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1965 Ford GT40 Roadster Prototype

380 hp, 289 cu. in. V-8 engine with four Weber 48IDA carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95 in. The first of six GT40 Roadsters built The eighth of only twelve GT40 prototypes The only GT40 Roadster to have continually survived in its original form Built for Shelby American as a test and development vehicle Driven by Ken Miles, Carroll Shelby, Jim Clark, and other legends Carefully documented by GT40 historian Ronnie Spain A 2003 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award winner Single prominent ownership for over two decades Simply put, one of the finest, most original, and certainly the rarest examples of the Ford GT40 in existence Please note, internet bidding will not be offered on this lot. Interested parties wishing to bid remotely are encouraged to bid via telephone or absentee. Please click here to register. Very few models in automotive history claim a comprehensive provenance that encompasses beauty of exterior design, power and flexibility of mechanical specifications, competition success, conception and execution by multiple legends in the field, and rarity. Though a short list of such models is always subjective in nature, there is still a consensus on a small handful of great cars, of which the Ford GT40 is certainly worthy of top consideration. Its sensational appearance and groundbreaking mid/rear-engine layout, powerful Detroit muscle, a design and proving team including Eric Broadley, Carroll Shelby, Dan Gurney, and John Wyer, and ultimately four consecutive victories at the 24-Hours of Le Mans combined to propel the GT40 to a stratospheric level of appreciation and esteem within the niche, which endures to this day. Yet despite the greatness achieved by the mighty Ford GT, success did not arrive overnight, as various teething pains prolonged the car’s development from Broadley’s 1963 Lola Mk 6 GT, the first mid/rear-engine sports prototype with large-bore power (see lot 139), into the GT40 Mk II race-winners that finished 1-2-3 at La Sarthe in 1966. As the story goes, Ford’s intention to produce the GT40 as a production road car cooled Broadley’s interest in the project, and he quickly extricated himself from his contract and returned to racecar production under the Lola banner (ironically at the Slough factory recently acquired by Ford for the GT’s development) after only five GT40 prototypes had been built. Ford reconfigured their early engineering team into FAV (Ford Advanced Vehicles) and continued work on the GT40 in the facility immediately adjacent to Lola. Chassis number GT/108 was the first roadster produced at the new FAV site. The car is one of just six open-top GT40 Roadsters eventually constructed, reflecting Ford’s experimentation with the configuration to test for market appeal and salability. GT/108 is also notable as one of the 12 early prototype cars with the three-digit “GT” chassis number designations, as opposed to the “P” designation stamped on the Mark I production cars that soon followed. Chassis GT/108 was constructed with a steel roadster-specification chassis and is one of only four GT40 Roadsters built this way, as well as the only roadster chassis to continually survive as such. It was completed by FAV in March 1965, having arrived there from chassis builders Abbey Panels, of Coventry, in October 1964, and construction began on November 2. The monocoque was equipped with a Cobra-specification Ford 289 cubic inch motor fitted with Weber carburetors mated to a Colotti T-37 transaxle. In addition to the unconventional roadster coachwork, GT/108’s body displayed several minor differences from prior GT40 prototypes, including a new nose developed by Len Bailey at FAV, and rear-pillar intakes that were higher than the standard beltline scoops. Painted white and mounted with 6½-inch-wide Borrani wire wheels up front and 8-inch Borranis in the rear, the completed car was tested in March 1965 by John Whitmore and the great Dickie Attwood at Silverstone along with GT/105, one of the prototype coupes. John Wyer was also on hand to witness both cars lap the 2.9-mile Silverstone track. According to Ronnie Spain, the Roadster was invoiced to Shelby American from FAV on March 8, with a note of “temporary importation for test purposes.” Nonetheless, Shelby American brought the car into the country on a permanent basis. The car was shipped to Shelby’s Venice, California, facility, where a Shelby American Work Order was issued on April 4, 1965, to “perform necessary repairs and mods to GT40/108.” On April 30, the car accompanied Shelby’s USRRC Cobra team to Riverside raceway, where it was used for exhibition purposes through the extent of the races on May 2. In early May, GT/108 was again in company with the Shelby Cobras for their USRRC outing, this time at Laguna Seca, where it was used for demo laps with Ken Miles behind the wheel. Later in the month, it is believed that the car was used for further development testing for the Le Mans effort at Riverside, again driven by Miles. On May 16, the car was shown by Shelby at the 3rd Annual South Course Concours d’Elegance in Newport Beach. In early June, GT/108 was again employed by Shelby for exhibition and press promotion, this time at Ford’s board of directors meeting held at Shelby’s Los Angeles headquarters on West Imperial Highway. During the event, individual board members received passenger-seat drives on the LAX airport tarmac with Shelby team driver Ken Miles (in coat and tie) performing demonstration duties; however, when it came to Henry Ford II himself, Carroll Shelby took over the driver’s seat. This is the only time Henry Ford II is known to have ever sat in a GT40. At the end of July, Miles tested the car at Riverside joined by writer Jerry Titus, of Sports Car Graphic, who shared his driving impressions in the magazine’s October 1965 issue. In addition to being “impressed by the comfortable seats and driver positioning,” Titus wrote, “we found it extremely simple and dependable to control from the first lap,” also opining that the roadster was “quicker than the best a competition Cobra could hack.” On August 8, GT/108 arrived in San Francisco, for Shelby’s Lew Spencer to drive at Candlestick Park, serving as pace car for the 28-car A-C Production race. Titus was present at this event, as well, and recounted it in his article, mentioning that Spencer drove the car with such vigor that the actual racecars had difficulty keeping up. “I can’t help it,” Spencer was quoted after the race. “That thing is such a ball to drive!” On August 17, 1965, GT/108 was relieved of its duties as a Shelby promotional and development car and was taken under consignment by Hank Madeiros at Hayward Motors in San Francisco. In October, about the time that Jerry Titus’s “Track Test” article was hitting newsstands, the GT40 was demonstrated at the United States Grand Prix at Watkins Glen, New York, now featuring a nose and hood painted matte black. The car was driven for hot laps by the recently crowned Grand Prix World Champion Jim Clark; this is believed to be the only time that Clark, the legendary Lotus champion driver, ever took the wheel of a Ford GT40. On October 29, a document logged that GT/108 had returned to Kar Kraft, the famed Ford tuning shop in Michigan, and was listed as a development car for the upcoming “J” and “X” models, a designation also given to another roadster, GT/110. It was, as a result, one of the two development cars for what led to the 1967 Le Mans win for the Mark IV. The roadster was then briefly used as a promotional car in November 1965 by Northwestern Ford in Milwaukee before being mothballed for several years at Kar Kraft. At about this time, the roadster’s “permanent” importation, when it was supposed to venture stateside only temporarily, led to complaints from the U.S. Customs Service. In Spain’s words, “To satisfy U.S. Customs, Ford’s Len Pounds required costs of materials, labour, dies, tools, moulds, design, etc., etc., for the two cars, as failure to give U.S. Customs a satisfactory figure would leave Ford open to duty payment of $140,000 on each car, as U.S. Customs had estimated a value for each car of $2,000,000. It must be assumed that Pounds appeal was successful, or else surely GT/108 and GT/109 would have gone the same way as GT/110, which was cut up a couple of years later to avoid duty when Customs caught up with it!” On July 31, 1969, a Ford document was compiled which listed the GT40s still with Ford and by then in storage. GT/108 was included in the list along with approximately ten other GT40s. It was eventually sold to a young Kar Kraft employee, George Sawyer, in May 1971. Mr. Sawyer, with help from the technicians at Kar Kraft, made the car drivable for the road. They rebuilt a 289 motor and installed it, as well as a ZF transaxle from the proto-type Mach 1. He even obtained a special certificate from Ford in order to have the car registered for the road in Michigan. Interestingly, having become enamored with the art of metal work at Kar Kraft, Mr. Sawyer began taking jewelry classes in his spare time. The potential for opening his own business eventually overcame his love of the GT40. Mr. Sawyer sold the car and used the proceeds to support his budding goldsmithing skills and jewelry business, which continues to this day. By 1978, GT/108 was owned by Harley Cluxton III, of Grand Touring Cars in Scottsdale, and the roadster was offered by him a year later and purchased by John Robertson, of Big Fork, Montana. Robertson notably reverted the nose to white and added black Le Mans stripes, and the original white paint is believed to largely remain intact to this day. Passing through Cluxton again in 1983, the GT roadster was then acquired by Tom Congleton, of Mission Hills, Kansas, who soon embarked on a full mechanical restoration. Following this freshening, the car was periodically campaigned at top vintage racing venues, such as Laguna Seca. It is notable that while the roadster never finished particularly well in these contests, this was mostly due to Mr. Congleton’s refusal to modify or upgrade the car in any way, ensuring that it remains remarkably authentic today. After appearing on the cover of The Shelby American #51, GT/108 was featured in one of Autoweek’s April 1984 issues, and three months later the car traveled to Dearborn for the SAAC-11 meet. In September 1989, it was displayed at the 25th Anniversary GT40 reunion at Watkins Glen. In 1992, GT/108 was purchased by the consignor, a well-known collector with discerning taste, who soon presented it at the SAAC Road America in 1994. The roadster has remained in the consignor’s collection ever since, driven occasionally for freshness and ideally maintained in a climate-controlled facility. In 2003, the car was treated to a substantial mechanical freshening by the renowned Phil Reilly and Company in Corte Madera, California. An ideal entrant for world-class concours d’elegance, GT/108 has since occasionally surfaced on the major show circuit, winning second in the GT40 class at Pebble Beach in 2003, appearing at the Quail Motorsports Gathering in 2010, and being invited to the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2013 for their special GT40 events. It is a phenomenally original example of the rare GT40 roadster. As author John Allen noted in his 1995 book, GT40: The Legend Lives On, “prototype GT/108 is currently the only intact example of the marque still to carry the correct 1965-style nose, and the low tail section unique to roadsters. 108 is [also] the only roadster, or “spyder”, to remain in as-built condition.” Ronnie Spain, GT40 historian and author of GT 40: An Individual History and Race Record, continues by saying, “GT/108 is one of the finest, and certainly rarest, examples of the Ford GT40 in existence. Its rarity value is stamped all over its history.” RM Auctions would like to thank Ronnie Spain for the assistance in research for this description, as well as former owner George Sawyer. Chassis no. GT/108

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
Show price

1956 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta 'Tour de France' by Carrozzeria Scaglietti

240 bhp, 2,953 cc single overhead camshaft V-12 engine with three Weber carburetors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm • Very first of the second series 14-louver design • One of nine examples built • Featured in the Hollywood Classic, The Love Bug • Matching numbers, extensively documented, and complete with full Ferrari Classiche certification • Received a class award at the 2011 Quail Motorsports Gathering • Single ownership for 14 years and offered for the first time ever at auction • Pristine example of Ferrari’s most revered berlinetta The tragic accident at the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans that claimed the lives of one driver and 79 spectators had a profound effect on the shape of racing, one that ultimately led to the creation of one of Ferrari’s most celebrated models. Racing enthusiasts and competitors alike agreed that the crash was ultimately the result of the increasingly potent powertrains of the Le Mans sports cars, and in order to prevent further disaster, new regulations would be required to veer from the path of these thinly veiled race cars, which were essentially grand prix cars packaged with two-seater bodies. The following year, the FIA responded by creating new gran turismo classes that not only prioritized safety, but also re-established the concept of competitively racing a road-based production car. Ferrari, of course, was well prepared for the challenge, having just debuted its new series-production 250 GT at the Geneva Motor Show of 1956. While the coupe on display featured an elegant body that would go on to be produced in quantity by Boano, thus providing necessary homologation, the underlying chassis proved to be the basis for the competition car, or berlinetta, that Ferrari sought to enter into the FIA’s new racing classifications. Pininfarina designed a new lightweight body that was built by Scaglietti, using thin-gauge aluminum and Perspex windows and a minimally upholstered cabin. The finished car, then known officially as the 250 GT Berlinetta, was ultimately made in a sparing quantity of 77 examples that are further sub-divided by subtle differences in coachwork over the model’s four-year production run. Ferrari’s hopes for competitive success were quickly realized when Olivier Gendebien and Jacques Washer co-drove the very first car, chassis number 0503 GT, to a First in Class and Fourth Overall at the Giro di Sicilia in April 1956, with a Fifth Overall (First in Class) at the Mille Miglia later that month. But the model’s defining success didn’t occur until September, during the 1956 Tour de France Automobile, a grueling 3,600 mile, week-long contest that combined six circuit races, two hill climbs, and a drag race. The Marquis Alfonso de Portago, a Spanish aristocrat and privateer racer, drove chassis number 0557 GT to a dominating victory that sealed the dynamic model’s reputation. Enzo Ferrari was so pleased with the outcome that the 250 GT Berlinetta was subsequently and internally, though never officially, referred to as the Tour de France. The moniker proved to be quite fitting, as Gendebien took First Overall at the 1957, 1958, and 1959 installments of the French race, as well as a Third Overall at the 1957 Mille Miglia, a triumph that witnessed the defeat of many more purpose-built sports racers. With the introduction of a short-wheelbase 250 GT in late-1959, the outgoing platform became retrospectively labeled as the long-wheelbase version, though the original car’s designation of 250 GT LWB Berlinetta is now largely simplified with the name ‘Tour de France.’ Through its brief production run, the TdF underwent several external body modifications, ultimately resulting in four different series-produced body styles (not including a handful of Zagato-bodied cars). The alterations in appearance are most easily recognizable in the so-called sail panels, the rear ¾-panels of the c-pillar that adjoin the roof. Initially produced with no louvers at all, these panels featured 14 louvers in the second-series cars, followed by a series with just three louvers, and ending with a series that featured just one sail-panel louver. Of all of these series, the 14-louver cars are the rarest, with only nine examples produced, and are judged by many enthusiasts to be the handsomest of the group. This fabulous, early Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France is the very first example constructed of the second series design that featured 14-louver sail-panels. On November 15, 1956, the stunning TdF was purchased by Tony Parravano, the Italian national and Southern California building construction magnate who is better known among 1950s racing enthusiasts for the numerous Italian sports cars that he campaigned in the area’s SCCA circuit. 0585 GT was entered for the Palm Springs road races in early April of 1957, before being disqualified because the sanctioning body did not recognize it as a production car. Changing hands among a couple of Los Angeles-based owners during the early-1960s, 0585 GT eventually came into the possession of Walt Disney Studios for use in the 1966 film The Love Bug, the celebrated Disney classic about “Herbie,” the racing VW Beetle with a soul. Following its memorable Hollywood turn, this important 250 GT fell on hard times, passing through the Schaub family, of Los Angeles, before reportedly being abandoned on the side of the Hollywood freeway. Records indicate two more owners during the 1970s and 1980s. In September 1994, the car surfaced and was offered for sale in an unrestored state by David Cottingham’s DK Engineering in Watford, England. Unable to sell 0585 GT for its true value, DK, in late-1996, elected to totally restore the historically significant Tour de France, a freshening that debuted to overwhelming acclaim at Coy’s International Historic Festival at Silverstone in July 1997. The festival proved to be a perfect stage for the immaculate car, as it was sold the following October to its current owner, a well-respected Southern California-based collector who has a 40-year history of collecting and caring for some of the most recognizable and important Ferrari cars ever built. Registered under license plate “MY 56 TDF,” 0585 GT was soon campaigned in a number of vintage rallies, including the Tour Auto of April 1998, as well as the Mille Miglia of the following May. The car also participated in the Tour Auto in 1999 and 2000, and placed 39th Overall at the 2000 Shell Ferrari/Maserati Historic Challenge at Le Mans. 0585 GT returned to the Tour Auto in 2001, 2002, 2004, and 2006 and was displayed at Car Classic: Freedom of Motion, the 2010 exhibition held at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. The following August, 0585 GT’s extreme quality and rarity were confirmed with the ultimate in exhibitive recognition, a class award at the 2011 Quail Motorsports Gathering in Carmel, California, where the car won “The Great Ferraris” class, honoring some of the marque’s earliest and important sports and racing cars. In addition to all of these awards and racing achievements, 0585 GT has also gone under the scrutiny of the Ferrari factory’s certification program and easily received the full “Red Book” certification through Newport Beach Ferrari specialist, John Amette. For the certification process, the original gearbox was put in the car; however, the current owner has since removed it and put a more user-friendly synchromesh gearbox in the car for much better drivability purposes. It must be noted that the original unit will be supplied with the sale of this car. A full set of original tools and a jack will also be included, as well as a booklet of documentation and various trophies and awards that the car has received over the years. In preparation for the sale, 0585 GT has also just been completely detailed and sorted at well-respected Junior’s House of Color in Long Beach, California, so it will look stunning in presentation. On a recent track drive in preparation for RM’s video and photography efforts, the car performed flawlessly, handling directly and powering through all of the gears with ease. As the RM specialist describes, “The four-wheel drum brakes and skinny tyres can sometimes provide a different driving experience for those familiar with later cars fitted with disk brakes and wider stances; however, it allows the pilot to become much more intimate with the driving experience and to engage the engine in a much different way, creating a completely different awareness of timing and speed…The most beautiful thing about these early TDs is what most Ferraristi will attest to, and that is the sound of the exhaust note when the car breaches 3500 rpm. As you power out of the corners, there is that point when the car just feels and sounds right! All the noises, the vibrations, and the elements of speed come together to create a symphonic harmony that is unlike anything else. Moreover, the sound is not too overpowering and is pleasurable for extended periods of time, which cannot be said for many other race-bred cars. It is the ultimate dual-purpose Ferrari!” Impeccably cared for and stunningly restored, 0585 GT is a beautiful and rare example of the second series 14-louver Tour de France, one of Ferrari’s greatest sports cars of all time. This car’s next owner can look forward to continued warm receptions at the world’s finest automotive events, including rallies such as the Tour Auto and Mille Miglia, and premium exhibitive venues, such as Pebble Beach, Amelia Island, and the Palm Beach Cavallino Classic. It is a truly unique representative of one of Ferrari’s most revered models, and in many ways, it is the ultimate symbol of Ferrari’s long pursuit of dual-purpose sports cars that can be seriously campaigned as easily as they can be road driven. Given their extremely low production numbers and desirability, these cars rarely come to the market. The availability of 0585 GT after 14-years of single ownership offers an unbeatable chance to acquire one of the most storied machines to emerge from Maranello’s legendary motoring lore. Addendum Please note this Ferrari’s transmission is of the correct, original type but is in fact not original to this particular chassis. Chassis no. 0585GT Engine no. 0585GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-08-17
Hammer price
Show price

Ex Bob Jane - 1963 Australian GT Championship Winning1963 JAGUAR E-TYPE LIGHTWEIGHT COMPETITION

Ex Bob Jane - 1963 Australian GT Championship Winning 1963 JAGUAR E-TYPE LIGHTWEIGHT COMPETITION Chassis no. S850667 Engine no. V682558P 3,781cc DOHC All-Alloy 6-Cylinder Engine Lucas 2MDC6/M Fuel Injection 293bhp at 5,750rpm 4-Speed Manual Close-Ratio Gearbox 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes – Inboard Rear *One of the absolute best and most original examples of the 12 Lightweight E-Types *Preserved by just 3 owners from new while accumulating less than 4,000 miles *Championship winning racing history in period *Documented in numerous books and with build sheets, factory correspondence and period photographs SUCCEEDING THE D-TYPE In June 1957, the Scottish team Ecurie Ecosse claimed its second consecutive victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in a Jaguar D-type, giving the legendary sports racer a third straight victory in the endurance contest for which it was essentially devised. Yet despite the D-Type's unmitigated success, Jaguar was already at work in 1957 on a succeeding model, one that might serve as a production development mule or the basis of a GT-class racer. Clothed in a svelte aluminum body, the so-called E1A development car eventually blossomed into the production E-Type project, though a more dedicated racecar dubbed the E2A followed by 1959. By early 1961, Jaguar was beginning to deliver production E-Type roadsters to racing customers in advance of the model's official debut at Geneva in March. This was intended to create a competition aura around the E-Type, even if it was merely a steel-bodied road car. With the idea of the open competition car gaining momentum, a memorandum was sent on March 16, 1961, from Jaguar engineering's lieutenant director Claude Baily to Coventry's production department. Under the name project no. ZP 537/24, the factory was instructed to proceed with the build of seven competition cars for which he listed specific modifications to the basic E-Type that were based on E2A. These cars were to receive special engines with gas-flowed cylinder heads, polished and crack-tested connecting rods, a lightened flywheel, a competition crankshaft damper, modified clutch, a close-ratio competition 4-speed gearbox, and trumpet tips for the S.U. carburetors. Although the engine specifications were substantial, the body remained steel and the suspension was modified only minimally with stiffer springs. The first of these cars, chassis no. S850006, was delivered to John Coombs' racing team, and the renowned Graham Hill achieved promising results with a third-place finish at Silverstone in May 1962, second at Mallory Park a month later, and fifth at Brands Hatch in August. Increasingly used as a factory development car, Coombs' E-Type was further modified with a lighter-gauge steel body, and the engine received a "35/40º" wide-angle cylinder head like the ones used on the D-Types. The new competition car was showing tremendous potential until the Ferrari 250 GTO arrived, which quickly set the racing world on its head. FORMULATION OF THE LIGHTWEIGHT Receptive nevertheless to the challenge of competing with Maranello's new thoroughbred, Jaguar moved a step further with the development of S850006, using it as the mold for 17 more competition cars. First entering the build process in October 1962, the racing E-Type also incorporated elements of an earlier works car known as the Low-Drag Coupe, for which Malcolm Sayers had revised his E-Type coachwork to feature a more aerodynamic roof and tail, including trailing exhaust vents. The new cars were lightened with aluminum alloy bodies and an aluminum hardtop that strengthened the shell's rigidity. The 3.8-liter competition engines were further upgraded with Lucas fuel injection and dry-sump lubrication, while the chassis was modified with a revised suspension geometry and myriad other competition parts. Other than the development example, cars began numbering with S850659 and proceeded sequentially to S850669, all within the standard E-Type numbering. The only signifier of a Lightweight within the chassis number was the S prefix. As Jaguar didn't intend to build enough cars for the Lightweight to be homologated separately, the model was passed off as part of the production E-Type family even though very few parts were shared, and it was never formally marketed or acknowledged in sales materials. The lack of factory marketing has only contributed to the model's increased cachet over the decades, lending it a shroud of mystery. The first two purpose-built Lightweights were completed in time for the 12 Hours of Sebring in March 1963, and team owners Briggs Cunningham and Kjell Qvale each acquired a car. While Bruce McLaren and Walt Hansgen finished 8th overall and second in class for Cunningham, Ed Leslie and Frank Morrill placed 7th overall and first in class for Qvale. At the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June, Cunningham entered three Lightweights with official support from the factory. While the two cars respectively driven by Hansgen and Augie Pabst, and Roy Salvadori and Paul Richards each retired early, the car piloted by Bob Grossman and Cunningham, himself, finished 9th overall and second in class. One can only speculate how well the car might have finished were it not for a two-hour delay caused by a brake issue. Results in non-endurance events during 1963 were even better, with four victories by Hill and a multitude of top-three finishes by Salvadori and Peter Sutcliffe at venues like Goodwood, Silverstone, Mallory Park, and Snetterton. In total, just 12 examples of the E-Type Lightweight were built, with production never actually reaching the original target of 18 cars. Jaguar provided significant factory support for these cars, as they were sold exclusively to preferred customers and friends of managing director Frank "Lofty" England. Among the most celebrated racing sports cars to emerge from postwar Britain, where they were known as GTO Killers, the rare E-Type Lightweights have evolved into the centerpieces of significant private collections around the globe. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED Chassis no. S850667 is the 10th example of the 12 E-Type Lightweights built. It benefits from a short chain of just three long-term caretakers, and displays phenomenal originality, having never been disassembled or rebuilt in any significant manner. Also, the winner of the 1963 Australian GT Championship, this car boasts nearly unparalleled overall quality among its Lightweight brethren. As illustrated by a tremendous file of documentation, the story of S850667 begins with Robert "Bob" Jane, an ex-truck driver from Melbourne, Australia, who raced motorcycles and water-skied for pleasure. By the late 1950s, Mr. Jane had transitioned to sports car racing, becoming a dedicated proponent of Jaguars. He was a principal racing customer of Bryson's in Melbourne, the official Jaguar importer Down Under. Among other models, Bob Jane owned and campaigned a D-Type as well as a red production E-Type fixed head coupe that was a regular competitor on various tracks around Australia. Jane even bored out his D-Type engine to a full 4.2 liters, well before the factory eventually undertook similar developments. One of the continent's most dominant competitors, Jane won the Bathurst 500 four years consecutively and reportedly took 38 straight victories in various Jags. Mr. Jane was also in the tire business, the owner of a chain of stores known as the Bob Jane T-Marts. On November 29, 1961, Jane even became an official Jaguar importer under an agreement with Jack Bryson. The opening of his showroom on Sydney Road in Brunswick was congratulated with newspaper advertisements from companies in motorsports including Repco, Mobil, Lucas, and Bosch. With his rising accomplishments on Australian tracks, Jane was increasingly recognized by the factory's competition department, as corroborated by correspondence. Files from the archives of marque expert Terry McGrath demonstrate that Jane sent a letter to England in the summer of 1963, inquiring about the availability of the new lightweight competition E-Type. Jane would later claim the car was given to him by the manufacturer, but a paper trail illustrates an invoice to Bryson's on Jane's behalf, including £1,400 worth of competition preparation. The factory provided a full 5-page specification sheet for S850667 with a dizzying array of competition features. Dated October 1, 1963, and including Jane's name, the list specifies a 35/40º cast-aluminum cylinder head on the alloy block, which was numbered RA 1353-9S. The rare alloy motor was mated to a Jaguar close-ratio 4-speed competition gearbox. Additional features included a competition crankshaft damper, lightened flywheel, cast aluminum sump, oil pump, and water pump, and a Lucas fuel injection system. The frame was modified to make room for the new front suspension geometry and a larger oil tank. Chassis modifications included a Thornton Tork-Lok differential with a 3.54:1 final-drive ratio, suspension mountings 25% stiffer than a standard E-Type, and 11¼ inch brake discs all around, with aluminum brake cylinders. The pedal gear was lightened and axles were mounted with light alloy disc wheels in the style of the D-Type. Suspension settings were adjusted with a modified rear set-up and anti-roll bars. The completed car shipped for Australia on October 20, 1963, reaching Melbourne the following month. On December 8, the Lightweight debuted at the Calder track in Victoria, winning the Australian GT Championship race while setting a lap record of 51.8 seconds. A few weeks later at Catalina, S850667 won the Production Sports Handicap and the New South Wales Touring Car Championships, followed by the sports and touring car races at Warwick Farm (where it set another lap record), concluding a dominant first month in service. In early 1964 Jane conducted a minor cosmetic modification to the exterior, painting a thin Shell-orange racing stripe along the hood to reflect his sponsorship from the oil company. The Lightweight then took the checkered flag at Calder on January 26, 1964, and at the Sandown A.G.P. meeting on February 9. At the end of the month, it finished second at the Australian Tourist Trophy while timed at 156 mph. Returning to Calder on March 8, the E-Type took second place, and then placed third at the New South Wales Sports Car Championship on March 29. The successful run continued at Sandown Park on April 19, where the E-Type set the fastest lap and placed third in the Victoria Sports Car Championship. Around May 1964, Bob Jane and his brother Bill took the Lightweight to Europe, where they intended to test its mettle in long-distance continental events while stopping by the Brown's Lane factory for a few upgrades. They also intended to socialize with Bruce McLaren on the Formula 1 scene. Correspondence shows that Jane wanted to source a ZF 5-speed gearbox at Coventry, but because the ZF units were in short supply the factory declined to install one. The opportunity was taken, however, to add wider disc wheels and install a Le Mans-style 45-gallon fuel tank, surely appropriate for the immediate goals of running Monza, Rheims, Goodwood, and the Portuguese Grand Prix. At Brands Hatch on July 11, Jane was able to finish 5th in class and 10th overall, but he later complained that an improper final-drive had rendered the car uncompetitive. He was apparently underwhelmed by the strict nature of support from the factory, which refused to undertake more aggressive modifications such as lowering the car's ride height. Chassis no. S850667 returned to Australia by the fall of 1964, though it would not race again until the following season. The Lightweight's success resumed at Bathurst on February 21, 1965, where it was timed at 146.05 mph and established a fastest lap. On May 2, Bill Jane drove the E-Type at the One-Hour Production Car Race at Lakeside in Queensland, finishing third, and a week later the car finished first in both the preliminary and the main races at Bathurst. As the season wore on, the Lightweight found itself competing against far more purpose-built racecars like the rear-engine Lotus 23B. Despite the increasing competition, S850667 still managed a 4th-place finish at the Australian Tourist Trophy at Lakeside, where Bob Jane ran the car without a hardtop. The season concluded with additional runs at Warwick Farm, Lakeside, Sandown, and Longford, though no top finishes were recorded. In 1966, Jane passed driving duties to Spencer Martin, and he won the GT race at Warwick Farm on September 18, setting another fastest lap. Martin then placed third at Sandown on October 16. Around this time Jane unfortunately blew out the original alloy engine block during practice, and this is probably the reason why he offered the car for sale in the publication Racing Car News, though it did not sell. Further documentation from the McGrath archives shows that Bryson's contacted the factory to source a replacement alloy block, even inquiring if one might be available with displacement greater than 3.8 liters. Brown's Lane assured Jane that such displacements had not been satisfactorily tested, but they provided a correct factory alloy replacement block, no. V682558P, which continues to power the car to this day. It should be noted that it is extremely rare to encounter a Lightweight with an original alloy block, as most examples are today powered by reproduction units. The end of the 1966 season basically concluded the E-Type's racing career, and over the following few years it was exhibited as a display piece at Jane's tire outlets. The car essentially remained unused for the next decade, and in November 1980 Bob Jane offered his cars publicly at the Australian Grand Prix auction. He would later comment that selling the Lightweight was the biggest regret of his life. CLOISTERED COLLECTABLE Chassis no. S850667 was then purchased for a shocking $80,000 AD by Peter Briggs, a Jaguar enthusiast from Western Australia who at various points owned a D-Type, an XK120, and an SS100. The new owner commissioned a re-finish in white with large blue racing stripes down the middle, and this is the only occasion the E-Type was ever repainted. Briggs raced the Lightweight a few times and occasionally drove it to his office, and the car was used by John Smith at the National Jaguar Rally event at Wanneroo in September 1984, again setting the fastest lap. In November 1985 and September 1986 the E-Type was presented at the historic events leading up to the Formula 1 Australian Grand Prix. After nearly 20 years of ownership, Briggs offered the rare E-Type for sale in early 1999, consigning the car to an auction in Florida. In preparation for the sale, the Lightweight was submitted to the famed Lynx Engineering in England, perhaps the premier authorities on vintage racing Jaguar C-Types, D-Types, and E-Type Lightweights. According to their written evaluation, the experts at Lynx were amazed by the car's originality, which included the factory-appointed leather seats, 4-speed close-ratio gearbox, and the 45-gallon Le Mans gas tank, as well as the original aluminum body. Currently displaying less than 4,000 original miles, chassis no. S850667 has been fastidiously maintained by just three caretakers over the course of 53 years. All of the original stampings, body tags, and related rivets remain intact, and the car has never been disassembled or restored. Considering that the factory alloy engine-block replacement was supplied in period, and that the factory modifications such as the installation of the Le Mans fuel tank were undertaken during May 1964, this car is basically a time capsule of its configuration as raced by Bob Jane. Possibly the most original Lightweight example in existence, this legendary Jaguar competition car is incredibly well documented, including race histories and photos, factory correspondence and spec sheets, the evaluation from Lynx Engineering, and numerous other records from the archives of Terry McGrath. S850667 offers marque aficionados and dedicated postwar sports car collectors the opportunity to acquire one of the most celebrated Jaguars ever built, one of the twelve legendary E-Type Lightweights, the wolves in sheeps' clothing that proved to be GTO killers.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
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The Ex-Phil Hill, Bill Devin, Count Vittorio Zanon1953 FERRARI 250 MILLE MIGLIA BERLINETTAChassis no. 0312 MMEngine no. 0312 MM

