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1959 Ferrari 250 GT "Tour de France"

260hp 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V12 engine, four-speed manual transmission and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2600mm (102.4") Ferrari was ready when the Commission Sportif International responded to the disaster at Le Mans in 1955 with renewed emphasis on racing gran turismo cars and the first of many attempts to slow down the sports racing cars in the interest of enhanced safety for both competitors and – most importantly – spectators. This played directly into Ferrari’s hands who had beenbuilding GTs for years – GTs different only in trim, coachwork and tune from the competition berlinettas built for long distance open road races like the Mille Miglia and Carrera Panamericana. At the 1956 Geneva show a new berlinetta styled by Pinin Farina was shown, a clean and stylish design on the 2600mm chassis. Using the original Colombo-designed Ferrari V12 now developed by Ferrari to produce 240-280hp using three downdraft Weber carburetors this new 250 GT was destined to dominate Gran Turismo racing for three years. It was supplanted as the GT racer of choice only by the development of the Ferrari 250 GT short wheelbase berlinetta in late 1959. Scaglietti, which had been building Ferrari’s racing car bodies for several years, now undertook building the lightweight Pinin Farina designed series production cars of which the 1956 250 GT was the first. Scaglietti, as much sculptor as coachbuilder, may be credited with much of this model’s aesthetic appeal, softening some of Pinin Farina’s more emphatic lines to create a deft and cohesive design. Fulfilling the destiny of this handsome and purposeful shape became the task of Ferrari’s loyal and enthusiastic clients and distributors. Olivier Gendebien early on showed the 250 GT’s competence, winning its class in the 1956 Tour of Sicily and Mille Miglia while finishing 4th and 5th overall respectively. As demanding as these events were, one of the premier competition tests of the time was the Tour de France, a much longer event that started at Nice and ended five days and 5,383 km (3,345 miles) later in Paris. Comprised of both open road rally style stages, six circuit races (Comminges, Le Mans, Rouen, Rheims, St. Etienne and Montlhéry), two hillclimbs (Mt. Ventoux and Peyresounde) and a drag race (a 500 meter course at Aix-les- Bains), the Tour de France demanded speed, reliability, regularity and stamina from both the teams and their cars. In 1956, only 37 of 103 starters finished the Tour. One of them was the stylish and quick Alfonso de Portago, who co-driver was the American Gunnar Nelson, driving an early version of the 1956 250 GT into first place overall after winning outright five of the six circuit races on the Tour. Second to Portago was none other than Stirling Moss driving a factory-backed Mercedes-Benz 300SL. In 1957 Olivier Gendebien teamed with Lucien Bianchi to back up Portago’s 1956 Tour de France win. They were followed home in 2nd and 3rd place overall by Trintignant/ Picard and Lucas/Malle, both in Ferrari 250 GTs. Having already associated the Mille Miglia with an earlier Ferrari 250 series, the sleek Pinin Farinadesigned, Scaglietti-built berlinettas of 1956 adopted these two epic victories to become known as the “Tour de France” model, one of Ferrari’s longest-lived successes in competition and most coveted models both for its great racing history and for its exceptionally attractive appearance. In 1958 Scaglietti’s design evolved slightly. Headlights were recessed into the front fenders and covered with Plexiglas fairings. Three slot front fender vents were featured. The rear fender peaks and taillights became more prominent and the greenhouse sail panel had a single vent to extract air from the closed interior. This style has become accepted as the definitive iteration of the 250 GT Tour de France, an instantly recognized form. 1958 250 GT TdFs also benefited from numerous mechanical improvements, the most important of which was a new gearbox with centrallylocated shift lever. Many internal features of the engine were strengthened and there were new valves, a new crankshaft, stronger connecting rods and revised cylinder heads and intake manifold. The appropriateness of the appellation “Tour de France” for these cars became even more obvious when in 1958 Gendebien/Bianchi repeated their overall victory, this time followed by Trintignant/Picard (again) and Da Silva Ramos/Estager in 3rd, all in 250 GT Ferraris. The magnitude of these accomplishments is apparent from the fact that in 1957 only 23 of 72 starters reached the finish line in the Tour; in 1958 it was only 21 of 60. 250 GT Tour de France Ferraris also were racking up other impressive performances in the hands of private entrants in Europe and the U.S. Stalwart Olivier Gendebien, partnered with his cousin Jacques Wascher, turned in a stunning performance in the 1957 Mille Miglia, finishing first in class, 3rd overall and barely eight minutes behind the 4.1 liter Ferrari sports racer of Piero Taruffi. Against the large capacity sports racers Gendebien even captured the Gran Premio Nuvolari for the fastest overall time between Mantua and Brescia, beating Von Trips’ Ferrari by 1.4mph and Taruffi by 2.5mph. Other 250 GTs finished 6th, 7th, 9th and 10th overall, a remarkable performance especially considering their competition included a strong factory-backed Mercedes-Benz entry. The outstanding performance of Gendebien and the 250 GT was, however, marred by the tragic accident in the 1957 Mille Miglia by de Portago whose 250 GT crashed into the crowd near Guidozzolo di Mantova killing both Portago and his co-driver Nelson along with a number of spectators, including several children. In the wake of the 1955 Le Mans disaster and the obvious fact that the GT cars, particularly the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France, were every bit as fast as the best sports racers in the world, stronger measures would be taken and the half-century tradition of racing over public roads would end. The combination of elegant Pinin Farina/Scaglietti styling and exhilarating performance kept the Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France in production for an unusually long period and through a steady, detailed evolution of the model and its coachwork. Its long production is remarkable for a competition car from any manufacturer and particularly from Ferrari which had the capability to turn out new models quickly and frequently built one or two cars specifically for particularly important races. The longevity of the TdF demonstrates just how successful and satisfying it was. It is without question the pinnacle of Ferrari’s drum-braked gran turismos – and that is saying a lot. Chassis 1161 GT offered here is the last of the 1958 250 GT Tour de France Competition Berlinettas and the last TdF regularly built with covered headlights. It is in full competition configuration, with a full alloy body, covered lights, single sail extractor vent, unpainted alloy three-vane front fender vents, hood hold down claws and a roll bar. Delivered in March 1959 to Luigi Chinetti it was shortly thereafter sold to Ferrari racer and dealer Bob Grossman who in turn either sold or leased to Walter Luftman to begin its racing career in the Northeast. Records indicate it was raced by Luftman at Montgomery airport in early 1959, then won first place at Lime Rock on July 19. In September it placed second on the new permanent circuit at Bridgehampton in a LISCA (Long Island Sports Car Association) race and raced again in early October at Lime Rock where it placed first in the GT race. Back at Bridgehampton for another LISCA race in August 28-29, 1960, it was driven to victory by Bob Grossman and is pictured in the 1960 Ferrari Yearbook carrying the post race checkered flag. The next known owner is Peter Sherman, Maitland, Florida in 1962 who sold it in 1968 to John Delamater from whom it was bought in September 1969 by Ken Hutchison. Seventeen years later, in 1986, it was sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi who commissioned a long term restoration to concours standards by Michael Sheehan’s European Auto Sales, including a repaint in red and interior redone in tan leather. This was completed in 1991 after which 1161 GT was sold to two subsequent Japanese owners in 1995 and 1996. The current owner acquired this 250 GT Tour de France in 1997 and since then has frequently used it in the Shell Historic Ferrari Challenge as well as the 2004 Monterey Historics, attesting to its quality, reliability and performance. The engine has been rebuilt in the current ownership and the owner says it is “very strong.” Superbly maintained, its 15 year old restoration has matured and is in outstanding condition, ready to resume competing in the challenge. Ferrari TdF 1161GT is a beautiful example of Ferrari’s mastery of the gran turismo competition berlinetta concept in the late fifties. Chassis no. 1161GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-19
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1936 Mercedes-Benz 500 K Offener Tourenwagen by Sindelfingen

Class award-winner, 2015 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance One of four extant examples of this highly sporting design Previous single-family ownership for 63 years Restoration by noted marque specialists Rakish and dramatic; the true Art Deco heir to the S and SS The grandly named Offener Tourenwagen was Mercedes-Benz’s name for, in its literal translation, a four-passenger open tourer. This design on the 500 K chassis was one of the few bodies for that model to share obvious visual DNA with the powerful S and SS models that had proceeded it in the 1920s. It had a light, sporting look, with long fenders and a low-slung beltline under its jaunty fabric top, and it is instantly, visibly a classic supercharged Mercedes in every line and curve. In many ways, even more so than the vaunted Spezial-Roadster, this was the performance model of the 500 K line, for the sporting gentleman or lady, and the true heir to the great brutes of the previous decade. By the time that this body style was introduced, open cars were steadily declining in favor, and historian Jan Melin notes that only 16 examples of the Offener Tourenwagen were produced on the 500 K chassis. Of those, four are known to have survived, all of them held in private collections. CHASSIS NUMBER 123724: THE HONEYMOON 500 K The example offered here, chassis no. 123724, was delivered by the Daimler-Benz branch in Munich on 19 November 1935, carrying engine number 123724 and Sindelfingen body number 814102, as it does today. Dr. Ralph W.E. Cox, an early American car enthusiast, aviator, and overall colorful figure, visited Munich on his honeymoon in 1951. He spotted the 500 K on a local used car lot and decided that it would make a splendid addition to his growing collection back home. It was shortly acquired from its owner, a Mr. Unholzer, and driven to Paris, then to the port at Le Havre, from which it was shipped to New York and eventually home to New Jersey. Dr. Cox eventually opened the Frontier Village Museum at the Cape May, New Jersey airport, and there the 500 K was exhibited for many years. Eventually it was transferred to the Museum of Automobiles at Petit Jean Mountain in Arkansas, where it remained on exhibit until finally being sold by Dr. Cox’s heirs in early 2014 to the consignor. While the car had received a restoration by Dr. Cox’s son in the early 1990s, it was found to be largely cosmetic, and the car remained in very original order, including what appeared to be its original 1936 leather upholstery. A comprehensive fresh restoration was undertaken by well-known Mercedes-Benz expert, Jim Friswold, in which the car was finished in this beautiful color scheme of medium oak green with a tan leather interior and corresponding green canvas top. It retains several of its most distinguishing features, including Bosch headlamps, fog light, and dual horns, and a handsome Munich-built Hopako touring trunk, which has been with the car since it was found in 1951 and perhaps earlier, and contains a two-piece set of fitted luggage. Satisfyingly, the car retains what appear to be the original engine number tag and stamping, and the original body number is still visible stamped into the body near a front frame rail, testament to its life spent in good hands as a largely unmolested machine. The owner has exhibited the restored car only selectively, including at the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was bestowed a Class award, and that year’s Forest Grove Concours d’Elegance, where it was the poster car, Best in Class, and Best of Show. It is therefore available for many further concours opportunities at the hands of a new owner, who will surely appreciate and treasure this rare 500 K just as much as the late Dr. Ralph W.E. Cox. Chassis no. 123724 Engine no. 123724 Body no. 814102

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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1991 Ferrari F40

