as part of his payment. Mr Freund, who would soon join the FCA (as demonstrated by an original 1969 application), retained possession of the car for over 20 years and personally conducted much of the car’s servicing and maintenance. Following his passing, around 1980, the Ferrari was sold by his widow to a Mr White, who in turn sold the car to Norman Wolgin. At the time, the Cabriolet was reportedly still finished in its original factory-equipped paint and cosmetic trim, and it displayed just 34,000 original miles. Chassis 1181 GT was subsequently offered by dealer Marc Tauber and purchased in October 1987 by respected marque enthusiast William Kontes. During his period of ownership, the car was extensively restored and refinished in a deep coat of black paint, with an interior of red leather and black carpets. In this distinctive livery, the beautiful Ferrari was featured on the cover of the December 1991/January 1992 issue of Cavallino magazine, as the subject of a story about the Series I Cabriolet model, which was written by noted automotive writer Ken Gross. In late 1997, the well-maintained 250 GT was acquired by a respected enthusiast and past chairman of the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, Glenn Mounger, of Bainbridge Island, Washington. Mr Mounger campaigned the Cabriolet numerous times on the prestigious Colorado Grand, during which his co-pilots included his wife and daughters, as well as noted collectors Knox Kershaw and Ken Waltrip. Having driven his PF Cabriolet Series I on the tour for nearly every year he owned it, Mounger was proudly named the Prime Motoring Fool in 2008, which was a sure sign that he truly enjoyed every minute behind the wheel. When recently asked about his experience with 1181 GT, Mr Mounger happily expressed that the Ferrari was “by far my favourite car I’ve ever owned. It really was a fantastic car …nimble, responsive, a real pleasure to drive”. In 2010, the Series I Cabriolet was acquired by Mr Steve Adler, who continued to show off the car at several concours, as well as take his turn behind the wheel on the Colorado Grand in 2010. This exquisite Ferrari was then acquired by the consignor, a discerning collector based in Great Britain who, seeking to shore up the 250 GT’s documentation, applied for Ferrari Classiche certification. The desirable Red Book was issued on 11 September 2013, sixty-four years to the day after the car’s original guaranteed date of delivery. The Certification of Authenticity importantly confirms that 1181 GT retains its original Colombo V-12 motor, gearbox, suspension, and bodywork. Chassis 1181 GT was recently repainted in an elegant shade of dark blue and benefits from a re-trimmed interior. It is a rare and arresting early example of the harmonious design and race-bred engineering that informed the collaboration between Ferrari and Pinin Farina. The car is particularly notable as it was the last Series I Cabriolet to feature the esteemed covered headlamps and it was an official New York Auto Show car that was owned by two luminaries in sports car racing, William McKelvy and Bob Grossman. This 250 GT has been certified by Ferrari Classiche to be a matching-numbers and factory-correct example, and it would make a strong contender at international concours d’elegance like Pebble Beach or Villa d’Este, as well as an ideal complement to any gathering of early Ferrari road cars. This outstanding paragon of Ferrari’s convertible development currently displays approximately 50,583 miles, which are believed to be original, inviting future ownership to enjoy the benefits of the updated 508D chassis and 128D engine. Without equivocation, 1181 GT is a highly desirable exemplar of Ferrari’s early open-top grand touring production and is worthy of the finest world-class collections. Moteur V-12, 2 953 cm3, 240 ch, 1 ACT par banc, trois carburateurs Weber 36DCL/3, boîte manuelle quatre rapports, suspension avant indépendante par triangles inégaux et ressorts hélicoïdaux, essieu arrière rigide avec ressorts semi-elliptiques et bras tirés parallèles, freins hydrauliques à tambours sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 600 mm. La voiture du Salon International de New York 1959 Le 36e de 40 exemplaires produits ; dernière voiture d'usine à phares couverts Produite sur le châssis amélioré 508D A appartenu à Bob Grossman, William McKelvy et Glenn Mounger Certificat Ferrari Classiche, exemplaire matching-numbers Apparaît en couverture du Cavallino Le cabriolet carrossé par Pinin Farina et présenté par Ferrari au Salon de Genève de mars 1957 n'est pas seulement un triomphe en matière de design, avec ses ailes élégantes, ses phares couverts et son long capot à prise d'air centrale, mais c'est aussi une voiture qui constitue une étape importante de l'histoire de Maranello, en tant que premier modèle découvrable de la marque. Les quatre premiers exemplaires sont principalement des prototypes qui varient visiblement, auxquels il est parfois fait référence comme les Spider Pinin Farina, mais les 36 exemplaire suivants sont de forme plus uniforme. Cependant, bien qu'il s'agisse de la première Ferrari découvrable de série, de nombreux spécialistes considèrent que les 250 GT Cabriolet Série 1 sont quasiment des modèles uniques, car ils sont produits dans l'atelier spécial de Pinin Farina plutôt que dans l'usine de production du carrossier. Chaque exemplaire se différencie suffisamment des autres pour supporter une telle affirmation. Au total, seuls 40 exemplaires du Cabriolet Pinin Farina Série 1 voient le jour, avant que le modèle ne laisse place au milieu de l'année 1959 à la nouvelle version redessinée pour se différencier plus nettement du Spider California. Peu de temps avant que la production de cabriolets de première série arrive à son terme, les voitures bénéficient de l'introduction d'un châssis beaucoup plus solide et rigide, utilisé simultanément sur les rares 250 TdF de compétition. Ces nouveaux châssis sont aussi adoptés par les nouvelles 250 GT Spider California châssis long. En développement permanent, le châssis des Ferrari V-12 de route est maintenant appelé Tipo 508D, qui succède aux 508B et 508C. Cette Ferrari, châssis 1181 GT, est le 36e exemplaire des 40 cabriolets Pinin Farina Série 1 produits, et le tout dernier arborant des phares couverts. Il a été fabriqué sur le châssis 508D plus résistant et il est équipé de la dernière version du V-12 de Gioacchino Colombo, le 128D (loué pour ses deux distributeurs Marelli montés à l'arrière), ce qui permet à la voiture de présenter la même excellente tenue de route que les Spider California. Cette voiture est entrée dans l'atelier Pinin Farina le 28 novembre 1958, et en est sortie le 12 mars 1959. Entre les mains des artisans renommés de Pinin Farina, ce cabriolet a reçu une peinture traditionnelle Rosso Corsa avec une sellerie moins conventionnelle en cuir Connolly blanc, avec pour résultat une combinaison de couleurs saisissante. Deux jours plus tard, la voiture était expédiée à New York pour être exposée sur le stand Ferrari au troisième Salon Automobile International, au Coliseum de New York, où elle partageait les honneurs avec un Spider California et une 250 Testa Rossa, comme en atteste le Ferrari Yearbook de 1959. Après le Salon, 1181 GT était livrée à Luigi Chinetti Jr., et une copie des documents de commande d'origine de l'usine confirment sa garantie de livraison le 11 septembre 1959. Ce cabriolet était ensuite vendu en 1960 au fidèle client Ferrari William McKelvy, fameux directeur de la Scuderia Bear (et aussi acheteur de la première 250 GTO, châssis 3223). La cabriolet retournait chez Chinetti un an plus tard avant d'être vendu à Bob Grossman, le distributeur bien connu basé à New York, pilote pour Briggs Cunningham et double champion SCCA, qui a participé à faire une star du Spider California. En 1965, la voiture était achetée à Grossman par John Freund, basé à Baltimore (Maryland), qui fournissait une Jaguar XK140 MC 1957 dans la transaction. M. Freund rejoignait rapidement le FCA (comme le montre un bulletin d'adhésion de 1969) et gardait la voiture pendant plus de 20 ans, tout en assurant lui-même une bonne partie de l'entretien et des révisions. Après son décès, autour de 1980, la Ferrari était vendue par sa veuve à un M. White, qui à son tour la cédait à Norman Wolgin. A l'époque, le cabriolet aurait été encore dans sa peinture et sa sellerie d'origine, affichant 34 000 miles d'origine (54 720 km). Le châssis 1181 GT était par la suite proposé par le distributeur Marc Tauber et acheté en octobre 1987 par le passionné de la marque William Kontes. Il faisait procéder à une restauration extensive, avec une peinture de teinte noir profond, accompagnée d'un intérieur en cuir rouge avec tapis noirs. Dans cette livrée particulière, cette splendide Ferrari apparaissait en couverture du numéro de décembre 1991/janvier 1992 du magazine Cavallino, tout en étant le sujet d'un article sur les cabriolets Série 1, écrit par l'auteur automobile Ken Gross. A la fin de 1997, cette 250 GT bien entretenue était acquise par un passionné et ancien président du Concours d'Élégance de Pebble Beach, Glenn Mounger, de Bainbridge Island (Washington). M. Mounger engageait ce cabriolet plusieurs fois au prestigieux rallye Colorado Grand, au cours duquel ses copilotes incluaient son épouse et ses filles, ainsi que les collectionneurs connus Knox Kershaw et Ken Waltrip. Ayant conduit son cabriolet Pinin Farina Série 1 sur le rallye presque chaque année depuis son achat, Mounger était nommé en 2008 le Prime Motoring Fool, ce qui constituait la preuve qu'il avait profité de chaque minute passée au volant ! Lorsqu'il fut interrogé récemment à propos de ses sensations avec 1181 GT, M. Mounger a répondu avec entrain que la Ferrari était « de loin ma voiture préférée de celles que j'ai possédées. C'était vraiment une voiture fantastique...agile, réactive, un vrai plaisir à conduire ». En 2010, cette Ferrari 250 GT Série 1 Cabriolet était achetée par M. Steve Adler, qui continuait à présenter la voiture dans divers concours, prenant part lui aussi au Colorado Grand en 2010. Cette superbe Ferrari était ensuite acquise par son propriétaire actuel, un collectionneur avisé basé en Angleterre et qui, cherchant à enrichir la documentation de cette voiture, demandait une certification Ferrari Classiche. L'enviable Livre Rouge était publié le 11 septembre 2013, 66 ans jour pour jour après la date garantie de livraison de la voiture. Il est important de souligner que le Certificat d'Authenticité confirme que 1181 GT est encore équipée de son moteur V-12 Colombo, de sa boîte de vitesses, de ses suspensions et de sa carrosserie d'origine. Ce cabriolet châssis 1181 GT a été récemment repeint d'une élégante teinte bleu foncé et bénéficie d'un intérieur refait. C'est un exemplaire rare et saisissant de style harmonieux et de technique sportive, témoin de la collaboration entre Ferrari et Pinin Farina. La voiture est particulièrement intéressante car c'est le dernier cabriolet Série 1 qui présente les désirables phares couverts, sans oublier qu'il a été exposé au Salon de New York et qu'il est passé entre les mains de deux stars du sport automobile, William McKelvy et Bob Grossman. Cette 250 GT a été certifiée par Ferrari Classiche comme étant un exemplaire correct d'usine, à numéros concordants (matching-numbers). Elle représente une concurrente de choix pour les concours d'élégance internationaux comme Pebble Beach ou Villa d’Este, de même qu'une présence idéale au sein d'un rassemblement de Ferrari de route anciennes. Cet extraordinaire parangon de l'évolution des Ferrari découvrables affiche environ 50 583 miles (81 400 km), supposés d'origine, ce qui ne peut qu'inviter le futur propriétaire à profiter de l'excellent châssis 508D et du moteur 128D. Sans aucune équivoque, 1181 GT est un exemplaire extrêmement désirable de cabriolet Ferrari de Grand Tourisme du début de la production, et trouvera sa place dans toute collection de qualité. Chassis no. 1181 GT Engine no. 1181 GT

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2014-05-10
Hammer price
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1939 Horch 853A Special Roadster by Erdmann & Rossi