The Ex-Phil Hill, Bill Devin, Count Vittorio Zanon 1953 FERRARI 250 MILLE MIGLIA BERLINETTA Coachwork by Carrozzeria Pinin Farina Chassis no. 0312 MM Engine no. 0312 MM *Superb example of marque and model *A race winner in its debut meeting, driven by Phil Hill *Front cover car in 'Road & Track' July, 1955, issue *Feature story Ferrari in 'Road & Track' July, 1965, issue *Defining Pinin Farina body style launched the Ferrari 250GT line *Powerful 3-litre three-carburettor V12 engine THE FERRARI 250 MILLE MIGLIA BERLINETTA The Ferrari 250 Mille Miglia was tailor-made to compete in frontline long-distance races, following upon the success of the pioneering 3-litre V12-engined 250S Coupe driven by Giovanni Bracco in the 1952 edition of the round-Italy thousand-mile road race. At the 1952 Paris Salon de l'Automobile exhibition, Ferrari showed a more conventional chassis for the new modello 250 3-litre V12-cylinder engine, for which the artistry of Carrozzeria Pinin Farina then created two-seat closed-cabin bodywork with aggressive 'potato-chipper' nose-grille treatment, a muscular, tucked-down tail and panoramic rear window – the defining Ferrari Berlinetta form. The new model was launched at the 1953 Geneva Salon as the Ferrari 250 MM (for Mille Miglia). It was based upon a longer-wheelbase chassis than the 250 S at 2420 mm (95.3 in), with the Berlinetta version some 50 kg (110 lb) heavier than the sister 850 kg (1,874 lb) open-cockpit Barchetta which accompanied it. The V12 engine's dry sump was omitted for the production car, and four-speed transmission was adopted instead of five-speed. Power output increased to 237bhp (177 kW; 240 PS). The 250 MMs made their race debut in the early-season 1953 Giro di Sicilia – round-the island – road race in Sicily, driven by wealthy young gentleman-driver Paolo Marzotto. The veteran Clemente Biondetti then drove a Morelli-bodied 250MM Barchetta home fourth in the 1954 Mille Miglia. In May 1954, 'Road & Track' tested future World Champion Phil Hill's own sister Ferrari 250 MM and recorded 0-60 mph acceleration in just 5.1 seconds, 0-100mph in 13.7. "Never before have I accelerated so rapidly, traveled so fast, or decelerated so suddenly," wrote R&T's Technical Editor. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED Here Bonhams is delighted to offer this simply outstanding example of Ferrari's first 3-litre V12-engined Gran Turismo family – launching the line that extended over the following decade to give us the abiding 250 Tour de France, 250 GT Short-Wheelbase and 250 GTO models. This magnificently-styled, Pinin Farina-bodied, two-seat Berlinetta was sold new to American enthusiast and racer Bill Devin of Fontana, California, in 1953. It was the 17th of 31 Ferrari 250 MMs to be built overall, and the 11th of the 250 MM Pinin Farina Berlinettas, being fitted with their body number '12230'. Factory records tell us that mechanic Sghedoni completed the car's rear axle assembly on March 2, 1953, ready for fitting. Workshop foreman Amos Franchini signed-off the gearbox on March 13 and on April 14 the car's V12 engine was completed by mechanics Turchi and Zagni, under Franchini's watchful eye. The car's chosen steering box was date-stamped that same day, and on April 15 and 28 the engine was dyno-tested by Storchi and Agnani. On May 5 the chassis frame was readied by Cioni and Nicolini and two days later it was delivered to the Pinin Farina plant in Turin, to be bodied. On July 1, 1953, '0312 MM' offered here was signed-off as complete, and it was sold through US agent Luigi Chinetti to his customer, Bill Devin. He made his public debut in this inspiringly aggressive-looking new Ferrari at the Sports Car Club of America San Francisco Region's 3rd Annual Members' Madera race meeting on September 20 that year. He promptly finished third in the novice event before handing over '0312 MM' offered here to fast-rising Santa Monica star driver Phil Hill who promptly won the main event there that day. The late, great, Phil Hill would of course go on to win the Formula 1 Drivers' World Championship title as a works Ferrari team member in 1961. Bill Devin subsequently appeared with this Ferrari 250 MM – resplendent in the American white-and-blue racing livery it still retains today – at Stead Air Force Base in October, 1953, while his brother Gene Devin drove it at March AFB that November. In June 1954 the car was advertised for sale in the monthly journal 'Road & Track' and it was snapped-up by Ken Heavlin who ran a luxury car garage at Grosse Point, Michigan. He part-exchanged a Deutsch-Bonnet Panhard for the Ferrari, which he took to Wacky Arnolt's showroom in Chicago. We understand it was then consigned to Ypsilanti, Michigan, dealer Tom Payne who loaned it to the Henry Ford Museum for their annual 'Sports Car in Review' show. Still wearing Bill Devin's original blue-striped, overall-white, US racing livery, the car was featured in a memorable front cover photograph on the July, 1955, edition of 'Road & Track'. Into 1955 it was again advertised, repainted by this time red with a white stripe. From him it passed subsequently – in 1959 – to Paul Lohmann (who rebuilt the engine) and then to Dr James W. Myers – both of Ann Arbor, Michigan. It was registered in Michigan as 'HS 3887'. The "one-time racing Ferrari..." was advertised in the classified ad section of the February 1961 issue of 'Road & Track'..." and that ad brought into the story William A. Lester – a Convair propulsion engineer of San Diego, California. He owned a 1952 Ferrari Export Ghia Coupe and wanted a car with more competition performance. He responded to the magazine advert and bought '0312 MM' sight unseen. It was shipped by air to Burbank, and trucked from there to Mr Lester's home. The July 1965 issue of 'Road & Track' carried a feature story on '0312 MM' quoting Mr Lester's recollection of the car's delivery: "I'll never forget its arrival in Burbank. I was on hand to watch them unload. There were signs on every window – 'Fragile, aluminum body, take special care'. A fork lift gently lowered the car from the plane. Slowly the lift inched the car toward the ground. An inch or two from the asphalt the pallet suddenly shifted. The car rolled off the pallet toward the nearest shipping crate. A sickening crash told me it had hit, nose first...". Fortunately damage was superficial and was quickly made good. The 'R&T' story went on to describe how the car's very spartan interior featured bare aluminium seats and an uncarpeted alloy floor pan. A roll-over bar had been fitted which prevented use of the passenger seat, and which was quickly removed. The seats were then upholstered in black naugahyde, instrument panel re-finished with black crackle paint, the cabin carpeted and the whole car re-sprayed with GM Swift Red. The magazine story told how "Lester's objective has been to build a competition touring car with concours possibilities..." and how due to contemporarily heavy road traffic "The last time he took the car to his office he was in second gear all the way". Interestingly – remember this was in 1965 – the story mentions "It is interesting to note that, financially, the 12-year-old Ferrari is still a sound investment. Originally, the car sold for about $13,000. Comparable versions today are priced at $16,000. The current value of Lester's Coupe is somewhere around $45,000...". In some ways, times have not changed... On May 30, 1967, Mr Lester eventually sold his much admired, enduringly classic, Ferrari 250 MM Berlinetta to Peter L. Tennant of Houston, Texas, who re-registered it locally as 'NPF 633'. Jack P. Reuter of St Louis, Missouri, became its next owner in April 1968 – new registration 'PG8 094'. He then sold it on after a year to John Carmack of Indianapolis from whose tenure it was sold by prominent enthusiast/dealer Kirk F. White of Philadelphia, PA, whose name would become familiar to racing fans the world over for his later sponsorship of Penske Racing's Ferrari 512M endurance racing Coupe and the team's assorted Indianapolis race cars. On June 9, 1973, the car was finally re-sold by Mr Carmack through John Delamater to furniture dealer Norman Silver of High Point, North Carolina. He then passed it on in 1983 to the well-known racing team patron, oilman John W. Mecom Jr of Houston, Texas. By 1986 this beautifully-proportioned, aggressive-looking Gran Turismo had been returned to its native land, joining the collection of that most respected of connoisseurial collectors, Count Vittorio Zanon di Valgiurata, resident in Turin. He co-drove the car in that year's Mille Miglia Storica event, using temporary registration plates numbered '38289 A6' and in 1987 it again attacked the daunting thousand-mile course from Brescia to Pescara, across to Rome, and then back to Brescia via Florence and Bologna. Count Zanon sold it then to Rudi Pas/Classic Car Associates in Holland, who found a Japanese buyer in Mr Shimada. However, the car was quickly returned to Pas and it was in the winter of 1987-88 that this Ferrari – with its early-career Phil Hill Californian connection – was acquired by Fabrizio Violati of Rome, Italy, and had at last found a settled and truly caring enthusiast home. Fabrizio Violati then entrusted this Ferrari Berlinetta to his daughter to drive in the 1989 edition of the historic Mille Miglia retro event. It then appeared repeatedly in the annual thousand-mile round-Italy run, while being maintained, preserved and displayed in-between-times within Signor Violati's superb Collezione Maranello Rosso. Luigi 'Coco' Chinetti drove the car in 1993 during Violati's 40th anniversary Ferrari 250 tour in Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany. It has always been very highly regarded as a particularly fine example of its marque and model. Since 2000, following the Maranello Rosso Collection's re-housing within fine new premises at Falciano, '0312 MM' has remained one of its most desirable, mouth-watering and evocative of Ferrari stars. It was painstakingly restored many years ago with its original-scheme Bill Devin 1953 exterior livery, and extensively quilt-padded interior trimming in dark blue. We would leave the last words upon this highly desirable and intensely useable race/rally/touring Ferrari Berlinetta to the Collezione Maranello Rosso's own pamphlet description: "The most significant thing about this car...is that chassis no. 0312"- more correctly its 250 MM line – "...was the first time that car designer 'Battista 'Pinin' Farina worked with Enzo Ferrari, who at that time was best known for manufacturing powerful engines. Chassis no. 0312 was the curtain raiser on true Ferrari style, an innate elegance which was soon to become known around the globe". Indeed... Without reserve

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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1939 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Special Roadster by Sindelfingen

115/180 bhp, 5,410 cc supercharged OHV inline eight-cylinder engine, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent coil-spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 129.5 in. A one-off, owner-commissioned 540 K Special Roadster Built for Rolf Horn of Berlin with rare five-speed transmission Formerly owned by Alf Johansson and the Lyon Family Collection Freshly restored Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award winner Mercedes-Benz’s success with the 500 K was aided by the continuing defaults of its sporting luxury competitors as the Great Depression worked its way through the ranks of society, politics, royalty, and finance. In 1936, the company followed up on that success with the 540 K. Regarded by many and respected by all as the high point of the Classic Era among German automobiles, the 540 K reflected the restless pursuit of perfection by Mercedes-Benz’s engineers, technicians, and craftsmen, and by the coachbuilders of the Sindelfingen Werke. The ultimate 540 K was the Special Roadster. Constructed on a nearly 130-inch wheelbase chassis and stretching over 17.5 feet in length, it was a massive automobile in which to accommodate only two passengers. Yet, that awe-inspiring blend of cost-be-cursed size, performance, and style is what gave it a commanding presence that remains palpable in any surroundings. Better still, Hermann Ahrens and the Sindelfingen designers succeeded in so skillfully blending the car’s styling elements that its overall proportions are harmonious. Subtle, bright accents complement and outline the body elements, punctuated by functional and stylish details that draw the eye and mitigate the car’s size. The Special Roadster’s imposing visage was matched by equally impressive performance. A stiff frame and fully independent suspension supported its nearly three-ton mass effortlessly, soaking up irregularities in highways and, at its best, showing the 540 K’s relaxed 85 mph cruising speed on the Autobahn. Mercedes-Benz fitted a camber compensator spring to the 540 K, to offset the swing axle independent rear suspension’s tendency to sudden camber changes, and the resulting driving experience is balanced and satisfying. The Special Roadster was no sports car; instead, it was the original grand tourer, a car in which two people could cover vast distances in comfort and at an outstanding clip. Of the 419 chassis delivered during the 540 K’s production life, from 1935 to 1939, it is believed that only 25 were Special Roadsters. Few of those were one-off designs, and fewer still were built on the most desirable later chassis with five-speed transmission, as, by 1939, most of Europe was being drawn into growing darkness. Fortunately, Rolf Horn could still see the light. ROLF HORN’S SPECIAL ROADSTER Chassis number 408383 was completed for Rolf Horn of Gebrüder Horn in Berlin, in August of 1939. Rolf, along with his brother, were proprietors of one of the city’s most exclusive art and interior décor boutiques. As a late 540 K, it was equipped with the five-speed transmission with fifth gear overdrive that was introduced that year, and it is, in fact, the latest known surviving Special Roadster, perhaps even the last one built. It is believed that Horn had a major influence in the conception and design of the car, which was not surprising, as he was a man who regularly dealt in beautiful art and consequently had an advanced understanding of aesthetics. While retaining the traditional chassis layout and basic body lines of the last style of Special Roadster produced by Sindelfingen, it further possesses some of the more typical roadster styling cues, including the set-back radiator, which emphasizes the powerful appearance of the front end; mother-of-pearl dash; a long hood; and a fully disappearing top. The similarities, however, end there. Separating it from other Special Roadsters are features likely directed by Horn himself, namely the cut-down doors, a cue seen on the very first series of roadsters introduced; the two rows of louvers on the hood side panels—later cars typically had two rows of screens; and the fully skirted French-influenced fenders, which are almost teardrop-shaped and are unique to this car. Additionally, the sweeping running boards, characteristic of all other Special Roadsters, were eliminated in favor of sculpted frame covers. The low doors have roll-up windows and rise abruptly past the hinges to a hard boot cover over the folded top, which gives the rear deck a smooth, aerodynamic surface and taper. While the windshield is a single piece, it is sharply raked to fall in line with the cowl, and it can be opened for ventilation. Most notably, a slim chrome beltline traces the hood break and then sweeps downward, paralleling the door tops before tapering to a fine point at the rear fenders. The coachwork is liveried in rich dark blue with matching leather upholstery; the chassis beneath is essentially hidden below the body and fenders. Even the 540 K’s signature outside exhaust pipes subtly drop through the right front fender, almost out of sight, and they emerge as a dual exhaust below the rear bumper. Bright chrome spoke wheels with body color hubcap detailing and Mercedes-Benz’s signature wheel-balancing weights are accented by the blackwall tires. Accessories are few: a combination spotlight and rearview mirror for the driver and a Telefunken radio, with German city bands marked on its dial. Not long after Mr. Horn took delivery of his bespoke creation, luxuries such as automobiles with high fuel consumption became impossible. At this point the car was put into storage and vanished from sight. THE SURVIVOR The current owner has gone to significant lengths to uncover more of the early history of the Horn Special Roadster, including interviewing previous owner Alf Johansson. In 1960, the Swedish Johansson traveled to Russia and began work as a translator, ultimately residing in Moscow for a decade. A car enthusiast, he made contact with Russian enthusiast Arthur Leshtin, who located a great many important classics in Soviet Bloc countries, including multiple supercharged Mercedes-Benz. Discovered in what was now Soviet-controlled East Berlin in 1949, the car was on blocks just as Rolf Horn left it with low mileage. It was driven by Soviet diplomats until 1953, when the Soviet-produced ZIL automobiles became available, and eventually made its way to Russia. Surviving historic images not only emphasize the intact condition of the car, but the visible registration numbers place it in Moscow by the late 1950s. When Leshtin acquired the car it was still in its original black livery; he owned it for a period in which he repainted it white and used it, even taking it along with his wife on a tour through Crimea. Leshtin eventually repainted the car in its original black, and sold it to Johansson around 1964, after which the new owner used it as a regular mode of transportation in Moscow for three years. The 540 K’s exportation from Soviet-era Russia in 1967 was no less challenging; ultimately, in a daring show of bravado, Johansson simply drove it over the border into Sweden. As a result, he should be credited with preserving a very valuable piece of Mercedes-Benz history for future generations. After a decade of enjoying his car in Sweden, Johansson sold the Special Roadster to American collector-dealer Tom Barrett. Following ownership by the Imperial Palace, it eventually passed into the well-known Lyon Family Collection, in California. For over two decades, it was carefully maintained in their stable of the world’s finest automobiles, and it was treated to regular maintenance by professionals familiar with his bevy of supercharged Mercedes-Benz. In 2011, the 540 K was inspected by two veteran experts from Mercedes-Benz Classic Germany, who concluded, in their expert opinion, that this car is a matching-numbers example. The engine is original to the chassis and retains the original number plate. The transmission is of the correct series, as is the steering box, and all of the correct stampings can be found throughout, including on the bodywork. The body number was found on numerous parts, further corroborating the car’s originality. While it has continued to maintain such originality, including the original factory firewall data plates, the Horn Special Roadster has, from 2011 to 2012, been lovingly restored. Great care was taken by its new owner, working with specialist Jim Friswold, to retain all of the correctly numbered components, and every nut and bolt was removed and returned to its original splendor. The result of the superbly finished restoration was a well-earned Second in Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2012. Shortly after acquiring it, the current owner commissioned additional cosmetic and mechanical fettling by RM Auto Restoration, which included sorting of the suspension and steering, brakes, fuel system, and engine tuning. Full service invoices of the hundreds of hours spent on this technical and detail work are on file for review by interested parties, and the 540 K now runs and drives at full speed with supercharger whining as its legendary reputation suggests. Accolades enjoyed by this Special Roadster include a Best in Class at the Amelia Island and Pinehurst Concours d’Elegance; Best of Show at Mar-a-Lago; Best of Show, Trophy Division at Winter Park; and Best European Classic at Boca Raton, all in 2014. The following year, it was recognized with a People's Choice award at Hilton Head and Judge’s Choice at Lake Mirror. The 540 K Special Roadster is among the most instantly recognizable, valuable, and desirable of all automobiles built during the Classic Era, and acquiring one is an instant mark of discerning taste and prestige for any collector. It is, quite simply, the ultimate bragging right. Offered here is the opportunity to purchase not only a Special Roadster, but also one that may have been the last built and boasts a fully unique, owner-commissioned design, with features that elegantly bridge the gap between 1930s elegance and 1950s streamlining. It also offers the advantages of a five-speed overdrive transmission, matching numbers, a wonderful story, and an excellent restoration. It is, quite simply, a singular car. Chassis no. 408383 Engine no. 408383

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-20
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1959 Aston Martin DB4GT Prototype