Two owners and only 2,802 original miles One of 213 examples specified for the United States Beautifully maintained, highly original condition Accompanied by original Schedoni fitted luggage, manuals, and tools Documented with original window sticker and service invoices dating to May 1991 Immaculate example of the legendary 40th anniversary supercar This sensational example of Ferrari’s revered 40th anniversary supercar claims very low mileage and fastidious upkeep, resulting in a near time-capsule F40. Chassis number 87895 is one of approximately 213 examples specified for the United States out of a total of 1,311 cars built worldwide. This F40 was completed by the factory in January 1991, finished in rosso and upholstered with a matching cloth interior. As confirmed by original documentation, including a window sticker and a dealer inspection check-in sheet, the F40 was delivered for retail on 13 May 1991 to the well-known Ferrari dealer Lake Forest Sports Cars, in Lake Forest, Illinois. In addition to the standard F40 equipment, such as twin IHI turbochargers, a limited-slip differential, and the unique Speedline wheels with Pirelli P Zero tires, this car was fitted with air conditioning and an electrically heated front windshield. On 20 May 1991, the F40 was delivered to its first owner Dennis Ahrens, an enthusiast residing in nearby Barrington. He ordered the customized Schedoni fitted luggage option, as a pristine leather set with his name embroidered on it still accompanies the car today. A telling file of service invoices from Lake Forest Sports Cars clarifies that Mr. Ahrens considered his F40 to be a collectible, as very little mileage accrued from service to service over the next 14 years. Work during this period included a replacement of the ECU and injectors six months after the car’s delivery (under warranty), a major cam belt service in 2004, and a factory-recall repair to the lower suspension forks in 2005 (a well-known and welcome measure on any F40), as well as intermittent fluid services. Around late-2005 the F40 was stored, and in April 2014 it returned to Lake Forest Sports Cars for sale. The car was purchased by the consignor, only the second owner, later that year, and he immediately submitted it to the dealership for evaluation and sympathetic freshening as needed. In December 2014, while noting that the F40 had not run in about 10 years, the technicians at Lake Forest performed a cam belt service (including new timing and drive belts), replaced the plugs, flushed the brakes, gearbox, and cooling systems, and mounted proper new Pirelli P Zero Corsa tires. The original factory Pirelli tires showed so little use that they were retained with the car for possible exhibition purposes. In July 2016 an annual service was performed and a new battery was installed, and the Ferrari has recently been serviced again for its current offering to ensure smooth operation for the next caretaker. Currently displaying just 2,802 actual miles, this incredibly original F40 has been remarkably preserved. It is accompanied by the original Schedoni fitted luggage, manuals in the proper leather pouch, and a complete tool kit, and is documented with the original window sticker, offering a fantastic exhibition piece for FCA events, preservation-class competition, and important Ferrari gatherings. Chassis no. ZFFMN34A9M0087895

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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2005 Maserati MC12

630 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine, six-speed Cambriocorsa paddle-shift transmission, front and rear suspension with double wishbones, steel dampers, and coaxial coils and springs, and four-wheel Brembo cross-drilled and ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 110.2 in. Offered from the Riverside International Automotive Museum Collection Purchased new by Doug Magnon; single ownership and 6,200 kilometers from new One of only a handful of MC12s imported under the Show and Display program Driven by Derek Hill with Phil Hill at Laguna Seca in 2008 When Maserati was on the rise in the mid-2000s, thanks to the success of the Spyder, Coupe, and Quattroporte, especially in the United States market, the company decided that it was the right time to produce its own supercar. Like Ferrari, Maserati was owned by Fiat S.p.A., so it only made sense for them to utilize the platform of the incredible Enzo, the gold standard of supercars, to their advantage. It goes without saying that the engineers and designers at Maserati had a big task ahead of them. How does one improve upon what is considered to be the finest Ferrari ever built? While the MC12 may have been very similar to the Enzo in terms of mechanics, its bodywork was anything but. Designed by Frank Stephenson, the MC12 had its own dramatic look and flair. The biggest difference between the Enzo and MC12 was the presence of a removable hardtop, allowing a more visceral, open-top driving experience for driver and passenger. At the back, the MC12 had a massive rear spoiler; thanks to that and its newer proportions, the MC12 created more downforce than the Enzo. Needless to say, the MC12 caused quite a stir amongst Maserati enthusiasts when it was first announced. As it was unequivocally the greatest road-going automobile that the company had ever built, everyone wanted their hands on Maserati’s newest supercar. The company had intended for the car to make an impact, and it did so by strictly limiting the number that would be built to only 25 cars. Each of which was hand-finished, with exacting attention to detail, and finished in a brilliant two-tone blue and white color scheme. However, apparently the urging of customers proved too much for Maserati to resist. Looking to not only please their demanding clientele, but also to celebrate the car’s racing success, Maserati eventually produced a second run of 25 cars, for a total of a still very limited 50 examples. While the Enzo never took to the track in competition, Maserati was quick to realize the MC12’s potential. The MC12 Corsa was campaigned in the FIA’s GT and GT1 World Championship series, where it saw considerable success. With the MC12 Corsa, Vitaphone Racing secured five consecutive team championships and a sixth of the first season of GT1 in 2010. Furthermore, Maserati won the manufacturer’s Cup in 2005 and 2007 and six Drivers’ Championships, four in the FIA GT Championship from 2006 to 2009, one for the 2006 Italian GT Championship, and another in the newly formed FIA GT1 class in 2010. Purchased new to be a part of the Riverside International Automotive Museum, Mr. Magnon’s MC12 has been both enjoyed and well cared for since day one. Imported to the United States under the Show and Display law by Classic Coach of Elizabeth, New Jersey, the car was never registered for road use in Magnon’s ownership. Instead, it saw the majority of its mileage accrued on tracks such as Pocono Raceway and Laguna Seca during associated concours and Maserati Club events, while occasionally being driven in the industrial complex surrounding the Museum to ensure that it remained in good running and driving condition. According to a small file of invoices, the car’s windshield was replaced in January of 2008. While factory records supplied by Maserati note that this MC12 was originally fitted with engine number 000075, the car is currently fitted with engine number 000090, which is strongly believed to be its original engine. Those closest with the museum who knew this MC12 from new have no recollection of an engine replacement or major engine issues to speak of. Furthermore, no service invoices noting an engine replacement could be found at the time of cataloging to support this claim. One very interesting tidbit from this particular car’s history is that it enjoyed a lap around Laguna Seca driven by Derek Hill with his father Phil, riding in the passenger seat, in honor of his 80th birthday. At the bequest of Maserati North America, Doug Magnon generously agreed to loan them his prized MC12 for use at the Western Automotive Journalists Media Day event in April 2008. Sadly, Phil passed away that August; this is believed to be one of the last times that he was driven around a racetrack. Today, the MC12 has remained the most impactful and memorable of all Maseratis built in the 21st century. It remains just as desirable today as it was the day it was announced and is a must-have automobile for any Maserati aficionado. With just 50 examples produced, MC12s rarely come up for sale, privately or publicly, and a single-owner example such as this should not be overlooked. Addendum Please note that this car has 6,200 kilometers, not miles as noted in the printed catalogue. Due to California emissions, this vehicle must be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. This title is in transit. Chassis no. ZAMDF44B000016977 Engine no. 000090

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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1953 Cadillac Series 62 Coupe by Ghia

210 bhp, 331 cu. in. OHV V-8, four-speed Hydra-Matic automatic transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 126 in. One of two such examples built by the famed Italian coachbuilder Ghia Part of its current owner’s collection for two decades Restored by the well-known Mike Fennel Italian style and American engineering at their peak Admiring the car offered here, one would be hard-pressed to predict its origins as anything but Alfa Romeo in the early 1950s. Only its very American size and presence belie it roots, as do the subtle Cadillac script and badging. Underneath its design, the creation of Ghia principal Luigi Segre, is the same Series 62 the average neighborhood banker drove to work in 1953. Such is the power of a coachbuilder to make over a car’s entire personality, transforming a staid Cadillac into something of sensual flash and dash. Copies of original build sheets on file indicate that a pair of 1953 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible chassis were ordered through the New York distributor; convertible chassis were often chosen by custom coachbuilders for their work, regardless of the intended body style, as they were more rigid and lent themselves to a wider range of designs. Both of these cars were bodied by Ghia to Segre’s dramatic design, with pontoon fenders curved at the front and flared into a slight fin at the rear and headlights and driving lights tucked into rounded “pods” on either side of the traditional upright radiator shell. Long chrome “ribs” were tucked into a subtle Corvette-style “cove” fit into each flank, running the length of the car and accentuating its appearance of low, smooth style. Greenhouse glass was expansive, with both a wrap-around windshield and backlight and narrow chrome pillars twixt the two. No surprise, then, that the two Ghia Cadillacs are shrouded in romantic mystery. One was apparently delivered to John Perona, owner of Manhattan’s fabled El Morocco and a longtime Ghia customer. Yet another persistent rumor places Rita Hayworth behind the wheel. Virtually no period photographs or documentation for either car survive, other than a press photo of one, taken by Ghia in Italy. The Cadillac offered here, chassis number 536253053, is distinguished from its sister Ghia coupe by its front-end design, which features a unique grille with thin vertical bars finished in gold-anodized aluminum, as well as no front fender parking lights, different taillights and rear license plate holder, and two half “bumperettes” rather than a full front bumper. It was acquired by Don Williams of the Blackhawk Collection for its current owners some two decades ago; Williams recalls it as a solid original car that was then restored by the late Mike Fennel, the well-known restorer from Santa Clarita, California. Following its restoration, the car was featured in several memorable magazine articles, including in Exotic Cars Quarterly (Summer 1991) and as the cover feature of Collectible Automobile (December 2008). It was also displayed as an exhibition-only entrant at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1989 and 2002, being reunited at the latter with its sister car, today in the Petersen Automotive Museum. Maintained in its owner’s collection since, the car remains in good condition, with its engine bay thoroughly detailed in preparation for the sale and only minor age and wear to the golden tan leather interior; similarly, the paint still has a good shine with only minor scratches. Much of the trim throughout the car is finished in gold-anodized aluminum, including that on the decorative chrome “ribs” on the body, badges, and grille bars, matching the Cadillac “sabre” wheels. The dashboard carries a sporting LeCarra wood-rimmed steering wheel, surrounded by gauges, detailing, and hardware with a wonderful futuristic 1950s bent; 34,320 miles show at the time of cataloguing. The combination of great 1950s American chassis, engineering, and build quality with breathtaking Ghia design is a showstopper. Desired by socialites of the era and wrapped in an air of romantic intrigue, this car ranks as one of the great coachbuilt creations of its age. It needs only a Hollywood starlet wrapped in mink and Givenchy to complete its appeal. Chassis no. 536253053

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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1934 Delage D8 S Cabriolet by Fernandez et Darrin