120 bhp, 4,944 cc inline overhead cam eight-cylinder engine, four-speed sliding gear synchromesh transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension via upper A-arms and lower twin transverse leaf springs and chassis lubrication system, fully independent rear suspension with half shafts and leaf springs, four-wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic drum brakes, and centrally controlled four-wheel hydraulic jacking system. Wheelbase: 135.8" Titled as 1939. • Pebble Beach Best of Show winner, with multiple other Best of Show wins • One of five built and three surviving of its kind • From the Collection of Joseph & Margie Cassini In the spring of 1896, 28-year-old August Horch saw his first motor car, a Benz, and immediately wrote Benz & Cie to inquire if the company might be able to utilize someone with his engineering and manufacturing experience. The reply was a positive one, and shortly thereafter, Horch was the plant manager, with 70 employees under him. Driven to accomplish more, he found independent financial backing and in 1899, founded A. Horch & Cie. His namesake vehicles were known for quality, even in their earliest days, and utilized the latest innovations, such as the new spray-jet carburetor, a transmission design with constant-mesh gears, and a two-cylinder engine of his own design. Horch cars participated in a number of reliability runs and races, acquiring quite a good reputation early on. By 1910, the company, however, was suffering from lagging sales and issues with malfunctions on cars entered in touring events. Horch found himself scapegoated and was forced out of his namesake company. Like Ransom Olds in the United States, Horch no longer had the right to use his name for another business concern and settled on the Latin translation of his name, Audi, which means “to listen,” for his new firm. The motor cars constructed by Audi Automobilwerk, m.g.H. had a good reputation and even outperformed the Horch in competition. However, a focus on only expensive, high-quality automobiles left the company in financial trouble, and Horch exited by 1920. The postwar financial crisis left most of the country’s manufacturing concern in disarray, and in 1932, four struggling auto companies from Saxony, Horch, DKW, Wanderer, and Audi, joined forces to become Auto Union, with four interlocking rings used as the logo. Shortly thereafter, in 1933, August Horch was reinstated as the head of the Horchwerke. Horch continued as a luxury car manufacturer; it had produced its first eight in 1927 and a twelve by 1930. In 1933, Horch launched the Type 830, followed by the 850 in 1934. The top Horch models were based on the fully-developed straight eight-cylinder engines and reached the absolute pinnacle between 1937 and 1940, with the type 853 and 951. The engine was now of five-liter capacity, and the 853 employed double-jointed rear axle shafts pioneered on the Porsche-designed Auto Union racing cars, providing fully independent De Dion rear type suspension. Front suspension consisted of an upper A-arm with the lower hub carried by a pair of transverse leaf springs. Vacuum-assisted hydraulic brakes were standard, as was a four-speed transmission with a lever-actuated overdrive that was usable in all four gears. The result was a highly advanced chassis for the time, and one that would not be matched by most other car manufacturers until well into the postwar years. Just as they were competitors on the track, with their team cars collectively known as the “Silver Arrows,” Horch and Mercedes-Benz also competed in the luxury market, and Horch decided to respond directly to the 540K. A design concept began, and a wooden model was built to assess the Horch Special Roadster. The decision was made to go ahead, and the construction of the car was undertaken by the factory works in Malan, Germany. The car was shown briefly but not initially sold, as plans to supercharge the car were contemplated. Ultimately, the straight eight engine was deemed sufficient for the car, and plans to supercharge it were abandoned. Although not supercharged like its rivals, the 853 models do have overdrive, which closes the performance gap. A second car was then produced. Built to the same model, it was similar in appearance to the first car, but the body of this car was built by prominent Berlin coachbuilders Erdmann and Rossi, established in 1898. These first two cars are considered the “First Series” cars. They are both based closely on the design concept and are virtually identical to each other, with both surviving in long-term ownership. The “Second Series” of cars built had more modern coachwork, with elegant flowing lines and pontoon-shaped wings. Five of these cars were built, three of which are known to survive today. The first example was built for Herman Göring and was fitted with a bulletproof windscreen, but at the same time, Mercedes-Benz built a 540K Special Roadster for Göring, fitted with bulletproof doors and glass, as well as the windscreen. The self-preservationist Göring chose the Mercedes and his semi-bulletproof Horch was ordered to be dismantled. Another example, probably the last built of the Second Series, remains unaccounted for, leaving just three cars surviving. Detail is important to consider when comparing the Horch Special Roadsters to their competition from Sindelfingen. Although the 540K Special Roadsters were considered one-off examples, the variance in detail between the approximately 25 examples built is minimal, and the coachwork was supplied by the factory. Conversely, only eight Horch Special Roadsters of all types were built. The prototype was factory bodied, but subsequent examples were clothed by independent coachbuilders Erdmann & Rossi and, in the case of the last example, Glaser. Although three examples of the Second Series Special Roadsters survive, each one is truly unique. Some have the “sweep panel” in the body sides; at least two were built with the beautiful louvered rear fender skirts, while others had no skirts at all. At least two cars had the blade style bumpers seen on this car, while others had traditional Horch 853 style bumpers. Similarly, at least three different interior patterns exist; all of this is documented in original photographs, many of which are found in Rupert Stuhlemmer’s book The Coachwork of Erdmann & Rossi. Due to the bespoke nature of these cars, the purchase price of a Horch Special Roadster was significantly higher than the cost of a production 540K Special Roadster. Additionally, Horch was extremely selective in allowing clients to buy its products; having payment in full did not guarantee a prospective one of these automobiles. The background and place in society of the prospective purchaser was considered, and it was required that the purchaser demonstrate that they had a minimum of 100,000 Deutschmarks in the bank, making these cars not only extremely rare in period, but probably the most difficult of any car to acquire new. Offered from the collection of Joseph and Margie Cassini is the most prominent of the three remaining Second Series Special Roadsters, commission number 3164. This car was brought to the United States after the Second World War by a returning serviceman, who opened a filling station in Cleveland, Ohio. He began dismantling the car with the intention of restoring it and like so many similar instances, the dream was never realized. In the late-1960s, collector Herbert von Fragstein began seeking one of the Special Roadsters and learned of the existence of 3164. After several years of letter writing and visits, he was successful in acquiring the car in 1973. Like the gentleman before him, von Fragstein did not commence the restoration; although, he did manage to acquire a number of original parts, which were to aid its eventual refurbishment. The Horch was acquired in 2001 by noted collector Joseph Cassini. When reflecting on the opportunity to acquire the car he relates, “I was familiar with the Special Roadster owned by Dr. Charles Key in Texas. It was a beautiful car, and I saw this example as an opportunity to take a diamond in the rough and realize its true potential.” He commissioned RM Auto Restoration to return the car to concours condition, which was the start of a two-year journey. The restoration began with a thorough inventory and dismantling, which proved the car to be remarkably complete. It was stripped down to the bare chassis, where every component was disassembled, inspected, cleaned, and refastened all the way down to the hydraulic jacking system. Even the wooden frame was totally taken apart, and again, each piece was inspected and cleaned. Although some of the ash framing in the lower portions required replacement, a remarkable amount of the original wood was saved. Restoration specialist Don McLellan notes the many hours of research that was conducted to make sure all aspects of the project were completed correctly. He also notes, “As we disassembled each component, you could really see the quality of engineering that whet into every piece. The chassis itself is massive and strong, as it was intended to be.” The steel and aluminum alloy body was, overall, in very good shape. Some areas required repair, and great pains were taken to save as much of the original coachwork as possible. The drivetrain was complete and thoroughly rebuilt. The fit and finish of every mechanical and cosmetic component was painstakingly researched, and two separate trips were made to Germany to photograph other original examples. McLellan also notes that previous owner von Fragstein was a huge help, because he had a lot of technical knowledge, had acquired many parts over the years, and had many contacts familiar with the marque. When it came time to choose livery, Cassini relates, “Making the final decisions regarding paint and interior were the most difficult. We went over a number of color combinations and spray outs before making a final decision.” The colors ultimately chosen were this period-correct shade of silver accented with a subtle grey two-tone. By the time the car was prepared for display, over 12,000 hours had been invested in perfection. No volume of words can adequately convey the emotion stirred at the sight of this spectacular Special Roadster. When closely observing this rolling sculpture, it is amazing to consider the delicate balance of the myriad of fine details. The use of chrome is restrained, led by the single blade-style bumper, which is followed by the radiator surround and a delicate latticework of trim that adorns the peaks of the fenders and also runs down the length of the center and sides of the hood, accenting the endless array of louvers. The hood trim continues to the cowl and into the windshield frame, while another piece continues down the length of the body, under the wide, low-slung belt molding on the doors, and wraps around the rear of the body. At the same time, a subtle sweep panel emerges from the cowl and gently tapers down towards the rear of the door. Everywhere, the mastery of the craftsmen at Erdmann and Rossi can be seen, as there is hardly any piece of sheet metal that does not have a hand-hammered compound curve. Other fine elements include the chromed bezels that surround the holes where the bumper mounts through to the front sheet metal, as well as the ornamental fluted louvers on the fender skirts, which have a chromed deco Horch logo at the center. A look at the passenger compartment lends the impression that it was designed and crafted by a jeweler instead of an automobile firm. The leather and alligator upholstery is complemented with deeply varnished Circassian burled walnut veneer on the door trim and dash, and it is interesting to note that the natural grain of the wood elegantly wraps around the centrally located speedometer, in addition to the fully fitted headliner in the convertible top, which was only available in the finest luxury automobiles. Again, all of the smaller pieces are adorned by a small amount of chrome, including handles, bezels, and even the cast pedals, which are also imprinted with the Horch logo. The Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance is unquestionably regarded as the most prestigious automotive gathering in the world. Joseph and Margie Cassini knew they had a special car, but assumptions regarding the outcome of that August day in 2004 were restrained. When class awards were announced, it dawned on everyone involved that the coveted Best of Show was within reach. The Cassinis were elated, as was the entire RM restoration team. McLellan notes the strong relationship that had been formed by the RM staff with the Cassinis throughout the two year endeavor, “The Pebble Beach win was very special because of the relationship that had been built during the restoration. It was like a family collaboration.” Says Judge Cassini, who has owned over 50 examples of the best marques on the planet, “I’ve had some really outstanding cars—but the Horch is at the top of the pile, and it is also very functional.” He notes that when returning from the Meadow Brook tour with his wife, it was an extremely hot day, and they decided to take the interstate back instead of back roads. The Horch performed wonderfully and kept up with the fast pace of traffic effortlessly. Subsequent concours wins include the New York City Concours in 2005, Meadow Brook in 2006, the Glenmore Gathering in 2008, Ault Park in 2009, and most recently, Greenwich in 2012. The Cassinis have fully completed a decade-long journey and thoughtfully chosen to share their example with a new caretaker. It is, arguably, not only the best example of the marque but also one of the finest European cars of the period. Chassis no. 854275 Engine no. 852006 Commission no. 3164

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-08-17
Hammer price
Show price