‘Design Project’ for all Aston Martin DB4GTs One of the most famous of all Aston Martins and a one-off Complete with original delivery engine Intimately known to Aston Martin historian and expert Stephen Archer DESIGN PROJECT 199 It is easy to forget that when Aston Martin announced the DB4 in September 1958, it was the world’s most advanced GT car. Indeed, demand for the new model would vastly outstrip supply. Such was the racing DNA in Aston Martin that, six months before the DB4 was announced, the project to create a lightweight, competition version of the DB4 was sanctioned by John Wyer. That project was DP199. Once back from the DB4 launch in Paris, the task of designing the DB4GT started in earnest with Harold Beach and Ted Cutting as the designers. John Wyer saw it as a straightforward task and told Ted “to cut five inches out of a DB4 and produce a cheap and cheerful GT car.” Wyer’s dry wit was to the fore, but the design team set about the project with the attention to detail that was typical of Aston Martin’s exceptional engineers. The shortening was behind the front seats, giving it shorter doors and a wheelbase of 93 inches. DP199, the prototype DB4GT, was made by cutting a very early DB4 platform chassis in two with the floor join reinforced by a fishplate, still visible today. The DB4GT was designed with two seats and a luggage platform in the rear. The doors were lightweight aluminum, and the boot was occupied by a 30-gallon fuel tank with the spare wheel on top, while the entire body skin was in thinner 18-gauge aluminum alloy. The engine was uprated with a twin plug head and triple 45 DCOE Webers. A front oil cooler scoop added to the air intake, and the car ran on Borrani light alloy wheels with uprated Girling brakes. The streamlined body lines had a purposeful, aggressive look in keeping with its intended purpose as a very rapid GT car and gentlemen’s racer. The DB4GT, with its higher compression ratio of 9:1, featured larger inlet and exhaust valves and uprated camshafts. The twin plug cylinder head was designed specifically for the DB4GT by Ted Cutting, while the transmission was a David Brown four-speed close-ratio synchromesh gearbox, mated to a Borg & Beck nine-inch twin-plate clutch. DP199 ON THE TRACK The prototype, DP199/1 (there was never a /2) first ran in March of 1959. It was then taken to Le Mans for the annual test on 26 April 1959 in preparation for the 24-hour race that June. Hubert Patthey drove the car and did a best time of 4 minutes and 38 seconds. This suggests that the car was run at the test with a 3.7-liter engine because the fastest time achieved in practice in June for the race was 4:46 when the car was fitted with a smaller engine. Appropriately, the first public showing of DP199 – four months before its official launch – was at Silverstone. Stirling Moss and Reg Parnell had asked Wyer to enter the car in a 12-lap GT race at the 2 May International Trophy Meeting. The car had only been back from Le Mans for a few days. Wyer was nervous about racing it at Silverstone so early in its development but need not have been; Moss put the car on pole position, won the race, and set a lap record. His average race speed was 87 mph, and he never used more than 5,500 rpm. In order for the car to be accepted for the race, John Wyer had to sign an undertaking that the prototype would go into production. Probably due to nervousness of using the untested GT engine at Le Mans and Silverstone, the car ran with a single plug engine, most likely a 3.7-liter DBR2 engine giving a respectable 280 bhp. Aston Martin doubtless avoided using the twin plug version of the DBR2 engine to reduce the chance of a protest from the other teams! Stirling Moss recalled, “All the road-going Astons seemed muscular and strong . . . but the DB4GT was also quite well balanced. It had bags of power and when I drove it against Jaguar saloons, it was no contest.” The Silverstone debut was a publicity triumph. DP199 was entered at Le Mans in June under the banner of ‘Ecurie Trois Chevrons’ and driven by Aston’s Swiss distributor Hubert Patthey with co-driver Renaud Calderari. For this race the engine was a 3.0-liter, the same type as was used in the DBR3 engine that made a one-off appearance a year earlier. The engine number for Le Mans was RDP 5066-2. The records say that it was RDP 5066-1, but the photographic evidence says otherwise, unless engine 2 was only used in practice. The capacity reduction was achieved with a short stroke crankshaft of 75 mm but a standard bore of 92 mm. This engine is of special relevance to the GT, as it was the first time the twin-plug head was used. It was a dry sump set-up and produced 238 bhp at 6,500 rpm. The oil tank was located in the boot. The front suspension then, as now, was polished forgings as seen on project cars, and it is probable that this was the actual suspension originally seen on the DBR3 for its one-off outing. At Le Mans, the engine ran the number six bearing after just 21 laps. Following Le Mans, the car was returned to Feltham, where it was converted into what would become road specification and prepared for numerous publicity shots. The single oil cooler scoop was replaced by two smaller scoops that were standard on the first 23 DB4GTs. It was shown at the launch of the DB4GT in London in October 1959. DP199, then registered 845 XMV, entered the second phase of its life as a press car and more significantly as a development car. In 1960, DP199 was tested at MIRA by Reg Parnell, who was able to go from 0 to 100 mph and back to zero again in 24 seconds. Later he would reduce this to 20 seconds with a taller rear axle. Press reaction after the launch was very positive. Dennis May drove DP199 and wrote in Car and Driver, “It does our English ego good to doubt whether this Englishman’s car is in much danger of having its feat eclipsed by foreign rivals of comparable rating. Or any rating.” The DB4GT in all its guises had another four years at the top level of international motorsport, and Aston Martin refined the DB4GT into the true thoroughbred that we know today. It also, of course, inspired the underpinnings of the legendary Zagato version and DP214. Aston Martin would go on to build 75 DB4GTs plus 20 Zagatos. But DP199 was the first and foremost of all the cars. It is the seminal DB4GT and progenitor of all subsequent GT Aston Martins to this day. STAGGERING ORIGINALITY AND UNPARALLELED IMPORTANCE DP199 was sold in June 1961 to the Hon Gerald Lascelles, the Queen’s cousin. Gerald had been friend to, and team member of, the Works for a number of years, and his loyalty was doubtless rewarded by the opportunity to acquire this car. Though the first car, it was the 69th DB4GT to be delivered. By this time, development work on the GT had moved onto other areas, including the Project cars; the ‘mule’ for that work would be 0167. When DP199 was delivered, it was with at least the third engine in its Aston Martin days and was numbered as it is today, 370/0184/GT. Works records show that it was commissioned in July 1959 and was numbered 184. The zero would have been added later; in April 1960, Aston Martin switched all DB4GT engine numbering to four digits being prefixed with a zero – hence 0184. Later in 1961, the DB4GT Zagato ‘0184’ appeared with engine number 0184, but Works records show the two separate engines with different block and head numbers. The original DP199 build card dating from June 1961 has been inspected to support this apparent anomaly. The block in DP199 is the correct, very early type with the side breather mount and the stampings on the block are authentic with the original casting intact. Lascelles enjoyed the car greatly and kept it at Fort Belvedere. Factory records show that Aston Martin maintained the car until he sold it in 1965 to Mike Salmon, who would have known Lascelles well. Salmon was, of course, a highly noted Aston Martin racer and retained DP199 until 1971. It was then enjoyed by a handful of enthusiasts and notable gentleman drivers of the era such as Chris Stewart, John Norrington, David Preece, Anthony Mayman, and Jimmy Wilson. After being sold to the current owner in 1986, Aston Martin was commissioned to restore the car in 1989. Under the personal guidance of Kingsley Riding-Felce, DP199 was returned to its Le Mans 1959 guise but kept the 3.7-liter engine. Kingsley recalled: “[the owner] was a great patron and customer and was keen to preserve the car rather than rebuild it. We went to great lengths to retain everything that was original. We even riveted the fish plate back onto the chassis!” The car appeared at the Aston Martin festival at Monterey in 1989 and went on to win its class at Pebble Beach in the same year. Since that time the car has had two other owners, including notable Aston Martin enthusiast Rowan Atkinson, before returning to the current owner, who restored the car in 1989. DP199 has, in recent years, been greatly enjoyed on road and track, but it has never been subject to any enhancements that would detract from its originality. Remarkably, the car appears never to have had a crash and certainly the bodywork is highly original. In June 2017, the car was inspected and driven by Stephen Archer, noted Aston Martin historian and author of the DB4GT book by Palawan. Stephen commented: Its restoration in 1989 concerned me because in those less enlightened times, many restorations served to destroy originality rather than respect and conserve it. I need not have worried; the work by Aston Martin in 1989 and subsequent care by R.S. Williams has left us with a car of huge importance that is frankly staggeringly original. To view the unique chassis and compare it to a standard GT is to view a true DP car with nods to the needs of racing and evidence of the sheer genius of the designers at Aston Martin. To see the original polished wishbones, the Project car style telescopic rear dampers and the unique driver’s wing vent is to take a step back in time. So many details, such as the pedals, the rear parcel shelf design, and the ultra thin lightweight bonnet, all scream ‘designed for the road, built for the track.’ What I found most exciting was to see the original metal around the headlight area and the unique shape of the nose on this car, where it is apparent that they took a DB4 front end and modified the headlight design. It is as if the car left the Works yesterday. I have inspected a lot of Aston Martins, but this one stirs the soul more than most because of its originality, history, and importance in the GT lineage of Aston Martin models. Stephen then went on to drive the car for some distance on a test track. To slip into an ex-Moss seat is always special, and the DBR1-style seats add to the sense of occasion. Though on paper this car is not hugely different to a standard GT, the many small differences add up to a very different experience. The engine is clearly in a state of race tune and once ‘on song’ above 2,500 rpm starts to really come to life. The David Brown gearbox can feel notchy in some cars, but in DP199 it is easy, fast, and precise. Brakes are firm and without a servo, the heaviness is compensated by fantastic ‘feel.’ This car feels light, lively, and easy to drive fast, and it is surprisingly quick. It is communicative, tight, and precise. It inspires confidence. It asks to be driven and is hugely rewarding. That it was conceived as a gentleman’s racer 59 years ago is hard to believe. It is a wonderful Aston Martin and without doubt I would suggest the most important DB4GT by some margin. Addendum Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this lot if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Chassis no. DP199/1 Engine no. 370/0184/GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
Show price

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/C by Scaglietti

275 bhp at 7,700 rpm, 3,286 cc Tipo 213/Comp. dry-sump V-12 engine with three Weber 40 DFI3 carburettors, five-speed synchromesh transaxle, four-wheel independent coil-spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm The 9th of 12 examples produced Fully matching-numbers example with Ferrari Classiche certification Frequent vintage rally participant Recently fully serviced by Ferrari specialists Perhaps the finest, most original example of its kind Creating a replacement for the hugely successful 250 series of Ferraris was a daunting task for the engineers at Maranello. As the 250 series was highly successful both in the showroom and on the track, it effectively etched Ferrari’s name into the automotive history books. With numerous wins at Le Mans, the Tour de France, Sebring, and Daytona, the 250 LWB TdF, the 250 SWB, the 250 LM, and the 250 GTO were the gold standard of sports car racing, all designed and engineered under the same roof no less, and now Ferrari needed to top their own series of world-beating sports cars with something even more extraordinary. In terms of improving on the competition pedigree of its predecessor, the 275 standard platform proved to be an excellent starting point. It possessed a nearly perfect weight distribution, which was largely thanks to an engine that was mounted low and further back on the chassis than usual and a counter-balance by a new five-speed transaxle. It also boasted a fully independent suspension both in the front and rear, as well as servo-assisted disc brakes. For 1965, Ferrari constructed three lightweight GTB Competizione Speciales, which were graced with 250 LM dry-sump racing engines in order to try the model’s hand in competition. Whilst the Scuderia only managed a 2nd in class finish at the Nürburgring, following a DNF at the Targa Florio with 06885, Ecurie Francorchamps campaigned the very same car (chassis 06885) at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it placed an amazing 1st in class and an even more monumental 3rd overall, which was an incredible result for a GT car duelling with sport prototypes. It was this success that encouraged Enzo Ferrari to develop the car further for the 1966 season. Building on their results from the 1965 season, Ferrari launched a new model in the GT class for the 1966 season. The car, dubbed the 275 GTB Berlinetta Competizione, or 275 GTB/C for short, was designed around a completely new chassis, which was specifically designed for this model. The chassis, designated Tipo 590A by the factory, boasted reinforced wheel hubs, and it was lighter and stronger than the standard 275 chassis. Ferrari also chose to fit an outside oil-filler cap on the top of the passenger-side front wing, allowing for access to the oil tank. The Borrani reinforced wire wheels were 7x15 in the front and 7.5x15 in the back, specific to the GTB/C, and they were shod with Dunlop Racing tyres; whereas, the standard 275 was fitted with 14-inch wheels. At the heart of the 275 GTB/C was the new Tipo 213/Comp. engine, which was developed from a Works car that campaigned in 1965. The engine block itself received extra reinforcement in the form of external ribs, and the casings of the sump, timing chain, cam cover, and bell housing were built in Elektron, much like the other Ferrari competizione models. Other improvements included higher-lift camshafts, reinforced pistons, special valves, and a special crankshaft. The GTB/C was also graced with dry-sump lubrication, allowing the engine to sit lower in the chassis in an effort to further reduce the car’s centre of gravity. When homologation papers were filed, Ferrari somehow neglected to mention to the FIA that the 275 GTB had a six-carburettor option, so the GTB/C was homologated for a three-carburettor manifold only. In order to make up for this mistake, a trio of larger, specific 40 DFI3 units was used, which helped the motor yield 275 brake horsepower at 7,700 rpm. The GTB/C also lacked rigid torque tubes; however, an exposed driveline meant less weight and facilitated quick repair, if needed, during a race, especially on the clutch. Of course, the car needed a body that was just as beautiful on the outside as its mechanical components on the inside, and the design of the 275 GTB won just as many hearts as it did races. Pininfarina came through with another breath-taking design that was in turn gorgeously executed by the craftsmen at Scaglietti. With a short rear deck, long, shark-like nose, and wider than the standard road cars, the 275 GTB/C’s bodywork was just as elegant as it was imposing, and it looked at home tearing down the Mulsanne Straight at Le Mans or sitting in front of the Hotel de Paris. Extremely thin aluminium bodywork was utilised for the GTB/C to shave an extra few grams of weight, and Ferrari designers chose not to carry over the three vents and outside filler cap from the 7,000 series cars. CHASSIS NUMBER 09067 According to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, this 275 GTB/C began its life in the summer of 1966. The chassis, bearing number 09067, was sent to Scaglietti’s facilities in Modena at the end of May, and the engine was assembled and dyno-tested by Ferrari at the end of July, providing 272 brake horsepower at 7,700 rpm. Ferrari issued a Certificate of Origin for the car on 16 August, and it was listed as sold by Ferrari S.p.A. on that same day to its first owner, not a racing team such as N.A.R.T. or Maranello Concessioniare, but a private company, Editoriale Il Borgo di Luciano Conti e C. S.a.s., of Milan. The car was then registered for road use under a Bologna license plate, BO 279382. It was retained under this ownership for less than a year before it was sold in March 1967 to Enrico Tronconi, of Milan, and re-registered under Milanese license MI F 52914. Also strange for a competition-specification model, 09067 would not see action on the race track until it fell into the hands of its third owner, Vito Figlioli of Milan, in 1969. The car saw its first competitive outing at the hands of a man named Marchesi at the Colle San Eusebio Hill Climb. A picture of the car in the event was featured in the 1968-1969-1970 Ferrari Yearbook, in the section “The Privateers Who Win”. In 1973, the car left Figlioli’s ownership and was purchased by Dr Paul Schouwenburg, of Amsterdam. For the next 22 years, the car remained in the Netherlands, in the hands of Cees Fokke Bosch from 1975 to 1985, and then it was purchased by Nico Koel in 1985. Koel also kept the car in his ownership for 10 years, before selling it to its current custodian in 1995. At that time, chassis number 09067 was registered in the United Kingdom. It has seen frequent use in the form of vintage tours and rallies, including numerous outings on the Tour de France Automobile, Tour Auto. In addition, it made an appearance at the 40th anniversary of the Ferrari 250 GTO reunion in 2002 and attended the 275 Anniversary Tour in 2004. This 275 GTB/C has been serviced by Chris Holly and his team of Ferrari specialists at The Light Car Company, who have continuously maintained the car since it was purchased by the current owner, and it recently underwent a full service, preparing it for the anticipation of more use with its next custodian. Chassis 09067 is finished in its original colour combination of Rosso Chiaro over the original Nero leather interior, and it has clearly seen careful preservation and care for its entire life. Attesting to its mechanical originality, it has also received Classiche certification. Like most racing cars, many 275 GTB/Cs were subject to hard use and abuse at the hands of their original owners, with few surviving their early racing careers unscathed. As this example did not see frequent race use in its early days, it has undoubtedly become one of the most original 275 GTB/Cs in existence. As it still retains its original colour combination, interior, drivetrain, and character that accompanied the car when it was sold new, this GTB/C would surely be welcome at concours lawns around the world. It would also unquestionably be welcomed back on the Tour Auto and would remain eligible for similar events. Amongst the hierarchy of alloy-bodied GT Ferraris, such as the 250 Tour de France, the 250 SWB Competizione, and the 250 GTO, the GTB/C sits near the top of the pyramid for obvious performance and rarity reasons. Offered here is a wonderfully pure example of those token few. Moteur V-12 Tipo 213/Comp., carter sec, 3 286 cm3, 275 ch à 7 700 tr/mn, trois carburateurs Weber 40 DFI3, boîte manuelle cinq rapports transaxle, suspension à quatre roues indépendantes avec ressorts hélicoïdaux, freins hydrauliques à disques sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 400 mm. Le neuvième de 12 exemplaires produits Tous numéros concordants avec certification Ferrari Classiche Participations fréquentes en rallye historique Révision complète récente par un spécialiste Ferrari Peut-être l'exemplaire le meilleur et le plus original de son genre Concevoir une remplaçante pour les Ferrari 250, gamme extrêmement réussie, constituait pour les ingénieurs de Maranello un défi difficile. La série des 250 ayant remporté d'immenses succès tant commercialement que sur les circuits de course, elle a véritablement gravé le nom de Ferrari dans les livres d'histoire automobile. Avec de nombreuses victoire au Mans, au Tour de France, à Sebring et à Daytona, les 250 châssis long TdF, 250 châssis court, 250 LM et 250 GTO ont constitué la référence absolue en matière de compétition d'endurance. Toutes étaient conçues et fabriquées sous le même toit et, après elles, Ferrari devait imaginer quelque chose d'encore plus extraordinaire pour succéder à cette série ayant assuré la réputation de la marque. Pour poursuivre sur la lancée du pedigree en compétition de sa devancière, la plateforme 275 standard s'est révélée une excellente base de départ. Elle offrait une répartition de poids presque parfaite, qu'elle devait largement à la position du moteur, très bas dans le châssis et encore plus en arrière qu'habituellement, ainsi qu'à une nouvelle boîte de vitesses cinq rapports accolée au pont arrière. De plus, elle était équipée d'une suspension complètement indépendante, et de freins à disques assistés. En 1965, Ferrari produisait trois GTB Competizione Speciale allégées, qui recevaient un moteur 250 LM compétition à carter sec, pour tester les capacités de la voiture en course. Alors que la Scuderia ne faisait pas mieux qu'une deuxième place de catégorie au Nürburgring, suivie par un abandon à la Targa Florio, avec le châssis 06885, l'Écurie Francorchamps obtenait avec la même voiture (06885) de meilleurs résultats : aux 24 Heures du Mans 1965, la voiture remportait sa catégorie et surtout terminait troisième au classement général, un résultat étonnant pour une machine de catégorie GT se battant contre des sports-prototypes. Ce succès encourageait Enzo Ferrari à poursuivre le développement de la voiture pour la saison 1966. Fort de ses résultats lors de la saison 1965, Ferrari lançait un nouveau modèle en catégorie GT pour la saison 1966. Nommée 275 GTB Berlinetta Competizione, ou 275 GTB/C, la voiture était réalisée autour d'un nouveau châssis conçu spécialement pour elle. Dénommé Tipo 590A par l'usine, ce châssis comportait des moyeux renforcés, tout en étant à la fois plus léger et plus résistant que la plateforme 275 standard. Ferrari choisissait aussi de placer une goulotte de réservoir d'huile débouchant au sommet de l'aile avant droite, permettant un accès direct au réservoir. Spécifiques à la GTB/C, les jantes Borrani renforcées à rayons étaient de dimensions 7x15 à l'avant et 7.5x15 à l'arrière, chaussées de pneus Dunlop Racing ; de son côté, la 275 standard était équipée de jantes de 14 pouces. Au cœur de la 275 GTB/C se trouvait le nouveau moteur Tipo 213/Comp., issu de celui d'une voiture d'usine ayant pris part à la saison 1965. Le bloc moteur était renforcé par des nervures extérieurs et le carter inférieur, le carter de distribution, le cache-arbre à cames et la cloche d'embrayage étaient en Elektron, comme les autres Ferrari de compétition. D'autres améliorations concernaient des arbres à cames plus « pointus », des pistons renforcés, des soupapes et un vilebrequin spéciaux. La lubrification de la GTB/C s'effectuait par un circuit à carter sec, ce qui permettait d'abaisser le moteur dans le châssis et de réduire la hauteur du centre de gravité. En remplissant les documents d'homologation, il se trouve que Ferrari négligeait de mentionner à la FIA que la 275 GTB comportait une option six carburateurs, si bien que la GTB/C était homologuée avec un collecteur à trois carburateurs seulement. Pour compenser cette erreur, trois carburateurs 40 DFI3 spécifiques, plus gros, étaient utilisés, ce qui participait à obtenir une puissance de 275 ch à 7 700 tr/mn. La GTB/C ne comportait pas non plus de tube de poussée rigide ; mais un arbre de transmission extérieur permettait de gagner du poids et facilitait les réparations au cours d'une compétition, en particulier sur l'embrayage. Bien entendu, la voiture avait besoin d'une carrosserie dont l'esthétique réponde à la qualité mécanique, et le dessin de la 275 GTB gagnait les cœurs autant que les courses. Pininfarina proposait à nouveau une ligne à couper le souffle, magnifiquement mise en forme par les artisans de Scaglietti. Avec un arrière court et un capot long en gueule de requin, tout en étant plus large que les voitures de route habituelles, la carrosserie de la 275 GTB/C était aussi élégante qu'impressionnante, à sa place autant sur la ligne droite des Hunaudières que devant l'Hôtel de Paris, à Monaco. Des panneaux d'aluminium très fins étaient utilisés sur la GTB/C pour gagner quelques kg, et les ingénieurs Ferrari décidaient de ne pas conserver les trois prises d'air ni le bouchon de réservoir extérieur des voitures de la série 7 000. NUMÉRO DE CHÂSSIS 09067 D'après l'historien Ferrari réputé Marcel Massini, cette 275 GTB/C a commencé sa carrière en été 1966. Le châssis, portant le numéro 09067, était envoyé à l'atelier de Scaglietti à Modène à la fin du mois de mai, et le moteur était assemblé et testé au banc d'essai par Ferrari à la fin du mois de juillet, affichant la puissance de 272 ch à 7 700 tr/mn. Ferrari délivrait le 16 août un Certificat d'Origine pour la voiture, qui était listée comme vendue le même jour par Ferrari S.p.A, non pas à une écurie de course comme le N.A.R.T. ou Maranello Concessionaires, mais à une société privée, Editoriale Il Borgo di Luciano Conti e C. S.a.s., de Milan. La voiture était ensuite immatriculée pour la route avec une plaque de Bologne, BO 279382. Elle restait moins d'un an chez ce premier propriétaire, qui la cédait en mars 1967 à Enrico Tronconi, de Milan, qui l'immatriculait à Milan MI F 52914. Aussi curieux que cela puisse paraître pour une voiture aux spécifications compétition, 09067 n'a pas connu la course avant d'arriver chez son troisième propriétaire, Vito Figlioli, de Milan, in 1969. Ainsi, elle connaissait sa première sortie en compétition entre les mains d'un individu du nom de Marchesi, à la course de côte de Colle San Eusebio. Une photo de la voiture lors de l'événement était publiée dans le Ferrari Yearbook 1968-1969-1970, dans la rubrique « I Clienti Che Vincóno ». En 1973, cette 275 GTB/C était vendue par Figlioli au Dr Paul Schouwenburg, d'Amsterdam. Au cours des 22 années qui ont suivi, la voiture est restée aux Pays-Bas, d'abord entre les mains de Cees Fokke Bosch, de 1975 à 1985, puis chez Nico Koel à partir de 1985. Celui-ci la gardait 10 ans, avant de la céder en 1995 à son propriétaire actuel. Ce châssis n°09067 prenait alors une immatriculation anglaise. Cette voiture a pris part à de nombreuses épreuves historiques, randonnées ou rallyes, dont plusieurs participations au Tour Auto. Par ailleurs, elle a fait en 2002 une apparition à la réunion du 40e anniversaire de la Ferrari GTO et a participé au 275 Anniversary Tour en 2004. Cette 275 GTB/C a été suivie par Chris Holly et son équipe de spécialistes Ferrari de The Light Car Company, qui l'ont entretenue sans interruption depuis son achat par le présent propriétaire ; elle a récemment bénéficié d'une révision complète, de façon à ce qu'elle soit prête à être utilisée par son prochain acquéreur. Elle se présente dans sa combinaison de couleurs d'origine, avec une peinture Rosso Chiaro et un intérieur Nero, et elle a connu de toute évidence un entretien soigné pendant toute son existence. Attestant de l'authenticité de sa mécanique, elle a également reçu un certificat de Ferrari Classiche. Comme la plupart des machines de course, de nombreuses 275 GTB/C ont été l'objet d'une utilisation sans retenue entre les mains de leurs premiers propriétaires, et rares sont celles qui sont sorties intactes de leur carrière en compétition. Cet exemplaire n'ayant pas connu d'usage fréquent en course au début de sa carrière, il est sans aucun doute resté l'un des plus originaux parmi les 275 GTB/C encore en existence. Cette voiture comporte encore son moteur, son intérieur et sa combinaison de couleurs d'origine et, en tant que telle, elle sera bienvenue sur les pelouses de tous les concours internationaux. Bien évidemment, elle sera également accueillie à nouveau au Tour Auto et reste éligible pour tous événements comparables. Dans la hiérarchie des Ferrari GT à carrosserie aluminium, telle que les 250 Tour de France, 250 GT châssis court Competizione et 250 GTO, la GTB/C n'est pas loin du sommet de la pyramide pour d'évidentes raisons de performances et de rareté. Ce qui est proposé ici est un exemplaire magnifiquement pur de cette toute petite série. Chassis no. 09067 Engine no. 09067