120 bhp, 4,050 cc OHV inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid axle and semi-elliptical leaf-spring front suspension, live rear axle and semi-elliptical leaf-spring rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulically actuated drum brakes. Wheelbase: 130 in. An outstanding example of French Art Deco design One of the great performance chassis of its time Formerly owned by Robert Friggens and Noel Thompson One of only two known examples CCCA Full Classic Howard Darrin was an American-born stylist who came of professional age in Paris, working at first with fellow American Thomas Hibbard and later, during the great Art Deco era, with a financier backer named Fernandez. His instinctive talent for dramatic design is exemplified in the powerful image of this dramatic Delage, one of his all-time great creations and one that was, in 1933, beguilingly ahead of its time in its proportions and styling. While in many ways classical in its long-hood, short-deck proportions, Darrin’s design is visually lengthened by the dual spares moved to the rear of the car, freeing up the full sweep of the sensuously curved fenders. Use of a long front fender curve that ends at a rather short rear fender gives a “tucked under” appearance to the rear wheels and also emphasizes that half of this automobile’s length is in its hood, which extends all of the way back to the short, raked vee’d windshield and then angles forward to move parallel to an angled cowl. Similar styling treatments were employed by stylists Alexis de Sakhnoffsky and Raymond Dietrich on Packards, but Howard Darrin was there first with this design on the Delage D8 S chassis. Research indicates that chassis number 38229 is one of only two known extant examples of this body style on the D8 S platform. Photographs of one of the two in Europe when new have been published in both the Winter 1968 and June 1993 issues of The Classic Car, copies of which are on file; the same car was also photographed at a concours d’elegance with screen actress Betty Spell, who was featured in numerous period advertisements for Delage. Examination of the photographs shows the use of metallic paint to the fenders and upper moldings, in which the traditional Fernandez et Darrin beltline extends as it meets the cowl and flows into a pointed “spade” that tapers to the radiator shell. In one of several retrospective articles he published, Howard Darrin noted, “The top was of a silken material laminated into the canvas. This material, which was manufactured in France and first used by Hibbard & Darrin, had a sheen and was impervious to water marks.” The period photographs also show the optional disc-style wheel covers and Darrin’s trademark door handles, features that are retained on chassis number 38229 today. After completion, this car was most certainly sold to its first private owner through Delage’s U.K. distributors, Smith & Company; its original British registration plates, number BLM 633, are retained on the car today. According to information provided by Peter Jacobs of the Delage Register, chassis 38229 was discovered in 1978 by Tim Eaton. It was in the ownership of Colonel Geoffrey Sparrow, a platoon commander during World War II, who had returned to become managing director of his family’s textile business. At that time, it was reported that the car had not been used since suffering from transmission issues during the war; however, a recent phone call with Mrs. Elisabeth Sparrow indicates that her husband may not have purchased the car until the immediate post-war years. In 1983, the Delage traveled to the United States, where it joined the well-known collection of longtime enthusiast Robert Friggens in Albuquerque, New Mexico. It then passed, around 1986, to Noel Thompson of New Vernon, New Jersey, who is well known among CCCA members for his automotive connoisseurship, including such notable marques as Delahaye, Auburn, Bugatti, and Stutz. Thompson entrusted his new acquisition to Stone Barn Automobile Restoration, which performed a complete restoration of the paint, upholstery, and chrome, as well as some mechanical repair work. Its previous two-tone black-and-red paint treatment was changed to a spectacular lilac shade in the upper and lower panels, as well as the fenders, with the accent beltline and hood “sweep panel” finished in bare polished aluminum. The top was reproduced in a fabric similar to the original Darrin-patented material, and the interior was outfitted in lilac leather. Befitting the car’s grand and flamboyant appearance, the radiator mascot chosen was a Lalique crystal Tete de Paon, or peacock’s head! Following the completion of the restoration, the Delage was displayed at the 1991 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded 2nd in Class. It went on to appear successfully in competition with the Antique Automobile Club of America, achieving a National First Prize in 1991, and with the Classic Car Club of America, scoring its Primary First at the 1992 Eastern Grand Classic in Pennsylvania and its Senior First at the 1993 CCCA Annual Meeting in Maryland, both with perfect 100-point scores. The car was then photographed by automotive photographer Michael Furman for a self-published booklet on the Thompson Vintage Automobile Collection. These photos also appear in Mr. Furman’s book Motorcars of the Classic Era, as well as in Richard Adatto’s marque reference, Delage Styling and Design. A gorgeous example of Fernandez et Darrin design at its flamboyant best, this spectacular automobile marks the beginning of a grand turning point in European styling, as streamlining met sophisticated curves. Unseen at concours d’elegance in recent years, it is unforgettable in its visage, colors, and sheer drama, just as Howard Darrin would have wanted it. Chassis no. 38229 Engine no. 131

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
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1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 bhp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-cam inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transition, coil-spring independent front suspension, and coil-spring single point swing axle rear suspension. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Single-family ownership from new until 2009 Only 42,312 original miles since new A First in Class and People’s Choice Award at the 2012 Mercedes-Benz National Starfest Concours d’Elegance Fresh restoration in original Ivory with Green leather interior Full matching-numbers example accompanied by original factory and title documentation and ample restoration documentation This example, chassis 7500229, is a 1957 U.S.-specification example. It was dispatched by train to the seaport of Hamburg, Germany, on September 27, 1957. Its first destination was Studebaker Packard, of South Bend, Indiana, which was Max Hoffman’s distribution center. According to the specifications provided by a copy of the original build sheet, this car was delivered new in Ivory (608) with a Green leather interior (1073) and green cloth top. It was specified as having a Becker Mexico radio, sealed beam headlights, U.S.–specification instrumentation with English inscriptions, and a final drive ratio of 1:3.89. From South Bend, it was delivered to Burklein Motors, of Beverly Hills, which was a Rambler dealer that also sold Mercedes-Benz. The car remained unregistered with Burklein Motors until March 28, 1963, when the franchise was dissolved; at that point, this Roadster was registered in the name of Mr. Burklein. The original California “pink title” from this transaction survives and is included with the sale of the car, as is the original 1963 California “black plate,” which notably only had one registration renewal sticker on it, for 1964. In 1967, Mr. Burklein and his family moved to Tucson, Arizona, and the Mercedes went with them. It was driven sparingly and always well maintained, being resprayed in white sometime in the 1980s. It remained in Mr. Burklein’s Tucson estate all those years, until its purchase by the second owner, Mr. Mischler, of Scottsdale, Arizona, in 2009, ending the original ownership chain that had remained intact for half a century! At this point, the car had less than 42,000 original miles on the odometer, for an average of less than 1,000 miles per year. Mr. Mischler commissioned famed 300SL restorer Bill Richardson, of Richardson Restoration & Machine Werks in Phoenix, Arizona, to perform a full, no-expense-spared, four-year restoration, at a cost of several hundred thousand dollars. Originality was Mr. Mischler’s prime interest, and it was decided that the car would be restored to its original color combination and specifications, down to the last detail. The restoration was one of the most comprehensive ever performed under Bill Richardson, who confirmed that, when he removed the paint, the condition of the car was one the best he had ever seen in the over one hundred 300SLs he has restored in the past four decades. All the mechanical work was either performed or directly supervised by Bill. At the owner’s direction, every nut and bolt was restored at great expense, in order to retain all of the original numbered parts whenever possible, including the axles, A-frames, generator, and a long list of other items. As such, it is believed to be one of the purest restored examples available today. Further, this California/Arizona car has never had any damage or rust of any kind, and, except for the passenger door, it still retains all its original body panels. The only modification that was made from the factory card was the upgrade to the expensive and more desirable European-specification headlight assemblies and bumpers, which were sourced as NOS units. Accompanying the spirited Mercedes is the original jack and an original owner’s manual, as well as the aforementioned pink title and California black plate. Complete records of the restoration are included on a CD, which contains over 300 photographs of the complete restoration. Finally, itemized billing, which comprises approximately 40 pages from Richardson Restorations & Machine Werks, is also included. Finished in its original livery of Ivory and Green, the result of the work was such that it won both a People’s Choice Award and First in Class at the September 2012 Mercedes-Benz’s factory-sponsored Starfest National Concours d’Elegance at the Biltmore Resort in Scottsdale, Arizona. The chain of ownership is amazingly intact, having remained in the Burklein family until 2009, when the title was established in the name of the current owner, Mr. Mischler, making the next owner of the car only the third in its 56 years of existence. Presented in stunning, show-ready condition, it is ready to grace the fields of concours around the globe, and the stable of its next owner. Chassis no. 198.042.7500229 Engine no. 198.980.7500107 Body no. 198.042.7500131

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
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1933 Duesenberg SJ Riviera Phaeton by Brunn

320 bhp, 420 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine with dual overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger, three-speed manual transmission, beam front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs front and rear, and vacuum-assisted, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" - From the estate of Mr. John M. O'Quinn - Ex-Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, famed industrialist and razor pioneer - A factory-supercharged Model SJ - Original Phaeton body - One of three built, beautifully restored and Amelia Island class-winner After the landmark introduction of the majestic Duesenberg Model J on December 1st, 1928 at the New York Auto Salon, Fred Duesenberg immediately set to work at making it even more powerful. His favorite centrifugal-type supercharger was beautifully adapted to the Model J’s giant eight, just as he had done so successfully to his 122-cubic inch racing eights a decade earlier. Fred died in a Model J accident in 1932, and his brother Augie, until then independently and very successfully building racecars, was retained to put the final touches on the supercharged Duesenberg. Without a doubt, the resulting SJ marked the pinnacle of American luxury automobiles. Even today, it remains unparalleled in concept and execution. The SJ delivered 320 horsepower at speed while retaining the outstanding naturally aspirated performance of the J at lower rpm. Alone among the Duesenberg Js, only the SJ embodied the input of both Duesenberg brothers. Just 36 SJs were produced, and conversion of a standard J to SJ specification was no small job, as the engine had to be completely disassembled to fit stronger valve springs, high-performance tubular connecting rods and other specific components. Since the SJ required external exhaust manifolds to accommodate the supercharger under its hood, the giant chromed flexible exhaust pipes became its signature feature. The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom body industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the style and grace of the factory sheet metal was ideally suited for the execution of elegant custom coachwork. While most of the leading coachbuilders of the day bodied the mighty J, many modern observers believe that Brunn & Company best combined exceptional design with outstanding build quality. One of the most remarkable designs of the classic era, Brunn’s Riviera Phaeton was both beautiful and practical. Although a convertible sedan by function, it was cleverly engineered and brilliantly styled, with most experts agreeing that the Riviera was the best-looking four-door convertible offered on the Duesenberg chassis. Whereas most convertible sedans had large and complicated top mechanisms, Brunn’s Riviera Phaeton top was compact and simple to operate. It was one of the few open designs that were equally attractive in open or closed form. This ingenious design allowed the entire rear body to open, hinged at the bumper, revealing a spacious compartment into which the top lowered completely. With the top down and hidden, the car has a very sporting presence, with compact lines emphasizing the muscular appearance of the high-performance chassis below. Just three of these remarkable Brunn Riviera Phaetons are known to have been built, with SJ528, the car offered here, also representing one of the five percent of Duesenberg Js delivered new in supercharged SJ form. The first owner was Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, best known today for two inventions: the cartridge-style Schick razor and the first electric “dry razor.” In June 1934, Schick purchased SJ528, driving it for a little more than two years before trading it in on a new car. Duesenberg sold the car a second time in October of 1936 to C.H. Oshei of Detroit, Michigan, the owner of the Anderson Windshield Wiper Company. Oshei traded J107, a well-known LaGrande dual-cowl phaeton, in the transaction. In 1941, SJ528 was purchased by noted Chicago-area Duesenberg dealer John Troka, who resold the car to A. E. Sullivan of Rockford, Illinois. Sullivan sold the car to Margarite Feuer, of Rockford, Illinois, who kept the car just a short while before a musician named Vaughn purchased it. Vaughan sold the car back to Troka in the late 1940s, who removed the supercharger for another project before reselling the car to Art Grossman of Chicago, Illinois. Grossman intended to undertake a restoration but instead sold the car in April 1950 to Harry Schultzinger of Cincinnati, Ohio, who immediately began restoring the car. For reasons unknown, Schultzinger decided to replace the frame with one from J551 (frame #2577), although the rest of SJ528, including engine, body, firewall and drivetrain components, remained with the car. Harry Schultzinger was an inveterate tinkerer, known for his performance improvements and said to have only two speeds – fast and faster! During his ownership, SJ528 received a number of “improvements,” including the installation of a five-speed transmission from a truck, 17-inch wheels, and an engine rebuild using components from J467. Schultzinger became SJ528’s longest-term owner, but finally in 1975, Dr. Don Vesley of Louisiana and Florida purchased the car. In 1983, he sold it to noted Florida collector Rick Carroll, who undertook a second restoration, this time in red, and reinstalled an original supercharger, transmission and 19-inch wheels. After Rick Carroll’s restoration, Bob Bahre of Oxford, Maine purchased SJ528, sometime in 1986. Later, in 1988, Phoenix, Arizona-based dealer Leo Gephardt advertised the car for sale, before it passed on to the late Noel Thompson, a prominent New Jersey collector. Thompson sold the car to the Imperial Palace, where it was prominently featured in the Duesenberg Room for many years before Dean Kruse of Auburn, Indiana acquired it as part of a multiple-car purchase in 1999. The next owner to purchase SJ528 commissioned the car’s third – and most comprehensive – restoration. Renowned multiple Best of Show-winning restorer Fran Roxas was chosen for the project. The complete, “nut-and-bolt” restoration included a bare-metal strip that revealed a remarkably solid and original body. Every mechanical component was completely rebuilt or refurbished as necessary and completely refinished. The body was block-sanded to perfection before multiple flawless coats of deep, rich black paint were applied, wet-sanded and buffed to mirror-like perfection. The interior was trimmed in rich, dark tobacco brown leather and an immaculately tailored matching Haartz cloth top was fitted. Accented by perfect show-quality brightwork, the result was truly breathtaking and remains so today. Prior to acquisition by the O’Quinn Collection in early 2005, SJ528 was road tested and revealed to have been among the best-running and most-powerful Duesenbergs the RM tester had ever driven in his experience. One can feel the additional power of the supercharger, especially given the engine’s desirable twin-carburetor intake system. Even more remarkably, the car’s steering was the lightest and smoothest in the tester’s experience, indicating a low-mileage chassis or an exceptional restoration, or perhaps both. Today, Lt. Col. Jacob Schick’s magnificent SJ528 is one of a mere handful of original-bodied supercharged Model J Duesenbergs remaining today. It is one of three Brunn Riviera Phaetons built and, amazingly, one of two such factory-supercharged cars. In 2006, SJ528 was shown at the prestigious Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded Best in Class. As expected, it is an exceedingly rare event when an original-bodied Duesenberg with the specification, pedigree, provenance and rarity of SJ528 comes to market. For the confirmed collector of the finest custom-coachbuilt cars of the Classic Era, SJ528 is very likely the finest example available today. Chassis no. 2551