1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster

Estimate: €4,720,000 - €5,810,000 Estimate: $6,500,000 - $8,000,000 Engine No. 154086 Commission No. 237938 Registration No. DYX 911 From the Collection of Mr. Bernie Ecclestone Specifications: 115/180bhp, 5,401cc overhead valve inline eight-cylinder engine with driver activated and gear driven Rootes type supercharger, twin updraft pressurized carburettors, four-speed transmission with synchromesh on third and a dog clutch on fourth, independent wishbone coil front suspension, independent swing arm rear suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 129.5in. ( 3,290mm). The Mercedes-Benz 540K was the master of the road and everything on it. Mercedes-Benz commanded a place as the premier supplier of fine motor cars to the political, artistic, and commercial aristocracy. While the company’s emphasis was on luxury and quality, the 540K combined the ultimate expression of those qualities with nearly unparalleled performance. It brought all the skills, experience, talent, and management ability that had made the combined Mercedes-Benz enterprise the premier car builder in Germany. Enjoying the enthusiastic support of the German government, Mercedes-Benz was encouraged to build cars that were the equal of any in the world and were as impressive and imposing in appearance as they were in performance. The Mercedes-Benz 540K was the culmination of the company’s motor vehicle development before World War II. The Evolution of the 540K Mercedes-Benz has been called the ‘engineer’s car company’, and although beauty was never forgotten, the souls of the machines were always much more than skin deep. No other car manufacturer has so consistently led the field, literally from the very beginning of the industry. Credited with the first production motor car, the company has been in production longer than any other. Steadily improving products meant that by the first decade of the 20th century, chain driven Mercedes racing cars were a dominant force around the world. On the street, the massive 90-hp cars had no equal for sheer power, speed, and elegance. By 1922, a 6-litre engine with the Porsche-designed supercharger was married to a shortened wheelbase. The result was considered the fastest touring car of its day, producing an outstanding – for the day – 160 hp with supercharger engaged. The S series followed, soon developed into the SS and SSK models. More than any other, it was this series of supercharged six-cylinder cars that established Mercedes-Benz’s reputation internationally. In its fully developed form, the supercharged 7.1-litre engine of the SSK could reach a staggering 300 hp, powering lightweight streamlined coachwork to an unheard of 147 mph. The overwhelming performance of the SSK model resulted in many victories for Mercedes-Benz. Perhaps the most important of these were Rudolf Carraciola’s wins at the 1931 Mille Miglia and German Grand Prix. By the late twenties, the S, SS, and ultimately the SSK chassis were proving to be the engineering masterpieces of the time. Few today remember that it was Dr Ferdinand Porsche who developed the dominant characteristic of the engines – their superchargers. Responsible for all engineering for Daimler from 1924 until 1929, he laid the foundation upon which the eight-cylinder cars would be built. Following the merger between Daimler and Benz in 1926, and some resulting consolidation over the next two or three years, a brilliant young engineer named Hans Nibel joined the company. He was named joint Chief Engineer, along with Dr Porsche, before being named Technical Director of Daimler-Benz AG in 1929 after Dr Porsche’s resignation. It was under Nibel’s direction that the eight-cylinder cars were designed. Although it is difficult today to guess at the motivation at the time, it seems fair to suggest that the SS had been successful not only on the track but in the coachbuilder’s galleries. The factory coachworks at Sindelfingen had already earned a reputation for top-quality workmanship – perhaps the best in Europe. Luxurious, well-trimmed, and smartly designed, they were well suited to a top calibre chassis. Clearly, there was more money to be made in catering to the carriage trade, and that probably triggered the desire for a more refined chassis – albeit one that would preserve Mercedes-Benz’s reputation for engineering excellence. The first result, introduced in 1933, was the 380, a supercharged overhead valve inline eight-cylinder engine. Power output was modest, at 90 bhp naturally aspirated or 120 bhp with blower engaged, but its refinement and smoothness made the potential clear. 157 chassis were built with the attractive Sindelfingen coachwork. Performance, while acceptable, was not outstanding, particularly with the heavier coachwork resulting from customer demand for even more luxurious bodies. Recognizing the need for more power, in 1934 Mercedes-Benz introduced the 500K (‘K’ for ‘Kompressor’– German for ‘supercharger’). With power increased to 100 bhp or 160 bhp with the supercharger engaged, the cars were finally among the fastest grand touring cars of the time. Even though the 380 had been supercharged, the K designation and new external exhaust left no doubt about the car’s very special chassis. 342 cars had been built before the introduction of the 5.4-litre 540K in 1936. Although similar in many respects to the 500K, the new model offered even more power: 115 bhp naturally aspirated, or an impressive 180 bhp with the blower engaged. A 12 inch increase in wheelbase to 128 inches improved ride quality and gave the master coachbuilders at Sindelfingen more room to create even longer and more elegant lines. According to Jan Melin in his book Supercharged Mercedes-Benz 8, just 419 540K chassis were built before production ended in 1940. A total of 11 catalogued body styles were created for the 540K and carried out by Sindelfingen, each one a masterpiece of the coachbuilder’s art. Based on a strong and rigid chassis these pioneering cars introduced coil spring four-wheel independent suspension using parallel wishbones at the front and swing axles at the rear. They featured synchromesh on the top three gears of their four-speed gearboxes, 12 volt electrical systems, central lubrication, and vacuum-assisted hydraulic brakes. These exceptional high-speed cars owed little to the S, SS, and SSK machines of the twenties except one glorious attribute: each was fitted with Mercedes-Benz’s driver-controlled supercharger that boosted engine output by about 60 per cent in short full power bursts. The Special Roadsters The ultimate Mercedes-Benz 540K was the Special Roadster. Exceptional at the time, the 540K Special Roadster has subsequently firmly established itself at the pinnacle of classic cars. It was priced at 28,000 Reichsmarks (about $12,000 at the prevailing exchange rate; the New York importer, Mitropa Motors, asked $14,000 landed in the US – about 40 per cent more than the most expensive catalogue bodied Cadillac V-16). The 540K Special Roadster is an awe-inspiring blend of size, performance, and style, possessed of a commanding presence that is palpable in any surroundings. Constructed on a nearly 130 inch wheelbase chassis and stretching fully 171/2 feet overall, the Special Roadster effectively accommodates only two passengers. Yet the Sindelfingen designers have succeeded in blending its elements so skilfully that its proportions are harmonious. One of the Special Roadster’s defining characteristics is the gently sloping Mercedes-Benz radiator that is tucked back behind the front wheels’ centre-line between sweeping front wings. The wings then dominate the long hood before gently and voluptuously curving up to create the rear wings, which in turn flow delicately into the tail. Subtle bright accents complement and outline the form of the body elements, punctuated by functional and styling details that draw the eye and mitigate the effect of the 540K Special Roadster’s size. Two massive exhaust pipes emerge from the bonnet’s right side and disappear into the wing, like the scaled coils of a legendary serpent lurking below the bonnet’s surface prepared to devour lesser cars. These were cars built to impress, but to do so with impeccable taste. The Special Roadster’s imposing presence is almost matched by its impressive performance. The stiff frame and fully independent suspension supports its 2ton mass effortlessly, soaking up irregularities in byways and at its best showing the 540K’s relaxed 85mph cruising speed on the highway. Mercedes-Benz fitted a camber compensator spring to the 540K to offset the swing axle independent rear suspension’s tendency to sudden camber changes, and the resulting driving experience is balanced and satisfying. This is no sports car, but for two people to cover vast distances on good highways it is nearly unmatched. It is the sudden burst of power when the supercharger is engaged by fully depressing the throttle pedal that tests both the driver and the 540K chassis. The sudden shriek of the blower’s 7 psi boost pressure unmasks the dragon within the 540K’s engine compartment, adding 65 hp at 3400 rpm. Mercedes-Benz chose to pressurize the carburettor on its supercharged cars, so the howl of gears, the blower itself, and the scream of air being squeezed is unmuffled, creating a siren’s roar that clears the 540K’s path with alacrity. Even fitted with a standard intake silencer, at full song a 540K will never be likened to a wraith or phantom but to the wailing of banshees. Without a doubt, of the 406 examples built during the 540K’s production life from 1936 to 1939 the most dominant were the Special Roadsters – designed and executed to the highest standards in Mercedes-Benz’s own Karosserie in Sindelfingen. Only 26 540K Special Roadsters were built. Chassis No. 154086 The exceptional example offered here was delivered through Mercedes-Benz UK in 1937 to Sir John Chubb, of the lock family. One of the most striking variations on the Special Roadster theme, it is the high-door, long-tail version with exposed spare wheels and tyres built into the rear deck. With its top secured below the carefully fitted metal top boot cover, the profile is long and sweeping, an elegant, dynamic, and imposing presentation that instantly set its owner/driver apart from all others on the road. Sir John, however, must have been more than a little annoyed when the gathering clouds of war made owning a fabulous but also ostentatious Mercedes-Benz less than popular in Great Britain. Fortunately it appears that he put his 540K Special Roadster away for the duration of hostilities, thus preserving this magnificent car. It was acquired in the early fifties by Edward Gaylord and was refurbished for him by Mercedes-Benz. In 1956 it was acquired by the noted American designer and pioneer collector of great cars Brook Stevens, and was displayed in his museum in Wisconsin for some 30 years. At some point, the car was converted from its original UK right-hand drive specification to left drive configuration. The quality of the workmanship suggests that the conversion may have been carried out by the factory, perhaps by Gaylord or Stevens. It was next acquired by the late Noel Thompson, a highly respected New England collector. Thompson commissioned a stunning nut and bolt professional restoration, which was completed in the mid-1980s; the car was subsequently given an Antique Automobile Club of America National First Place award in 1987. In the late 1980s, Noel Thompson succumbed to the pressure exerted by another well-known New England collector, Speedway owner Bob Bahre, who displayed the car at Pebble Beach in 1988, where it earned a well-deserved first in class award. By 1990, the car was in the hands of Jerry Sauls, a well-known east coast collector and dealer. During his ownership, he showed the car at a Classic Car Club of America Grand National meet, where it was awarded its National Senior National First Place badge (no.1270). 154086 became part of the Ecclestone Collection in 1995, with duties paid in the United Kingdom. The original UK registration, DYX 911, has been recovered through the collection’s efforts. Condition Much mechanical and set-up work has been performed since the car’s return to the UK, including an extensive refreshing and service with T. E. Berrisford in 2004 and continuing work and attention by the Ecclestone Collection staff; it is now in sound and drivable condition as well as being very well presented. Although the restoration of this outstanding 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster is now effectively 20 years old, the car remains in very good overall condition. While it might not win trophies on the modern concours circuit, it is still very presentable. Panel fits are quite good, although the paintwork shows minor evidence of use and age, with a few edge chips around the movable panels, and small areas of texture and shrinkage as well as minor bubbling. The chrome and brightwork appear as new, although there are areas of waviness on the radiator shell and trim strips. The radiator core finish is a little coarse for a car of this calibre, and Berrisford’s report indicates that re-coring might be advisable if a new owner anticipates long-distance driving. The tyres appear to be virtually new. All lighting including the headlights, centre-mounted driving light, and marker lights are all the correct Bosch units. The upholstery is older but fits well and is in excellent condition, as is the all but irreplaceable mother of pearl instrument panel insert and the steering wheel. The dashboard switch handles are older and may well be original. The engine compartment and undercarriage have been restored to concours condition – as shown by this car’s Pebble Beach win and AACA and CCCA Senior First Place awards. The engine has been serviced and adjusted by Berrisford, with extensive attention to cleaning and servicing the fuel system and to cleaning and adjusting the supercharger clutch so it now runs as it should. The brakes and chassis also were serviced, tightened generally, and set up. Summary With an important history of first delivery in Great Britain, a Pebble Beach-quality restoration, and recent mechanical refreshment and set-up, this is a showcase car of the highest quality throughout. 70 years after it emerged from the Mercedes-Benz Karosserie at Sindelfingen its visual effect is still immediately arresting, even among gatherings of the finest coachbuilt cars of the thirties and forties. Mercedes-Benz built just 406 of the exclusive 540K models. Only 26 of them were the sleek, luxurious, powerful, imposing Special Roadsters like the exceptional example offered here. They are quite simply the rarest and most beautiful cars of their kind. This most powerful, beautiful, and imposing Mercedes-Benz of the classic era still has the grandeur to stop traffic by looks alone – then leave it far behind as the howl of its supercharger fades into the distance. Addendum Please note that this lot is titled by the engine number. Chassis no. 4086

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2007-10-31
Hammer price
Show price