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2014-05-10
Hammer price
Show price

1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

225 bhp at 7,000 rpm, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber carburettors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm The eighth of nine 1956 250 GT Berlinetta Competiziones Outstanding period racing history Top 10 finishes at the 1956 and 1957 Tour de France Automobile Matching-numbers example and certified by Ferrari Classiche Original user manual, spare parts catalogue, and comprehensive history file included THE “TOUR DE FRANCE” When Ferrari’s first 250 GT Berlinetta left the factory gates in March 1956, one can only assume that the engineers that had built and designed the car had no idea of the impact the factory’s newest berlinettas would have on the future of Ferrari’s most sporting line of road cars. The first iteration of the 250 GT Berlinetta would achieve great success on race tracks across Europe, and it would lead to even more successful cars that would be derived from the same platform in the future. These berlinettas were undoubtedly the most desirable cars in the Scuderia’s stable, as they were built as dual-purpose sports cars. They combined all the luxury and performance Ferrari had to offer but in a driver-friendly package. There was nothing that these cars could not do in the eyes of their drivers. The 250 GT Berlinetta’s nickname owes itself to Alfonso de Portago, his co-driver Edmont Nelson, and their win at the 1956 Tour de France, which was the first for Ferrari’s 250 GT Berlinetta. Following de Portago’s result in 1956, Olivier Gendenbien led Ferrari to overall victories for the next three years, cementing the car’s nickname into the annals of automotive history with a compelling show of engineering and competitive dominance. The TdF also picked up an overall victory at the Targa Florio in 1957 and won the GT class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959. CHASSIS NUMBER 0563 GT: THE EIGHTH TdF Chassis 0563 GT is the eighth of only nine 1956 250 GT Berlinetta Competiziones, and it is eligible for every historic motoring event, including the Mille Miglia. Following factory completion, it was sold new to Racing Sport S.r.l, of Torino, Italy, on 10 September 1956. The car was then immediately leased to Jacques Peron, of Nice, France. It was registered on Torino plates TO 214813 on the 14th of that month, and it began its racing career just three days later, at the event that would grant this car its namesake. This TdF entered the fifth annual Tour de France Automobile wearing race number #75 and was driven by Peron and co-driver Jacques Bertrammier. Peron and Bertrammier would finish 8th overall and was the second TdF behind de Portago and Nelson, which no doubt helped to cement the nearly new car’s reputation at the Tour de France and within sports car racing in general. Peron would enter his TdF in one more race that year, the Coupes du Salon in Montlhéry, where he finished 2nd overall. The 1957 season got off to a very good start for 0563 GT when Peron won the Rallye des Forêts in March. The car and driver’s second outing for the season proved to be equally successful, and on 7 April, Peron took 1st again, at the U.S.A. Cup at Montlhéry, which was followed by 2nd overall and 2nd in class in the Rallye du Printemps. Peron and 0563 GT returned to Montlhéry in June for the Grand Prix of Paris, where he won his class once more. The car then entered the Rallye de l’Allier, where it continued its dominance with another 1st place finish. Following some mechanical issues that lead to a DNF at the 12 Hours of Reims in July, the car finished 1st at the Razal race in August before embarking on its second Tour de France the following month. The 1957 Tour de France would prove even more successful for 0563 GT than its first outing at the same event. Peron and his co-driver Georged Burggraff finished 5th overall behind a trio of TdFs: the Ecurie Francorchamps entry driven by Gendenbien and Bianchi, the Scuderia Ferrari entry driven by Maurice Trintignant and François Picard, and the 3rd place team of Garage Montchoisy, which was driven by Jean Lucas and Jean-François Malle. It is important to note that 0563 GT was just one place behind the legendary Stirling Moss in a Mercedes-Benz 300 SL, which was an incredible achievement in itself! The Coupe du Salon at Montlhéry was followed by Peron’s last event of the year, the Armagnac Rallye, in which he finished 3rd. Nineteen fifty-eight saw a more limited season for the car, but its highlights included a 7th place finish at the Pau 3 Hours and a class win at the Plainfoy hill climb. Later in the year, Peron returned 0563 GT to the Ferrari factory in Modena, marking the end of its professional racing career. The car would remain there for over a year before being sold by to Bruce Kessler on 11 November 1959 and exported to the United States. In 1960, it was sold to Ron Wakeman from California, who kept it for over a decade, and in 1973, it became the property of Larry Taylor, also of California. Ten years later, in 1983, Richard Gent Jr. bought the car from Taylor’s estate and had it restored by Joe Piscazzi’s Auto Body and Tom Selby. Following the restoration, Gent displayed the car at the 25th Annual Ferrari Club of America International Concours at Stouffer’s Pine Isle Resort at Lake Lanier Island, Georgia, where it was awarded Second in Class. In the 1990s, still under the ownership of Richard Gent, 0563 GT was fully restored by Bob Smith Coachworks in Texas, who brought the car back to the livery which it wore at the 1957 Tour de France. Gent did not show the car again until January 2001, when it attracted great interest at the 10th Annual Palm Beach Cavallino Classic. Later that year, the car won the Forza Award at the 37th Annual Ferrari Club of American National Meeting and Concours in Dallas. Chassis 0563 GT made its way to California in August 2003 for the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it placed Second in Class, which was no small achievement in a highly competitive class that year. Following Gent’s tenure, 0563 GT was purchased by its current owner in 2009, and he would campaign the car in historic racing and continue to display it at several concours events. The car, now boasting Ferrari Classiche certification, was driven in the Shell Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge in 2010, which was followed by winning the Spirit Cup, as well as a Platinum Award, at the 19th Palm Beach Cavallino Classic the next day. The car would return to the Cavallino Classic the following year and once more for the historic races associated with that event in 2012, where it placed 3rd. That same year, the car was accepted to the Mille Miglia and was driven with gusto around its native Italy whilst wearing #371. It would compete once more in the same event in 2013, again without fault. Finally, 0563GT was entered into the Tour de France rally this year and also took part in the small and very exclusive Le 250 Tornano a Casa rally. The rally started at Le Mans, where this TdF was invited to take part in the parade laps prior to the start of the race. It would then drive through France and back to the Ferrari factory in Maranello. Once again, the car performed faultlessly, attesting to the durability and reliability of these cars. In many ways, the TdF is the ultimate symbol of Ferrari’s long pursuit of perfecting the dual-purpose sports car. As a result of their extremely low production numbers and, in turn, high desirability, these cars rarely make their way to the open market. Chassis 0563 GT is a very compelling example of its breed, as it boasts two top 10 finishes in the very race that earned the car its fabled nickname. It was driven as the factory would have intended when new, and it has received the opportunity to relive its glory days through historic racing at the hands of its current owner. The car was recently repainted in Italy and is still in excellent condition, and it will be welcomed at any historic racing or concours event around the globe, including the Mille Miglia, the Tour de France, and the Le Mans Classic. Without the TdF, there would be no California Spider, no 250 GT SWB, and no 250 GTO. This is the model that started Ferrari’s most valuable series of dual-purpose sports cars and the one that brought home more silver than any other. For the individual looking to establish a collection of historically important Ferraris, this TdF is a necessity. Chassis no. 0563 GT Engine no. 0563 GT

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-09-08
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The Ex-Frederico Gatta, Robert Solomon1962 FERRARI 250 GT SHORT-WHEELBASE SPECIALE AERODINAMICAChassis no. 3615

The Ex-Frederico Gatta, Robert Solomon 1962 FERRARI 250 GT SHORT-WHEELBASE SPECIALE AERODINAMICA Coachwork by Carrozzeria Pininfarina Chassis no. 3615 *One of only four Aerodinamicas on 250 GT SWB chassis *Peerlessly luxurious lightweight 3-litre V12 two-seater *One of the most exclusive Ferraris by Pininfarina THE FERRARI 250 GT SWB SPECIALE AERODINAMICA During the turn of the 1950s to the 1960s, the Ferrari 250 GT family of Gran Turismo designs with their front-mounted 3-litre V12 engines provided the Maranello company with a firm foundation to expand their manufacturing volume. Limited production of the parallel Superamerica series of 4-litre V12-engined prestige models was continuing to satisfy what has been described as "the fastidiousness of a few perfectionists who demanded even more performance, comfort and refinement, and who wanted even more of an image of prestige and exclusivity than could be provided by the 'standard' Ferrari". In November 1960, at the Turin Salone dell'Automobile exhibition, Ferrari and Pininfarina had absolutely stunned the automotive world by releasing their breathtaking Superfast II model, launching an entirely new body shape for a fastidiously-detailed performance car, in effect an aerodynamically sleek Gran Turismo limousine... Ferrari authority Antoine Prunet has described the Superfast II as follows: "This experimental creation by the great Torinese coachbuilder was actually quite remarkable for the completely new style which it proposed. Born in a wind tunnel, this harmonious design resembled the profile of an airplane wing. The leading edge was, in fact, the nose of the car, in the middle of which was the air intake for the radiator, an ellipse of very reduced dimensions resembling that of several sports Ferraris. The trailing edge was represented by the rear deck, streamlined to a point, upon which converged the curves of the roof. The graceful curve of the hood, devoid of all harshness, was particularly remarkable, as was the shape of the windshield, whose posts, very noticeably curved inward, reinforced the effect.... This marvelous two-place Coupe can certainly be considered as one of the most significant examples of the art of coach building...". At the Geneva Salon of 1962 a Superfast III revision of the innovative, aerodynamic, high-performance limousine was unveiled, offering a more open 'greenhouse' cabin window treatment. A Superfast IV followed, but the design of Pininfarina's peerless 'Coupe Aerodinamica' would also be applied to only four, we believe, 250 GT Berlinettas with shorter 2.40-metre wheelbase – the Passo Corto or 250 GT SWB chassis length - of which this fine example is one. And it is from the Coupe Aerodinamica theme that the so-called GTO Prototype car was produced to compete at Le Mans in 1961, leading ultimately to the legendary Ferrari 250 GTO itself. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED To quote directly from the Collezione Maranello Rosso booklet on this startlingly beautiful aerodyne: "Enzo Ferrari used to welcome top politicians, sports heroes and entertainers to his kingdom at Maranello, when these Ferrari enthusiasts came to pick up their (new car) directly from the hand of its creator. Just three of these sports cars were ever built. Chassis no. '3615' was assembled like a bespoke suit – this was the one and only time that this colour appeared on a Ferrari – for one of the world's greatest car collectors, the Shah of Persia. This is a truly unique vehicle, an amalgam of a 250 SWB chassis and engine in a body specially designed by Pininfarina and inspired by the Superamerica model...". Well, ignore the delusory Shah of Persia attribution and puff, but - bodied in similar form to the 4-litre V12-engined Superamerica - this gorgeous example of Italianate automotive high fashion was supplied new in 1962 to businessman F. Gatta, finished to Pininfarina and Ferrari's highest standards and liveried in dark blue with tan interior upholstery and trim. Its Pininfarina body number was '99541', it has left-hand drive and its 'Special 400SA-type bodywork' with open headlights. Factory records indicate that the chassis was consigned to Carrozzeria Pininfarina's Turin plant on April 7, 1962, and it was signed off as complete on June 18,1962. In July that year it was repainted into 'Grigio Marrone Italver 20563 Acryl' livery. Its Maranello factory completion date is July 23, 1962, and its formal Certificato d'Origine was issued three days later, on July 26. It was sold new by SEFAC SpA on that same day to first owner Ferdinando Gatta, "born in Torino on 1st March 1919, resident at Strada Michele 8 in Moncalieri (Torino), Italy, price paid Italian Lire 6,950,000" as the illustrious Swiss Ferrari specialist and historian Marcel Massini's records describe. On August 29, 1962, the car was first registered on Turin license plates as 'TO 470900'. There is a Ferrari factory Assistenza Clienti record of it being serviced and maintained by them on October 1, 1965, factory order number '491', delivery note '486' and odometer reading then recorded as '49,337kms'. On April 18, 1966, the car was sold by first-owner Gatta to Evasio Arcangelo Ricaldone, "born in Pomaro Monferrato (Province of Alessandria) on the 3rd of August 1982, resident at Vicolo Mazzi 1 in Pomaro Monferrato". On April 22 the car was re-registered on Alessandria license plates as 'AL 136903'. Signor Ricaldone sold '3615 GT' offered here to its third owner on April 5, 1967. The car's lucky recipient was Antonina Pravata, "born in Mirabella Rocca Palumbo on the 30th January 1925, resident at Via Varese in Torino, Italy, price paid was Italian Lire 1,000,000". Eventually as the car became such a collectible icon of Ferrari history, it was exported from Italy into the USA by Luigi Chinetti Motors. Its new owner into the 1970s was Ferrari aficionado Robert Solomon, resident in Los Angeles, California. He sold it in 1977 to Donald L. Rose, also of California, and on February 6 that year it was advertised for sale in the 'Los Angeles Times' newspaper, the vendor being presented as Ferrari of San Diego. By that Fall the car had been acquired by Marvin L. Johnson of Dallas, Texas. The car's ownership was listed within the Ferrari Owners' Club USA records as being Mr Johnson from 1979-1983, although he had advertised it for sale in 1981. In September 1983 it was advertised for sale in the Ferrari Market Letter, Volume 8 number 18, Mr Johnson describing it as having been mechanically rebuilt bumper-to-bumper, and featuring factory air conditioning, AM/FM cassette radio player, center console (still on the car today as a useful and well-matched after-market addition), power windows, two-tone gray leather seats with matching carpets, and white exterior. His asking price was US $59,500. Advertising continued to appear in subsequent Ferrari Market Letter editions until it was eventually sold to Stephen Barney's Foreign Cars Italia company in Greensboro, North Carolina. The following year saw it re-sold to Ed Waterman's Motorcar Gallery in Fort Lauderdale, Florida but before it could even be collected by them it was re-sold to Tom Davis of Fort Lauderdale. In 1985 it was then acquired by Canadian collector and connoisseur David Cohen of Vancouver, British Columbia. At some stage the car lost its original engine, serial '3615 GT', which in July 1988 was owned individually by John Ridings Lee in Dallas, Texas. On November 22, 1991, Bob LeFlufy of Autoclassic Restorations in North Vancouver, BC, Canada, advertised this gorgeously restored Aerodinamica in the 'Toronto Globe & Mail' newspaper – described as (again according to Marcel Massini's incredibly detailed marque records) "special body in immaculate condition, owned by one of their principals since 1986...". By February 1992 the original engine was with Richard Freshman of Chatsworth, California, and in April 1992 '3615 GT' itself was offered for sale again, this time by Garry Roberts of Costa Mesa, California. His asking price was US $750,000. By December 1992 in the Ferrari Market Letter, Volume 17 number 25, it was offered again – "dark blue paint with parchment interior, asking price US $500,000...". In 1993 it was then registered 'VYJ 850' in England and it was sold by the Bonhams team – then Brooks Auctioneers – in the October 26, 1993 Earls' Court, London, Sale. During that period of deep recession within the classic car market, '3615 GT' passed to Talacrest Ltd of Egham, England, who advertised it for sale yet again in the Ferrari Market Letter, Volume 19 number 4, described as bing "dark blue with tan hides and carpets, the fourth and last 250 GT SWB with 400 Super America-style coachwork, asking price US $400,000". It was then that the car was acquired by Fabrizio Violati for his Collezione Maranello Rosso in San Marino. When Fabrizio Violati passed away in January 2010, he had owned '3615 GT' for the preceding 16 years, and it has since continued to be maintained and preserved upon display as one of the jewels of his surviving Collezione Maranello Rosso. Today the car is offered with its long-installed replacement engine, but as a long-term Museum exhibit it certainly merits careful expert inspection and proper re-commissioning both mechanically and cosmetically to proper health. The car presents extremely well – in its shape, furnishing, and colour choice it is simply beautiful. Settle into its pale-tan or cream leather upholstered driver's seat and the commanding view forward – with 0-8,000rpm tachometer dial on the left of the dash panel and 0-300km/h speedometer upon the right – is just majestic. Aquamarine-blue topped pull switches dominate the cream leather centre console, contrasting gorgeously against the hide colour, and in every hand-stitched detail '3615 GT's furnishing, with its expansive rear deck beneath the 'fastback' rear screen, is just an opulent delight, as is the pile-textured parallel-quilted headlining. Back in June 1963, 'Road & Track' magazine road tested a related 400 Superamerica and recorded maximum speeds of 58.5mph in first gear, 83.7mph in second, 115.3mph in third and 179.6mph in fourth with overdrive engaged. The test car weighed a hefty 3,710lbs, and the 250 GT SWB variant presented here is expected to be considerably lighter, with the more nimble 3.0 litre motor and its performance would probably lie in a comparable bracket. So not only does the car combine its gloriously sleek Aerodinamica looks with luxurious accommodation and style, but also with – for an effectively two-seat limousine - quite prodigious street performance. What's more, '3615 GT' offered here possesses the extra cachet of being based upon a 250 GT SWB chassis frame, and its familial relationship to the competition-bred GT SWB 3-litre V12 cars is an important plus. As it stands – and with the possibility of it being reunited with its long-since exchanged original engine – this very rare, immensely attractive and most desirable Ferrari Aerodinamica by Pininfarina would certainly be the envy of every other country club member should the new owner purr up to the clubhouse in such eye-poppingly luxurious Italianate splendor... Here is Pininfarina style and flair at its finest. Without reserve

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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The 1957 Turin Show, Ex-Carlos Kauffman1958 FERRARI 250 GT SERIES 1 CABRIOLETChassis no. 0759 GTEngine no. 0759 GT

The 1957 Turin Show, Ex-Carlos Kauffman 1958 FERRARI 250 GT SERIES 1 CABRIOLET Coachwork by Carrozzeria Pinin Farina Chassis no. 0759 GT Engine no. 0759 GT *1957 Turin Salone dell'Automobile show car * Open early Ferrari Pinin Farina Cabriolet - with detachable hardtop * Early central-American history in Venezuelan ownerships * Fresh from 23 years in the Collezione Maranello Rosso Museum THE FERRARI 250GT SERIES 1 CABRIOLET It is to the emergent, dynamic and at the time only two-year-old Italian coachbuilding company, Carrozzeria Boano, that credit should go for reviving 1950s interest in Cabriolet convertible coachwork upon Ferrari chassis. The very first 250 GT Cabriolet was built by Boano in time for the 1956 Geneva Salon de l'Automobile exhibition. Its unveiling there coincided with that of the first Ferrari to launch genuine series production – a Pinin Farina Coupe built in a small production series by the same Boano company. Boano's Cabriolet was subsequently displayed by Luigi Chinetti – Ferrari's legendary American East Coast importer – at the New York Show. The car found a ready buyer, and meantime Pinin Farina had taken notice of interest in these convertible cars, producing its own Cabriolet that was launched to the public at the following year's Geneva Salon, in March 1957. This very functional and rather sporty-looking styling exercise featured a functional notch in the crest of the left-side door, to give space for the driver's elbow while the waistline thereafter kicked-up into the rear fender peak. While that dream car was finished in Italian red for its debut, it was quickly resprayed green and became Ferrari's British works driver Peter Collins's personal car. It was subsequently fitted by Dunlop with British-made disc brakes – and they in turn would be adapted one day to enhance a works-team Testa Rossa sports-racing machine. Pinin Farina continued to develop the notion of a 3-litre V12-engined Ferrari Cabriolet, first with a rather exotic and even more sporty-looking Spyder, followed by a more sober prototype street version. The group of four Speciale 250 GT Cabriolet prototypes finally culminated in a green-finished example, sold to Prince Saddrudin Aga Khan in May 1957. The first 'true production' 250 GT Cabriolet Pinin Farina was then delivered in mid-summer 1957 to American, Mr Oscar 'Ozzie' Olson, later sponsor of the Indy-racing Olsonite Eagles. His Cabriolet's flanks were devoid of the air vents that had adorned the preceding prototypes, and this more discreet style was adopted for the vast majority of the 20-plus examples which quickly followed. The basis of these early Cabriolets was the same chassis frame/engine aggregate which had under-pinned the 1956-58 Coupe cars. During the summer of 1958 a new, more sporting convertible was introduced as the 250 GT California, but the Series 1 Cabriolet, such as the simply outstanding example offered here, remained the open street Ferrari of choice for the truly discriminating, and perhaps temperamentally less extrovert, less flamboyant, more discreet of Ferrari's contemporary, up-market, clientele... Here was a Cabriolet for a customer of real taste. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This particularly magnificent Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet S1 Pinin Farina is chassis serial '0759 GT'. It is a very early example, being only the eighth of some 40 units built overall. Its chassis frame was delivered to the Pinin Farina plant on September 9, 1957, and upon its completion with this strikingly handsome body it was promptly (and so justifiably) exhibited at the 39th Salone dell'Automobile in Turin's Valentino Park exhibition hall, from October 30-November 10 that year. In January, 1958, this Cabriolet was then shipped to the Venezuelan Ferrari importer, Carlo Kauffman, in the central-American state's capital city of Caracas. It was registered there on Venezuelan plates 'NC 6159'. The car was pictured in the factory's official 1959 Ferrari Yearbook, whose compilers every year made much of the burgeoning marque's global appeal. Study the car's gorgeously preserved tan leather and honeyed carpeting today and one can imagine just how cool and stylish it must have seemed to Carlos Kauffman and his eager clienti as they sampled '0759 GT' here on the broad sun-soaked boulevards of Venezuela's then booming, already oil-rich, capital city... Caracas itself had grown in economic importance during Venezuela's oil boom of the early 20th Century. By the 1950s, the sprawling city had blossomed through an intensive modernization programme that continued throughout the 1960s and into the 1970s. The dramatic change in the economic structure of the country, which went from being primarily agricultural to becoming focused upon oil production, had stimulated rapid development and Carlos Kauffman found ready interest amongst his friends and neighbours within the upper-tier of Caraquenian (Caracas) society. Included within the file accompanying this outstanding Cabriolet, are a lavishly-decorated Venezuelan registration certificate, and also a copy of a sales agreement later struck for the car between Luiz Perez Dupuy and his wife Carmen Pietri de Perez Dupuy on the one hand, and Gustavo A. Gutierrez on the other. The document cites the car's colour at that time as having been 'verde' – green – and the sale price as 80,000 Venezuelan Bolivares. Senor Gustavo Guttierez retained the car in Venezuela until 1986, when it was offered for sale, by that time being described as painted red. Ultimately, in 1991 – 23 long years ago - it was acquired by the great Italian enthusiast Fabrizio Violati and inducted into his Collezione Maranello Rosso displays in the tiny, and-locked, Italian-encircled Republic of San Marino. There the car graced Fabrizio Violati's exhibition halls, restored in the white paint finish it still retains and fully equipped with a well-made but probably not contemporary white-painted hardtop, which actually exhibits most attractive louvre detailing. We understand that the car was started-up and run from time to time, and it is pictured in colour on pages 54 and 55 of the Collezione Maranello Rosso book 'Ferrari 250 – Le Ferrari a San Marino' written and compiled by the acknowledged 250 GT-series authority, French expert Jess G. Pourret. Today this magnificently imposing Cabriolet is offered with a lovely patina of well-preserved age, its exterior Bianco paintwork providing a striking counterpoint to its luscious, believed original, thick, supple and just exquisite Pelle Naturale Conolly leather upholstery. The ignition lock and switch panel are integrated in a neat bright-metal panel topping the thickly-carpeted central transmission tunnel, just behind the leather-booted gearshift with its adjacent – and in 1960s Caracas no doubt much-used and appreciated – chromium-lidded ashtray. The dash panel is neat and functional, yet still discreetly stylish, with its central ancillary instruments flanked by 'just-the-right-sized' multi-coloured warning lights. Beneath the hood, the Cabriolet's 3-litre V12-cylinder engine exhibits undoubtedly original engine numbering, punched cleanly and of course in the correct period serif type-face, into the normal ground boss at the right-rear of the block/crankcase casing. The car is as factory-specified, with Tipo 508C chassis and gearbox, and engine Tipo 128C. The carburettor set-up beneath the typical period air filter pack comprises triple twin-choke Weber 36DCL instruments. The engine bay is tidy and in good order but after its years of museum display it is understandably not in concours condition. Relatively modest attention, valeting and fine detailing would undoubtedly elevate the manner in which the car presents under the hood. The delightful coachwork is Pinin Farina's contemporary Job No '19454', still featuring its original-style front bumperettes and covered headlights. The trunk is dark-brown carpeted and carries a spare Borrani wire wheel shod with a period Pirelli tyre – itself these days something of a desperately rare museum item. What appears to be an original period tool-roll within the boot contains mostly non-original – but still useful – tools, while an original Riganti, Varese, pillar jack has survived beside them. Of all these wonderful road-going Ferraris from Fabrizio Violati's Collezione Maranello Rosso, this ex-Carlos Kauffman, 1958 Turin Show car, has proved one of the most admired by our specialist – and immensely experienced – Bonhams team members. It radiates a palpable aura of La Dolce Vita – of a romantic by-gone lifestyle – of a particularly sophisticated international jet-set whose discretion in all things would have kept their names, and their lifestyles, just below that borderline at which gossip columnists might begin to take notice... By any standards, technical, historical, sociological, '0759 GT' offered here is indeed a lovely, lovely automobile... Without reserve