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
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1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Disappearing Top Convertible Coupe

320 bhp, 420 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine with four valves per cylinder, dual overhead camshafts and Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger, three-speed manual transmission, front beam axle, live rear axle, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" From its introduction, the mighty Duesenberg Model J has long been regarded as a true masterpiece of the Classic Era. In fact, the announcement of its long anticipated launch was accompanied by a trading halt on the New York Stock Exchange in 1929. Priced from $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America and when fitted with its coachwork, the delivered price of many Duesenberg models escalated to $20,000, a truly staggering sum at a time when the typical family car only cost around $500. Nonetheless, few argued that the engineering excellence and abundant features of the Model J did not support its lofty price. Indeed, the Model J’s impressive mechanical specifications remain impressive today, including dual overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and power-assisted hydraulic brakes. Power output ranged from 265 horsepower in naturally aspirated form, rising to 320 horsepower with an optional Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger in the case of J-527, the incredible example offered here. From the outset, the new Duesenberg chassis was tailor-made for the needs of the diverse yet robust custom coachbuilding industry of the era, with the power, strength and sheer presence to carry the most imposing yet elegant coachwork. With an abundance of lightweight aluminum components, weight was carefully managed, allowing the Model J to achieve truly staggering levels of performance while remaining quite docile and easy to drive at low speeds, thanks to accurate and surprisingly light steering and responsive, power-assisted hydraulic brakes. Despite some conjecture, Duesenberg’s power ratings were quite accurate indeed, supported by speeds of 89 miles per hour in second gear en route to a top speed approaching 116 miles per hour for the J, while the SJ could easily exceed 125 miles per hour. While many of the finest custom coachbuilders of the era offered a truly stunning array of the finest bespoke coachwork to suit virtually any customer need or taste, the Walter M. Murphy Company of Pasadena, California is generally recognized today as the most successful coachbuilder on the Duesenberg Model J chassis. At once simple and elegant, Murphy-built bodies were distinguished by their trim lines and undeniable sporting character, seeming all the more so when compared to contemporary East Coast designs, which were generally heavier and more ornate in their concept and execution. The trademark of Murphy body design was the “clear vision” pillar. On the convertible coupe, the windshield pillars were designed to be as slim as possible, creating a sportier, more open appearance. In fact, Murphy advertised that their windshield pillars were “narrower than the space between a man’s eyes”; a design feature that they also claimed eliminated blind spots. Without doubt, the Convertible Coupe is generally considered the best looking of Murphy’s designs and indeed, it was one of the most popular body styles for the Model J chassis. The story of J-527, the engine now installed in Chassis 2406, begins in November of 1933 when socialite Isabel T. Pell purchased it new from the Duesenberg Factory Branch in New York. Built as a show car, J-527 (LWB chassis 2556) was originally supercharged and featured a beautiful Convertible Coupe body by Rollston. Miss Pell drove her new Duesenberg for a little more than a year before deciding to trade it in. Returning to the New York branch in 1935, she found another new Rollston-bodied Duesenberg on the showroom floor. This car, J-550 (LWB chassis 2576), carried Convertible Victoria coachwork. Miss Pell, however, loved her original Rollston-bodied Convertible Coupe, so on February 15th, 1935 she purchased J-550 and instructed Duesenberg to move her beloved original convertible coupe body to the new (normally aspirated) chassis. The result was that Miss Pell’s original used Duesenberg chassis now wore brand-new Rollston Convertible Victoria coachwork. H. T. Ames purchased this car on March 25, 1935 and then in October that year, George A. Spiegelberg purchased it. Less than six months later, in March of 1936, William Randolph Hearst, the legendary publishing magnate, bought the car. Some time later, the car was stolen and damaged. Next, Mr. Shirley D. Mitchell purchased it during the late 1930s. At this time, Mitchell also owned J-401, chassis 2406, a short-wheelbase Murphy Convertible Coupe, whose engine had been used in the restoration of a Castagna-bodied Convertible Sedan. As a result, while restoring the now-engineless Murphy Convertible Coupe, Chassis 2406 in the late 1930s, Mitchell decided to install the supercharged engine from J-527, with the car remaining in this configuration ever since. At this point, the car was sold to Cuban diplomat Norberto Angones Quintana, who took the car with him to Cuba and then in 1939, Quintana accepted a post as First Secretary of the Cuban Embassy in Paris, bringing J-527 with him. In September 1940, he was issued a certificate from the German Military Occupation Administration, permitting him to drive his Duesenberg on holidays and weekends! (A copy of this certificate accompanies the car today). As these operating permits were available only to diplomats, J-527 was accordingly registered during this period on French diplomatic plates bearing the number CD 355X. In 1941, Quintana was transferred to Cuba’s Spanish Embassy in Madrid, and once again, J-527 accompanied him. At some point after his arrival in Madrid, he sold the car to two brothers, Miguel and Jose Maria Arechavala of Spain. Next, the car was purchased by Pericao Gandarias, a wealthy businessman from Bilbao, Spain. While the timing cannot be established precisely, it is well known that during its time in Spain, the original supercharger was removed from J-527 and replaced with a standard intake manifold. In a further twist worthy of a Hollywood script, John Ward, a retired U.S. Marine Sergeant who had married a Spanish girl and was running a bar in the resort area of Palma de Mallorca, became the next owner. According to a letter from Nicolas Franco, he and Rafael Estavans learned that Ward had cash flow problems caused by a number of large unpaid bar tabs that were incurred by U.S. Navy sailors. In a remarkable story, one night Franco and Estavans struck a handshake deal with Ward to buy the car for the total of all the unpaid bar tabs – which, when tallied up, amounted to $2,800! Later, in the early 1960s, Estavans sold his half-interest in the car to Nicolas Franco, Jr. An extensive file of correspondence with Duesenberg historian Ray Wolff documents Franco’s efforts to correct some errors contained in a story on the car published within the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club newsletter. While Franco owned J-527 for several years, he apparently became interested in selling the car in 1971, when he was asking $35,000. By 1975, he still owned the car, when Jerry Whittaker, an A-C-D club member, wrote to Ray Wolff and reported visiting Madrid in an unsuccessful attempt to buy the car. Finally, on December 5, 1976, Franco sold the car to Archie Meinerz, who undertook a comprehensive restoration and retained J-527 for nearly 15 years before selling it to Al Webster, a noted Canadian collector, in February 1990. Webster recalls that the car was in very good condition and during his ownership, he corrected only small flaws and details, although he did commission Duesenberg expert Brian Joseph of Detroit to perform a full engine rebuild. During the rebuild, the internal upgrades required for supercharging were found to be present and accordingly, the engine was rebuilt with the intention that a supercharger would be reinstalled. After showing J-527 at the Meadow Brook Hall Concours d’Elegance in August 1992, Webster sold the car to Robert Gottlieb in November that same year. Gottlieb entrusted the maintenance of the car California-based Duesenberg restorer Randy Ema and on November 11, 1993, A-C-D Level 1 Certificate number D-074 was issued. Gottlieb kept J-527 until March 2000, when New York-based collector Piers MacDonald acquired it. During MacDonald’s tenure, he commissioned the well-respected, award-winning Stone Barn firm of Vienna, New Jersey to repaint the body and fenders, trading the previous two-tone red paintwork for a single shade of Dark Garnet Red. New brakes, a new top and new 19-inch chrome wheels were also installed and then J-527 was shipped back to Brian Joseph in Detroit to have the transmission rebuilt and the car prepared for the 2002 Fall Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club meet. In August 2003, J-527 was sold to Chris Gruys, who decided to return the engine to supercharged form, with the necessary work performed by RM Auto Restorations. A new and correct supercharger, one of 10 precise reproductions of the original units, was obtained from Leo Gephardt and Brian Joseph, complete with the ultimate high-performance “ram’s horn” manifolding. During the supercharger installation, the RM team fabricated all of the required brackets, lines and drive assemblies, removing the oil plugs that were added to the engine block and cylinder head when the original supercharger was removed during the process. Once the supercharger installation was complete, the engine was tuned and the mechanical systems were inspected and serviced while the cosmetics were freshened. Next, the Duesenberg was sold through RM Classic Cars to collector Steve Schultz, who later sold J-527 to the current owner, an East Coast-based private collector. Today, the Duesenberg continues to be highly presentable throughout, complemented by many period correct features including side mounted spare tires, dual Pilot-Ray lamps, cowl lamps, dual “Sport Light” spotlights, dual trumpet-style horns, dual taillights (one optional) and a polished aluminum luggage rack. With its stunning open Murphy coachwork, fascinating history and powerful supercharged engine, this well-sorted and extremely rare automobile stands ready to write a new chapter with a new owner. Chassis no. 2406

  • USAUSA
  • 2009-08-13
Hammer price
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1967 Shelby 427 S/C Cobra Roadster