1959 Ferrari 410 Superamerica Series III Coupe by Pinin Farina

One of just 12 Series III 410 Superamericas produced Factory covered headlights, unique taillights, and rear fenders Formerly owned by Peter van Gerbig and George and Rosella Wamser Matching-numbers engine and gearbox Prominently featured in Dyke W. Ridgley’s Ferrari 410 Superamerica Series III The ultimate road-going Ferrari of the Jet Age THE MOST POWERFUL ROAD-GOING FERRARIS OF THEIR ERA There were Ferraris . . . and then there were Ferraris. Enzo Ferrari always wanted to build a few very exclusive grand touring models for very famous and ultra-wealthy clientele. Constructed in several series, in very limited numbers and most frequently bodied by Ferrari’s favorite carrozzeria, Pinin Farina (known as Pininfarina beginning in 1961), along with Mario Boano and Ghia, the Superamericas were truly the ultimate Ferraris and were nearly all coupes, attracting an exclusive client list. Noted American industrialists and businessmen like Bob Wilkie, William Doheny, and Bill Harrah were Superamerica owners. Royal customers included the Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlevi, and Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands. Wealthy Italian clientele like ‘Pasta King’ Pietro Barilla and Johnny Walker spirits importer Dottore Enrico Wax headed a list of prominent Europeans who favored the unique and prestigious cars from Modena. Individually tailored, as Ferrari historian Dean Batchelor said, they incorporated “many detail differences which enhanced their exclusivity.” Traveling in a Superamerica was traveling in style, Batchelor wrote. “The owners knew it, and all who saw the car knew it, which is what the owners wanted them to know.” CHASSIS NUMBER 1305 SA: A UNIQUE TREASURE This 410 Superamerica was essentially a modern coachbuilt car, with, in its Series III iteration, a powerful, 4.9-liter, 400-bhp, race-derived, Lampredi V-12 engine. Completed in May 1959, chassis number 1305 SA was the 25th 410 Superamericas built and the 4th of a dozen Series III models produced. As was typical of these bespoke super-coupes, it boasts several special features, including the desirable competition-style covered headlamps, as well as unique rear fenders with one-off taillights. The original color scheme was Nero Tropicale over Naturale leather. The car was sold through the official Swiss Ferrari dealer Garage de Montchoisy SA of Geneva to Mr. Griffin, an American residing in the city at the time. It was subsequently stored for several years in a Geneva parking garage before being sold to its second owner, Hans U. Maag of Renens, in 1970. Shortly thereafter it was sold through Rob de la Rive Box to well-known American Ferrari connoisseur, Richard Merritt, then to Tom Viltner of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, and in 1976 to John Hajduk of Chicago. Mr. Hajduk’s Motorkraft of Bensenville, Illinois, completed a full restoration in dark British Racing Green with yellow striping, the same color scheme in which the car is seen today. Afterwards it was sold to John Vernon of Vail, Colorado. In 1978 the car was purchased by Peter van Gerbig of Hillsborough, California. Mr. van Gerbig was a member of one of New York City’s oldest and most socially prominent families, and was an avid motorist and customer in good standing of both Ferrari and Rolls-Royce, ordering several unique examples of each over the years. Mr. van Gerbig maintained the 410 Superamerica for four years before selling it to longtime, beloved Ferrari Club of America members, George and Rosella Wamser of Bloomington, Illinois. The Wamsers treasured their 410 Superamerica and enjoyed it for nearly two decades, during which time it was regularly used and seen at Midwestern FCA meets. It was also prominently featured in their good friend Dyke W. Ridgley’s famous book on the model, Ferrari 410 Superamerica Series III (pp. 40–41). Following the brief ownership of noted collector and vintage racer Dennis Machul, the 410 Superamerica joined the collection of its present owners in the late 1990s and has remained largely out of sight ever since. It retains its original numbers-matching engine and chassis, as well as the original gearbox and rear axle. Much of the original Hajduk restoration, seen in Mr. Ridgley’s book, remains intact, with a wonderful patina now about it, especially regarding the thick, comfortable leather seats. The car had recorded 57,305 miles at the time of cataloguing, and would undoubtedly be a superb choice to be driven and enjoyed with great enthusiasm, just as in the tradition of its caring previous owners. Chassis no. 1305 SA Engine no. 1305 SA Gearbox no. 4 SA Body no. 15823

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1964 Ferrari 250LM

The ex-Jochen Rindt, Austrian Grand Prix winning, Chassis # 5845 Engine # 5845 Design: Pininfarina Coachwork: Scaglietti Specifications: 320bhp, 3,300cc overhead camshaft, alloy block and head V-12 engine with six twin choke Weber 38 DCN carburettors and dry sump lubrication, five speed non-synchromesh gearbox, four wheel independent suspension via wishbones, coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, and four wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400mm (94.5 in.) The 250 LM is a legendary Ferrari. Although it had its share of victories – as well as disappointments – on the track, it has come to symbolize so much of what was right, and wrong, with both Ferrari and the authorities governing sports car racing during this dynamic period. The story of the 250 LM begins with the legendary 250 GTO. The GTO’s competitors argued bitterly that the car did not meet the homologation requirements that 100 examples or more be built. They were right, of course – but Enzo Ferrari had another trick up his sleeve. He argued that the 250 GTO was nothing more than a variant of the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, of which more than enough cars had certainly been built. It was a clever argument, and persuasive enough (especially when it was accompanied by the fear that the crowd’s favourite red cars might otherwise not participate). The rest is history, of course, and the 250 GTO was a formidable weapon on the track, earning well more than its share of victories for the Scuderia Ferrari, and the many privateers who also campaigned the astonishingly quick berlinetta. By 1962, however, it was becoming clear that the 250 GTO was aging, and that remaining competitive would require something completely new. Starting in 1961, Ferrari began experimenting with an entirely new type of car with the engine in the back. A series of V-6 and V-8 prototypes named “Dino” after Ferrari’s late son were developed, and their early success seemed to show that Ferrari was on the right track. In essence, the new layout provided better-balanced weight distribution, and by positioning the engine over the driving wheels traction was improved as well. While chassis development was underway, a variety of new engines were also in process. It was at this time, however that the infamous “palace revolt” took place. Several of Ferrari’s leading engineers left the company in a dispute over a variety of issues. Enzo Ferrari may not have been the easiest man to work for, but the same stubborn character was probably responsible for a large part of his success – he knew what it took to win, and he knew what the public wanted, and he was seldom wrong. In any event, when Enzo Ferrari learned that Ing. Carlo Chiti, one of the engineers who had left that fateful day was developing a V-8 engine for ATS, he immediately cancelled Ferrari’s V-8 project, and ordered that his tried and true Colombo-designed single overhead cam V-12 be used instead. The result was the 250P. Completely new in appearance, it also incorporated a rear mounted transaxle and a dry sump version of the venerable V-12 engine. Oil and coolant radiators were front mounted, and the conventional tube frame chassis was arranged such that four of the tubes were pressed into service as coolant and oil lines. The 250P enjoyed considerable success, including the ultimate motor racing achievement – victory at Le Mans. In 1963, Scarfiotti and Bandini brought their 250P home in first place; they were followed by a second 250P, which finished in third place. Even the intervening position went to Ferrari, with a 250 GTO ensuring a 1-2-3 finish for the Cavallino Rampante. The domination was complete when the red cars also took 4th, 5th, and 6th as well. With a replacement for the 250 GTO now due, the easiest solution was to put a roof on the 250P. Pininfarina accepted the assignment and the result was the unconventional but undeniably pretty 250 Le Mans Berlinetta, or 250 LM. The only hurdle remaining was homologation in the GT class. Enzo Ferrari thought his earlier trick would work again, and he told the FIA that the new 250 LM was a variant of the 250 GTO. Even the car’s name was part of the strategy. Given that all but the first prototype were fitted with the 3.3L version of the Colombo V-12, the car should, by Ferrari convention, have been called the 275 LM. Unfortunately, it was all in vain, as even the FIA could not be convinced that the radically new sports car with its rear engine, transaxle, and all new bodywork was in any way related to the GTO. As a result, the FIA refused the 250 LM homologation status and the cars were required to run in the much more competitive prototype classes. Nonetheless, their record is exceptional. In total, the 1964 cars would enter more than 50 races, winning more than a dozen of them outright – along with many other podium finishes. Notable examples included races at Snetterton, the Coppa Intereuropa, the Kyalami GP, and Elkhart Lake. Drivers notching victories in the LM included Roy Salvadori, Nino Vaccarelli, Willy Mairesse, and David Piper. This lot is EC taxes paid and originates from the UK Proof of European taxes paid - American certificate of title Ferrari Classiche Certification Package ITALIANTEXT L’ex Jochen Rindt, vincitore del Gran Premio d’Austria, Motore # 5845 Disegno: Pininfarina Carrozzeria: Scaglietti Specifiche: Motore V-12 a camme in testa, testa e blocco in lega, con 320 CV di potenza, 3.300 cm3 di cilindrata, sei carburatori Weber 38 DCN a doppio corpo e lubrificazione a carter secco, cambio non sincronizzato a cinque rapporti, sospensioni indipendenti sulle quattro ruote a bracci trasversali, molle elicoidali e ammortizzatori telescopici, freni a disco sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2.400 mm La 250 LM è una Ferrari leggendaria. Malgrado avesse conquistato in pista la sua buona dose di vittorie, nonché di dispiaceri, divenne il simbolo di ciò che vi era di giusto e di sbagliato in casa Ferrari. La storia della 250 LM ha inizio con la leggendaria 250 GTO. Le concorrenti della GTO argomentarono aspramente che la vettura non rispettava i requisiti di omologazione che prevedevano di produrre 100 o più esemplari. Ovviamente avevano ragione, Enzo Ferrari aveva un altro asso nella manica. Dichiarò che la 250 GTO non era altro che una variante della 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, vettura della quale erano certamente stati prodotti un numero più che sufficiente di esemplari. Fu un’argomentazione intelligente e abbastanza convincente (soprattutto perché accompagnata dalla paura che la rossa preferita dalle folle avrebbe potuto non partecipare). Il resto è storia, ovviamente, e la 250 GTO si rivelò un’arma formidabile in pista, conquistando una sostanziosa fetta di vittorie per la Scuderia Ferrari e per i tanti team privati che parteciparono con la velocissima berlinetta. Tuttavia, nel 1962 fu evidente che la 250 GTO stava invecchiando e che ci voleva qualcosa di completamente nuovo per rimanere competitivi. A partire dal 1961, la Ferrari iniziò a sperimentare con un tipo di vettura totalmente nuovo, con motore montato sul retro. Fu sviluppata una serie di prototipi V-6 e V-8 con il nome “Dino”, in onore del figlio più giovane di Ferrari; il successo registrato in un primo momento da questi prototipi sembrò dimostrare che la Ferrari fosse sulla buona strada. In sostanza, la nuova configurazione prevedeva una distribuzione del peso più bilanciata. Inoltre, anche la trazione fu migliorata posizionando il motore sulle ruote motrici. Mentre il telaio era in fase di sviluppo, anche una serie di nuovi motori era in corso di studio. Tuttavia, fu proprio in quel periodo che si verificò la tristemente famosa rivolta. Diversi ingegneri di spicco della Ferrari lasciarono l’azienda in seguito ad una controversia. Forse lavorare per Enzo Ferrari non era semplicissimo, ma probabilmente fu proprio il suo carattere caparbio a decretare in gran parte il suo successo: sapeva cosa serviva per vincere, sapeva cosa voleva il pubblico e raramente si sbagliava. In ogni caso, quando Enzo Ferrari fu informato che l’Ing. Carlo Chiti, uno degli ingegneri che lasciarono l’azienda in quel fatidico giorno, stava sviluppando un motore V-8 per l'ATS, cancellò immediatamente il progetto del V-8 Ferrari e ordinò che al suo posto fosse utilizzato il collaudato e fedele motore V-12, disegnato da Colombo. Il risultato fu la 250P. Completamente nuova nell’estetica, la vettura era dotata di un cambio montato posteriorimente e della versione del motore V-12 con lubrificazione a carter secco. I radiatori dell’olio e dell’impianto di raffreddamento erano montati anteriormente. Il tradizionale telaio tubolare fu progettato in modo tale che quattro dei suoi tubi fungessero da condotti per l’olio e per il liquido refrigerante. La 250P riscosse un notevole successo, incluso il massimo risultato possibile nelle corse automobilistiche, ossia vincere la Le Mans. Nel 1963, Scarfiotti e Bandini condussero la loro 250P alla conquista del primo posto, seguiti da una seconda 250P che si classificò terza. Anche la posizione intermedia andò alla Ferrari, con una 250 GTO che completò la tripletta del cavallino rampante. Il dominio fu completo quando le rosse conquistarono anche il 4°, 5° e 6° posto. Quando si rese necessario sostituire la 250 GTO, la soluzione più semplice fu montare un tetto sulla 250P. Pininfarina accettò l’incarico e il risultato fu la non convenzionale, ma innegabilmente affascinante 250 Le Mans Berlinetta, o 250 LM. Ora l’unico ostacolo era l’omologazione per la classe GT. Enzo Ferrari pensò che il suo vecchio trucco avrebbe funzionato anche questa volta e disse alla FIA che la nuova 250 LM era una variante della 250 GTO. Persino il nome della vettura faceva parte della strategia. Dato che tutte le vetture, tranne il primo prototipo, furono dotate della versione da 3,3L del motore V-12 di Colombo, la vettura avrebbe dovuto chiamarsi, come da tradizione Ferrari, 275 LM. Purtroppo gli sforzi furono vani, poiché la FIA non si convinse del fatto che la nuovissima sportiva, con motore e cambio montati sul retro e telaio totalmente, fosse in qualche modo legata alla GTO. Di conseguenza, la FIA rifiutò di omologare la 250 LM e le vetture furono utilizzate nelle gare per prototipi. Ciò nonostante, i risultati di queste vetture furono eccezionali. In totale, nel 1964 le vetture parteciparono a più di 50 gare, vincendone più di una dozzina senza problemi e completandone molte altre con un podio. Esempi importanti di queste vittorie furono la gara di Snetterton, la Coppa Intereuropa, il GP di Kyalami e la Elkhart Lake. Tra i piloti che collezionarono alcune di queste vittorie con la LM ricordiamo Roy Salvadori, Nino Vaccarelli, Willy Mairesse e David Piper. Documento d'importazione britannico - Titolo americano Certificazione Ferrari Classiche. Addendum This lot is an addition to the catalogue and is sold with an estimate of €4,200,000 - €4,800,000. It originates from the UK and is sold with proof of European taxes paid and American certificate of title. Furthermore, the car will have to be returned to Ferrari Classiche for minor cosmetics and some chassis adjustments. All costs will be paid by the Vendor Chassis no. 5845