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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The ex-Indianapolis, Ralph Mulford, Arthur H. Klein, Lindley Bothwell 1914 PEUGEOT L45 GRAND PRIX TWO SEATER Chassis no. 1 Engine no. 1

The ex-Indianapolis, Ralph Mulford, Arthur H. Klein, Lindley Bothwell 1914 PEUGEOT L45 GRAND PRIX TWO SEATER Chassis no. 1 Engine no. 1 4,491cc 112hp Inline 4-Cylinder engine with Gear-Driven Dual Overhead Camshafts and 4 Valves Per Cylinder Single Miller Barrel Throttle Updraft Carburetor (original Peugeot unit included) 112bhp at 2,800rpm 4-Wheel mechanical drum brakes Semi-Elliptical Leaf Spring Suspension, Live Axles THE BOTHWELL PEUGEOT In a dual overhead camshaft engine, the cams operate on inclined valve stems directly or through interposed cam followers. The intake and exhaust valves are disposed through an intermediate angle that minimizes intake and exhaust flow restrictions. Combustion chamber shape can be tailored to fuel quality, spark plug position and combustion propagation. It is the accepted standard for extracting performance and economy in internal combustion engines. Today virtually every racing engine uses dual overhead camshafts. At the other end of the internal combustion engine spectrum, high efficiency road engines, even hybrids, use them to maximize recovery of the innate energy of hydrocarbon fuels. All dual overhead camshaft engines trace their origins back to a few Peugeots built a hundred years ago by a trio of racers, Jules Goux, Georges Boillot and Paolo Zuccarelli, and their engineer collaborator Ernest Henry for Peugeot. The race cars they built had several variations to comply with changing regulations, but today only two examples of these pioneering cars exist. This is one of them, while the other has a secure position in a Florida collection. The Lindley Bothwell Peugeot L45 has a clear, unambiguous history of owners, from Peugeot through owners Lutcher Brown and Frank Book, and drivers Ralph Mulford and Arthur H. Klein to Lindley Bothwell. It is the original 4½-liter chassis, numbered "1", and the original engine, also numbered "1". In other words, it is the real deal, the genuine article, with no gaps in its hundred-year history. It has never fallen into disrepair nor been ignored. RACING IN FRANCE The center of the automobile industry in the early 20th century was France. It had more serious automobile manufacturers than the rest of the world combined. Its technology was the most advanced, its engineers the most educated, its factories the best equipped, its road network the finest in the world, and the first automobile races, held on city-to-city routes over open roads, were held in France. In 1906, The Automobile Club de France (ACF) succeeded the Gordon Bennett Trophy with the first Grand Prix. Held on a triangular circuit near Le Mans, it was won by Ferenc Szisz on a 13 liter 90hp Renault AK. 1907 was dominated by Felice Nazzaro driving another monster, a 16.3 liter 130hp FIAT. Engine size restrictions were introduced by general agreement in 1908, and now it was Christian Lautenschlager on a 13.5 liter 135hp Mercedes who won the ACF Grand Prix on a new triangular circuit based in Dieppe. After a two year hiatus, the ACF GP was renewed for 1911 on the Dieppe course where Louis Wagner's 14.1 liter FIAT was outclassed in the two-day event by a newcomer barely half its size. Georges Boillot drove a revolutionary 7.6 liter Peugeot, the first of the "Charlatans" dual overhead camshaft revelations. It was a turning point in automobile history, especially as teammates Jules Goux won the Grand Prix de France and Paolo Zuccarelli was victorious in the Sarthe Cup. "THE CHARLATANS" PEUGEOT The origins of the L76 Peugeot have been shrouded by the passage of time. Some attribute the design to Swiss engineer Ernest Henry. Others believe it was Paolo Zuccarelli, who had worked with Mark Birkigt at Hispano-Suiza. No matter: it was a collaboration among Boillot, Goux, Zuccarelli and Henry that achieved a historic breakthrough. In The Classic Twin-Cam Engine, historian Griffith Borgeson speculated on the early history as the collaborators convinced Robert Peugeot to fund the development of their radical design in a separate workshop apart from Peugeot's engineering and design office, recently reunited with its cousins at Lion Peugeot. The Peugeot establishment scoffed at the group working by themselves at Suresnes and referred to them derogatorily as "The Charlatans". The L76 Peugeot four set the automobile world on its ear, a car that Lawrence Pomeroy called "of startling technical novelty". A conventional but lightweight chassis had shaft drive, a 4-speed gearbox and the L76 engine. A four-cylinder, it had a single piece cast iron cylinder block with integral cylinder head bolted to a horizontally split alloy crankcase and an aluminum wet sump. The crankshaft was supported by five plain main bearings and was offset from the centerline of the cylinders, an arrangement thought at the time to reduce side loads on the pistons. The offset crank is characterized by clearance channels cast into the cylinder block on the intake side. It was the valve gear that caused the world to take note. The dual overhead camshafts were contained in separate aluminum sleeves, supported off the head by the timing gear cover and pairs of pylons. The main valve springs were placed between the cam sleeves and the head, their exposed location aiding cooling and minimizing oil seepage from the pressure lubricated camshafts to the cylinder head valve guides. There were four valves per cylinder each with its own stirrup-type cam follower that both opened and closed the valve, effectively a spring-augmented desmodromic system. Camshaft drive was by a vertical shaft and bevel gears. The valve stems were angled to create a pent-roof combustion chamber and minimize changes in direction of the intake and exhaust gasses with two intake ports each serving a pair of cylinders and four large rectangular exhaust ports. Later Peugeots would benefit from experience with the L76 and continuously improve in both specific output and reliability. A smaller L56 Peugeot was built in response to the ACF's fuel consumption limitation in 1913 and it was even more advanced than the L76. The L56 did away with plain main bearings, in fact it did away with two of the five bearings and went to ball bearings, single row at the front and the center positions and double row at the rear of the counterbalanced 2-piece crankshaft. The crankcase was a single piece alloy barrel with the center ball bearing supported in its full circumference by a bronze web that was inserted into a heated crankcase which then contracted to an interference fit. Lubrication was now – and probably its first appearance ever – by a dry sump system. The camshafts now were driven by a chain of spur gears in a compact housing at the front of the engine. The stirrup cam followers of the L76 were replaced by L-shaped followers between the cam and the valve stem. Highly unusually for the times the intake valves were larger than the exhausts, another prescient development that continues to the present day. This became the definitive form of The "Charlatans" four-cylinder engine. The 1914 ACF Grand Prix was held on a new circuit near Lyons, 20 laps of a 37.6km circuit on July 4, a few weeks before the start of the First World War. The ACF had again changed the rules, limiting displacement to 4.5 liters. Peugeot's entry was, accordingly, a team of three L45 cars with a spare. The engines were essentially the same as the L56 with reduced displacement, but there were improvements to the chassis including four-wheel brakes and new Rudge centerlock wheels with winged securing nuts. The latter are thought to have been a Georges Boillot innovation, that could be removed and attached more quickly with a hammer. The Peugeots' bodies were modified with long, tapered tails carrying two spare wheels and tires vertically under a hump. The team was led by Georges Boillot backed up by Jules Goux and Victor Rigal replacing Paolo Zuccarelli who had died in a practice crash a year before. The four-wheel brakes were effective and the quick change wheel nuts proved to be of immense value as Peugeot's tires were not up to the sustained high speed running and cornering. Their competition was a five-car team of Mercedes with single overhead camshaft four-cylinder engines, a team of experienced, dedicated drivers and the kind of organization for which Mercedes was justly famous. Nearly every marque in the Grand Prix now had overhead camshaft engines, some single but others double in the Peugeot pattern. An epic battle ensued as Mercedes' driver Max Sailer drove ferociously in an attempt to wear out the determined Boillot dogging his heels. When Sailer's thrashing of the Mercedes sent a connecting rod sailing, Boillot moved into the lead, pursued by a horde of Mercedes and the Delage (an artful reimagining of The Charlatans' Peugeot) of Leon Duray. Boillot led the middle half of the race, despite changing tires at twice the rate of the Mercedes of Christian Lautenschlager who was steadily eating into Boillot's lead. He eventually passed Boillot on the penultimate lap and the Peugeot star succumbed to a dropped valve (or a broken rear axle, depending upon the source) before reaching the finish. Mercedes finished 1-2-3 with Jules Goux fourth and Rigal seventh in the remaining Peugeots. The 1914 ACF Grand Prix at Lyon is generally considered to be the most exciting race of its era and Georges Boillot's performance an epic of skill and determination. Shortly after, war broke out, effectively ending racing in Europe "for the duration." The Peugeot L45s, though, had further glory in their futures. PEUGEOTS AT INDIANAPOLIS In 1913, Peugeot sent a two-car team to Indianapolis for the 500 mile Sweepstakes, at the time far and away the richest race in the world with a guaranteed purse of $50,000 and $20,000 for the winner. The L76-based Peugeot Indy cars were reduced in bore and stroke to 449 cubic inches to meet the Speedway's 450 cubic inch displacement limit. Paolo Zuccarelli dropped out after only 18 laps when a main bearing failed, but Jules Goux, relying on advice and coaching from American veteran Johnny Aitken and six splits of champagne provided by fans from the Alliance Français, drove a perfectly calculated race. He took home not only the first-place money but also the trophies for leading at 200, 300 and 400 miles. It was a clean sweep, and the American racing community noticed. The Peugeots returned in 1914 with a pair of L56s for Boillot and Goux. Arthur Duray brought a privately owned L3, the revised 3-liter Coupe de l'Auto competitor. Boillot set the fastest time in pre-race qualifying, turning in a 10-lap average of 99.85mph. Goux was only a few ticks of the watch behind with the second fastest average, 98.13mph while Duray averaged 90mph. The European racing community had sniffed the aroma of money from middle America and attended in force: Delage, Sunbeam, Isotta-Fraschini, Bugatti and Excelsior. At the finish, the top four places were taken by French entries with Rene Thomas in a Delage taking home the big prize followed by Arthur Duray's 3-liter Peugeot, Albert Guyot's Delage and Goux's Peugeot L56. Boillot's Peugeot crashed on lap 141 while running third and threatening for the lead. AND A DIVERSION In January 1915 Bob Burman destroyed the engine of his Peugeot L56 in a race at Point Loma (San Diego), California. Peugeot declined on account of the war to provide a replacement. Burman turned to Harry Miller in Los Angeles, then the ranking genius in racing engine carburetion, not only to repair the bits and pieces of his shattered Peugeot but to configure it to the new 300 cubic inch limitation. In the process of doing the almost-impossible – delivering a competitive 300 cubic inch engine to Burman in time for Indianapolis – Miller and Fred Offenhauser succeeded also in examining the innermost workings of the Peugeot L56. A 50-year history of Miller, Offenhauser and Meyer-Drake dual overhead camshaft engines followed. The onset of hostilities in Europe also presented a problem for Carl Fisher and the Indianapolis management, some of it their own doing with the reduced 300 cubic inch displacement limit. The race, however, proved to be compelling. Ralph DePalma in a Mercedes and Dario Resta in a Peugeot waged an exciting seesaw battle from the 80th lap until, with 165 miles to go, Resta encountered a steering problem and backed off to preserve second place. DePalma continued only to launch a connecting rod through the crankcase with three laps to go. Far in the lead, DePalma slowed, finishing the race three and a half minutes ahead of Resta while running on three cylinders and no oil. Continuing war in Europe and escalating war production opportunities in the U.S. drastically reduced the potential entry for the 1916 Indianapolis 500. Promoter Carl Fisher rose to the challenge by canvassing Europe for available competitive cars, but could come up only with two Peugeot L45s. One of them probably was the 1914 Lyon Grand Prix spare. Desperate for more entries, Fisher engaged the Premier Motor Car Company, only recently reorganized from bankruptcy, to build three Peugeot duplicates. The 1916 Indianapolis Sweepstakes reduced the race distance to 300 miles. Three Peugeot L45s were entered. One, ostensibly entered by the "Peugeot Auto Racing Co.", was driven by star Dario Resta. Another was entered by the "Indianapolis Speedway Team Co." for Johnny Aitken, Jules Goux's 1913 Indianapolis coach, along with the Premier replicas racing as Peugeots. A third was privately entered by driver Ralph Mulford. Mulford's car is understood to have been owned by Lutcher Brown, a timber baron, who on September 11, 1915 is recorded in 'The St. Louis Lumberman', as leaving for New York 'to prepare his new Peugeot racing car for entry in the Sheepshead Bay races on October 2nd.', for which he had paid the considerably sum of $10,000. Mulford was slated to drive then, with Jimmie Stakes as mechanic. Which car was which? The 1914 Peugeot Lyon Grand Prix spare is visually distinguished from its three counterparts by one subtle detail: hood side louvers that are shorter than the other three cars. A photo of Mulford's car a Sheepshead Bay and perusal of the official Indianapolis race entry photos shows that his 1916 Indianapolis Peugeot L45 has the same short hood side louvers and was almost certainly the 1914 Lyon Grand Prix Peugeot spare team car. Mulford brought it home third overall behind Resta's Peugeot and Wilbur D'Alene's Duesenberg. In March 1917, Ralph De Palma stated in that year at Indianapolis he would campaign the Peugeot which he had just bought from Lutcher Brown. There was to be no race that year afterall, but this seems to be the point at which it passed from Brown to De Palma's backer Frank P. Book, one of a trio of brothers who were wealthy Detroit Property entrepreneurs and are today immortalised by the Book Tower and Buildings in that city. Book had previously funded De Palma's purchase of the 1914 Grand Prix de Lyon Mercedes, which had run at Indy in '16. Racing at the Speedway ceased upon the United States' entry into the war but was resumed quickly in 1919. Georges Boillot had been killed in a dogfight over Europe, and Johnny Aitken had died in the 1918 influenza epidemic but Carl Fisher invited Jules Goux to return to the Speedway in 1919 to take charge of preparing the Speedway's Peugeots and their clones, the Premiers, and to drive one of the Speedway's Peugeots. Goux personally entered another Peugeot of 2½ liters for Georges Boillot's younger brother, André. Goux lost the engine in his Peugeot in practice on the final day of qualifying and rushed to fit one of the Premier-built Peugeot clone engines, taking to the track in the final minutes of the last session and posting a 95mph lap to qualify 22nd after only a single warmup lap. The quick engine change shows how accurately Premier had replicated The Charlatans L45 in nearly every detail. Contemporary press reports confirm that for 1919 Frank Book was keen on a serviceman driving his car, and handed the drive to Art Klein, an Indy veteran and now Lieutenant who was fresh from Issodun in France, where he had charge of the largest group of Liberty engined planes in foreign service. Klein would sport the blue and maize colors of the Detroit Automobile Club, and the Peugeot would also wear a DAC badge on its radiator grill. Book had hedged his bets with a second entry, a 'Detroit Special', built by the De Palma Manufacturing company which he also funded. In the race – held on Saturday May 31 to avoid conflict with the first Decoration Day commemoration following the carnage in Europe – the early pace was set by Ralph DePalma in his Packard V12, followed respectfully by Earl Cooper's Stutz, Howdy Wilcox in one of the Speedway's Peugeots and René Thomas's Ballot. DePalma pitted for repairs on lap 103 and was replaced as leader by Wilcox in the Peugeot, a position he would hold until the finish where he was followed by Eddie Hearn's Stutz and Jules Goux in the Peugeot/Premier, adding further laurels to the Peugeot Lyon GP cars' successful record. Sadly, Art Klein in this Peugeot had to retire in 19th place after breaking an oil line on lap 72. Klein raced the Peugeot again during 1919 in the Elgin, Illinois Road Race August 23, in Uniontown, New Jersey on September 1, at the September Sheepshead Bay board track (finishing 4th), on the Cincinnati 2-mile board track October 12 (finishing second to Joe Boyer's Frontenac), ending the Championship season in 11th place. It is believed that after Indy, Book sent a team of three cars west and that the Peugeot was once again seen in action at Beverly Hills in 1920 on the 1¼ mile Beverly Hills board track. After this the Klein would pilot a Frontenac. Both international and Indianapolis regulations changed for 1920, again reducing displacement to 3-liters. The Charlatans leader Georges Boillot and Paolo Zuccarelli had died. Ernest Henry was with Rene Thomas at Ballot where he designed a brilliant dual overhead camshaft straight eight. Only Jules Goux remained loyally at Peugeot where his family had been employed for generations. Peugeot came up with an even more wild idea, a 3-camshaft, 5-valve per cylinder 3-liter four. It was a disappointment. For a while the L45 was mothballed only to reemerge in 1923 the hands of another Detroit tycoon, Joe Boyer, in the AAA dirt championship. There in a select series of four races over the summer months, at Toledo, Ohio, Danville, Quincy, and Chicaco, Illinois, the Peugeot contested against the 'usual suspects' - two Frontenacs, with shared drives by Resta, Chevrolet and Wilcox, De Palma's Double Overhead Cam 183, and Leon Duray's Miller 183. Ralph de Palma took the laurels, with Boyer second in that championship, the Peugeot still wearing race no. 29. It is thought that throughout this period Frank Book remained the owner of the car, and that after Boyer's death later that year, Klein took over ownership of the Peugeot. Sources differ on this aspect, but Klein was certainly known to have been very close to and well liked by the Book family, and Bothwell notes are quite clear that their acquisition was made from Klein, rather than Book. Art Klein kept the Peugeot for years and eventually became head of transportation for Warner Brothers Studios in Burbank. Slowly, as so often happens with race cars, the other Peugeots – and there was no small assortment of them in the U.S. – disappeared until Art Klein's became the sole survivor of the 4½-liter L45. Lindley Bothwell's collection, already one of the best in the country, had marvelous cars, but there in the San Fernando Valley just a few miles from the Bothwell Ranch resided in nearly pristine originality the absolute paragon of early race car design. Because, after all, what is to be done with a thirty year-old race car? Lindley Bothwell knew, as he would soon show. It is believed that he repeatedly asked Art Klein to let him add the 1916 Indianapolis 500 Peugeot to the growing Bothwell Collection. Art repeatedly demurred. In the late 40s, a fire at the Bothwell Ranch consumed many of the carefully collected, preserved and maintained cars in the Bothwell Collection, and this event is believed to have softened Art Klein's resolve. He eventually agreed to sell his Peugeot to Bothwell for $2,500 on February 11th, 1949, an important step forward to start rebuilding the collection. Although it has been known since then as the Dario Resta 1916 Indianapolis winner, it is in fact – as shown by the photographic evidence – the 1914 ACF Lyon GP spare driven to third place by Ralph Mulford at Indy in 1916 and raced by Klein at Indy in 1919. Its survival in original and largely untouched condition, with its original chassis, engine and body, is nearly miraculous. Examining it is to be transported back in time with construction and bodywork details completed at Peugeot in Suresnes in 1914. The tapered tail has two covers, a smooth one used at most U.S. races and the original Lyon GP tail with the hump for two vertically stored spare wheels and tires, found in a loft of the Bothwell Ranch buildings by Lindley Bothwell's grandnephew John Bothwell and reunited with the car. It is one of only two surviving Charlatans Peugeots, and the only one with Grand Prix history. After receiving it in early 1949, Lindley Bothwell registered it with the AAA Competition Board, prepared it and took it to Indianapolis where he put it on the track and lapped the Brickyard at 103.24 mph, decisively quicker than the experienced Johnny Aitken's 96.7 mph fastest qualifying speed in another Peugeot in 1916. The engine was rebuilt since 2000 and demonstrated its performance in the Goodwood Festival of Speed hillclimb twice, in 2003 and again in 2011. It was an unjudged special exhibit at Pebble Beach in 2014. It is still capable of over 100mph performance, but more than that, it is a singular example of the pioneering vision of The "Charlatans": Georges Boillot, Jules Goux, Paolo Zuccarelli and their gifted collaborator Ernest Henry who conceived the dual overhead camshaft engine. Henry Ford's Model T put the world on wheels but twenty years after its introduction none of its technical characteristics were reflected in the popular automobiles of the day. The Model T was by 1927 an anachronism. Not so the Peugeot/Mulford/Klein/Bothwell Peugeot L45, which based a lineage that still exists today in everything from Formula 1 to economy hybrids.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-11-12
Hammer price
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1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

263 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 40 DCL3 carburettors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm Recently uncovered period competition history A very early single-louvre example with covered headlights Important provenance, including ownership by Prince Zourab Tchkotoua, Steve Earle, and Richard Merritt Original engine recently rebuilt by GTO Engineering The ultimate dual-purpose alloy competition Ferrari Highly eligible for many of the world's premier historic motoring events, including the Tour Auto, Goodwood Revival, and Le Mans Classic FERRARI’S TOUR DE FRANCE The Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta is one of the most influential and impressive automobiles produced in the company’s illustrious history, as it helped to establish the marque’s dominance in racing in the GT class. With the 3.0-litre Colombo V-12 engine fitted to Ferrari’s 2,600-millimetre wheelbase chassis, numerous highly desirable Ferraris that followed in its footsteps, including the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta and the 250 GTO, can directly trace their roots to the 250 GT LWB Berlinetta. With incredible alloy coachwork that was designed by Pinin Farina and hand-built by Scaglietti, this was a car that was just as beautiful to look at as it was exciting to drive. The 250 GT LWB Berlinetta proved its worth at the Tour de France in 1956, where an early example of the model (chassis 0557 GT) raced to victory with Alfonso de Portago behind the wheel. It is worth mentioning that this was not just a few laps on a closed course, but a multi-day event consisting of 3,600 miles of all-out racing, including six circuit races, two hill climbs, and a drag race. The fact that the 250 GT LWB Berlinetta came out on top of such a gruelling event spoke not only to the performance of the car but also to the level of craftsmanship behind it. Nineteen fifty-six would not be the only year where a 250 GT LWB Berlinetta would take 1st overall at the Tour de France. Olivier Gendenbien went on to place 1st overall for the next three consecutive years, cementing the car’s reputation in not only motorsport but also automotive history and earning the nickname of “TdF” to commemorate its success over four years of racing throughout the French countryside. It is the most successful competition 250 GT Ferrari model, as it has garnered more victories than any other model, including the revered 250 GTO. CHASSIS NUMBER 0897 GT Ferrari’s production of the LWB Berlinetta is divisible into five distinct versions. This particular TdF, chassis number 0897 GT, is a classic 1958 version that has been fitted with a single louver between the rear and side windows and covered headlamps. Thirty-six such examples were produced, with this car being the fifth example built, and all were bodied in aluminium by Scaglietti and ready for competition. This example was completed in late March 1958 and sold new to F.A.S.T. SpA, of Milan, Italy. Copies of the build sheets and the engine dynamometer tests show that this car produced an incredible 263.2 horsepower at 7,200 rpm and a similarly impressive torque output. Most 250 GT LWB Berlinettas only produced around 240 horsepower at the time! Furthermore, additional research undertaken by RM Sotheby’s has uncovered that chassis number 0897 GT raced in the Gran Premio della Lotteria di Monza on 28 June 1959, under the banner of Scuderia Ambrosiana. Wearing #20, the car was driven by Carlo Leto di Priolo, yet it failed to finish. However, it did achieve the ninth fastest time in practice at that event. The car was then sold to Prince Zourab Tchkotoua in September 1959 and re-registered as MO 53102. Under his ownership, chassis 0897 GT was raced at the 1959 Cotê de la Faucille, held on 6 September, where he finished 2nd in class and 13th overall. The prince was a devoted Ferrari client and even finished 2nd in class at the Tour de France in 1959, whilst racing chassis 0503 GT. Thereafter, the car was exported from Italy to the United States and was noted as being owned by Steven J. Earle, of Santa Barbara, California, the founder of the Monterey Historic Races. Earle sold the car in the late 1960s to another noted Ferrari enthusiast of the time, Richard W. Merritt of Bethesda, Maryland. It is believed that during Merritt’s ownership, the car’s original engine was removed, and the car was later sold to Don Peak and then Bill Zierling, of Malibu, California, in 1971. The TdF was then restored by Allen Bishop, of Pacific Palisades, who fitted an engine from a 250 GT PF Coupé, number 1555 GT. Whilst passing through the care of well-known enthusiast Don Orosco, of Carmel, California, it was again restored, this time by Nino Epifani Restorations in Berkley, in 1989, and it was then sold to Engelbert E. Stieger, of St. Gallen, Switzerland. At this time, Stieger sourced and purchased the car’s original engine. The TdF also received a partial restoration by Garage Leirer in Switzerland. In 1995, 0897 GT was sold to Matthias Fitch, of Munich, Germany. Over the course of the next 17 years, the car was regularly driven and enjoyed on rallies and historic racing events across Europe. These included the Mille Miglia on five separate occasions, the Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge, and the Le Mans Classic in both 2010 and 2012. During this time, the car was driven with engine number 1555 GT, although Fitch still retained the original engine. Recently, the original engine was reinstalled following a full rebuild by the Ferrari specialists at GTO Engineering. With only test mileage since the engine rebuild, the car is reported to be in excellent driving condition, and it would make a wonderful candidate for further historic racing events and vintage rallies. Accompanying the sale are copies of the car’s build sheet, documenting its high-horsepower specification, as well as its Italian Estratto Chronologico and period photographs that confirm its early ownership and racing history. Moreover, it is accompanied by its valid FIA HTP and A/3 Class FIVA Passport. The 250 GT TdF, renowned for its incredible driving dynamics and road manners, is eager to please both on the road and track. Today, this car remains as desirable as when it was new, and it is highly valued as a competitive and successful GT car from one of Ferrari’s most successful eras of racing. As it is an ideal entrant for historic events around the globe, the acquisition of chassis number 0897 GT would not only afford its next caretaker access to some of the world’s most prestigious and selective driving events, but it would also serve as a highlight of any significant collection. As a true aluminium-bodied competition Ferrari, the TdF is one of the most successful and iconic dual-purpose Berlinettas ever to wear the Prancing Horse. Addendum ‘Please note that after the auction the car will be returned to GTO Engineering where it will receive final set up and shakedown further to the engine rebuild. The car will be transported to GTO Engineering, the works completed and then delivered to the RM Sotheby’s storage facility at the sellers cost. It is expected these works will take roughly two weeks to complete. Chassis no. 0897 GT Engine no. 0897 GT