One of Only 30 Semi-Competition Cobras Built, the ex-John Mozart Collection 427, a Genuine and Fully Documented Example 427 cu. in. “medium-riser” overhead valve V8 engine, 10.4:1 compression ratio on 1 x 4v Holley carburetor and developing approximately 485 bhp, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension; upper and lower A-arms on coil spring. Koni tubular shock absorbers and anti-sway bars, rack & pinion steering and four-wheel alloy caliper Girling disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90" A LEGEND AND HIS COBRAS In 1960, racing driver Carroll Shelby, aged 37, was diagnosed with a heart condition. After only eight years of successful motor racing, including a first overall for Aston Martin in the 1959 24 Hours of Le Mans, Shelby was forced to think about retirement. One more race beckoned before he would hang up his helmet – the LA Times-Mirror Grand Prix at Riverside, in which he scored a fine third place. Shelby’s self-enforced “cold turkey” was hard to take after the glamour and personal challenge of an international racing career. Pursuing new interests, he tried drilling wildcat oil wells and started a Texas trucking company. In 1961, still bored, he became the West Coast Goodyear Racing tire distributor and formed a motor racing school at Riverside Raceway in California. Now with a steady flow of cash, Shelby was at last positioned to pursue the long held dream of building his own sports car. Carroll Shelby’s many years of racing had taught him what worked and what did not, and the idea of a hybrid sports car fascinated him. Since the Brits had styling, road holding and superb brakes and the Yanks held the horsepower advantage, why not combine these traits for a “best of both worlds” concept? Of course, Shelby did not originate the idea – postwar Allards, Cunninghams and Nash-Healeys come to mind, but he did it better than anyone before, or thereafter, for that matter. After considering Austin Healey, Jensen and Bristol, he heard that AC, builders of the stylish and sturdy Ace-Bristol Sports Cars, had lost their engine supplier when Bristol ceased production. Timing was everything – in September, 1961, Shelby wrote Charles Hurlock of AC Cars to propose a hybrid car using the AC Sports Car body and chassis. “I’m interested”, wrote Hurlock, “if a suitable V8 could be found”. Shelby moved quickly when editor Ray Brock of “Hot Rod” magazine told him of Ford’s new lightweight V8 and soon had an early 221 cubic inch example installed in a stock AC Ace. The V8 weighed only a few more pounds than the six-cylinder Bristol. Ford engineer Dave Evans offered Shelby more good news - a high performance 260 cubic inch version was already in production for Ford’s Falcon and two engines would be on the way to him soon. These were immediately sent by airfreight overseas and on February 1, 1962, Carroll Shelby flew to England to test drive the new Shelby Ford “Cobra”. The rest is, as they say, history. THE S/C 427 COBRA – “THE FASTEST PRODUCTION CAR EVER MADE” Although the 289 Cobra was well proven in competition, by the mid sixties, it was becoming clear that something else was needed. Every year, more power was required to stay competitive, and Ford’s 289 had reached its reliability limit at around 380 or 390 horsepower. In many respects, the father of the 427 Cobra was racing driver and development engineer Ken Miles who thought the idea of a bigger engine might work for the Cobra, especially if winning in SCCA’s A Production Class was the aim. If there was any doubt about the need, it was eliminated when the Shelby team went to Nassau for Speed Week in 1963 where they were confronted with Chevrolet’s new Corvette Grand Sport, which was more than nine seconds a lap faster than the Cobras. Although Shelby had been promised a new aluminum block version of Ford’s 390 engine, internal resistance developed from the NASCAR faction inside Ford and Shelby was forced to make do with the cast iron 427. Reliable at 500 hp, the engine was so much heavier that a complete redesign of the chassis was required to ensure that the car would handle properly. The result was a new larger chassis, five inches wider, with coil springs all around. With the help of Ford’s engineering department, the necessary work was done, and the 427 Cobra was born. As with all his cars, Shelby intended to see that they were winners on the track. In order to qualify as a production car under FIA rules for the GT class, manufacturers were required to produce a minimum of 100 examples. With Shelby’s strong relationship with privateer racers, he was confident he could sell that many, and as a result, a competition spec version of the new 427 was announced. Competition features included an expanded body to accommodate wider wheels and tires, an oil cooler, side exhaust, external fuel filler, front jacking points, roll bar, and a special 42-gallon fuel tank. Anticipating FIA approval, Shelby placed an order with AC for 100 of these competition 427 Cobras. Each was finished in primer, with a black interior, and air shipped to Shelby’s facilities upon completion. Unfortunately, on April 29th 1965, when the FIA inspectors arrived they found just 51 cars completed and denied Shelby the homologation he needed. Oddly enough, the same fate befell Ferrari; his 250 LM, which was intended to replace the GTO, was also denied approval. As a result, both of these archrivals were forced to return to the previous year’s cars for the upcoming season. Once Shelby knew that the FIA was not going to allow the new 427 Cobra to compete in the GT class, he cancelled his order for the remaining competition cars, and AC reverted to the production of street cars. Meanwhile, in June of 1965, the FIA decided to juggle its classification system, and a new class called “Competition GT” was created as the production requirement was lowered to 50 – coincidentally, one less than the number of 427 competition cars built at the time of the FIA inspection. The rule change created another problem for Shelby – it put his Cobra in the same class as Ford’s GT40. Since Shelby was running that program for Ford, there was a clear conflict of interest, not to mention a disparity in performance. To resolve it, Shelby agreed not to campaign his own car, leaving it in the hands of the privateers. By this time, 53 competition chassis had been completed by AC (Chassis # CSX 3001 through CSX 3053), and of those, 16 had been sold to private teams. The first two were retained as prototypes, and one chassis (CSX 3027) was sent to Ford Engineering. The remaining 34 chassis were something of a problem for Shelby. Parked outside Shelby’s L.A. warehouse, they were proving difficult to sell. Seeing the cars prompted Shelby’s east coast representative, Charles Beidler to suggest that they be painted and completed as street cars, and marketed as the fastest street car ever built. The idea worked, and the 427 S/C, or Semi-Competition was born. While the cars were being converted for street use, three more orders were received for Competition Cars, for a total of just 19 full Comp 427 Cobras. The cars were brutally fast, and driving one was an exhilarating experience. One of the most memorable stories about the 427 Cobra surrounds a test that was arranged for Sports Car Graphic magazine by Ken Miles. A few years earlier, Aston Martin had bragged that their racing cars were capable of accelerating from 0-100 mph to zero in less than 20 seconds. Miles had the idea to restage the test using the new 427 Cobra. The result, according to SCG editor Jerry Titus, was an astounding 13.2 seconds. THE HISTORY OF “SEMI-COMPETITION” COBRA # CSX 3045 A well known and fully documented, no stories S/C, CSX # 3045 is actually pictured three times in the Shelby American World Registry – in 1967, then with early owner Peter Bayer on page 252; page 251 shows a nice on-track shot (Car # 288) with early 1980s owner Jere Clark at the wheel and again in the present owner’s driveway, shortly after taking delivery in 1995. The Cobra presented here was invoiced to Shelby American on February 23, 1965 and completed to S/C specification under Work Order # 15103. On April 21, 1966, Shelby American received an order for an S/C model including a request to install a modified race exhaust system to be delivered to the customer, a Mr. Hall, on May 31st. Likely “Mr. Hall” did not actually take delivery or kept the Cobra on its MSO since the next recorded owner, Peter Bayer, acquired # 3045 as payment for promotional work done on behalf of dealer Larsen Ford of White Plains, NY and was the first to register this car in 1967. Doug Carsen of Rimersburg, PA who is believed to have raced this particular S/C in several SCCA events, became the next owner. In the mid-1970s, John Parlante of Whitestone, NY began some restoration work prior to passing the S/C to Geoff Howard in 1978 who completed the work including the Guardsman Blue paint scheme. By 1979 it was offered for sale with 10,400 miles: “Fresh restoration, all competition options, polished Halibrands – expensive!” Well known historic and Cobra collector Jere Clark of Phoenix, AZ bought the car, installed Arizona plate “427 S/C” and went vintage racing. At SAAC-5 in Dearborn, Michigan, # 3045 won first place in the Competition Shelby Popular vote category, after which Dick Smith gave a white-knuckled Rick Kopec an on-track demo-drive at 185 mph! In the spring of 1983 the car was sold to European Coachworks and then on to Cobra aficionado George Stauffer of Blue Mounds, Wisconsin who advertised it as “A real S/C, has run at Laguna Seca several times and ready to win more historic races. Guardsman Blue, fuel cell, not for the timid”. Bob Jordan of Investment Motorsports bought the S/C before passing it, in 1986, to Carl Schwartz of Grand Blanc, MI. For the next eight years, beginning in 1988, # 3045 resided in the famous John Mozart Collection where it was subjected to a full restoration carried out to his impeccably high standards. It was contracted to Mike Giddings of Robin Automotive in Northern California who refurbished the suspension, braking systems, rear end and transmission as well as doing all of the final assembly and detailing. The original engine was rebuilt and dynoed by Elgin Cams and Tech Craft, with the paint work handled by Scott Veazie Restoration Services of Los Angeles, CA. In December of 1994 the current owner assigned Cobra expert Dave Dralle of Redondo Beach, CA to carry out an inspection prior to his purchase of the car from John Mozart in early 1995. Although the car was then, as it is now, in show condition, much post-purchase detail work as well as meticulous servicing was carried out by both Cobra Restorers Ltd. (GA) and Conover Racing & Restoration Inc. (PA) during the next decade. A dossier of invoicing for this work, totaling $23,013 will accompany the sale of the car. This proved to be money well spent as # 3045 won a Gold at the 1998 SAAC Convention in Charlotte, NC plus Best Cobra and Best Comp Cobra at SAAC Ann Arbor, MI in 1999 in addition to many regional SAAC Show First Place Awards. With only 30 Shelby 427 Semi-Competition Cobras built, these raucous roadsters are seldom offered for public sale. It is even more unusual to find a genuine, 17,000 mile S/C with this car’s perfect provenance and stunning appearance, providing here a very tempting purchase consideration for a serious collector of American racing history. Chassis no. CSX 3045

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-01-19
Hammer price
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1953 Ferrari 250 MM Competition Berlinetta