  • ITAItaly
  • 2008-05-18
Hammer price
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1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder avec hard-top d'usine

1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder avec hard-top d'usine Châssis n° 1283GT Moteur n°1283GT Internal n°0326D - Provenance unique et fantastique - Modèle mythique, matching numbers, phares carénés - Grande rareté, un des 47 exemplaires, la 22e construite - La California de Roger Vadim - Ancienne collection Jean-Claude Bajol C'est cette même voiture, qui a fait tourner les têtes entre les mains d'un des play-boys les plus célèbres de la Côte, que nous avons le plaisir de présenter ici. Avec la 250, le destin de Ferrari va changer. De constructeur marginal, il va prendre une dimension industrielle et acquérir l'aura mondiale qu'on lui connaît aujourd'hui. Autour du fameux V12 3 litres, dont les qualités de puissance et de souplesse ne sont plus à démontrer, naissent deux familles d'automobiles : des Ferrari exclusivement destinées à la piste, et d'autres plutôt réservées à un usage routier et offrant donc un confort et un équipement dont étaient jusque là dépourvues les voitures de la marque. La branche course donnera naissance à des légendes sur roues comme les Testa Rossa, berlinettes Tour de France, 250 GTO ou 250 LM alors que la famille des voitures de route produira de merveilleux coupés ou cabriolets que se disputeront stars, sportifs de haut niveau et gros industriels. Mais ce qui caractérise aussi le constructeur de Maranello, ce sont les "passerelles" constantes qui relient les deux familles, et qui fait que les voitures de route ne sont jamais très loin de la piste... Le spyder 250 GT California est le fruit de ce mariage idéal. En effet, alors que le cabriolet 250 GT Pinin Farina est directement dérivé du coupé grand tourisme, le spyder California s'appuie sur les berlinettes destinées à la compétition. A tel point d'ailleurs que, sur un dessin magistral de Pinin Farina, il est carrossé chez Scaglietti, à qui Ferrari confie la réalisation de ses voitures de compétition. Le spyder reprend le même châssis de 2,60 m d'empattement que la berlinette Tour de France, son moteur offre des caractéristiques comparables et sa forme adopte le décrochement d'aile arrière caractéristique de la version fermée. Comme il est moins systématiquement orienté compétition, il accuse sur la balance quelques dizaines de kilos de plus que son homologue, mais reste malgré tout plus léger que le cabriolet. D'ailleurs, certains modèles plus spécialement préparés pour les joies du chronomètre vont se distinguer sur circuits : ainsi, Ginther et Hively terminent premiers de la catégorie Grand Tourisme et neuvièmes au classement général des 12 Heures de Sebring 1959 et Grossman et Tavano décrochent la cinquième place aux 24 Heures du Mans de la même année, au volant d'un spyder engagé par l'écurie du NART de l'enthousiaste Luigi Chinetti. Ledit Chinetti n'est d'ailleurs certainement pas étranger à l'appellation "California" du spyder 250 GT : d'origine milanaise, ami intime d'Enzo Ferrari, il participe largement et efficacement à la diffusion de Ferrari en Amérique du Nord, qui devient pour le constructeur italien un marché avec lequel le modèle va connaître une évolution parallèle à celle des versions compétition et un grand succès commercial auprès des plus exigeants amateurs fortunés. En tout, quarante sept exemplaires sont vendus en moins de deux ans dont curieusement 6 seulement en Californie. En réalité deux California de plus sont sorties des ateliers de Scaglietti à la même époque, un coupé " Boano " et un cabriolet Pinin Farina, rhabillés à la suite d'accidents. Et il convient bien sûr de ne pas oublier les 52 exemplaires sur châssis court qui ont pris la suite entre 1960 et 1962. Modèle exclusif et performant, le spyder California garde une place à part dans la production Ferrari, car il réalise une synthèse inégalé entre les qualités des modèles de piste et ceux de route, les deux voies sur lesquelles Ferrari a appuyé son succès planétaire. De plus les carrosseries cabriolet de la marque sont particulièrement rares dans la production Ferrari, ce qui explique son succès grandissant au fil des décennies faisant aujourd'hui de la California la plus chère des Ferrari routières. Sortie d'usine le 11 avril 1959, il s'agit de la 22e Ferrari California produite, prototype inclus. Peinte d'un vernis gris argent, elle est dotée d'une sellerie en cuir noir, d'une capote de toile noire, d'un hard-top et de phares carénés qui ont été préférés à l'option très récente des phares droits. Le Pubblico Registro de Modène indique que 1283GT a reçu sa première immatriculation, MO 51012, le 15 avril 1959 au nom de Franco Mattioli, domicilié à Sassuolo, commune voisine de Maranello. Manifestement, ce n'est pas ce jeune Emilien de 25 ans qui a payé les 5 millions et demi de lires portés à l'acte, mais il a dû agir comme prête-nom pour le compte de Roger Plemiannikow, alias Roger Vadim. Avec l'actrice danoise Annette Stroyberg, sa seconde épouse, ils roulent à peu près six ans, jusqu'en 1965, avec cette Ferrari sans changer les plaques italiennes. Vadim fait toutefois remplacer les freins à tambours par des disques en 1959, à l'usine, qui monte alors des freins Amadori, qui équipaient désormais les modèles produits fin 59. Puis il commande la nouvelle California à châssis court. Celle qui porte le numéro de châssis 2175GT lui est livrée début 1961 chez l'importateur Ferrari en Suisse, le garage Montchoisy, à Genève. Selon Marcel Massini, la California "longue" est revendue en 1965 par le même Garage Montchoisy à Georges Lang, un transporteur d'Annecy. La voiture est alors immatriculée dans le département de Haute-Savoie, 10 FY 74 et, entretemps, elle est devenue rouge Bordeaux. En 1967, Lang acquiert une Lamborghini Miura chez Atomic Garage, à Lyon, à qui il laisse la California en reprise. Un ami du vendeur se souvient bien l'y avoir vue en vente à 7.000 F, puis en 1973 dans un garage voisin du Pont-de-la-Caille, sur la route Annecy-Genève. Elle est retrouvée en 1993 et vendue à un grand marchand américain qui la fait transporter à Amsterdam pour l'exporter mais Jean Guikas la rachète alors qu'elle se trouve encore en douane et la ramène à Marseille où il la garde jusqu'en 1997. Lorsque Jean-Claude Bajol se rend compte qu'il s'agit en fait de la voiture de Vadim dont il rêvait depuis tant d'années, il fait immédiatement un chèque au négociant. Il entreprend alors une restauration complète à Modène jusque dans le moindre détail, y compris les cuirs refait par Luppi avec du cuir d'époque Ferrari. Bajol avait lui-même bien connu Roger Vadim lorsqu'il l'apercevait dans les rues de Paris au volant de la voiture de la vente. Bajol racontait d'ailleurs qu'il avait roulé avec Vadim en vue de lui acheter, mais à l'époque ses multiples tentatives restèrent vaines. Quarante ans après, il a pu réaliser son rêve pour la garer aux côtés de sa 250 TDF et des innombrables voitures de sa collection présentées ici. Cette Ferrari exceptionnelle combine tous les ingrédients qui font d'une une automobile une Œuvre d'Art: marque mythique, modèle rarissime, mécanique puissante et raffinée, matching numbers, dessin de toute beauté avec les très exclusifs et désirables phares carénés, signé d'un grand carrossier, utilisation facile, été comme hiver avec le hard-top d'usine et offrant d'enviables sensations de conduite, excellent état et, la qualité qui fait toute la différence, histoire suivie et provenance fascinante. Une rarissime opportunité. Carte grise française - Unique and extraordinary provenance - Mythical model, matching numbers, covered headlights - Extremely rare, one of 47 examples, the 22nt built - The Roger Vadim's California - factory hard-top - former Jean-Claude Bajol collection We are delighted to present here the very car that turned heads while in the hands of one of the most famous playboys from the South of France. Ferrari's destiny was changed by the 250. Starting as a small-scale constructor, it took on an industrial dimension and gained the international reputation that it enjoys today. Centred on the famous V12 3-litre engine, which had nothing further to prove, two Ferrari families were born: one destined exclusively for the track and the other, offering a level of comfort and equipment missing until that point, for the road. The racing line gave birth to such legendary cars as the Testa Rossa, Tour de France berlinetta, 250 GTO and the 250 LM. Meanwhile stars, tycoons and amateur enthusiasts fought over the road-going line which produced splendid coupés and cabriolets. A constant characteristic of Maranello was the strong link between these two groups, which meant that the road-going cars were never far from the race track...The 250 GT California Spyder is the child of this perfect marriage. Indeed, while the 250 GT cabriolet by Pinin Farina is derived from the GT coupé, the California Spyder is drawn from the competition berlinettas. So much so that the brilliant design by Pinin Farina was bodied by Scaglietti who built all competition cars for Ferrari. The Spyder used the same chassis with 2.6m wheelbase as the Tour de France, had a comparable engine and featured the same rear wing styling as the closed version. Being geared less towards racing, it was a little heavier than its counterpart, but still lighter than the cabriolet. Also, there were certain models, specially prepared with a stopwatch in mind, that distinguished themselves on the circuit : Ginther and Hively finished first in the GT category and ninth overall in the 1959 Sebring 12 Hour race, and Grossman and Tavano took fifth place in the Le Mans 24 Hour race the same year, at the wheel of a spyder from the NART team belonging to enthusiast Luigi Chinetti. The aforementioned Chinettii was involved in the " California " title of the 250 GT Spyder : originally from Milan and a close friend of Enzo Ferrari, he was largely responsible for the widespread and efficient distribution of Ferrari throughout North America. This became an important market for the model that evolved alongside the competition versions, and enjoyed great commercial success with demanding wealthy amateur drivers. In all, forty-seven examples were sold in under two years, with surprisingly just six going to California. Two further Californias left the Scaglietti workshop at that time, a " Boano " coupé and a Pinin Farina cabriolet, both rebodied after accidents. And one must not forget the 52 short-chassis examples which followed on between 1960 and 1962. An exclusive and high-performance model, the California Spyder holds a special place in the history of Ferrari, as it embodies an unrivalled fusion of qualities for road and track, the two paths on which Ferrari built its global success. The open versions of this marque are particularly rare, which explains the growing success across the decades of the California, the most expensive road-going Ferrari today. Leaving the factory on 11 April 1959, this was the 22nd Ferrari California to be built, including the prototype. Finished in lacquered silver grey, with black leather interior, black fabric hood, a hard-top and the preferred optional covered headlights. The Pubblico Registro in Modena indicates that 1283GT was first registered on 15 April 1959 as MO 51012, to Franco Mattioli from Sassuolo, the neighbouring district to Maranello. Clearly, this 25-year old youngster did not pay the five and a half million lira needed to complete the transaction. He was simply the frontman for a certain Roger Plemiannikow, alias Roger Vadim. Accompanied by his second wife, the Danish actress Annette Stroyberg, Vadim drove this Ferrari for nearly six years without changing its Italian plates. In 1959 he returned the car to the factory to have the drum brakes replaced with the Amadori disc brakes that were standard on models produced from that year. He then ordered the new short-chassis California model, and chassis number 2175GT was delivered to him at the start of 1961 by the garage Montchoisy, the Swiss Ferrari importer based in Geneva. According to Marcel Massini, the " long " California was re-sold in 1965 by the same garage Montchoisy to Georges Lang, a shipper from Annecy. The car was registered in the Haute-Savoie department, 10 FY 74, and was repainted Bordeaux red. In 1967, Lang acquired a Lamborghini Miura from the Atomic Garage in Lyon, trading in the California at the same time. A friend of the vendor remembers seeing the car for sale for 7,000 F, and later in 1973 in a neighbouring garage in Pont-de-la-Caille, on the road from Annecy to Geneva. It was rediscovered in 1993 and sold to an important American dealer who had it transported to Amsterdam for export. However, Jean Guikas, on discovering the car at the docks, bought it and took it to Marseille where he kept it until 1997. When Jean-Claude Bajol realised that this was the actual car owned by Vadim that he had dreamed about for so many years, he wrote a cheque to the dealer immediately. He undertook a nut and bolt restoration of the car which was carried out in Modena, so thorough that it even included replacing the Luppi leather upholstery with period Ferrari leather. Bajol recollected driving with Vadim with an eye to buying the car, but his many attempts at that time failed. Forty years later, he finally fulfilled this dream, and was able to park the car alongside his 250 TdF, 512 BBLM and other cars from his collection that will also be offered in the sale. This exceptional Ferrari contains all the ingredients that make up a work of art: a mythical marque, powerful and highly developed engine, matching numbers, beautiful styling with desirable covered headlights, designed by a major coachbuilder, easy to use in summer or winter with its factory hard-top, unrivalled driving sensations, superb condition and, the part that makes all the difference, a continuous and fascinating provenance. A very rare opportunity. French title Estimation 2 800 000 - 3 200 000 € Sold for 4,507,104 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2012-02-03
Hammer price
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1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Spyder California Competizione