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-09-07
Hammer price
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2005 Ferrari Enzo

660 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic engine management and electronic fuel injection, six-speed electro-hydraulic computer-controlled sequential F1 transmission, limited-slip differential and traction control, front and rear pushrod-actuated double wishbones with horizontal external reservoir coil-spring damper units, and four-wheel ventilated carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in. Gifted to His Holiness Pope John Paul II by Ferrari; the 400th and final Enzo built One of very few finished in Rosso Scuderia (Scuderia Red) Fitted with unique options, Daytona seats, and a carbon fiber rear spoiler Fully serviced by Ferrari of Central Florida in December 2014 As-new condition, with just 179 kilometers from new Undisputedly the most desirable and historically important Enzo; provenance more fascinating than perhaps any other supercar Open the boot lid of this Enzo and its place in history is written in plain sight. There lies one simple sentence, in Luca Corderi di Montezemolo’s distinctive handwriting: Questa Enzo unica nella storia della Ferrari quale segno della solidarietà per chi soffre ispirata da un Grande Papa, Giovanni Paolo II. This Enzo, unique in the history of Ferrari, as a sign of solidarity for those suffering, inspired by a Great Pope, John Paul II. THE FINAL ENZO Upon Ferrari’s introduction of the Enzo, it was stated that only 349 examples would be produced, in keeping with the company’s traditional mantra of building one car fewer than what the market would demand. However, the 349 failed to placate enough of Ferrari’s best customers, so production was raised to 399. After the completion of the 399th Enzo, Ferrari built one more, to bring production to an even 400. This car, which would definitively be “the last,” was built not for any of the factory’s customers but as a gift for His Holiness Pope John Paul II. One might expect a car built for a Pope to have unique features, and this Enzo does. It is finished in Rosso Scuderia, a color seldom seen on Enzos and one that was more commonly used for the Scuderia’s Formula One cars, making it instantly discernable as something special to the most passionate of tifosi from a distance. Furthermore, its rear spoiler was crafted of bare carbon fiber, which is a one-off feature that presents a wonderful contrast of color. The cockpit features an upper dashboard and steering wheel in Nero leather, as well as seats and lower dashboard in Cuoio leather. The seats have matched Cuoio-colored “Daytona” inserts, which is an option seen on only a handful of Enzos. The car was intended to be gifted to Pope John Paul II by Montezemolo and other Ferrari executives at the Vatican in January 2005. While His Holiness thanked his visitors for such a generous gift, in typical humility, he suggested that they sell it on his behalf and donate the proceeds to the victims of a tsunami that had ravaged Southeast Asia just weeks before. Accordingly, the car was returned to Ferrari’s Maranello facility until the auction that was held there in June 2005. There it was sold, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to charity. Sadly, Pope John Paul II had passed away in April, but Ferrari honored their promise to him and returned to the Vatican to present his successor, Pope Benedict XVI, with a check of the sale funds for charity. Following the auction, the car was destined for the United States, and it has remained here ever since. It has been only sparingly driven and kept in as-new condition, showing, at the time of cataloguing, only 179 kilometers from new and appearing as if it had just left the production line. It has been properly maintained mechanically throughout its life, with an annual service last performed by Ferrari of Central Florida in December 2014. Importantly, it comes with its original tool kit and the original set of manuals. That the Ferrari Enzo is a technological and performance masterpiece is well known, and with only 400 built, each is a rarity in its own right and accordingly coveted by enthusiasts. However, it is rare that an Enzo has its own special, distinctive, and important history, making the car offered here the most important of all. As it has been gifted by Ferrari to one of the most beloved leaders of modern times, sold at his request to benefit humanity, and since preserved as beautifully as it deserves to be, it is a landmark car that RM Sotheby’s is delighted to offer at auction once more. Add to that the rarity of this car's options and color scheme, and one is left with an Enzo so important that it is as much a supercar as an invaluable historical document. It is one of the most important stories in automotive history. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions this vehicle will need to be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. Chassis no. ZFFCZ56B000141920 Engine no. 91280 Assembly No. 59050

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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Ex Scuderia Ferrari 1952 FERRARI 340 AMERICA SPIDER COMPETIZIONE

Ex Scuderia Ferrari 1952 FERRARI 340 AMERICA SPIDER COMPETIZIONE Design by Vignale Chassis no. 0196A Engine no. 0196A 4,101cc Tipo 340/A SOHC V-12 Engine Triple Weber 40 DCF/3 Carburetors Approximately 280bhp at 6,600rpm 4-Speed Manual Transmission Front Independent Suspension Tipo 340 'Doppia Balestra' Rear Suspension 4-Wheel Hydraulic Drum Brakes *Campaigned in the 1952 Mille Miglia, 24 Hours of Le Mans, Targa Florio and other prominent races *Raced in period by noted factory drivers Piero Taruffi, Maurice Trintignant, and Giovanni Bracco *Factory prepared from new to 340MM Competizione Specifications *Sensational Competizione Coachwork design by Vignale and Giovanni Michelotti *Veteran of the Mille Miglia Storico, the Monaco Historic GP and the Monterey Historic Races *Documented history by marque authority Marcel Massini and factory build sheets *Stunningly unique and collectible example of Scuderia Ferrari history *Retains matching numbers engine *Eligible for the most prominent motoring events around the globe THE RISE OF LAMPREDI'S V-12 The early history of Ferrari is overwhelmingly characterized by the evolution of one classic engine, the Giacchino Colombo-designed motor that is often referred to as the short-block V-12. Colombo had been a principle engineer for the Scuderia Ferrari prior to World War II, and his postwar 1.5-liter engine soon became the backbone of early Ferrari models like the 125S, 166MM, and the 212 series. Once the motor's displacement was enlarged to three liters in 1954, the Colombo V-12 became the unifying component of Maranello's road car development for the following fifteen years. Considering the short-block V-12's longevity and significance to Ferrari's evolution, Colombo, himself, actually exited the company rather early, joining Alfa Romeo in 1950. His defection was ultimately prompted by some of the limitations in his engine's design, and the rise of one of his pupils, one Aurelio Lampredi. While Colombo's V-12 thrived in the aforementioned sports car models and their respective racing endeavors, the engine was considerably less successful in the all-important Grand Prix competition format. Somewhat ironically, Alfa Romeo's Grand Prix cars dominated the immediate postwar period with a supercharged version of the motor that Colombo had designed for them before the war on the Scuderia's behalf. This engine championed the prevalent notion of the prewar period that Grand Prix success was reliant upon blown motors of relatively small displacement. While this approach had no doubt resulted in winning cars, such engines required extreme degrees of tuning, maintenance, and parts replacement, as the high-revving motors were particularly susceptible to wear. Along these lines, Colombo had attempted to supercharge his postwar V-12 for Ferrari's Grand Prix entries, but the short-block engine could not hold pace with the highly developed Alfa unit. Junior Ferrari designer Aurelio Lampredi envisioned a different approach. As a considerably larger un-supercharged engine was allowed under the formula, Colombo's apprentice proposed a naturally aspirated 4.5-liter motor, which Ferrari approved for development by 1949. Lampredi's creation differed from his mentor's not only with a bigger displacement, it featured a wholly taller and longer architecture, thus prompting the "long-block" nickname (and the retroactive "short-block" designation for Colombo's unit). The engine also featured single intake porting versus the Colombo V-12's siamesed arrangement, and twin ignition per cylinder for increased power. First utilized in the Scuderia's 1950 grand prix cars, and soon after in the corresponding sports cars, the Lampredi engine offered unprecedented power capabilities at a fraction of the required maintenance during endurance events. The immediate success of the powerplant prompted Ferrari to temporarily abandon further development of the short-block V-12, and Colombo accordingly soon made his exit. At the ripe age of 30, Aurelio Lampredi was promoted to chief engineer of Ferrari. While Lampredi's long-block engine initially displaced 3.3 liters in Grand Prix configuration, versions of 3, 4.1, 4.5, and 5 liters were eventually developed. These motors became the grist of Ferrari's sports car racing campaigns over the following five years, powering superlative models like the 340MM, 375MM, and the Le Mans-winning 375 Plus. The displacement limitations in FIA formulas that followed the disastrous accident at Le Mans in 1955 spelled the end of the long-block's remarkable run, allowing Colombo's original short-block design to re-enter the picture. In addition to the evolving road cars, the short block would figure prominently in racecars like the 250 Testa Rossa and Tour de France Berlinetta. But the achievements and overall dominance of the more potent Lampredi motor during the early 1950s will always be fondly celebrated as a uniquely important chapter in Ferrari's sports car racing history, and the major force behind their World Sportscar Championships of 1953 and 1954. THE 340 AMERICA - A BIG FERRARI FOR THE U.S. In April 1950, the 3.3-liter Grand Prix motor designed by Lampredi was dropped into chassis no. 0030 MT, a Touring-bodied Barchetta that was dubbed a 275 S. Two such cars were entered at the 1950 Mille Miglia, one driven by Luigi Villoresi and the other by Alberto Ascari, but both suffered transmission failures during one of the final stages, the Appenine section between Pescara and Rome (despite leading the eventual winner, Giannino Marzotto's 195 S Touring Berlinetta). The result would be markedly different a year later. Given the dominance of Allard's Cadillac and Chrysler-powered cars in SCCA circuits in the United States, Enzo Ferrari reasoned he could effectively market a large-bore sports car specifically for the American market. In August 1950, the company announced plans for a 4.1-liter Lampredi engined car, and 0030 MT was shown at the Paris Motor Show in September 1950, reconfigured with the new larger engine and now called the 340 America. Production began with chassis no. 0082A, a Vignale-bodied berlinetta that made its debut in April 1951 at the Mille Miglia. Villoresi and Piero Cassani drove this 340 America to first-place overall, demonstrating the tremendous promise of the platform. This car marked the first of 22 purpose-built 340 America examples, all assigned even-numbered chassis designations and thus theoretically intended for competition use like the concurrent 212 Exports. Despite this chassis numbering, cars could still be individually ordered to preference by coachbuilder or bodystyle, and eight of the 22 cars were actually trimmed as well-appointed roadgoing examples. Three of the fourteen sporting examples were more uniquely equipped as Competizione cars, complete with dual-sprung rear suspensions for improved handling and durability, and engines tuned to specifications that would eventually be employed in the successful 340MM racecars. Good for 280 hp, this configuration was soon employed on the 340 Mexicos that showed so much promise at the 1951 Carrera Panamericana, and eventually powered the 340MM Competition cars that won the Mille Miglia in 1953. This in turn led to a further enlargement of displacement in the 4.5-liter 375 MM, which won Spa and Pescara, and the 4.9-liter 375 Plus, which took the ultimate triumph at Le Mans in 1954. Available in open and closed coachwork from both Touring and Vignale, the 340 America was also clothed as a Coupe by Ghia. The model constituted the first premium supercar that Ferrari marketed specifically to the United States, and the precursor to the 410 Superamerica, which would eventually employ the ultimate 4.9-liter configuration of the Lampredi design for roadcar use. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED As the 17th of 22 cars in numerical chassis sequence, and one of just three Competizione examples, the featured 340 America Spider began construction in the spring of 1952, with the transaxle assembled in March by Walter Sghedoni, and the engine in early April under the supervision of Amos Franchini. Per the Competizione specifications, chassis no. 0196A was equipped with twin leaf-spring fittings on the rear suspension, and it is believed to be one of only three 340 America examples to feature this specification more common to the 212 Export. Furthermore, the engine was specified with larger Weber carburetors, essentially the configuration that would soon be used in the 340MM. As notes in a factory engine build sheet dated April 1, 1951, read, "Motore per vettura MM/52 SF," or to paraphrase, "Engine for car Mille Miglia 1952 SF [Scuderia Ferrari]." The chassis build sheet more specifically mentions intent for Piero Taruffi in the Mille, and eventual plans for Le Mans. This car was the second of four Spiders built by Vignale on the 340 America platform, and one of ten total Vignale-bodied cars (including 5 Berlinettas and one Cabriolet). It is interesting to note the design cues penned by the noted Vignale stylist Giovanni Michelotti as they relate to the greater series of Vignale-bodied Ferraris. Loosely based on the styling first used on 0076E, a 212 Export, this design employs the sweeping fender lines seen on many of the Vignale Coupes and Cabriolets built on the 212 chassis, though the elaborate grillework of those cars is dropped here in favor of the timeless eggcrate design. The rear shoulder haunches are also more pronounced, actually closer to the Touring treatment than the single-beltline Vignale Cabriolets. Despite the Spider's race-bred Competizione agenda, the coachwork still features characteristic Vignale ovoid portholes on the front fenders, an aesthetic adornment that lends added elegance to the design. Apropos of the larger carburetor profile, the hood possesses a center bulge that is framed by two rows of triple scallops, and the grille is flanked by two vertically elliptical cooling inlets, and underlined by two more horizontal inlets. Additional brake vents was fitted on the rear deck, along with vertical vents between the door and rear wheel arch. Dispatched on April 15, 1952, to Vignale's Torino factory for fitting of this coachwork, chassis no. 0196A was completed by the end of the month, just in time for the Mille Miglia held on May 3. Fitted with a single two-place frameless racing windscreen, the 340 America was entered by the Scuderia Ferrari and piloted by renowned Scuderia member Piero Taruffi, the noted grand prix driver who won the Carrera Panamericana the previous fall. Co-driven by Mario Vandelli and decorated with #614, the Spider had taken the lead when an airborne landing damaged the transmission and forced the car to retire early. The car's run in the Mille was photographically captured in an image that was later printed in Marzatto's book, La Ferrari alla Mille Miglia. Shortly thereafter, some bodywork modifications were undertaken with the intention of improving airflow and cooling the rear brakes. These measures included fitting a one-piece wraparound windscreen, and modifying the rear fenders with several cooling ducts (consisting of a single vertical entry duct in front of the rear wheels, and three mildly angled scallops behind them, as well as unusual sculpted brake ducts atop the rear fenders that were sometimes fitted with an inlet funnel). Two weeks later, the 340 America was entered by the factory at the Prix de Berne in Switzerland as #26, with Willy-Peter Daetwyler taking the wheel. Registered with tags reading "Prova MO 36," and painted red with a white triangle stretching from the grille to the windscreen, the spider once again retired early, this time with a broken transaxle at the race's beginning. Despite the result, the powerful Ferrari was again photographed at the race, as depicted in Adriano Cimarosti's book Grand Prix Suisse, and Ferrari by Vignale, the definitive survey written by marque historian Marcel Massini. In late May 1952, chassis no. 0196A was refinished in French blue paint and then loaned to Louis Rosier's Ecurie Auvergne for use at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it joined a contingent of seven other Ferraris (including two factory entries, and three from the NART). As #15, the America was fitted with a one-place windscreen and passenger tonneau, and then co-driven by the famed Maurice Trintignant, but unfortunately a clutch failure six hours into the race forced the car to bow out early. Its presence at Le Mans was photographed and depicted in numerous books, including Domique Pascal's Ferrari au Mans, Antoine Prunet's Ferrari Sports Racing and Prototype Competition Cars, a biography of Louis Rosier, and various histories of Le Mans. On June 29, 1952, the 340 America was lent to Giovanni Bracco for Targa Florio, the upstart driver who had won the 1952 Mille Miglia in a Ferrari 225 S with just a whiff of factory support while legendarily sipping wine and cognac. Numbered as #64, the spider didn't fare quite as well, dropping out of the race with transmission issues once again. Nearly a month later, the car was sold by the factory to Piero Scotti, a businessman and privateer from Florence who had placed third at the 1951 Mille in a Motto-bodied 212 Export. This transition to private ownership initiated an extended racing campaign in the hands of Italian privateers. FROM FACTORY RACECAR TO SUCCESSFUL PRIVATEER On August 10, 1952, Mr. Scotti entered the 340 at the VIII Circuito Automobilistico di Senigallia, where he placed 2nd in class while racing as #10. Five days later, the car experienced an axle failure during the seventeenth lap of the XXI Coppa Acerbo (the 12 Hours of Pescara), forcing another early retirement. On August 31, the car was entered at the Maloja-St. Moritz hillclimb in Switzerland, and as a photograph reveals, the hood had been modified with two horizontal air intakes towards the front, presumably for improved engine cooling. At the Colline Pistoiesi Cup on September 7, Scotti finished first, a triumph he followed with another checkered flag at the Catania-Etna hillclimb six days later. The month concluded with entry at the VI Grand Prix of Bari as #88. On October 19, the Vignale-bodied spider finished first overall again at the XXII Annual Vermicino-Rocca di Papa hillclimb, organized by the Automobile Club of Rome. Given its high level of activity throughout the year, the 340 America duly earned a place in the 1952 Ferrari yearbook. By the end of 1952, the fetching 340 America Competizione was returned to the Maranello factory, where the body was further modified by enlarging the elliptical air vents on each side of the grill. During 1953, the spider was loaned by the factory to various Italian privateers for racing in local hillclimb events, including the IV Annual Savona-Colle di Cadibona event on August 23, where Camillo Luglio took first overall as #188. Luglio also finished 4th in class at the XVIII Pontedecimo-Giovi hillclimb later that year. During 1954, at the behest of potential customer interest or perhaps merely as a styling exercise, Ferrari and Vignale undertook a re-bodying of the 340 America. After removing the original Spider coachwork, the chassis was clothed with a Vignale-built one-off coupe body that may have previously been used on a competition Aston Martin DB3 (as implied by file notes written by Ferrari historian Antoine Prunet). Reminiscent of the closed Vignale designs for the racing 212 Exports, the coachwork was finished in the then-popular two-tone treatment, with the body painted red and the roof in black. By March 1955, chassis no. 0196A had made its way to the United States, where it was first owned by Joseph Ricketts of Long Beach, California, and around this time it was spotted while parked at one of the Palm Springs road races. Later acquired by the Bates brothers, the Ferrari was acquired by dealer Harry Woodnorth of Chicago in 1960. It then passed to several other Illinois-based collectors, starting with Lee Sturtevant of Chicago, followed by H. Martin Burdette of Northfield in 1965, and then the well-known Joe Marchetti of Chicago in 1977. In 1979, the striking 340 America was sold by Marchetti to Aldo Bigioni of Ontario, Canada, and during his nearly 20 years of care, the car was fitted with a Mercedes gearbox and disc brakes. After being purchased in 1997 by Jerry Bowes of Villanova, Pennsylvania, 0196A finally began to find its way to the show fields of the collectable Ferrari niche, starting with an appearance at the 11th Annual Concorso Italiano, which was staged at the Quail Lodge in Carmel Valley California in August 1997. After passing through dealer Mark Smith, the rare Lampredi-engined Ferrari was purchased in early 1998 by collector Bill Jacobs of Joliet, Illinois. In March 1999, Jacobs sold the car to Hugh Taylor of the United Kingdom, and its path then took a most fortuitous turn towards its historic roots. In June 1999, 0196A was purchased by the well-known collector Lord Bamford of Stoke-on-Trent, England, and he commissioned a complete restoration, including the fabrication of Spider coachwork that was precisely designed and hand-pounded to match 0196A's original Vignale Spider body as accurately as possible. The cars underpinnings such as chassis and body sub-frames, suspension, and drive line all remained intact and original. The restoration was entrusted to the esteemed David Cottingham and his well-known firm DK Engineering, and under their expertise 0196A was returned to a highly original and authentic state of condition, including the 1952 Mille Miglia livery. After completing the meticulous restoration in 2000, the 340 America Spider was entered in the Mille Miglia Storico in May 2001, commemorating its original appearance there in 1952 when driven by the legendary Taruffi. The car was then similarly celebrated with a run in the Monaco Historic Grand Prix at Monte Carlo in May 2004. Vintage racing appearances continued at the 31st Annual Rolex Monterey Historic Races at Laguna Seca, California, in August 2004, and the Monaco Historic Grand Prix in May 2006. 0196A's extraordinary tale did not go unnoticed by the motoring press, and a full color feature on the car was published in the March 2004 issue of Octane magazine. After explaining the America's illustrious factory racing history, the feature indulged in a full test drive at the Donington circuit by renowned racer Willie Green. He commented, "It's got good mid-range torque, surprisingly good for a V-12. It's very smooth, a real jewel. For a 50-year-old car I can't believe how fast it is...The rear end is great and the handling is very good. [The drum brakes] were better than I could have hoped for...It's a very, very special car." In March 2008, Sir Bamford sold the 340 America Spider Competizione to German collector Dr. Michael Willms, who was living in Belgium and then Switzerland. The Spider America was soon the subject of two more extensive print features, in the October 2008 issue of Forza magazine, and the May 2009 issue of the British publication Auto Italia. In September 2011, the rare 340 was purchased by the consignor, a German collector who has continued to optimally maintain the spider while using and presenting it at historic events. Participation in the Mille Miglia Storico in May 2012 was followed four months later by display at the 3rd Annual Unique Special Ones Concours held at the Four Seasons hotel in Florence, Italy. According to marque authority Marcel Massini, this impressive Spider Competizione retains its original Lampredi V-12, the specially tuned 4.1-liter unit with the competition carburetor profile. The car is further accompanied by a deep file of documentation including dozens of period photographs from the aforementioned races, restoration photographs, correspondence from Ferrari expert and author Antoine Prunet, factory build sheets, and a copy of Piero Taruffi's original written evaluation of the 340 America model for the Ferrari factory. Eligible for every conceivable event in the automotive niche, from world class concours like the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance or Villa d'Este Concorso d'Eleganza to premium vintage rallies like the Mille Miglia Storico or Le Mans Classic, this sensational early racing Ferrari checks all the proverbial boxes. 0196A boasts rarity and legitimate racing provenance at the hands of some of the era's most legendary divers (Taruffi, Trintignant, and Bracco) on the behalf of the one and only Scuderia Ferrari, and it would make a crowning acquisition for the dedicated Ferrari collector or competition roadster purist, a perfect synthesis of the finest qualities of 1950s Italian sports racing machines.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
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1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