The Ex-Franco Rol and the Prototype 250 MM PF Berlinetta COACHWORK BY PININ FARINA 240bhp at 7200rpm, 2,953 cc Colombo type V12 single overhead cam, 9.0:1 C/R with triple four-barrel down-draught Weber carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with double wish-bones and single transverse leaf spring, rear suspension by rigid axle on semi-elliptical leaf springs and Houdaille hydraulic lever-action shock absorbers and four-wheel hydraulic alloy/steel drum brakes with dual master cylinders. Wheelbase: 2400 mm (94.5") GENERAL HISTORY OF THE 250 MM As with most Ferrari race lore, the tale of how the immortal three liter V12 and the 250 MM model came to be is fascinating. It involves a miraculous overall victory in Italy’s most famous open road race by an unknown amateur driver in a new Ferrari for which the bookmakers offered few odds of winning. The classic Ferrari V12 engine had originally been designed by Gioacchino Colombo in 1948 as a supercharged 1500 cc unit, which soon gave way to the two liter “166”, the 2,340 cc tipo 195, the 2,544cc “212”, and finally the 2.7 liter as found in the 225 sport models. When the Factory’s well-worn cylinder-boring machine “lightened” the 225 S to its final form as a three liter of 2,953 cc’s, it instigated a tradition of Ferrari Sports and GT racing supremacy that was to last more than a decade. The first three-liter thusly created was installed in a Vignale Coupe (0156 ET) which was entered for veteran “Gigi” Villoresi at the 1952 Mille Miglia. However, it was not Villoresi who was destined to initiate the three liter legend, but an unlikely individual by the name of Giovanni Bracco. Brash and wealthy, Bracco had leased his textile factory in 1947 for 12 years in order to be able to concentrate entirely on racing. “I will win the Mille Miglia or die in the attempt,” he declared, an attitude that did not endear him to other drivers who said he was too old, too reckless and too overconfident. In short, a man Enzo Ferrari could love, especially in view of the fact that Bracco could write a good check for one of his latest racing cars. In 1951 he had earned the grudging respect of his contemporaries when he finished second at the Mille behind Villoresi’s 4.1 liter Ferrari in a little Lancia two liter sedan! When the latter was injured in a road accident less than a week before the start of the 1952 Mille Miglia, Enzo Ferrari allowed Bracco to take over his 250 Sport in order to enter the race as a privateer, although no one expected too much from the Commendatore’s gesture. Over 25 Ferraris were entered including the big 4.5 liter sports car of Taruffi/Biondetti as well as factory cars for such fast rising stars as Castellotti and the Marzotto Brothers – not to mention the might of Mercedes, Stirling Moss in a C-Type Jaguar and three factory Porsches. Team manager Alfred Neubauer had prewar legends like Carraciola, Karl Kling and Herman Lang in no less than three of their new Gullwing prototype cars. As the old adage goes – legends die and legends are born – and it was Bracco’s turn to create his own. From Brescia to the first checkpoint in Verona, Bracco had the lead with a 93mph average, in the pouring rain, ahead of Kling’s Mercedes. However by Racenna, the fourth checkpoint, he was forced to slow down because he had exhausted his inadequate supply of spare tires. (As a private entrant with little chance of winning, no one had thought to arrange stocks of tires along the route for Bracco). By the time he reached L’Aquila he had lost 13 minutes to the 300SL, and was now driving on bald rear tires of two different sizes scrounged from a garage along the route. Kling’s Mercedes set the pace into Rome with Taruffi’s big 4.5 liter factory Ferrari Barchetta in second place, but Bracco arrived in third, 12 minutes behind the 300SL and five minutes in arrears of Taruffi. At Siena, on the northward leg of the 1952 Mille Miglia, Taruffi passed the Mercedes only to have his transmission break. By this checkpoint Bracco had reduced his deficit to eight minutes and by Florence he was only four minutes behind the 300SL. Now began Giovanni Bracco’s legendary drive over the treacherous Futa Pass on the final leg of the race. Chain-smoking cigarettes and knocking back brandy he drove like a man possessed until he caught and passed the Mercedes. When he reached Bolongna at the foot of the pass he was four minutes ahead of Kling’s 300SL, a lead he maintained to the finish, arriving in Brescia in 12 hours, 9 minutes and 45 seconds, averaging 79.9 mph, much of it on tires worn to the cords and through torrential rainstorms! At the finish several empty bottles were seen in the back of the 250 and Bracco could hardly stand unaided. Whether this was due to sheer exhaustion, or brandy, or both, has never been satisfactorily answered. Whatever the case, Bracco is remembered as the fearless amateur who beat the might of the Mercedes team - a feat he was to almost repeat in 1952 when he again led the 300 SL’s in the Mexican Road Race until his differential broke. On the way to victory in the Mille Miglia, Bracco’s reception, as he flew through Modena was quite hysterical. Not only was the underdog winning in a Ferrari but the first victory of a new and untried three liter V12 Ferrari engine was about to enter the record books. In honor of this triumph, Enzo Ferrari wasted no time announcing a new three liter model; the 250 Mille Miglia, first shown at the Paris Auto Salon in September, 1952. Thirty-one of these wonderful sports cars were built in 1953, 19 of which were Pinin Farina coupes like the MM here offered; 11 bodied as Vignale Spyders and one further coupe thought to be by Vignale. The first 250 MM, a Vignale Spyder, was sold to movie director Roberto Rossellini who promptly entered it in the 1953 Mille, but most went to privateer racing drivers of means as the factory concentrated on its fledgling Formula One program and the racing of the larger Lampredi-based sports cars. 250 MM factory entries for Villoresi, Farina, Marzotto and Trintignant did produce several wins in international competition, while in America Phil Hill won a number of races in his Vignale 250 MM Spyder. PERIOD HISTORY OF 250 MM CHASSIS NO. 0250 MM The historic Pinin Farina MM coupe offered here, chassis number 0250 MM, is actually the prototype of this small series of 19 cars and has an interesting history. Owing to an amazing and hitherto unrecorded coincidence, its chassis and model numbers are one and the same – 0250 MM! According to information supplied by the current owner number 0250 was delivered to Carrozzeria Pinin Farina as a chassis and drivetrain on January 23, 1953 emerging as a complete car on March 1, 1953 after having the first of the new PF Berlinetta bodies fitted. The original owner Signore Franco Rol of Venice immediately entered the 250 MM in the XIII Giro di Sicilia where he co-drove with a Sig. Macchieraldo on April 12, 1953. A mishap during this race resulted in damage to the front of the car, however, it was returned to Pinin Farina for repairs. At the request of the owner, a more attractive covered headlamp nose with a wider and lower air intake, similar to Pinin Farina’s 375 MM Berlinetta’s 0322 AM and 0354 for instance, was installed, this work being completed as job number 12248 in November of 1953. The 1954 competition season produced some excellent results for new owner/driver Salvatore Ammendola as follows: Jul. 4, 1954 – Bolzano-Mendola Hill Climb Jul. 11, 1954 – Coppo D’Oro delle Dolomiti (Race No. 105) – 4th overall, 2nd in class. Jul. 25, 1954 – San Bernardo Osta-Gran Hill Climb (Race No. 160) Oct. 24, 1954 – Sass-Supera Hill Climb – 1st SUBSEQUENT HISTORY OF 0250 MM The next owner sold number 0250 to an enthusiast in England who added air outlets to the front fenders. In late 1964 it was overhauled and serviced by Merchiston Motors in the UK, being sold by Ian Sutherland of Angus, England to BOAC air steward Barry Ward who made an excellent adventure by driving our 250 MM from New York City to Atlanta, Georgia. In 1966 it went to George Sterner of York, Pennsylvania who eventually passed the car to Richard Gorman’s Competition Motors of Brooklyn, New York where somehow the original engine was separated from the chassis. One of the next two owners, either Walter Hagstrom or Ed Williman of Briarcliffe Manor, New York had the foresight to reunite the original engine with the car prior to the latter’s sale to Hartmut Ibing of Dusseldorf, Germany in 1989. The next owner, Dietrich von Botticher of Munich decided to treat the still original but very tired PF 250 MM to a total mechanical and cosmetic restoration that was carried out in UK marque expert DK Engineering’s shops. Four years later in 1995, after an expenditure of £150,000 pound sterling the restored Ferrari emerged, resplendent in Rossa Corsa, its body configuration as specified by Pinin Farina’s job number 12248 of November 3, 1953. In the summer of 1997, 250 MM Berlinetta was sold to the present owner through a west coast dealership. On April 20, 1998 ACCUS/FIA Papers were issued to 0250 that, of course, accompany the sale. After a major check over by Savannah, GA based Andy Greene Sports and Vintage Racing Cars, the Ferrari was accepted for the 1998 Mille Miglia Retrospective in which it competed with distinction. In 1999 it won a first place trophy at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in the R2 (1946-1969 racing cars) class. In preparation for the 2005 Mille 1000 the 250 MM Berlinetta has again been thoroughly prepared by Andy Greene SVRC – particularly worthy of mention is the recent engine refurbishment that included new cylinder liners, cylinder rings, rod bearings and a clutch assembly. According to the owner it has also been accepted for the 2005 version of the Mille Miglia Retrospective. The 250 MM series is one of Ferrari’s greatest early creations, possessing all the most desired attributes of the fabled marque; power, performance and a purposeful beauty, as well as eligibility for all the world’s most respected vintage events. It is rare for such a thoroughly documented and historic Ferrari competition car to be offered at auction. Chassis no. 0250MM

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-01-28
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1964 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS

185 bhp, 1,966 cc DOHC air-cooled flat four-cylinder engine with two Weber 46 IDM 2 carburettors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with shock absorbers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,300 mm Originally owned by Frazer Nash Works driver and Porsche privateer Dickie Stoop The first example imported to England Only 904 finished in Irish Green Beautifully restored; only three owners from new Recent engine rebuild by four-cam specialist Bill Doyle The 904 Carrera GTS, one of Porsche’s most captivating sports racers of all time, was borne of the company’s disappointments in Formula One during the early 1960s. Seeking a return to its stock-in-trade sports car racing, Porsche commenced work on a new coupé in late 1962, with Butzi Porsche designing a light-weight fibreglass body that was mounted to a box frame for a semi-monocoque structure. Porsche was keen to utilise their new flat-six, the forthcoming 901 engine, but the motor was still not tested enough for a car that was intended primarily as a customer-based racer, so the proven Type 547 Carrera four-cam flat-four was chosen instead. The breath-taking 904 first appeared in the spring of 1964, and it went on to dominate the unfolding season, with class wins at Sebring, Spa, Nürburgring, and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Between the remarkable successes of select factory efforts and numerous privateers, the Carrera GTS rather easily secured the 1964 two-litre championship for Porsche. The story of 904-045 begins with Richard “Dickie” Stoop, one of the RAF’s Spitfire pilots during World War II. Whilst stationed at Westhampnett Airbase, Stoop and fellow pilot Tony Gaze would often spend their R&R on the nearby track at Goodwood, racing their respective sports cars. By some accounts, it was they who eventually convinced the Earl of Richmond to more regularly utilise Goodwood for racing events, and after the war, Stoop soon became active in the amateur sports car races held on British circuits. By the late 1940s, the pilot had gained employment as a Works driver for Frazer Nash (AFN), even winning the two-litre class at the 1950 24 Hours of Le Mans with a 9th overall finish. AFN had begun importing BMWs to England prior to the war, and by 1954, the company was also importing Porsches, with a few of which eventually being acquired by Stoop for his private racing endeavours. Whilst these generally consisted of various 356 Carrera models, on 6 March 1964, Stoop acquired 904-045, the very first example of a 904 GTS to cross the English Channel. Period photos show him taking delivery of 904-045 from company principal W.H. Aldington at the Frazer Nash factory. As the first example of a 904 seen in the UK, the car was reportedly highly scrutinised by the motoring press, who were undoubtedly also struck by the unusual Irish Green paint finish. This car is believed to be the only 904 finished in the colour. On 2 May, the Porsche debuted on the British racing scene with a 12th place finish at the Silverstone International, whilst a month later, it placed 15th at the Rossfeld Hill Climb, followed by an 8th place at Brands Hatch on 11 July. The 904’s competition zenith truly arrived eight days later, at the Scott-Brown Memorial at Snetterton, where Stoop piloted the car to a 1st in class and 5th overall finish. On 1 August, career highlights continued with a 4th place at the DARM GT at Nürburgring and a 2nd place at the Tourist Trophy at Goodwood on 29 August. Stoop’s season in the 904 concluded on 26 September, at Snetterton, where the car roared to a 6th place finish. On 3 March 1965, chassis 904-045 was entered one more time, with Stoop scheduled to drive, but it apparently never arrived at the Senior Service GT event at Silverstone. Following Stoop’s tragic death at the wheel of his Porsche 911S road car in 1968, the 904 GTS was sold from his estate to John Wean, a well-known collector of important Porsches who was based out of Fox Chapel, Pennsylvania. This 904 had been beautifully maintained during a long period of ownership, seeing occasional use, and it enjoyed the company of such legendary Porsches as a 1970 911 ST, a 1970 908/3 Spyder, and a 1974 RSR. The current owner acquired the car in 1997 and has used it on numerous road rallies. Since acquiring the Carrera GTS, he has also treated the car to a beautiful sympathetic restoration. The engine has been freshly rebuilt by renowned Porsche four-cam specialist Bill Doyle in California, at a cost of over $20,000. This spectacular 904, now being offered publicly for the first time in 17 years, checks all of the boxes in terms of provenance, as it has had a well-documented racing career against some of the era’s best known competitors, and it has received the dedicated care of just three owners since new. Furthermore, 904-045 is the only example of the model originally finished in the unique Irish Green paint, and it was the very first 904 GTS to have been imported to Great Britain. This beautiful Porsche is the paragon of sports car design, with its ground-breaking mid-rear engine layout and arresting fibreglass bodywork. It will command the respect of sports car aficionados far and wide, and it would surely be the toast of marque events and premium concours d’elegance. Competition history for this car can be found in both our print and digital catalogues. Moteur quatre cylindres à plat à 2 ACT par banc, 1 996 cm3, 185 ch, deux carburateurs Weber 46 IDM 2, boîte-pont manuelle à cinq rapports, suspension à quatre roues indépendantes et quatre freins à disque. Empattement: 2 300 mm. Propriété à l’origine du pilote d’usine de Frazer Nash et privé de Porsche Dickie Stoop Premier exemplaire importé en Angleterre Seule 904 peinte en Irish Green Superbement restaurée ; trois propriétaires en tout Moteur récemment refait par le spécialiste Bill Doyle Une des Porsche sport compétition les plus passionnantes de toute l’histoire, la 904 Carrera GTS naquit des déceptions de Porsche en Formule 1 au début des années 1960. En quête d’un brillant retour en catégorie sport, sa spécialité et sa raison d’être, Porsche commença à travailler sur un nouveau coupé en 1962 quand Butzi Porsche conçut une caisse très allégée en fibre de verre qui fut installée sur une plate-forme en caisson formant ainsi une structure semi-monocoque. Porsche avait souhaité utiliser le nouveau moteur six cylindres, le futur 901, mais le groupe n’avait pas encore été suffisamment testé pour propulser une voiture destinée avant tout à être un modèle compétition client. Le bien connu et très au point quatre cylindres à plat Type 547 Carrera à 4 ACT fut donc choisi en attendant. Apparaissant au printemps 1964, l’étonnante 904 allait dominer toute la saison en remportant sa catégorie à Sebring, Spa, au Nürburgring et aux 24 Heures du Mans. Avec autant de remarquables victoires signées par des voitures officielles et des écuries privées, la Carrera GTS remporta assez facilement pour Porsche le championnat mondial en catégorie deux litres. L’histoire de 904-045 commence avec Richard « Dickie » Stoop qui fût pilote de Spitfire dans la RAF pendant la guerre. Alors stationnés sur la base de Westhampnett, Stoop et son camarade pilote Tony Glaze passaient souvent leurs permissions sur la piste voisine de Goodwood avec leur voiture de sport personnelle. D’une certaine façon, ce sont eux qui, par la suite, persuadèrent le comte de Richmond d’utiliser plus souvent le circuit de Godwood pour y organiser des épreuves sportives. Après la guerre, Stoop courut souvent en amateur sur les circuits britanniques. À la fin des années 1940, l’aviateur recruté comme pilote officiel par Frazer Nash (AFN) remporta la catégorie deux litres aux 24 Heures du Mans 1950 en terminant neuvième au général. AFN avait commencé à importer les BMW en Angleterre avant la guerre et, en 1954, la firme importa les Porsche dont certaines furent achetées par Stoop comme voitures de compétition personnelles. S’il s’agissait généralement de diverses 356 Carrera, le 6 mars 1964, Stoop acheta 904-045, tout premier exemplaire de 904 GTS à franchir la Manche. Des photos d’époque le montrent prenant livraison de la voiture avec le directeur de la société, W. H. Aldington, à l’usine Frazer Nash. En tant que premier exemplaire de 904 jamais arrivé au Royaume-Uni, la voiture fit l’objet d’examens attentifs de la part de la presse automobile qui fut aussi frappée par la teinte Irish Green. Cette voiture serait été la seule 904 de cette couleur. Le 2 mai, la Porsche fit ses débuts en Grande-Bretagne avec une 12e place au général dans la course Silverstone International , se classant 15e un mois après à la course de côte de Rossfeld, puis 8e à Brands Hatch le 11 juillet. La 904 connut son apogée en course huit jours plus tard au Scott-Brown Memorial à Snetterton où Stoop remporta sa catégorie avec une cinquième place au général. Le 1e août, les bons résultats continuèrent avec une quatrième place au DARM GT au Nürburgring et une 2e place au Tourist Trophy à Goodwood le 29 août. La saison de Stoop avec la 904 s’acheva le 26 septembre à Snetterton où la voiture prit la 6e place. Le 3 mars 1965, 904-045 fut encore engagée avec Stoop comme pilote déclaré, mais apparemment, elle ne termina pas l’épreuve Senior Service GT à Silverstone. À la suite de la tragique disparition de Stoop dans un accident de la route avec sa Porsche 911S en 1968, la 904 GTS fut vendue à John Wean, collectioneur bien connu d’importantes Porsche résidant à Fox Chapel en Pennsylvanie. Excellemment entretenue pendant une longue période, la 904 était en bonne compagnie avec des machines aussi légendaires qu’une 911 ST 1970, une 908/3 Spyder 1970 et une RSR 1974 tout en étant pilotée de temps à autre. L’actuel propriétaire a acheté la voiture en 1997 et participé à de nombreux rallyes. Depuis cette acquisition, il a aussi soumis la Carrera GTS à une sympathique et belle restauration. Le moteur a été refait récemment pour un coût supérieur à 20 000 dollars par le réputé spécialiste des Porsche « 4 arbres », Bill Doyle en Californie. Proposée ici pour la première fois en vente publique depuis 17 ans, cette spectaculaire 904 cumule les bons points en matière de provenance avec une carrière en compétition bien documentée, face aux meilleures machines de son temps tout en étant la voiture favorite de trois propriétaires seulement. De plus, 904-045 est le seul exemplaire fini en Irish Green et le premier exemplaire de 904 GTS importé en Grande-Bretagne. Machine emblématique de la catégorie sport moderne avec son moteur central arrière et sa remarquable caisse en fibre de verre, cette Porsche admirée et désirée par tous les passionnés de voitures de sport ne peut que devenir la star des événements concernant la marque et même des plus importants concours d’élégance. Addendum Please note that this car is not currently registered in Australia as stated in the catalogue; it will be offered on a Bill of Sale. Chassis no. 904-045 Engine no. P99034

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-05
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1929 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Coupe

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. four valves per cylinder twin overhead camshaft inline eight-cylinder engine with hemispherical combustion chambers, three-speed synchromesh transmission, front suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and beam axle, rear suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and live rear axle, vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" The Model J Duesenberg has long been regarded as the most outstanding example of design and engineering of the classic era. Introduced in 1929, trading was halted on the New York Stock Exchange for the announcement. At $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America. With coachwork, the delivered price of many Duesenbergs approached $20,000, a staggering sum at a time when a typical new family car cost around $500. The Mighty Model J The story of Fred and August Duesenberg and E.L. Cord is among the most fascinating in automotive history. The Duesenbergs were self-taught mechanics and car builders whose careers started in the Midwest at the beginning of the twentieth century with the manufacture of cars bearing the Mason and Maytag names. Fred, the older brother by five years, was the tinkerer and designer of the pair. Augie made Fred’s ingenious and creative things work. The Duesenbergs’ skill and creativity affected many other early American auto manufacturers. Their four-cylinder engine produced by Rochester powered half a dozen marques. Eddie Rickenbacker, Rex Mays, Peter DePaolo, Tommy Milton, Albert Guyot, Ralph DePalma, Fred Frame, Deacon Litz, Joe Russo, Stubby Stubblefield, Jimmy Murphy, Ralph Mulford and Ab Jenkins drove their racing cars. In 15 consecutive Indianapolis 500s, starting with their first appearance in 1913, 70 Duesenbergs competed – thirty-two, an amazing 46 percent of them, finished in the top 10. Fred and Augie became masters of supercharging and of reliability. Their engines, because engines were Fred’s specialty, were beautiful and performed on a par with the best of Miller, Peugeot and Ballot. In 1921, Jimmy Murphy’s Duesenberg won the most important race on the international calendar, the French GP at Le Mans. It was the first car with hydraulic brakes to start a Grand Prix. Duesenberg backed up this performance at Indianapolis in 1922 – eight of the top 10 cars were Duesenberg-powered, including Jimmy Murphy’s winner. In 1925, Errett Lobban Cord added the Duesenberg Motors Company to his rapidly-growing enterprise, the Auburn Automobile Company. Cord’s vision was to create an automobile that would surpass the great marques of Europe and America. Cadillac, Isotta Fraschini, Bugatti, Rolls-Royce and Hispano-Suiza were his targets and Duesenberg was his chosen instrument. He presented Fred Duesenberg with the opportunity to create the greatest car in the world, and Fred obliged with the Duesenberg Model J. The Duesenberg Model J was conceived and executed to be superlative in all aspects. Its short wheelbase chassis was 142.5 inches, nearly 12 feet. The double overhead camshaft straight eight-cylinder engine had four valves per cylinder and displaced 420 cubic inches. It made 265 horsepower. The finest materials were used throughout and fit and finish were to toolroom standards. Each chassis was driven at speed for 100 miles at Indianapolis. The Duesenberg Model J’s introduction on December 1, 1928 at the New York Auto Salon was front page news. The combination of the Duesenberg reputation with the Model J’s grand concept and execution made it the star of the show and the year. Duesenberg ordered enough components to build 500 Model Js while development continued for six months after the Model J’s introduction to ensure its close approximation of perfection. The first customer delivery came in May 1929, barely five months before Black Tuesday. Unfortunately, the Model J Duesenberg lacked financing and support from E.L. Cord and Auburn Corporation, which were both struggling to stay afloat in the decimated middle market. The effect of the Duesenberg J on America cannot be minimized. Even in the misery of the Depression this paragon of power illustrated the continued existence of wealth and upper class. Duesenberg’s advertising became a benchmark, featuring the wealthy and privileged in opulent surroundings with only a single line of copy: “He drives a Duesenberg.” The outside exhaust pipes inspired generations of auto designers and remain, 60 years later, a symbol of power and performance. “She’s a real Duesy,” still means a slick, quick, smooth and desirable possession of the highest quality. Duesenbergs were expensive cars, and only men or women of means could afford them. At a time when a perfectly good new family sedan could be purchased for $500 or so, a coachbuilt Duesenberg often cost $20,000 or more. If a full-sized family sedan sells for $30,000 today, that is the equivalent of more than $1 million dollars now. Such extravagance was born of an era of unbridled capitalism, a time when a man with vision and ability could make – and keep – a fortune of staggering size. These were the men who could afford the very best, and there was absolutely no doubt that when it came to automobiles, E. L. Cord’s magnificent Duesenberg was the best that money could buy. The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom body industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the style and grace of the factory sheet metal was ideally suited for the execution of elegant custom coachwork. The Murphy body company of Pasadena, California is generally recognized as the most successful coachbuilder on the Duesenberg Model J chassis. The Walter M. Murphy Company Associated initially with Packards, Murphy built bodies which suited the California tastes of the time. They were simple and elegant, with trim lines and an undeniable sporting character. Murphy bodies seemed all the more revolutionary when compared to their contemporaries from the east coast, who built heavier, more ornate designs. The trademark of Murphy body design was the “clear vision” pillar. On the convertible coupe, the windshield pillars were designed to be as slim as possible, creating a sportier, more open appearance, while improving visibility for the driver. In fact, Murphy advertised that their windshield pillars were “narrower than the space between a man’s eyes”, a design they claimed eliminated blind spots. The convertible coupe is generally considered to be the best-looking of Murphy’s designs, and indeed, it became one of the most popular bodies for the Model J. J142/2165: The Roster of Keepers The wonderful Duesenberg presented here, J142, has a well-known ownership history from new. Originally sold to Jarvis Hunt, Jr. of Chicago, J142 went to its second owner, Joe Neidlinger of Chicago, IL in January of 1933. Sometime in the mid-1930s, Neidlinger sold the car to William E. Schmidt, but by 1936 the car was in the hands of Eddie Glatt, a Duesenberg enthusiast and owner of Chicago-based Edwards Finance Company. Obviously unable to resist the appeal of J142, Neidlinger bought the car a second time from Glatt. Within a year, however, he sold the car to a Mr. Lacey of Oak Park, Illinois who traded it to Duesenberg dealer John Troka against the purchase of SJ515. In 1938, Troka sold J142 to a Chicago-area physician, Dr. J. Phister. Later the same year, Troka bought the car back, reselling it to Tom L. Grace, who became the first long-term owner, keeping the Duesenberg for nearly 12 years before selling it to Louis A. Ostendorf of Berwyn, Illinois. A year later, in 1951, Troka bought J142 again – for the third time – reselling it to Nathan R. Swift. Four months later, Swift sold the car to John Herriott. In May of 1957, Herriott was enroute to the Indianapolis 500 when the car broke down, and he left it by the side of the road where it was discovered by enthusiast James Thorton. Thorton tracked down Herriott, and a deal was made. Thorton kept the car for 11 years before he sold J142 to Russell Kenerson (of Jamestown, New York and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) on October 28th, 1968. It was in his hands that the car underwent its first major concours quality restoration in the early 1970s, which garnered the car a Classic Car Club of America National First Place award in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1974. In October of 1978 – after ten years – Kenerson sold J142 to E. B. Jeffries of Carefree, Arizona. Six years later, in 1984, J142 was purchased by the Blackhawk Collection. It was later sold to Tenny Natkin of Riverwood, Illinois, who in the early 1980s had the interior refurbished by noted specialist Steve Gundar of Topeka, Kansas. Around the same time, well-known restorer Fran Roxas repainted the car. In 1982, the car was awarded a National First Place prize by the Antique Automobile Club of America. By the mid-1980s, after having been invited to the prestigious Pebble Beach concours, the car was sold to Jack Denlinger, before joining the well-known Imperial Palace collection of Duesenbergs in July of 1990. In 1999, J142 was purchased by Charles Cawley, CEO of the MBNA bank. About a year later, in September of 2000, the car was sold at RM’s New York Auto Salon and Auction to Dale Walksler of Maggie Valley, North Carolina. While in Walksler’s collection, J142 was driven regularly, and just recently, underwent a complete engine rebuild by his museum staff. Having enjoyed a long history of meticulous maintenance and caring ownership, the car remains complete and correct. Light tan leather covers both the interior and rumble seat. The dashboard gauges, which include temperature, speedometer, brake, amperes, fuel, altimeter, oil, and chronometer all appear to be correct and in good working order. J142’s exterior appointments include original TwiLite headlights, Pilot Ray driving lights, scripted sidelamps, chrome wire wheels and a rear-mounted trunk. Summary In recent years, Duesenbergs have enjoyed healthy appreciation as more and more collectors pursue a dwindling number of the best examples. They are without a doubt the ultimate American-made automobile. They are also rare, powerful, sporting, sophisticated, and beautiful. J142 is all of these things and more. It has a continuous ownership history from new. Unlike many, it has never deteriorated, and it retains all of its important original components, from coachwork to engine and chassis. Many cars have been lost; of those that remain, few offer the provenance and the appeal of J142. Chassis no. 2165