RM Auctions is honored to present the ex-Bob Grossman, 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Spyder California Alloy Competizione, chassis no. 1451 GT. It is offered on behalf of its private owner who acquired the car over 26 years ago and is one of only seven original alloy-bodied examples built. Bob Grossman piloted 1451 GT to 5th overall while finishing first in class at the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans. It remains one of the most important and desirable open Ferraris in existence. Specifications: 260bhp, 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V-12 engine with triple Weber 40DCL6 carburetors, , four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension using parallel A-arms and coil springs, solid rear axle with trailing arms and leaf springs, Houdaille lever action dampers all around, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600mm (102.4") The 250 GT Series With the benefit of hindsight, it is clear that the brilliant 250 GT series is the foundation upon which the modern Ferrari legend was built. Imagine a single car that was capable of winning thousands of races - earning international sports car championships. Imagine a platform upon which a vast array of stunning coachbuilt cars would be built, earning the company worldwide acclaim among the social and financial elite. And of course, imagine the 250 GT becoming the basis for the most beautiful and wildly successful production models the company had ever seen, earning Enzo Ferrari the he cash needed not only to survive, but to pursue – and win – a host of championship titles. In the beginning, the 250 GT was derived from dual-purpose cars that offered little in the way of luxury and creature comforts, emphasizing light weight and high performance. Cars like the 250MM performed admirably in the long distance open road races of the fifties. Before long, the 250 GT evolved into two lines – those intended primarily for the street, and the dual purpose road/race berlinettas, which sacrificed comfort for performance, but proved highly capable on the track. The first of the more luxurious road-going Ferraris to achieve some semblance of series production was the second series of 250 GT Europa. Fitted with the same 3-liter Colombo engine and bodied by Pininfarina, some 36 were built, with most enjoying life as spirited road-going cars. The Europa was followed by the Boano/Ellena-bodied coupé road cars, and still later, by the Pininfarina coupes and cabriolets. The dual purpose line evolved into the 250 GT Coupe, and utilized a lightweight racing berlinetta body built in limited numbers by Scaglietti to a Pininfarina design. After an early victory in the legendary race, the car became known as the 250 GT Tour de France. Built on the same 2600mm wheelbase chassis as the Boano/Ellena, the 250 GT TdF dominated gran turismo competition; its combination of exceptional performance and good looks has made it one of the most desirable Ferraris of the period. At the same time Ferrari and Pininfarina cooperated to create the first series of 250 GT coupes and cabriolets, the successors to the Boano/Ellena coupés. These luxurious and individually custom-built cabriolets were created for gentleman drivers who wanted open air Ferraris to cruise the boulevards of sunny resorts with style and flair. Ferrari in America With affluent enthusiasts, vast networks of open roads, and a growing sports car racing scene, the American market was always very important to Ferrari. By the middle 1950s, largely through the efforts of importer Luigi Chinetti and racers like Chinetti himself, Johnny von Neumann, Tony Parravano, and many others, Ferrari’s reputation on the track was at least as strong in the U.S. as it was in Europe. The better teams enjoyed factory support at some level – even if it was only in terms of access to the latest and hottest cars. The factory-affiliated teams’ success generated sales both of new racing cars and recycled team cars. Ferrari developed specific models, such as the 2-liter Monzas and Mondials, for the North American market and the racing classes that attracted wealthy amateur (and in some cases professional) drivers who could afford to buy and race the very best. Most of these were dual purpose cars – capable, in theory at least, of driving to the track, winning, and driving home. This racing success – and the aura it lent the brand, resulted in a growing demand for Ferraris intended purely for the street. As with the racing cars, Ferrari built special models more attuned to the tastes of its American clients. Chinetti and his dealers identified market niches and Ferrari built cars to fill them, small series of cars that brilliantly integrated design and performance, and capitalized on the synergies between Ferrari and its gifted designers and coachbuilders - Pininfarina, Touring, Ghia, Vignale, Scaglietti, and others. Luigi Chinetti loved the 250 GT TdF coupes – their light weight and crisp handling gave them a delightful character on the street – but their power and superb chassis had what it took to win on the track. However, Chinetti saw a market for something more. Unlike Europe where tradition and moderate climates dictated a preference for closed cars, Americans lived in hotter climates, like Florida, Arizona, and particularly California – and preferred both the good looks and the cooler nature of open cars. The 250 GT Spyder California Ferrari responded by commissioning Pininfarina to built a new open car based on the chassis of the 250 GT TdF. Dubbed the Spyder California after its intended market, the new design was a masterpiece – widely regarded by collectors today as the prettiest open Ferrari built to that point – and perhaps since. As good as the 250 GT TdF chassis was, it was the exquisite lines of the coachwork that has made the Spyder California an icon among Ferraris. The first thing any observer notices is the windshield. How such a simple shape can be so elegant is a testimonial to the designer’s art, but it manages to be both clean and graceful, with just enough rake to make its performance heritage clear. It sets the tone for the rest of the car, where long lines and gentle curves eloquently define the shape of the car, alternating between smooth convex panels and crisp edges, striking the perfect balance between simplicity and complexity. Many consider this original version, built on the longer 2,600mm wheelbase, to be in some ways more attractive than the later SWB design, as it allows these graceful lines to spread out over the longer chassis. Either way, there is no doubt that the Spyder California is the single most desirable dual purpose open Ferrari of all time. Production began in 1958, and some eleven examples had been built by the time it became a separate model in December 1958. One of the earliest Spyder Californias was entered by Luigi Chinetti’s NART at Sebring early in 1959, driven by Richie Ginther and Howard Hively. It finished ninth overall (behind four Testa Rossas and four Porsche RSKs) and won the GT class. Chinetti even found a way to make an impression upon American drag racers with a sub-14 second quarter mile result from a steel bodied Spyder California. 1451 GT: Provenance and Condition This Ferrari Spyder California was ordered through Luigi Chinetti Motors and delivered to Bob Grossman at LeMans during the third week of June 1959. Grossman was a Nyack, New York, car dealer who had taken to racing. An aspiring professional singer, he started selling cars after Wold War II to finance voice lessons. By the mid-1950s he had franchises for Jaguar, Alfa Romeo and Volkswagen and was racing his own XK120 at area events with considerable success. In 1958 he took the SCCA G Production national title with an Alfa Giulietta Veloce. Grossman had been racing another long-wheelbase Spyder California, purchased used from Chinetti, but was having trouble beating the Corvettes in SCCA competition. He complained to Chinetti, who promised to come up with “something special”, and s/n 1451 GT was the result. One of 51 long-wheelbase Spyder Californias, and one of nine alloy-bodied competition models, s/n 1451 GT was sent from the Ferrari factory to Sergio Scaglietti’s new workshops on Modena’s Via Emilia Est on May 18, 1959. Meanwhile, engine and gearbox were assembled, completing tests on June 14th. The car was then, according to Grossman, driven to LeMans. The first Spyder California with the new “outside plug” 128F engine, it was also fitted with Testa Rossa cams with an extra millimeter of lift and larger 40DCL6 carburetors, giving at reported 262 horsepower at 7,300 rpm. The factory had installed an oil cooler within the radiator, stiffer suspension and an oversize fuel tank with filler cap through the trunk lid. A tall 3.55 to 1 final drive ratio was installed especially for Le Mans. Grossman, co-driving with Fernand Tavano, finished fifth overall, placing third in the GT class. Having been hastily assembled for Le Mans, the car was returned to Ferrari for final completion after the race, at which time the interior was finished and a final paint job administered in metallic silver. Upon completion, s/n 1451 GT was imported to the U.S., where it was raced by Grossman for the remainder of the 1959 season, placing first at SCCA National races at Montgomery, New York in August, then sixth overall and second in class at Thompson, Connecticut, in September. At Montgomery he was protested for the oil cooler, said to be “non-standard,” after which he ran in the D Modified class. He failed to finish at Watkins Glen at the end of September, due to a blown engine. Driving the car to Florida with an engine borrowed from Luigi Chinetti, Grossman went on to the Sixth Annual International Speed Weeks at Nassau, Bahamas, in December. In five races over three days, he managed one first-in-class, one first-overall, and won the Governor’s Cup for both five-lap and twelve-lap races. The 1960 season was even better. Grossman ran first overall at Marlboro (in April and again in July), Bridgehampton SCCA Nationals in May, and the Vanderbilt Cup revival at Roosevelt Raceway in June. He placed second overall at Thompson in September, a feat repeated at Watkins Glen later in the month. Toward the end of 1960, someone at SCCA got wind of all the other factory “tweaks” on the car, and he was warned not to enter any more club events. When the new 250 GT short-wheelbase competition berlinettas became available, Grossman sold s/n 1451 GT, and didn’t see it again for more than 20 years. Its history in the 1960s is largely unknown. By the early 1970s, it was owned by a banker in Maryland. A few years later, it turned up in Florida. Gerald Sutterfield, the West Palm Beach Porsche dealer, found it languishing in the garage of a wealthy resident. He called Ferrari authority Stan Nowak, who quickly identified it as Grossman’s old car and set about looking for a buyer. He offered it to Grossman, who turned it down because he already had too many old Ferraris. It was then bought by Sidney Stoldt, a VSCCA member from New Jersey, who drove it back north. Nowak found it in excellent shape, needing very little except some spirited driving to “blow out all the cobwebs.” In 1981, the car was acquired by the vendor, a noted California collector. He then commenced a painstaking two year restoration. The intention was to create nothing less than the most accurate Ferrari restoration ever completed – with one notable exception. Most competition cars sacrifice appearance for utility, with the resulting car often described as “aggressive”, or “purposeful”. In this case, s/n 1451 GT began life as one of the most beautiful open sports cars ever built, and the vendor could not bear to spoil its lines in any way. The decision was made to allow minor historical variations so long as they could be easily reversed in the future, and then only if they could be justified in terms of normal Ferrari production. Included Spares & Documentation Correct and complete Tool Kit Cold Air Box (unrestored) Roll Bar (aftermarket installation without altering the car) 4 Dunlop Racing Tires (lightly used) 4 Borrani Wire Wheels (excellent condition) Complete set of Factory Build sheets (no longer available from Ferrari) New windscreen (made to-order from original in car) Bidders are advised that these items are supplied FOB Long Beach, CA. Shipping and packaging are the buyer’s responsibility. A restoration faithful to the car’s Le Mans configuration would entail decals, lights and a bug deflector that the vendor felt would detract from the purity and beauty of the car’s original shape as it had been crafted by the artisans at Scaglietti. Instead, he chose not to include these in the restoration. However, on the other hand, things like the external fuel filler had been removed. A key identifying feature, the decision was made to restore the car to this configuration during the restoration. Another difficult decision was that of color. While metallic silver would be authentic, it was decided that a racing red would accentuate the lines of the coachwork. As a result, a stunning – and completely correct - 1959 Ferrari red was selected, and the paintwork entrusted to the legendary craftsmen at Southern California’s Junior’s House of Color. A virtually flawless tan interior was installed to complete the combination. While the trim on a Spyder California is quite simple, that very simplicity requires that the interior be executed with meticulous attention to the straightness of the stitching, proper padding, and flawless welting to ensure that the result does justice to the restoration. Perhaps the most difficult – and the most outstanding – aspect of the restoration is its attention to detail. At a time when few were restoring cars to this standard, a great deal of research was required to ensure the authenticity of the smallest parts. From engine compartment finishes to hoses, lines, and wiring, everything imaginable was restored to as new finish and condition, as possible. The quality of the restoration is attested to by a long list of concours victories. The first, and perhaps the most impressive was at Pebble Beach in August 1983, where s/n 1451 GT placed First in Class, against rigorous competition. Perhaps equally impressive was the Phil Hill award for Best in Show at the 1984 Ferrari Club of America National Meet. Six more first place awards followed, including Santa Barbara, Le Circle Invitational, Long Beach Grand Prix, Meadow Brook Hall, and a repeat at Pebble Beach in 1994 – ten years after the first. Other notable achievements include a Judge’s Award at the Classiques Concours d’Elegance at Parc de Bagatelle in Paris, Best in Show at the Newporter Invitational, the Chicago Historic Races and Palm Springs Concours. No trailer queen, s/n 1451 GT has also participated in the Colorado Grand, the Shell/Ferrari Challenge, and the Laguna Seca Historic Races. Although the restoration is now an older one, the quality of the workmanship and the care the car has received is evident in its current condition. Little would be needed to return to the concours field – though perhaps the most enjoyment can be had by driving this lovely Spyder California. It is, after all, uniquely suitable for both grand touring events and historic racing. Summary Some argue that the ultimate Ferrari is one with a racing history, whose track record has made important contributions to the lore of the Prancing Horse. Others feel the ultimate Ferrari is about beauty and shape, a car whose lines are achingly beautiful. Still others insist that rarity is the key. Consider, then, the ex-Le Mans Bob Grossman Spyder California Competizione. One of just nine alloy-bodied examples built, it is certainly rare – and few would argue that it is among the most beautiful Ferraris ever built. As one of a handful of LeMans Ferraris, and with its stellar record in American sports car racing, s/n 1451 GT’s historical importance is undeniable. It is perhaps the most important of all the surviving Spyder Californias, and for that reason it has remained with the vendor for nearly thirty years. Remarkably offered for sale for the first time in a generation, it may well represent an unrepeatable opportunity to own one of the rarest and most beautiful racing Ferraris ever built. Chassis no. 1451 GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-08-17
Hammer price
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1953 Ferrari 340/375 MM Berlinetta Competizione