260 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 38 DC3 carburetors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4 in. The second 1956 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione built; one of nine with the original-style bodywork Wonderful period racing history; competed in both the 1956 Mille Miglia and the 1959 Tour de France Brilliantly restored; Best of Show GT and Platinum at the 2006 Cavallino Classic A very early example of one of Ferrari’s most celebrated dual-purpose GT racers THE 250 GT BERLINETTA COMPETIZIONE ‘TOUR DE FRANCE’ The impact that Ferrari’s 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione left on motorsport, let alone Ferrari itself, is something that is difficult to quantify. Similarly, stating that this new model saw consistent success on race tracks around the globe would be an understatement. The new model fared quite well in its earliest outings in 1956, but it truly came into its own at the 1956 Tour de France. At that event, a notoriously grueling six-day rally that included circuit competitions, hill climbs, and even drag races, Alfonso de Portago and his trusted co-driver Edmund Nelson finished 1st Overall, marking the start of what would become a three-year winning streak for the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione at that event, earning the model the nickname of “Tour de France,” or, more commonly, “TdF.” Success was not limited to the namesake event, however; a TdF won the Targa Florio overall in 1957, another conquered the GT class at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959, and a variety of others had class or overall wins at over 250 other international and local races between 1956 and 1965, making the model one of the most successful racing cars in Ferrari history. Simply put, few competition Ferraris of the company’s first full decade saw as wide-ranging success, or were as all-conquering, as the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione. It was the car that cemented Ferrari’s brand and left a legacy of victory that would carry the company’s reputation for years to come. It is no surprise, then, that the surviving TdFs – particularly those with well-known racing histories – rank among the most desirable sports cars of the period, and among the most sought-after of all Ferraris. CHASSIS NUMBER 0507 GT The car shown here is part of the first series of nine TdFs built, and in fact, as the second example, it was actually produced prior to the Tour de France victory that gave the model its famous nomenclature. Chassis number 0507 GT was delivered new to Dr. Ottavio Randaccio of Milan on 23 April 1956. Only five days later, it was entered into the Mille Miglia, wearing race number 510. It would appear that by the end of 1956, the car must have suffered some race damage, as the headlights and taillights were changed to reflect the later cars of that early series. Over the course of the 1957 and 1958 seasons, Dr. Randaccio continued to drive the car at a handful of hill climb events, mostly in Italy, but in two races in Austria in 1958, as well. Following the 1958 season, the car was passed to Angelo Roma, also of Milan. While the car would continue its competition career in Signore Roma’s ownership, rather than drive it himself, the owner selected noted French rally driver Rene Trautmann to pilot the TdF. It was a wise decision, as Trautmann secured 1st in Class finishes in his first three events with the car during the 1959 season, an incredible feat for a three-year-old racing car! In the early 1959 season, the car was returned to the Scaglietti coachworks as the result of a second shunt and once again Signore Roma chose to have its styling modernized, with a lowered nose, smaller grille, covered headlamps, and a rear spoiler. In this form, the car ran in what would be its final race in period, the Tour de France—the same event that gave the car its legendary nickname—but did not finish the race. The car remained in Roma’s ownership until 1962, when it was sold to Maria Felicita Gattori of Milan. Following two years in her care, the car left her ownership and was imported to Switzerland. By 1968, the car had passed into the ownership of the well-known Ferrari author and historian Rob de la Rive Box of Vilmergen, Switzerland, before being sold again that same year to Claus Ahlefeld of Kvaerndrup, Denmark. The mileage was noted at that time as being 52,000 kilometers (just over 32,000 miles), indicating what an impressive, albeit short, racing career it led. It would remain in Mr. Ahlefeld’s ownership for a remarkable 32 years, spending much of that time at the Egeskov Veteranmuseum, his castle and renowned private collection. Sam and Emily Mann acquired the car from Mr. Ahlefeld in 2000, and subsequently decided that chassis number 0507 GT would be fully restored back to its original configuration, as it had appeared during its second season. Accordingly, the car was shipped to Ferrari distributor Classic Coach of Elizabeth, New Jersey, who performed much of the restoration. A short while later, the car was delivered to marque specialist David Carte of Classic & Sport Auto Refinishing in Edinburg, Virginia, known for the high-quality workmanship and attention to detail it performs on Ferraris for some of the world’s foremost collectors. Carte’s facility completed some mechanical work as well as show details. As part of the work, the nose and tail were returned to their original configurations, as raced in the 1957 Tour de France. The body was refinished in a most attractive color combination, its original silver grey with a blue leather interior. Since restoration, the car has been shown, driven, and enjoyed at a selective handful of the world’s most prestigious automotive events. It was displayed for the first time post-restoration at the Cavallino Classic in 2006, 50 years after its construction, and was awarded Platinum honors and the Gran Turismo Cup for Best of Show GT. That August, it ventured here to the Monterey Peninsula, where it was awarded 3rd in Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Yet, typical of Mr. Mann’s restorations, the car has been enjoyed for its performance as much as for its dramatic beauty. The Manns drove the car on the 2008 Colorado Grand, reporting that it performed admirably on the 1,000-mile rally; it has also performed admirably on the California Mille. In many ways, the 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione, a.k.a. the “TdF,” is the most important of the Ferrari gran turismo berlinettas of the company’s golden era. It is the road-and-track model that paved the way for such future successes as the 250 GT SWB and the 250 GTO; in fact, it can be contended that without the “TdF,” neither of these two models would have existed in the form in which they became legendary—nor would there have been a California Spider, a car whose drivetrain owes much to the Berlinetta Competizione’s development. Sam and Emily have enjoyed 0507 GT in their collection for many years; in Sam’s words, “In my opinion, it is one of the most elegant cars penned along lines by Pinin Farina, and while designed as a race car, it is wonderfully at home for leisurely driving or long-distance touring. Presented in highly compelling colors from a wonderful collection, 0507 GT has been enjoyed and preserved as a superb example of the breed and a must-have in any collection of Enzo-era Ferraris. It represents the proud genesis of an era.” CHASSIS NO. 0507 GT – RACE RESULTSDATEEVENTRACE #DRIVERRESULTApril 28–29, 1956Mille Miglia510Ottavio RandaccioDNFJune 2, 1957Coppa Lombarda, Monza170Ottavio Randaccio2nd OASeptember 1, 1957Garessio-Colle San Bernardo HillclimbN/AOttavio Randaccio3rd OA, 3rd ICSeptember 8, 1957Coppa InterEuropa, Monza78Ottavio Randaccio8th OASeptember 29, 1957Pontedecimo-Giovi Hillclimb326Ottavio Randaccio3rd ICOctober 6, 1957Trieste-Opicina Hillclimb158Ottavio RandaccioDNSApril 25, 1958Coppa Vigorelli34Ottavio RandaccioResult UnknownMay 15, 1958Internationales Flugplatzrennen, Wien-Aspern31Ottavio Randaccio4th OAJune 15, 1958Varese-Campo di Fiori115Ottavio Randaccio17th OA, 3rd ICAugust 17, 1958Internationales Auto- und Motorradrennen, Flugplatz Zeltweg93Ottavio RandaccioResult UnknownSeptember 7, 1958Coppa InterEuropa, Monza75Ottavio Randaccio5th OAMay 3, 1959St. Antonin Hillclimb126René Trautmann1st OAMay 7, 1959La Gineste Hillclimb126René Trautmann1st ICMay 10, 1959Tropheé de Provence126René Trautmann1st ICJune 14, 1959Macon-Solutre Hillclimb87René Trautmann2nd ICAugust 23, 1959Urcy HillclimbN/ARené Trautmann8th OASeptember 18–28, 1959Tour de France160René Trautman/GeléDNFAddendum Please note that this title is in transit. Chassis no. 0507 GT Engine no. 0507 GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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1958 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series I by Pinin Farina

*Premium Lot – Bidding via Internet will not be available for this lot. Should you have any questions please contact Client Services. 240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber 36 DCL/3 carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.3 in. The 14th of 40 Series I Cabriolets built Purchased new by John R. Fulp Jr.; owned for 40 years by Robert Donner Jr. Fully restored to original specifications and color Ferrari Classiche certification in process Since the mid-1950s, Ferrari’s road-going automobiles have been integral to the longevity of the company. Founded in the pursuit of domination in international motorsport, Enzo Ferrari quickly realized that, in order to fund his racing efforts, his company would have to produce road cars alongside his racecars. Utilizing lessons learned in competition, Ferrari’s road cars were some of the fastest and most desirable automobiles on the planet, all in an effort support the company’s indomitable reputation on the track. Considered by many to be one of Pinin Farina’s most elegant designs, the Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet is the quintessential open-top gentleman’s Ferrari. Whereas the earliest iterations of the California Spider were simply long-wheelbase 250 GT Berlinettas without a roof, this was a much more refined automobile, built for touring rather than racing. The Series I Cabriolet dripped with sophistication, benefitting from smooth and unobstructed lines defined by its closed headlamps and graceful taillights artfully crafted into the rear wings. It was the gold standard for the upper class, and ownership showcased not only the owner’s appreciation of engineering and performance but also their refined and sophisticated taste in transportation. The Series I Cabriolet was always in style—no matter the time, place, or occasion. THE 14TH OF 40 The cabriolet presented here, chassis number 0791 GT, is the 14th of approximately 40 examples built. It was finished in a very fetching color combination of Bianco (MM 10019) over a Blu (VM 3315) Connolly leather interior, reflecting the model’s subtle and refined personality. It was also fitted with four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes by the factory. Shortly after its completion, it was delivered new to Ferrari dealer Parauto S.r.l. of Genova, Italy, in March of 1958. It was then sold to Luigi Chinetti Motors of New York and was subsequently shipped to the United States. Chinetti sold the car to its first private owner, John R. Fulp Jr. of Greenville, South Carolina. Fulp was a young and highly successful gentleman racer, and his garage was often home to a variety of incredible vehicles bearing the Cavallino Rampante. Fulp enjoyed much success behind the wheel of Ferraris at some of the world’s most prestigious and competitive racing events, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the 12 Hours of Sebring. However, as 0791 GT was not built for racing, it is likely that his Series I Cabriolet was enjoyed solely on public roads during his ownership. Fulp only kept the car until the fall of 1959, when it was traded back to Luigi Chinetti for a 410 Superamerica Coupe (1311 SA). After returning to Luigi Chinetti in New York, chassis 0791 GT was later sold to James Harrison, an American then living in Paris, France. Harrison had the car refinished in silver with red upholstery by French Ferrari distributor Charles Pozzi, who he also commissioned to revise the dashboard layout in a style similar to the 400 Superamerica. Harrison kept the car in the United States and was living on Park Avenue in 1969 when issues with the engine arose, leading him to source a newer, outside-plug replacement motor through Chinetti. The car was then moved to Florida in July of 1970 but remained with Harrison at his home in Palm Beach. SINGLE-FAMILY OWNERSHIP FOR 40 YEARS The following year, the car was sold by Harrison to its third owner, Robert Donner Jr., another noted gentleman racer based in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Donner was a much-admired figure in the racing world and enjoyed success racing MGs, Jaguars, and Porsche Spyders in particular. Donner further grew fond of Ferraris, and over the years, he owned a number of significant Ferraris, including a 250 GTO. In 1975, Donner rebuilt his cabriolet’s engine and refinished the car in red over red. From that point on, it became his car of choice for top-down cruising. In his ownership, 0791 GT was driven on the Colorado Grand no less than a dozen times. While the car was primarily used as a warm-weather driver, Donner did take this car to The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering in 2007, where it was displayed in a special Series I Cabriolet class. Following Donner’s passing, chassis number 0791 GT was purchased by West Coast-based enthusiasts and received a minor cosmetic restoration prior to being sold to its current and fifth custodian. The Ferrari was then shipped to Europe, where it has resided ever since. Shortly after its arrival, it was decided that the car should be brought back to its as-delivered specification, and it was sent to Ferrari specialists DK Engineering, where work began almost immediately. The car’s older outside-plug engine was replaced with a brand-new and correct type 128-C engine from Ferrari Classiche, providing the car with a powerplant that is not only factory correct but also arguably better than new. It was then refinished in its original color combination of Bianco over Blu Connolly leather, returning it to its original specification inside and out. The Series I Cabriolet showed that Ferrari could toe the line between sporting and elegant automobiles. It brought in new customers to Maranello who would not normally have been interested in racing and turned them into regular customers, instantly enamored by the Ferrari’s visual subtlety coupled with dynamic performance. Following its recent restoration and benefitting from known history from new with just five owners, this is surely one of the finest first-series cabriolets. Addendum Please note Ferrari Classiche supplied the engine block, not the entire motor, as described in the catalog and although Classiche Certification remains in progress, it has not been completed at present. Chassis no. 0791GT Gearbox no. 44C

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
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1966 FERRARI 330 P3

The ex-Scuderia, 1000kms of Monza and Spa-Francorchamps Winning 1966 FERRARI 330 P3 Chassis No. 0844 Engine No. 0844 (412 P3) Ferrari racing red with black interior and red seats Engine: V12, double overhead camshafts per bank, twin spark plug per cylinder, water-cooled, 3,967cc, 420bhp at 8,200rpm; Gearbox: ZF five-speed in unit with transaxle in 1966, replaced by Ferrari unit in early 1967; Chassis construction: tubular steel with aluminum sheet reinforcing (semi-monocoque); Suspension: front, upper and lower A-arms with coil spring/shock absorber units, rear, wide based lower wishbone, upper top link, twin radius arms per side with coil spring/shock absorber units; Brakes: Girling discs, outboard at the front and inboard at the rear. Right hand drive. With Ferrari's 330 P3 #0844 we visit the very heart of Ferrari history at a time when its rear engined racing prototypes truly reached maturity, the result of half a decade of experience with that configuration. Motor racing's golden era between the years of 1964 and 1971 was the era of the no-holds barred big displacement sports-prototypes in World Championship sports car racing for the Manufacturers' Championship. It was the time of such legendary race cars as the Ford GT40, the Lola T70, the Ferrari 512S and M, the Porsche 917 and, perhaps the greatest of all, the Ferrari 'P' (for 'prototipo') series. The P3 was a logical and comprehensive evolution of the P2 of 1965, itself a four liter mid-engined car, but of traditional 'space frame' chassis construction. For the P3 of 1966, Ferrari's engineers redrew the chassis, this time adding riveted-on aluminum panels to generate enhanced torsional rigidity. Furthermore the fiberglass underbody was bonded into the chassis. An all-new V12 engine using twin overhead camshafts was developed for this new P3 and fuel was no longer delivered via the long-used Weber twin or quadruple carburetors as had previously been seen on all of Ferrari's sports and sports-racing cars. In their place was the more efficient British Lucas indirect fuel injection. Another change was the switch from Marchal to Champion sparkplugs, no less than 24 of which were used for the double ignition, completed by two distributors and an impressive battery of 4 coils all by Marelli. Power was quoted as 420 horsepower at 8,200 rpm. The gearbox was a German ZF unit. The suspension featured wider tracks accomodating even wider wheels: 8.5 inches at the front and 9.5 at the rear, underlining the rapid advances in tire technology at the time. It was also, at 1,587lbs (720kgs), almost 220lbs (100kgs) lighter than its predecessor, 65lbs of which were saved on engine weight alone. The P3 then received what is recognized as one of the most pure and beautiful bodies ever created for a competition Ferrari or for any motor car in fact, one that has been painted, sculpted and rendered in numerous forms by artists for over three decades. Built by Brazilian Piero Drogo's Carrozzeria Sports Cars in Modena, this was a smooth, all-enveloping Berlinetta with gracefully curving fenders, cooling intakes and slots. It was much lower than the P2, at 37.4in. As underlined by its wide tracks, flawless design and dramatically sloped and rounded windshield, it was a shape that had come into its maturity; so much so in fact that its succesor the P4 was almost undistinguishable to all but the most expert eyes. Its sheer timeless presence was matched by its efficiency. Announced to the press on December 12, 1965, the first P3 was actually shown to journalists in February, 1966. 0846 was there with open spyder bodywork. Two months later 0844 made its debut on April 14, 1966 at Modena, looking almost identical in all respects except that the roof over the driver's head had not been removed. John Surtees conducted the testing of the new berlinetta in preparation for the forthcoming event at Monza. Because of labor disputes in Italy, only three P3's were ever built, whereas 5 P2's were made the year before. 0846 in spyder configuration was readied to take part in the Sebring 12-hour race in Florida in March, 1966. Mike Parkes, Ferrari's chief development driver, shared the car with Bob Bondurant. Parkes led for most of his stint, but when handing the spyder over to Bondurant at the final stop, warned him of a weakening clutch. Alas, a few laps later, the spyder did grind to a halt with no drive to the rear wheels, but enough had been seen of Ferrari's new car to warn Ford that in this fresh new season of 1966, Ferrari was more than ever a contender for the Championship. 0844's first race outing was in the 1000 Kilometer race at Monza where Mike Parkes was partnered by John Surtees, in his return to competition after his severe 1965 crash in Mosport Canada. The pair led from start to finish in what was mostly a wet race. Their victory was dominant, but not without some windshield wiper troubles! During the race Surtees set a new lap record of 108.67mph and depite the weather its overall average speed was some 103.06mph. The Ford GT40's, especially in small block form, did not seem to have the power to beat the beautiful Ferrari. At the Targa Florio, Ferrari's factory team entry, the singleton 0486 Spyder, was knocked out by an errant GTO whilst 0844 was readied for the infamous Spa-Francorchamps 1000 Kilometers, held on the ultra-fast eight mile long circuit in Belgium. Once again, Mike Parkes was slated to drive the big Ferrari; this time due to a date clash with the Monaco GP, Surtees was unavailable and 'Parkesi' was partnered by Lodovico Scarfiotti, the generally acknowledged Ferrari 'hillclimb' specialist. During the race Parkes set a new lap record at 139mph and despite facing a horde of Ford GT40's, 0844 trounced the opposition again, winning both races it had contested. Both the Berlinetta and the Spyder were entered for the next race, that at the Nürburgring, Germany's fearsome fourteen and a half mile circuit which snakes through the Eifel forest, just forty miles from Spa-Francorchamps. In fact it was for purposes of evaluation and comparison that 0844 had been brought along with the spyder, 0846. During pre-race testing, John Surtees assessed both and his verdict to Ferrari's new team manager, Eugenio Dragoni, was that the spyder was the more efficient and practical of the two around the 'Ring. Dragoni withdrew the Berlinetta, leaving the Spyder to race in the hands of 'il grande' John with Mike Parkes. During the race it once again suffered clutch and gearbox trouble and was retired. Thankfully for Ferrari, the NART and SEFAC Ferrari Dinos finished second and third, letting Ferrari and Ford enter the Le Mans 24-Hour race on an absolutely even points score. Le Mans 1966 was a battle of the Titans. Ford entered no less than eight of the seven-liter GT40 Mark II's. For the first time, three P3's were to be run, two of which were officially Nart entries, but for all intents and purposes were managed by SEFAC Ferrari, the factory team. 0844, 0846 and 0848 were entered. Also present were an assortment of 365 P2's, Dino Sp's and even a 250LM from Ecurie Belge. It turned out to be the quintessential David versus Goliath battle in motorsport history up to that point: Maranello's squad of 3 P3's paled with the industrial might of Detroit's eight 7 liter Fords, as did their 4 liter engine sizes, nearly half as big. Furthermore unpleasant politics saw Ferrari's team shoot themselves in the foot just before the most important race of the year. Their fastest driver, John Surtees, found himself replaced by Lodovico Scarfiotti as lead driver by team manager Dragoni and walked out. (Scarfiotti was a family member of the Agnellis, Fiat's owners, and it may be no coincidence that Ferrari was courting Fiat for financial assistance during this period). Though this has never been officially admitted, it is widely believed that the fiercely nationalistic Dragoni had arranged some funding for Ferrari and therefore had a measure of control. 0844, wearing race number 21, was to be driven by Jean Guichet and Dragoni's favorite, Lorenzo Bandini. Jean Guichet, the 1964 Le Mans winner, recalls his drive in 0844: When I drove it with Bandini at Le Mans I was under the impression that it wasn't really for Chinetti (as it was officially entered) but for Ferrari directly. I had exchanged telegrams with Mr. Ferrari so I am sure that it was in fact a factory car. I don't recall driving it before Le Mans. Bandini had pulled off a very good time in qualifying. During the race I had a big spin after the Dunlop curve, at the bottom of the hill when it began to drizzle. It was also the beginning of the night. I was lucky and just grazed one of the guardrails or earthbanks there with the back end and resumed. Well I was so annoyed at having spun that when I got onto the Mulsanne straight, just past that row of trees on the left at the beginning I gave it too much throttle and as the track was slick I had another huge spin. Somehow I stayed on track... Then because one of my rear round lights had been broken by the contact Ford went to the organizers and whined about it so I had to come in to get it changed. I guess we had them worried: in the first hours we ran really fast at 224kmh average speed. Then eventually the engine broke. Le Mans that year saw the total rout of Ferrari. Ford GT40's took the top three slots. 0844 acquitted itself well, holding fifth position in the fifth hour. It lasted longer than its two siblings but dropped out with head gasket failure in the seventeenth hour. Ferrari re-grouped for 1967. Forghieri developed the glorious P4, as noted previously a car looking very similar to the P3. Its shape, perhaps because it so perfectly combined efficiency and beauty, just could not be improved upon barring some detail differences which made it a faster car. The P3's had their bodies upgraded and their injection removed in favor of a simplified Weber carburetor set-up. Shortly after the season began, the P3/4's (now called '412P' by the factory) received new, Ferrari-designed gearboxes to replace the unsuitable and less reliable ZF units. Suspension modifications were carried out to allow even greater wheel widths. 0844 was sold to Luigi Chinetti's North American Racing Team for 1967. (The other two P3/4's plus two new cars were sold off to Ferrari's other Concessionaire Race teams). The first race was at Daytona and the new P4's dominated the race, coming in first and second. 0844, driven by Pedro Rodriguez and Jean Guichet, completed Ferrari's domination in third place. The Ford GT40's suffered gearbox failure, one after another. In perhaps the most recognized triumph in Ferrari history the three cars staged a formation finish which has since been depicted in numerous paintings and generated the 365GTB/4 berlinetta's unofficial nickname of Daytona. Jean Guichet recalls the historic occasion: At Daytona when I raced it with Pedro Rodriguez the car was rather well worn and tired. I believe he took the start. We had some gearbox problems. I had also previously raced with Muller in the Targa Florio in another of these cars for Filipinetti the Swiss team and we had a number of gearbox problems with the ZF unit. Filipinetti himself then complained to Ferrari which directly contributed to the eventual replacement of the gearbox in these cars with a new in house unit. Going back to Daytona, there were two incidents. First Pedro in a very rare event, burst both rear tires simultaneously! Also during the race, before or after that, I burst a front tire just in front of the pits so I had to drive all the way around the track with the burst tire, on three wheels, back to the pits. Then Pedro had a problem with the gearbox, got stranded and was unable to get a gear. So he got out, broke off a little bit of the armature which held the spare tire in place and he used this to jam the box in gear, without which he would not have been able to drive back to the pits. I don't remember which one of us was driving at the end. Obviously there was much rejoicing in the Ferrari pits afterwards because this was Ferrari's revenge on Ford after they had wrung Maranello's neck at Le Mans the previous year. The Ferrari factory, quite content, did not bother to try and contest the Sebring 12-Hours, leaving that to be a Ford benefit with their new GT40's Mark IV, nor did Nart enter 0844 there. At Monza, the P4's triumphed again while 0844 shared by Jean Guichet and Pedro Rodriguez charged hard from the start. In fact Pedro eventually got the lead from Parkes's factory P4 thanks to the 412P's better fuel mileage and his blinding pace until the Mexican, trying too hard, went off at the first chicane and damaged the radiator too seriously to continue. Guichet recalls that 'At Monza it ended rather quickly with Pedro driving before my turn at the wheel.' 0844 was now prepared for the return match at Le Mans. There, she was race number 25 driven by Rodriguez and Giancarlo Baghetti. Even more than the year before, a huge crowd of over 300,000 spectators had come to witness the awe inspiring battle of the Maranello racing legend against the Ford armada. It is actually Rodriguez in 0844 who led the field at the start of this classic race, but the pace of the winning GT40 Mark IV of Dan Gurney and A.J. Foyt simply left all others gasping in their wake. 0844 after showing signs of strain was eventually retired in the eleventh hour with piston failure. As in 1966 Ferrari had been overwhelmed by a rival with vastly superior means and an almost unfair advantage. The responsibility for the latter undoubtedly goes to the perennially short sighted CSI - now FIA - rules whose top category was vaguely described in the rule book as 'over 2 liters'. The CSI certainly never foresaw the potential arrival of Ford and Chaparral's seven liter engines from across the Atlantic, a dawn invading force from the west as unexpected as that which took place on the coastline northwest of Le Mans 21 years earlier. This rule was compounded by a second one, equally inane which granted larger fuel tanks, the larger the engine. There were clearly cobwebs in that rarely visited part of the rule book and this simple innocuous line of text made all the difference in favor of Ford's armada. Still Ferrari had lost a battle but won the war. At the last race of the season, at Brands Hatch, while Chaparral won, the P4 of Chris Amon and Jackie Stewart barely beat a Porsche to give Ferrari victory in the Manufacturers' Championship by just one point, thanks to their second place! Thus 0844's third place at Daytona was a direct contribution to the title, illustrating how championships are often won by points acquired early in a season. The CSI then finally and suddenly awoke. Shocked by the speed of the American 7 liter chargers, they now made the very abrupt decision to reduce the capacity of sports-prototypes to three liters and so 0844 was now, to all intents and purposes, obsolete. However, Can Am racing was proving to be extremely popular and so Chinetti wasted no time in returning 0844 to the factory where the car's bodywork was cut down into open 'spyder' shape; the engine was not modified but the opportunity was taken to replace all four uprights with P4, Tipo 603 castings. Finished in late August, 0844 was flown to America and had its first Can Am race at Bridgehampton where it was driven by Scarfiotti into seventh place; just one week later, the P3/4 showed up again at Mosport where a bad start and a puncture ended Scarfiotti's run. Chinetti had now realized that four liters of European V12 stood no chance against seven liters of American V8 on either side of the Atlantic and retired the Ferrari from active competition. RETIREMENT After being in storage for four years, Chinetti sold 0844 in its Spyder form to Major William 'Bill' Cooper of Wisconsin. Long time historic car dealer Harley Cluxton of Grand Touring Cars remembers: Bill Cooper bought the car from Chinetti in 1970, on September 12. He also bought engine 0844 and traded in engine 0838. He raced it at Road America. That was in 1971 I believe. I was there racing a 512. I remember how pretty the car was. I was behind Bill for a while. He used to race a lot in the SCCA, always bought his Ferraris from Chinetti and had some very nice cars. Then I bought the car from Cooper on June 30, 1972, trading it for a 1971 Daytona (#14147 I believe) which I had received from Chinetti. At the time I was based in Chicago and had two factory mechanics on loan. They went through the car chassis-wise, wheel bearings, halfshafts, etc. and there was really nothing that needed to be done. It had just recently been painted by Bill Cooper. Otto Bowden an attorney from Florida bought it on the 10th of September, 1972. 0844 remained in Mr. Bowden's ownership for almost ten years. Bowden: I kept it in my garage but had very little time since I was still working so I never did anything with it. I never ran it on the track. Then as time went by I became concerned about humidity and porosity of magnesium parts: there were a number of pinhole leaks and I also had to replace two or three water hoses. Eventually I sold it back to Harley Cluxton. The Grand Touring Car owner then gave the car a comprehensive restoration before selling it again to Mr. Walter Medlin of Kissimee, Florida. Cluxton: I believe that he started it up once or twice and had the usual Buckingham fountain out of the magnesium water pump case and so I bought it back from him. Wayne Beckwith then rebuilt it for me, this was after I had moved to Phoenix. I then sold it to a very good friend, Walter Medlin. He sold a lot of land in central Florida to a corporation by the name of Walt Disney. His aim was to start a Ferrari museum in the Orlando area. He picked it up, took it back home to Florida to the abandoned movie house in which he kept his cars. Wayne had done such an incredible job as he always does on restoring these cars that you could literally lean into the car, just turn the ignition on, let the pumps run, push the key and the car would start right up. When it arrived in Florida Walter wanted to really impress his lady friend so he pushed it off the trailer. He was so impressed and so happy because this was a car that really ran and was just absolutely perfect. As she came out of the house, he leaned over telling her to watch, turns on the ignition, the pumps run, he starts it...he forgot it was in gear and it promptly hit the wall! Thankfully it wasn't a hard hit; it wasn't much. He was so depressed after that that I don't think he did anything with it during those years. He had it from 1979 until 1994. It was here again that year along with 0858. We rebuilt it for the big Laguna Seca Historics Ferrari gathering since the factory was very eager to have one there. I was to drive it, drove it in practice and Brian Redman was actually sitting on the pitwall watching me and I could not believe he was not out driving something. I came into the pits, asked him what he was doing and he said, 'Oh, I am just out watching: Ferrari had no car for me to drive'. So I offered him to drive it! He was surprised but happy and accepted. He came in fourth overall having started in the back and really loved the car and enjoyed himself. In a field described as the most valuable ever raced, 0844 truly played the starring role. In starting from the back of the grid and finishing fourth, Brian beat two 512Ms and two 312 PBs. Afterwards, 0844 was returned to Harley Cluxton's shop to be cleaned, sorted and detailed and was then purchased by the Symbolic Motor Car Company of La Jolla, California in October, 1996. 0844 then enjoyed further time under the limelight as one of the honored cars at the 1997 fiftieth anniversary celebrations in Rome and Maranello. It was displayed at the capital's Stadio dei Marmeli on May 31 and thereafter, with seemingly all of Rome watching and waving enthusiastically, it took part in the Caracalla run on June 1 with Luigi Chinetti Junior at the wheel of the former NART entry. The latter then drove it on the road rally to the factory on June 3rd and in the ensuing events in and around Maranello and Modena. In late 1997/early 1998 it was decided to return the glorious warrior to its original 330 P3 berlinetta configuration. It was not in fact the first such occurrence. Many years ago none other than the World's most respected Ferrari collection, that of the Mas du Clos, had restored its 330 P4 0860, also used in the Can Am series, from that open spyder shape back into its original 330 P4 spyder body configuration. This clearly was a vast and ambitious undertaking that involved far more than the usual repaint. Rob Shanahan who was in charge of the process explains: We got some parts from [longtime British Ferrari privateer] David Piper; the roof panel is the old roof panel of his car, which we found in Scottsdale actually. Then the door, the window surrounds on the doors actually came from Piper. Those are parts from his original car, the roof of which he cut off. Then he provided us with a fiberglass copy of his car made back in 1966. He made us some extra thick body parts so that we could actually bend metal over them, like a mannequin or a buck in effect. We used 1 millimeter thick aluminum. Having these molds is what made it all possible: they were incredibly detailed, you could see the placement of every rivet, you could even see where stickers were placed, you could see the raised circle where the racing numbers had been; great information. Then of course he just had a nose and a tail, we knew our doors were original, they hadn't been modified but we needed the roof panel and window surrounds. He had the window surrounds but not the roof: the latter turned out to be with a private individual in Scottsdale: they were painted the same BP green and matched perfectly with the window surrounds and it was marked 330 P3/4. So we were able to incorporate that into it. Now we had an original roof, tail and nose. The only thing we now needed was a glass windshield, which we had made. We had it molded and did a compound curve windshield which is a little difficult; usually all you can get is plastic since it is very difficult to get glass companies to deal with a one-off; most people do not wish to spend what it actually costs anyway. There wasn't much work to do in the way the bodywork was anchored because they had originally just taken the original bodywork and quickly modified it to make the Can Am body. Then it was just a matter of aligning everything properly. The biggest difficulty was in getting all the little details right. For example the wire mesh screen for the vertical portion of the rear body had to be custom made because we could not find a screen that matched. That car's original screen had a different mesh, more closely woven than some of the other cars. There were a hundred little things like that we had to have made or make ourselves to get all the little details right. Mechanically we also went through the suspension and brakes, while the engine and transmission had already been done by Harley Cluxton. We had to re-do the interior. We restored the dashboard and all the instruments; they were all there. The only thing that wasn't there is that silly little ventilation vent right in the middle of the dashboard. We could not figure out where that came from. Finally it turned out that the part originally used by the factory came from a Renault R8! This was the first time I have run into a Renault part on a Ferrari. Finally we got hold of one, which wasn't easy in the US! The whole process took less than six months, from decision to completion. After decades hidden away in darkness the P3 would now embark on a series of shows on two continents, to the delight of countless smitten tifosi. Noted Japanese collector Hayashi then purchased 0844 in 1998. Shortly before its flight to Japan it was displayed at Concorso Italiano in August of that year. This was the first time it was seen as a berlinetta since 1967. After it crossed the Pacific, Hayashi enjoyed it at the Ferrari Club of Japan 10th anniversary celebration at Suzuka on June 5-6 1999 where it was run on the Grand Prix circuit. That same weekend it was also displayed in the FCJ's Concours in which it scored a perfect 400 points, just edging out a 312PB, also owned by Hayashi, for class 3 honors. Despite the presence of several Ferrari GP cars and an incredible array of major machinery, it unquestionably stole the show. In 1999 it once again returned to the US and was bought by the current east coast collector. Ironically it then took part in four events in Florida, the very State in which it had spent almost 25 years in a time warp. It was displayed and briefly run at the Homestead Ferrari millennium race near Miami in early December of 1999, and then shown at the concours of the Cavallino Classic IX in Palm Beach Florida on January 22nd, 2000. It was later run in Brian Redman's Targa 66 event at Moroso Motorsports Park in February and finally displayed again at Homestead in April on the occasion of the inaugural North American Ferrari 360 Modena challenge race. As one of only three 330 P3's, one of the most revered racing cars of all time, as a true factory prototype, victorious in the 1000kms races of Monza and Spa along with its third place finish in the famous Daytona 67 triumph, #0844 will forever belong in the pantheon of Ferrari history. Rarefied icons such as this tend to be sold not at auction, but very much by private sale from one cognoscenti to another, the latter having sometimes courted the former to that end for over a decade. Thus Christie's is proud to present a very rare opportunity to bypass that process and acquire what is arguably the most important motor car to come to auction in the millennium. In fact occasions when a car of this significance is sold are so thin on the ground that the World of classic cars stops and takes notice.