THE EX-SCUDERIA FERRARI TEAM CAR, EX-PAOLO AND GIANNINO MARZOTTO, UMBERTO MAGLIOLI, PIERO CARINI, LUIGI VILORESI, NINO FARINA, AND MAIKE HAWTHORN, FIFTH OVERALL AT LE MANS, AND 24 HOURS OF SPA WINNING EX-SCUDERIA FERRARI, PAOLO E GIANNINO MARZOTTO, UMBERTO MAGLIOLI, PIERO CARINI, LUIGI VILLORESI, NINO FARINA E MIKE HAWTHORN, CLASSIFICATA QUINTA A LE MANS E VINCITRICE DELLA 24 ORE DI SPA Specifications: 340 bhp 4,494 cc single overhead camshaft V-12 engine with three four-barrel Weber 40/IF/4C carburetors, single plug ignition with dual Marelli magnetos, four-speed manual transmission, ZF limited-slip rear axle, independent front suspension with wishbones and a transverse leaf spring, longitudinal leaf spring and solid axle rear suspension, four Houdaille lever action shocks, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,500mm (98.4") Ferrari has been called a racing company with a production department, and nowhere is that emphasis more evident than in the case of the company’s production sports cars of the early 1950s. Not only was Enzo Ferrari passionately dedicated to pursuing victories on the world’s Grand Prix circuits, but his sports cars – which were supposed to fund the operation – quickly became dominant racers in their own right. Of course, there was method to the madness. Sports cars earned both starting and prize money for the Scuderia, but their success on the track meant that they could then be cleaned up and sold to a waiting list of gentleman racers and any number of serious sports car racing teams. The 340/375 MM The heart of the 340 MM and 375 MM cars was their engines. Designed by Aurelio Lampredi, a superbly talented engineer, they were intended to provide a large displacement alternative to the original Colombo-designed V-12. Although the initial intent was to provide an entry for the naturally-aspirated 4.5-litre Grand Prix class, the engine’s broad power band and rock solid reliability made it an ideal weapon for sports car racing in a variety of displacement configurations. The 375 MM’s Lampredi engine was an all aluminum expression of the art of the foundry. Designed for durability, it featured seven main bearings, single overhead camshafts with roller followers and hairpin valve springs and dual magneto ignition. It breathed through a trio of beautiful four-choke Weber 40IF4/C downdraft carburetors – one venturi per cylinder. The four-speed fully synchronized gearbox was mounted to the engine, driven by a multi-plate clutch. Everything was built for strength and reliability. The 340/375 MM’s chassis was conventional Ferrari, based on two parallel oval tubes in a welded ladder structure. Front suspension was independent by parallel unequal length A-arms with a transverse leaf spring, sway bar and Houdaille hydraulic shock absorbers. The usual Ferrari solid rear axle with semi-elliptic springs, Houdaille shocks and parallel trailing arms (for location and taking braking and acceleration loads) was both well proven and reliable. The cars were brutally powerful, and soon proved their worth on long, high-speed tracks where their torque and power gave them tremendous speed, but where their weight and period brakes didn’t handicap the cars against smaller and more nimble competition. On the track, these Ferraris were not for the faint of heart. Challenging to drive, they also responded well to a skilled pilot. The chassis’ tendency to understeer could be counteracted by the limitless oversteer available under the driver’s right foot. 0322 AM – Victory, Endurance, and Survival According to factory records, 0322 AM was completed in June of 1953 as a 340 MM and sent immediately to France as a factory entry for the 21st running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans on June 13th. Driven by the Marzotto brothers, Paolo and Giannino, 0322 AM finished fifth overall – the highest place finish for a Ferrari that year. Next, 0322 AM was off to the Rheims 12 Hour race, driven by Umberto Maglioli and Piero Carini. Unfortunately, the car was disqualified while leading for running without lights while it was still too dark. Following the race, the car was returned to the factory where it was upgraded to 375 MM specifications. An increase in stroke raised displacement to 4.5 litres from 4.1 litres. At the same time, a number of body modifications were carried out to improve cooling and aerodynamics. A lower grille was fitted, and the headlights were lowered and moved back, covered with Perspex lenses. The large rear window opening was filled in and a much smaller rear window fitted in order to keep the car cooler and reduce glare during night driving. Fresh air intakes were added to the rockers, and the brake cooling ducts and wheel clearance blisters were revised. By July 25th, all the modifications had been completed, and 0322 AM – now a full 375 MM - entered the 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps, driven by Nino Farina and Mike Hawthorn, who took the checkered flag for first overall. Barely two weeks later, 0322 AM won again, this time at the Circuit of Senigallia, with Paolo Marzotto driving. Just one week later, the car was the factory entry at the Pescara 12 hour race, where it was a dnf, driven by Marzotto and Luigi Villoresi. On August 30th, it was entered in the 1000 km race at the Nürburgring, but failed to start. On October 7th, a certificate of origin was issued, and on the 9th the car was officially delivered to Tullio Pacini, the Ferrari dealer in Rome. By November 19th, 0322 AM was in the hands of Franco Cornacchia’s Scuderia Guastalla in Milan. The Scuderia immediately shipped the car to Mexico for the November 19th running of the Carrera Panamericana, with Guido Mancini and Fabrizio Serena, who brought the Ferrari home in fourth overall – a remarkable achievement. The following year the Ferrari was bought by Marty Christensen of Racine, Wisconsin, who put Dick Irish behind the wheel. Together they raced a number of events, including Watkins Glen on September 18th, 1954, where Irish brought 0322 AM home in fourth overall. On November 6th, they raced at Riverside in California, finishing seventh overall. In 1955, Christensen tried unsuccessfully to find a buyer – for a two-year-old Ferrari! Finally, in 1956, he donated the car to the University of Wisconsin engineering department. Apparently they couldn’t figure out what to do with it either, and in 1958 they sold it to John Norsym of Chicago, Illinois. Norsym didn’t own 0322 AM for long before advertising it for sale in the January 1959 issue of Road & Track, which is presumably when it sold to George Bell of Chicago, who drove the car to California. Sometime around 1965, Bell sold the Ferrari to Roy Behrens, of Long Beach CA, where it was registered on California plates numbered KIS 684. In August 1968 0322 AM was again offered for sale in Road & Track, restored, for $6,500. In 1972 the car was owned by Kirk White Motorcars, who sold it to Dudley Cunningham of Concord, Massachusetts. Cunningham kept the car for two years before selling it to Ernest D. Beutler of Detroit, Michigan in 1974. Beutler kept the Ferrari until 1984 when he sold it to Swiss collector Albert Obrist, who commissioned Fantuzzi to conduct its first comprehensive restoration. The car remained with the Obrist Collection until it was acquired by Formula 1 organizer Bernie Ecclestone in 1995. In March of 1998, Ecclestone sold the car to Seattle collector John McCaw, who kept it for just a few months before selling it to well-known Ferrari collector Jon Shirley of Medina, WA. Shirley used the car in several events, including the Colorado Grand, the Mille Miglia, and the California Mille. In 2003/2004 Jon Shirley commissioned noted Ferrari specialist Butch Dennison to conduct an exhaustive professional restoration, returning the car to its 1953 Carrera Panamericana configuration and livery. An extensive file of restoration invoices totaling more than $325,000 accompanies the car – along with an extensive photo archive and dossier of historical information – and its FIVA passport. The quality of the restoration is attested to by its first in class award at Pebble Beach. Its accuracy is proven by its Ferrari Club of America Platinum award – the highest accolade possible in Ferrari concours judging. Furthermore, its winning pedigree has continued with the award of the Chairman’s award at the 2007 Amelia Island Concours d’ Elegance – presented by none other than the legendary Derek Bell. More importantly, the car’s heritage as a Ferrari competition car – lies in its performance, not its beauty. 0322’s Coppa Bella Macchina award demonstrates its ultimate performance as a street car – a stringent driving evaluation that ensures, among other things, that everything works as the factory intended. Most important of all, however, is the Coppa GT award earned by Jon Shirley, for demonstrating 0322 AM at speed on the track at Laguna Seca. After all, what good is a race car if you can’t exercise it on the track? Summary In an article published in Cavallino #146, Alan Boe writes “0322 was the highest placed Ferrari in every race it completed in 1953, and it accounted for 13 of the 30 gross points Ferrari collected towards the Constructor’s Championship that year.” In fact, the three points awarded for Mancini and Serena’s finish in the Carrera Panamericana turned out to be the final points needed to secure the Constructor’s Championship for 1953. Three were built, but only two remain. Only 0322 AM won two races, competing at the world’s great venues. It is a factory team car, a sponsored entry in the Carrera Panamericana, and a successful entrant in American sports car racing. Many of the most talented drivers took the wheel of 0322 AM in its short five month career as a Scuderia Ferrari team car: Paolo and Giannino Marzotto, Umberto Maglioli, Piero Carini, Luigi Villoresi, Nino Farina, and Mike Hawthorn among them. Today, 0322 AM has it all - rarity, beauty, and power. More than that, it has an unblemished provenance – and an undeniable record defending the honor of the Scuderia in many of the most grueling events in the history of motor racing. ITALIANTEXT specifiche: 340 bhp, 4494 cc di cilindrata, con monoalbero a camme in testa, motore 12 cilindri a V con tre carburatori Weber 40/IF/4C a quattro cilindri, accensione singola con doppi magneti Marelli, trasmissione manuale a quattro rapporti, asse posteriore a slittamento limitato ZF, sospensioni anteriori indipendenti con forcelle e molla a balestra trasversale, molla a balestra longitudinale e sospensione rigida sull’asse posteriore, quattro ammortizzatori Houdaille e quattro freni a tamburo. Passo: 2500 mm (98,4") Ferrari