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-08-20
Hammer price
Show price

1958 Ferrari 412 S Sports Racing Car

The ex-Scuderia Ferrari, One-Off, Pebble Beach Class Winning Singular Example Chassis no. 0744 Engine no. 0744 FERRARI 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Engine: Type 141, 60 ° V-12, front mounted, longitudinal; bore x stroke: 77 X 72 mm; Capacity: 4023 cc, valve gear: DOHC per cylinder bank Carburetion: Six twin choke Weber 42 DCN carburetors Compression Ratio: 9.9:1 Max. Power: 447 bhp at 8500 rpm Gearbox: Four-speed and reverse, manual Clutch: Multi-disc, dry Chassis: Steel tubes, type 524 Front Suspension: IFS, two A-arms, coil springs, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers Rear Suspension: deDion back axle, transverse leaf spring, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers. Brakes: Dunlop hydraulic on four discs Wheels: 16” wire center-lock Borrani Tires: 6.00 x 16” front; 7.00 x 16” rear Dunlop Racing Wheelbase: 2350 mm The ex-Scuderia Ferrari, One-Off, Pebble Beach Class Winning 1958 Ferrari 412 S Sports Racing Car Chassis no. 0744 Engine no. 0744 FERRARI 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Engine: Type 141, 60 ° V-12, front mounted, longitudinal; bore x stroke: 77 X 72 mm; Capacity: 4023 cc, valve gear: DOHC per cylinder bank Carburetion: Six twin choke Weber 42 DCN carburetors Compression Ratio: 9.9:1 Max. Power: 447 bhp at 8500 rpm Gearbox: Four-speed and reverse, manual Clutch: Multi-disc, dry Chassis: Steel tubes, type 524 Front Suspension: IFS, two A-arms, coil springs, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers Rear Suspension: deDion back axle, transverse leaf spring, Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers. Brakes: Dunlop hydraulic on four discs Wheels: 16” wire center-lock Borrani Tires: 6.00 x 16” front; 7.00 x 16” rear Dunlop Racing Wheelbase: 2350 mm “Mysterious, powerful, beautiful and unquestionably one of the most significant cars in Ferrari’s history.” Vintage Ferrari Magazine HERO DRIVERS IN HEROIC MACHINES SPORTS CAR ROAD RACING IN THE 1950s Today’s vintage racing enthusiasts may find modern motor racing uninspiring at times. Space-pod shaped racing cars that all look the same, except for garish sponsorship liveries, speed across our TV screens as a sort of moving billboard display, their main purpose apparently, being to promote the sale of various consumer goods. Computers that control acceleration, braking, cornering and even a mechanism that eliminates wheel-spin from a standing start are all employed by today’s most exciting race cars. Overtaking for a position during an event – once the raison d’etre of motor racing, is seldom seen, race winners nowadays often being determined by pit stop prowess, the latter having replaced the actual on- track racing as the real “sport” of auto racing. Much like the past, today’s technology combined with the correct tires and various decisions made by the team’s race engineer are significant influences on the outcome of any given race. When contrasted with all the other professional sports; stick & ball, track & field, tennis, even golf, where individuals, their skill displayed for all to see, still make the difference between winning and losing, auto racing has been largely transformed into an expensive display of the latest scientific technology. One of the most lacking aspects in today’s racing world are the gentleman drivers and mechanics who, after personally towing their factory or privateer entry to the track, acted as their own pit crews and team managers all at once. Pre and post war racing, at least until the late 1960s, when the effects of major sponsorship began to erode the ideal, was a grand and glorious International spectacle. Hero drivers with larger then life personalities, Counts and commoners alike, the well-born and the pauper, united solely by their super-human abilities to manhandle an over-powered, ill-handling sports car, often over dangerous public roads, wrote chapters in the history book of motor racing, the likes of which we shall not see again. With Richie Ginther behind the wheel, the mighty 412 S seemed like an undefeatable beast, its presence both imposing and intimidating whether stagnant in the pits or at speed on the track. In the hands of the right skilled driver such as Ginther, it was only a matter of time before it would claim the checkered flag. Ginther is shown here at the Riverside Grand Prix coming around turn number 7 in October of 1959. Photo Credit: Bob Tronolone A short list of the titans of the 1950s would certainly include Englishmen Stirling Moss, Mike Hawthorn and Peter Collins, Belgian Olivier Gendebien, Frenchman Jean Behra, Argentine champion Juan Manuel Fangio, Italians Luigi Musso and Eugenio Castellotti, Count Wolfgang von Trips from Germany, Swede Jo Bonnier, Spanish nobleman Alfonso de Portago and Americans Carroll Shelby, Phil Hill and Richie Ginther. (Amazingly, six of these international stars – Hawthorn, Gendebien, Musso, Portago, Hill and Ginther, all drove the star of this year’s Monterey Sports and Classic Car auction, the 1958 Ferrari 412 S, chassis no. 0744 or raced its engine in prior installations – but more on that later.) If we find the drivers of the era fascinating, the cars are perhaps even more so, being very much expressions of the national personas of their countries of origin. Racing in their national colors – British Racing green, German silver and Italy’s Rosso Corsa, each country seemed to focus on different design aspects in order to achieve a competitive machine. Jaguar and Aston Martin both won LeMans in the 1950s as a result of superior handling and braking, Jaguar being the first to use disc brakes in international racing. Accentuation of these positives was not only a clever but necessary concept for these Brits, since both were limited to the use of production-car based six-cylinder engines. For Porsche, Teutonic efficiency applied to its highest level was even more necessary since the German marque had to make do with a little air-cooled flat-four that was basically a hot-rodded VW engine. Minimum weight and aerodynamics became their mantra and Porsche scored many long distance race placings based on making half as many fuel stops as the faster more physically dominant cars. THE ALWAYS-DISTINGUISHABLE THOROUGHBREDS OF ITALY NEVER SUFFERED FROM AN ENGINE INFERIORITY COMPLEX By 1957, Maserati’s 450 S sports cars were pumping out 400 horsepower from their V8s, while Ferrari equaled this output with a 4.1 liter V-12 with four overhead cams and six dual-choke carburetors. From the beginning, as early as 1945, Enzo Ferrari had insisted on a V-12 engine. One of his wealthiest drivers, Count Trossi had often talked about his wonderful pre-war V-12 Packards. Ferrari also knew that no other manufacturer was likely to dare a V-12, meaning that he would garner headlines in the sports press which would attract the best drivers and in turn, guarantee racing victories. So, in effect the Italian sports car consisted of a big powerful multi-cylinder engine stuffed into a strong state-of-the-art chassis and clothed in a breathtakingly beautiful aluminum body. Independent rear suspensions or new fangled disc brakes would not be needed for a few years because Ferrari’s engines and brave drivers more than made up for these deficiencies. Would you expect less from the land of Verdi, Sophia Loren, Amaroni and a country that closed vast distances of its public roads each year in order to host the legendary Targa Florio and Mille Miglia Road Races? We think not! THE 1956 AND 1957 WORLD SPORTS CAR CHAMPIONSHIP AND FERRARI 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 Mercedes, aided by drivers like Fangio and Stirling Moss won the 1955 Championship ahead of Ferrari and Jaguar but a corporate edict cancelled further Mercedes Factory racing in response to the tragic 1955 LeMans accident. The years 1956 and 1957 however were particularly good ones for Ferrari as each season ended with a World Constructors’ Championship. In 1956, Ferrari and Maserati fought a fierce battle with Maserati making the better start by winning the Buenos Aires 1000 km race on January 29th; Stirling Moss sharing the driving with Carlos Menditeguy, won with a Maserati 300 S, ahead of the Ferrari 857 Sport, driven by Olivier Gendebien and Phil Hill. The positions were reversed at the 12 Hours of Sebring on March 24th with a 1 – 2 for the 860 Monza’s of Fangio/Castellotti and Musso/Schell/Gendebien. At the Mille Miglia on April 28th- 29th, Ferrari triumphed with their new car, the 290 MM, driven in the pouring rain by Eugenio Castellotti. The second 290 MM piloted by the master Juan Manual Fangio finished fourth. Placed between these two were the 860 Monzas driven respectively by Peter Collins, navigated by his friend/photographer Louis Klemantaski (who managed to take some great photos of this epic race) and Luigi Musso. On May 27th at the 1000 kms of Nürburgring, Piero Taruffi, Harry Schell, Jean Behra and Stirling Moss shared the wheel of the winning Maserati 300 S. The new 290 MM was third. At Le Mans on July 28th and 29th, the Ecurie Ecosse Jaguar D-Type and the Aston Martin DB3S put Ferrari back into third place. The 290 MMs took the first two places with Maurice Trintignant/Phil Hill and Wolfgang von Trips/Peter Collins/Juan Manual Fangio on August 12th at the Swedish GP. Ferrari dominated the season, gaining twice as many points as Maserati to win the World Title. It was an exciting and historic season only to be superseded by the next one. THE 1957 SEASON At Maserati, work continued on the formidable 450 S, which consequently should have been the ultimate weapon for the 1957 season. The horsepower battle however continued throughout the racing season; the eight-cylinder 4.5 liter 400 bhp 450 S had to fight against more and more powerful Ferraris resulting in the birth of some of the most brutally beautiful sports racing cars the world has seen. Aurelio Lampredi had left to join Fiat but a new and brilliant engineering team at Ferrari created such masterpieces as the 290 S, 315 S, 335 S – and the 412 S on offer here. These wizards, under the supervision of Vittorio Jano and with Luigi Bazzi taking the part of chief-tuner were Alberto Massimino, Vittorio Bellantani and the young Andrea Fraschetti. Massimino was in charge of the chassis department and Bellantani of the engines. Phil Hill, Eugenio Castellotti and Olivier Gendebien had signed again as drivers. Peter Collins and Wolfgang von Trips were recruited along with Alfonso de Portago and Luigi Musso to complete the driver package. The end of the Lampredi era resulted in a comeback of the V-12. The tipo 130 engine or 290 MM retained some Lampredi features, such as the liners screwed into the heads, but with new bore and stroke dimensions and a new design introducing a shorter block. These tipo 130 engines provided 320 bhp at 7,300 rpm, enough to hold off the Maserati 300 S, but not the 400 bhp of the Maserati 450 S for 1957. The 290 MMs were beautifully skinned by Scaglietti to a peerless Pinin Farina design. At the season opener in Buenos Aires on January 20th, Maserati brought their new 450 S, while Ferrari countered with a four camshaft version of its 290 MM, the 290 Sport. The 290 MM finished first, after the Maserati 450 S, which was leading by a large margin, failed. One of the new 290 Sports also finished in third place. The Maserati menace asserted itself again at the 12 Hours of Sebring. Jean Behra and Juan Manuel Fangio in the 450 S finished first ahead of the 300 S piloted by Harry Schell and Stirling Moss. Ferrari fielded his heavy artillery with a 290 MM and two new 315 S’, s/n 0674 and 0646 driven by Peter Collins, Maurice Trintignant, Wolfgang von Trips, Alfonso de Portago, Luigi Musso and Eugenio Castellotti. The 290 MM finished in 4th place and the two 315 S entries were 6th and 7th. At the May 11th & 12th Mille Miglia, Ferrari won a 1-2-3 victory with a 315 S s/n 0684 driven by Piero Taruffi in first; the Wolfgang von Trips 335 S s/n 0674 in second with a Tour de France Berlinetta chassis s/n 0677 in third, thanks to the faultless driving of Olivier Gendebien. Sadly, however this race will be remembered for Alfonso de Portago’s tragic accident while lying a strong 3rd overall in his 335 S s/n 0646. In the May 26th 1000 km of the Nürburgring, the Aston Martin DBR1 driven by Tony Brooks came home ahead of the 335 S s/n 0700 and 315 S s/n 0656, driven respectively by Peter Collins and Mike Hawthorn. Jaguar won Le Mans on June 22nd & 23rd with 315 S s/n 0684 finishing in a respectable fifth place. At the Swedish GP on August 11th, the victory of Behra and Moss at the wheel of Maserati 450 S ahead of the Phil Hill/Peter Collins’ 335 S s/n 0700 raised Maserati hopes for the Championship Title. However, bad luck and a row of accidents in Venezuela put Maserati out of contention and left the Ferrari 335 S’, s/n 0700 and 0674 to take the first two places, driven by Collins/Hill and Hawthorn/Musso respectively. Ferrari won the World Constructors’ Championship and Maserati retired from racing in spite of Fangio securing the Driver’s World Championship in the Maserati 250 F. The battle had been triumphant and tragic – with both marques entering the finest racing cars that had ever been built. Because of the new Sports Car Championship three-liter limit for 1958, the European careers of Maserati’s 450 S and the Ferrari 335 S effectively ended in 1957. The glory of big bore machines like these would however continue in North American racing where sports car engines were unlimited. As a result, all of the remaining Ferrari four camshaft factory sports cars went to private USA teams. 1958 FERRARI 412 Sport Race History CHASSIS NO. 0744; 1957 – 1964. (ALSO OF 290 S, 315 S, 335 S, 412 MI / ENGINE 0646/0744) Motor Tipo 141 #3 Race Record Prior to installation in chassis 0744 DATE DESCRIPTION DRIVER RESULT Jan. 20, 1957 Buenos Aires 1000 kms. Eugenio Castellotti DNF (ignition) (mounted in 290 Sport #0646 in 3,490 c.c. form) Wolfgang Von Trips Luigi Musso Mike Hawthorn Mar. 23, 1957 Sebring 12 Hours Alfonso de Portago 7th (mounted in 315 Sport #0646 in 3,780 c.c. form) Luigi Musso Eugenio Castellotti May 11-12, 1957 Mille Miglia Alfonso de Portago DNF (crash) (mounted in 335 Sport #0646 in 4,023 c.c. form) Edmond Nelson June 29, 1958 Monza Race of Two Worlds Luigi Musso 3rd (mounted in 412 MI Grand Prix Mike Hawthorn chassis in uprated 4,023 c.c. form) Phil Hill Chassis Tipo 524 #0744 Race Record 312 Sport DATE DESCRIPTION DRIVER RESULT May 18, 1958 Spa Grand Prix (fitted with Tipo 142 3-liter engine) Olivier Gendebien DNF 412 Sport DATE DESCRIPTION DRIVER RESULT August 1958 Fitted with Tipo 141 4-liter engine #3 and becomes the 412 S Sept. 28, 1958 Watkins Glen International Formula Libre Phil Hill DNF (suspension) Oct. 12, 1958 Riverside Times GP Phil Hill DNF (fuel pump) June 20, 1959 Hourglass Field Richie Ginther 1st July 19, 1959 Riverside Kiwanis GP Richie Ginther 1st Oct. 11, 1959 Riverside Times GP Richie Ginther DNF (engine) Oct-Nov. 1959 Returned to factory for engine rebuild and conversion to disc brakes Dec. 4, 1959 Nassau Governors Trophy, 5 lap race Richie Ginther 2nd OA Dec. 4, 1959 Nassau Governors Trophy Richie Ginther DNF (used as test session) Dec. 4, 1959 Nassau Ladies Race Josie Von Neumann N/A Dec. 6, 1959 Nassau Nassau Trophy Richie Ginther DNF Oct. 15, 1960 Riverside Times GP Richie Ginther Practice (breaks own backstretch record at 173 mph) Oct. 16,1960 Riverside Times GP Richie Ginther DNF (started w/out 2nd gear) Feb. 28, 1961 Riverside Fred Knoop 3rd OA Feb. 29, 1961 Riverside Fred Knoop 2nd OA 1961-1964 Various Races Skip Hudson N/A CHASSIS NO. 0744 AT SPA On May 18, 1958, a unique prototype was entrusted to Olivier Gendebien for the Spa GP in Belgium. This 312 S featured a four-cam three-liter V-12 engine. Ferrari race department documents signed by Carlo Chiti identify this prototype as chassis s/n 0744 powered by a Type 142 engine and constructed on a Type 524 chassis. Late in 1958, the Factory re-engined 0744 to become the 412 S. CHALLENGING THE SCARABS IN THE USA In early 1958, Ferrari’s west coast distributor John von Neumann asked the Factory to come up with a sports racing car to beat Lance Reventlow’s Scarabs, the current front runners in American sports car racing. Enzo Ferrari already possessed the very powerful engine from the single seater used at the 1958 Monza Race of Two Worlds. With a Factory rating of 447 bhp, this engine, when combined with the ex-Spa tipo 524 chassis seemed ideal for von Neumann’s project. Accordingly, the 412 S (for 4-liters and 12 cylinders), was dispatched to von Neumann in August of 1958. He paid an enormous price too, reportedly $20,000 – a sum, which then would have landed two 250 Testa Rossas. Von Neumann put Phil Hill in chassis no. 0744 for the September “Formula Libre” race at Watkins Glen, but he suffered handling problems due to a malfunctioning shock absorber. The 412 S then went to California for the Riverside GP which was highly promoted by the Los Angeles Times newspaper, inviting the spectators to support either the “All American Scarabs” or the “beautiful Ferrari”, the latter again being driven by Phil Hill. Von Neumann was driving his 335 S and had entrusted a 250 TR to Richie Ginther. The Scarabs were driven by Lance Reventlow, Bruce Kessler and Chuck Daigh. Hill and Daigh made a quick start, leaving the field far behind and began a head-to-head duel, lasting over 21 laps, until a vapor lock shut down Hill’s V-12. Although von Neumann retired from racing after 1958, the 412 S chassis no. 0744 was seen again at Riverside in the Kiwanis GP in July, where Richie Ginther won. Ginther was also the star of the Riverside race in October but did not finish due to engine problems. The car was then returned to the Factory, accompanied by Richie Ginther. There are photos recording the 412 S’ Italian holiday, during which the car was fitted with disc brakes. It was returned to the USA in time to compete in the Nassau Speed Week in December 1959. The 412 S was sold to Jack Nethercutt in California, then to Fred Knoop, a gentleman-driver. It later belonged to Bill Harrah who employed Skip Hudson as a driver. Bought by Charles Pinkham, it then became the property of his widow in partnership with Steve Earle. Steve Earle created the “Monterey Historic Automobile Races”, showcasing the 412 S at the inaugural meeting. Chassis no. 0744 also won its class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Other notable U.S. owners have been Bob Donner, Carle Conway, Jarold Evans, David Livingston and Bill Bauce. 412 S CHASSIS NO. 0744 IN RECENT TIMES The current owner, a discerning collector and very competitive and skilled historic racing driver acquired this Ferrari in 1994. While it looked quite presentable and was totally complete, after a thorough examination, a decision was made to execute a complete mechanical restoration to vintage racing standards. This work took eighteen months and is documented in a 3” binder along with all subsequent maintenance records. This data should be required reading for prospective purchasers and is available confidentially for all those interested buyers. A new correct body was fitted during the car’s 1982-1987 restoration for owner Jarold Evans, but the complete original body sections have stayed with the car, still remaining in excellent overall condition and will accompany the Ferrari in its sale. During the current ownership, the Ferrari has been featured in various vintage races including the Monterey Historics and the Road America/Elkhart Lake vintage races. Conc