è stata definita una casa costruttrice dedita alle corse automobilistiche, dotata di un reparto per le vetture stradali. Questa affermazione risulta evidente nella produzione di auto sportive che Ferrari ha presentato all’inizio degli anni 1950. Non solo Enzo Ferrari si dedicava con passione al conseguimento di importanti vittorie sui circuiti dei Gran Premi di tutto il mondo, ma le sue automobili sportive, che venivano realizzate sostanzialmente per finanziare il settore corse, riuscirono ben presto a primeggiare in gara. Naturalmente, c’era metodo in ciò che appariva come una pazzia. Le automobili sportive consentirono alla Scuderia di cominciare la propria attività e di guadagnare, ma il loro successo in pista significava la possibilità di essere vendute ad appassionati di corse in lista d’attesa, nonché a qualsiasi altro team serio. La 340/375 MM Il cuore della 340 MM e della 375 MM era il loro propulsore. Progettata da Aurelio Lampredi, un ingegnere di straordinario talento, dovevano diventare l’alternativa di grande cilindrata all’originale V12 disegnato da Colombo. Sebbene l’intento iniziale fosse consentire l’ingresso della classe Grand Premio da 4,5 litri con motore aspirato, l’ampia potenza del motore e la sua solidissima affidabilità, la rese un’arma ideale per le corse automobilistiche, a diversi livelli di cilindrata. Il motore della 375 MM Lampredi era l’espressione in alluminio dell’arte della fonderia. Progettato per essere resistente e durevole, esso era costituito da sette cuscinetti di banco, monoalberi a camme in testa con bilancieri a rulli, molle di richiamo delle valvole a spillo e accensione a doppio magnete. Utilizzava un trio di eccellenti carburatori a quattro corpi Weber 40IF4/C. Il cambio sincronizzato a quattro rapporti era collegato al motore, controllato da una frizione multidisco. Tutto era stato realizzato nell’ottica della resistenza e della stabilità. Il telaio della 340/375 MM era un telaio tradizionale Ferrari, basato su due tubi ellitiri paralleli inseriti in una struttura saldata a scala. Le sospensioni anteriori erano indipendenti con bracci ad A paralleli di lunghezza diversa con una molla a balestra trasversale, barra stabilizzatrice e ammortizzatori idraulici Houdaille. Il tradizionale e robusto asse posteriore Ferrari con molle semi-ellittiche, ammortizzatori Houdaille e bracci posteriori paralleli (per localizzazione e per sostenere il carico in frenata e accelerazione) erano consolidati ed affidabili. Le automobili erano estremamente potenti e presto dimostrarono il loro valore su tracciati lunghi e adatti alle alte velocità, dove la loro coppia e la potenza consentivano di raggiungere altissime velocità, ma dove il loro peso e i freni non le penalizzavano nelle gare con tratti più corti e agili. Sulla pista, queste Ferrari non erano adatte ai deboli di cuore. Stimolanti da guidare, rispondevano bene alla guida di piloti esperti. La tendenza del telaio ad andare in sottosterzo poteva essere controbilanciata dalla disponibilità illimitata di sovrasterzo. 0322 AM - Vittoria, resistenza e sopravvivenza Secondo la documentazione ritrovata, la 0322 AM venne ultimata nel giugno 1953 con il nome 340 MM e spedita immediatamente in Francia per partecipare alla 21ª edizione della 24 Ore di Le Mans in programma il 13 giugno. Guidata dai fratelli Marzotto, Paolo e Giannino, la 0322 AM si classificò quinta: il piazzamento più alto mai raggiunto quell’anno da una Ferrari. Successivamente, la 0322 AM venne spedita a Rheims per la 12 Ore, che vide al volante Umberto Maglioli e Piero Carini. Sfortunatamente, l’automobile venne squalificata mentre era in testa perché non aveva i fari accesi mentre era ancora troppo buio. Dopo la gara, la vettura venne rimandata in fabbrica per introdurre le specifiche della 375 MM. L’incremento della corsa dei pistoni consentì di aumentare la cilindrata portandola da 4,1 a 4,5 litri. Allo stesso tempo, una serie di modifiche vennero introdotte sulla carrozzeria per migliorare il raffreddamento e l’aerodinamica. Venne introdotta una griglia inferiore, i gruppi ottici vennero abbassati ed arretrati, coperti da lenti Perspex. La grande apertura del lunotto posteriore venne chiusa e venne creato un lunotto posteriore molto più piccolo, al fine di mantenere il raffreddamento della vettura e ridurre nel contempo l’effetto di abbagliamento durante la guida notturna. Le bocchette di ventilazione per l’aria fresca vennero aggiunte ai bilancieri e vennero rivisti i condotti di raffreddamento dei freni e le dimensioni dei passaruota. Il 25 luglio tutte le modifiche erano state ultimate e la 0322 AM, ora in tutto e per tutto trasformata in una 375 MM, venne iscritta alla 24 Ore di Spa-Francorchamps, con al volante Nino Farina e Mike Hawthorn, i quali tagliarono il traguardo per primi. Solo due settimane più tardi, la 0322 AM vinse nuovamente, questa volta sul circuito di Senigallia, guidata da Paolo Marzotto. Una settimana più tardi, la vettura partecipò alla 12 Ore di Pescara, dove Marzotto e Luigi Villoresi non riuscirono a concludere la gara. Il 30 agosto, venne iscritta alla 1000 km sul circuito del Nürburgring, ma non riuscì a partire. Il 7 ottobre, venne emesso un certificato di origine e il 9 l’auto venne consegnata ufficialmente a Tullio Pacini, il concessionario Ferrari di Roma. Il 19 novembre, la 0322 AM era nelle mani della Scuderia Gastalla di Franco Cornacchia a Milano. La Scuderia spedì immediatamente la vettura in Messico per partecipare alla Carrera Panamericana il 19 novembre. Al volante, Guido Mancini e Fabrizio Serena, i quali conclusero la corsa al quarto posto ottenendo un risultato eccezionale. L’anno seguente la Ferrari venne acquistata da Marty Christensen di Racine, Wisconsin, che mise alla guida Dick Irish. Insieme parteciparono ad una serie di eventi, compreso il Watkins Glen del 18 settembre 1954, in occasione del quale Irish piazzò la 0322 AM al quarto posto della classifica finale. Il 6 novembre, parteciparono ad una corsa a Riverside in California, concludendo la gara al settimo posto. Nel 1955, Christensen tentò, senza riuscirci, di trovare un compratore - per una Ferrari che aveva solo due anni! Infine, nel 1956, donò la vettura alla facoltà d’ingegneria dell’Università del Wisconsin. Apparentemente anche loro non sapevano cosa farne, e nel 1958 la vendettero a John Norsym di Chicago, Illinois. Poco tempo dopo averla acquistata Norsym la mise in vendita nel gennaio 1959 sulla rivista Road & Track, probabilmente quando riuscì a venderla a George Bell di Chicago, che la guidò fino in California. Attorno al 1965, Bell vendette la Ferrari a Roy Behrens, di Long Beach CA, dove venne immatricolata con la targa California KIS 684. Nell’agosto 1968 la 0322 AM venne nuovamente messa in vendita su Road & Track, restaurata, ad un prezzo di $6.500. Nel 1972 la vettura era diventata di proprietà della Kirk White Motorcars, la quale la vendette a Dudley Cunningham di Concord, Massachusetts. Cunningham tenne l’auto per due anni per poi venderla nel 1974 ad Ernest D. Beutler di Detroit, Michigan. Beutler tenne la Ferrari fino al 1984 e poi la vendette al collezionista svizzero Albert Obrist, il quale chiese a Fantuzzi di eseguire il primo restauro completo. L’auto rimase nella collezione di Obrist fino a quando non venne acquistata dal patrono della Formula 1, Bernie Ecclestone, nel 1995. Nel marzo 1998, Ecclestone vendette l’auto al collezionista John McCaw di Seattle, il quale la tenne solo per alcuni mesi per poi venderla al famoso collezionista di Ferrari Jon Shirley di Medina, WA. Shirley usò l’auto per partecipare a diversi eventi, tra i quali il Colorado Grand, la Mille Miglia, e la California Mille. Nel 2003/2004 Jon Shirley chiese al famoso esperto di Ferrari Butch Dennison di realizzare un restauro professionale completo, riportando l’auto all’aspetto e alle condizioni del 1953 per la Carrera Panamericana. La fattura relativa al costo totale dell’intervento di restauro ammontò a oltre $325.000 - e accompagnò l’auto unitamente a un considerevole archivio di foto e a un fascicolo di informazioni storiche - nonché al suo passaporto FIVA. La qualità del restauro è attestata dal primo premio conquistato a Pebble Beach. La sua accuratezza è certificata dal premio conferitole dal Ferrari Club of America Platinum Award - il premio più prestigioso assegnato da una giuria Ferrari. Inoltre, il suo pedigree vincente vanta anche il premio del Chairman’s Award conferito all’Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance del 2007 - presentato nientemeno che dal leggendario Derek Bell. Cosa ancora più importante, la tradizione tramandata da quest’automobile come auto da corsa Ferrari risiede nelle sue prestazioni e non nella sua bellezza estetica. Il premio Coppa Bella Macchina vinto dalla 0322 dimostra le sue prestazioni eccezionali come automobile da strada - una rigorosa valutazione di guida che assicura, tra le altre cose, il suo corretto funzionamento, come specificato dal costruttore. L’evento più importante di tutti, tuttavia, è la Coppa GT conquistata da Jon Shirley, in occasione di una dimostrazione della 0322 AM lanciata sulla pista di Laguna Seca. Dopo tutto, cosa vale un’auto da corsa se non la si può guidare su una pista? Riepilogo In un articolo pubblicato sul n°146 di Cavallino, Alan Boe scrive “la 0322 è stata la Ferrari che si è classificata meglio in tutte le corse alle quali ha partecipato nel 1953 e ha conquistato 13 dei 30 punti ottenuti quell’anno da Ferrari nel Campionato Costruttori.” Infatti, i tre punti assegnati per il risultato conseguito da Mancini e Serena nella Carrera Panamericana risultarono essere i punti decisivi necessari per assicurarsi il Campionato Costruttori nel 1953. Ne vennero costruite tre, ma oggi ne rimangono solo due. Solo la 0322 AM vinse due corse, gareggiando sui circuiti automobilistici più prestigiosi del mondo. Si tratta di un’auto della scuderia Ferrari, iscritta alla Carrera Panamericana, e vincente nelle corse automobilistiche in America. Molti dei più talentuosi piloti si sono seduti al volante della 0322 AM durante la sua breve permanenza di cinque mesi nella Scuderia Ferrari: Paolo e Giannino Marzotto, Umberto Maglioli, Piero Carini, Luigi Villoresi, Nino Farina, e Mike Hawthorn sono alcuni nomi. Oggi, la 0322 AM è completa sotto ogni punto di vista - eccezionale, bellezza e potente. Inoltre, le sue origini sono irreprensibili, questo unito a un’innegabile tradizione dell’onore e dei colori della Scuderia Ferrari in occasione di molte delle corse più difficili nella storia dell’automobilismo. Chassis no. 0322 AM

  • ITAItaly
  • 2007-05-20
Hammer price
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