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-15
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1997 Ferrari F50

520 bhp, 4,698 cc V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic 2.7 engine management, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and unequal-length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,580 mm The 266th of only 349 examples produced Complete with book, tools, car cover, and roof storage box Matching numbers throughout; Ferrari Classiche certified The goal of Ferrari’s F50, which was built on the culmination of four years of development and fifty years of success in motorsport, was to offer customers an experience as close to a Formula 1 car as possible but on a road-legal platform. The car was presented to the public for the first time at the 63rd annual Geneva Motor Show, and Luca di Montezemolo, Piero Lardi Ferrari, Sergio Pininfarina, and Niki Lauda were all on hand at the unveiling, illustrating the monumental importance of this new model to the history of Ferrari. The F50 was propelled by a 4.7-litre normally aspirated V-12 with five valves per cylinder, which was a first for a road-going Ferrari V-12. It was derived directly from the powerplant used in the 1990 F1 season, and it produced 520 horsepower at an earth-shaking 8,000 rpm, though the 436-pound engine was capable of reaching over 10,000 rpm. The six-speed longitudinal gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine, between which the oil tank was mounted for the dry-sump engine lubrication system. This layout was reminiscent of the one used in Ferrari’s contemporary Formula 1 cars. The interior of the F50 featured few creature comforts, as Ferrari wanted the driver to fully concentrate on handling the most powerful machine to ever leave their factory. The instrument panel featured a tachometer and speedometer, as well as fuel, oil, water temperature, and oil pressure gauges, which were all controlled by a microcomputer and displayed to the driver by LCD. The throttle, brake, and clutch pedals were all fully adjustable and drilled to further maximise weight reduction. The gated gearshift was traditional Ferrari, although, in the interest of weight savings, even the gear knob and lever were made of lightweight composite materials. Of course, Ferrari’s fanatical attention to detail and weight reduction meant massive dividends in terms of performance. The F50’s top speed was purportedly 325 km/h, and the 0–100 km/h dash required just 3.7 seconds. Keeping one’s foot on the accelerator pedal would bring the F50 to a standing mile time of 30.3 seconds. However, all this performance would not be available to every person with the appropriate funds to purchase Ferrari’s newest supercar. Only 349 examples were made, one less than what Montezemolo believed the market demanded and just over a quarter of total F40 production. The beautiful example offered here, chassis 106825, was sold new to Elicar S.r.l in Italy through the Verona Ferrari concessionaire, Ineco Auto S.p.A., on 19 February 1997. The car was finished in the sporting combination of Rosso Corsa (FD80-31ZR) over Nero (8500) with red seat inserts. Registered AN 599 LJ, the F50 was regularly serviced, the first of which took place on 24 November 1997 at RAM Ferrari Service in Vicenza, Italy. Two years later, it again visited RAM, and once more in 2005. In 2006, the Ferrari was sold to a Frenchman who registered it on license AB 166 ZH. The car was then displayed at the XVI Sport & Collection 500 Ferrari Contre le Cancer at Le Vigeant in Southern France. In 2007, the dashboard with LCD display (including the tachometer) was replaced by Modena Sport in Toulouse. It was next seen in the Le Mans Classic paddock in 2010 and 2012. It again received a service at Auvergne Moteurs of Philippe Gardette in July 2012. The F50 is undoubtedly one of the most iconic vehicles created in the 1990s, as it celebrates 50 years of Ferrari’s continuous development and integration of road and racing technology. It was the supercar that gave Ferrari’s most loyal customers the opportunity to experience the same levels of performance and exhilaration previously reserved for Formula 1 drivers. This stunning example, Ferrari Classiche certified, has covered little more than 30,000 kilometres. The F50 is a car that can introduce you in style to the very exclusive club of supercar owners, and it will allow you to enjoy the fantastic sound of Grand Prix–derived 12 cylinders, with manual gearbox. Who would dream for more? Moteur V12, 4 698 cm3, 520 ch, injection Bosch Motronic 2.7, boîte de vitesses manuelle à six rapports, quatre roues indépendantes par triangles inégaux et ressorts hélicoïdaux et quatre freins à disque à commande hydraulique. Empattement : 2 580 mm • La 266e sur seulement 349 exemplaires fabriqués • Complète de ses manuels, outillages, housse et coffre de rangement du toit • Tous numéros concordants certifiés par Ferrari Classiche L’objectif de la F50 de Ferrari, construite à l’issue de quatre années de développement et de cinquante années de succès dans le sport automobile, était de donner aux acheteurs une expérience de conduite la plus proche possible de la Formule 1, mais au volant d’une voiture homologuée pour la route. La voiture fut dévoilée au public au 63e Salon de l’Automobile de Genève en présence de Luca di Montezemolo, Piero Lardi Ferrari, Sergio Pininfarina et Niki Lauda afin de bien souligner l’importance monumentale de ce nouveau modèle dans l’histoire de Ferrari. La F50 était propulsée par un moteur V12 atmosphérique de 4, 7 litres à cinq soupapes par cylindres, une première pour une Ferrari V12 de route. Ce moteur qui découlait directement du groupe utilisé lors de la saison 1990 de F1 délivrait 520 ch au régime élevé de 8 000 tr/min, mais ce moteur de 197 kg pouvait atteindre 10 000 tr/min. La boîte à six rapports montée en long et complétée d’un différentiel à glissement limité était placée en arrière du moteur et, entre les deux, se trouvait le réservoir d’huile du système de graissage à carter sec. Cette architecture rappelait celle des Ferrari de F1 contemporaines. L’intérieur de la F50 offrait peu d’éléments de confort aux occupants car Ferrari voulait que le conducteur fût totalement concentré sur le pilotage de la machine la plus puissante jamais vendue par l’usine. Le tableau de bord comprenait un compte-tours et un compteur de vitesse ainsi qu’une jauge de carburant, des thermomètres d’huile et d’eau et un manomètre de pression d’huile, tous contrôlés par un micro ordinateur et transmis au pilote par écran LCD. Les pédales d’accélérateur, de frein et d’embrayage étaient toutes réglables et perforées pour gagner du poids. La grille du sélecteur de vitesse était typiquement Ferrari, mais, toujours pour réduire les masses, le levier comme son pommeau étaient fabriqués dans des matériaux composites ultra légers. Naturellement, le soin apporté aux détails et à la réduction du poids se traduisait par des gains massifs de performances. La vitesse maximale de la F50 était de 325 km/h et l’accélération de 0 à 100 km/h demandait 3, 7 secondes seulement. Maintenir le pied sur l’accélérateur lançait la F50 sur un mile parcouru en 30, 3 secondes. Mais toutes ces performances n’étaient pas à la portée de toute personne même assez fortunée pour acquérir la plus récente supercar de Ferrari. Seuls 349 exemplaires furent produits, soit un de moins que ce que le marché demandait selon Luca di Montezemolo et un peu plus seulement que le quart de la production de la F40. Le bel exemplaire proposé ici, châssis n° 106825, fut vendu neuf à Elicar S.r.l. en Italie via le concessionnaire Ferrari de Vérone, Ineco Auto S.p.a., le 19 février 1997. La voiture était finie en Rosso Corsa (FD80-31ZR) et noir Nero (8500) avec empiècements de siège rouges. Immatriculée AN 599 LJ, la F50 fut régulièrement entretenue, le 24 novembre 1997 pour la première fois chez RAM Ferrari Service à Vicenza (Italie). Elle y revint deux ans après puis une fois en 2005. En 2006, la voiture fut vendue à un Français qui l’immatricula AB 166 ZH. Elle fut ensuite exposée au XVIe Sport et Collection - 500 Ferrari contre le Cancer au circuit du Vigeant dans la région Poitou Charentes. En 2007, le tableau de bord LCD incluant le compteur a été change par Modena Sport à Toulouse. On la vit ensuite dans le paddock du Mans Classic en 2010 et 2012. Elle bénéficia d’un entretien chez Auverge Moteurs de Philippe Gardette en juillet 2012. La F50 est indubitablement un des modèles les plus emblématiques créés dans les années 1990 car il célébrait 50 ans de développement continu et d’intégration des technologies de F1 sur des véhicules routiers. C’est la supercar qui donna aux plus fidèles clients de Ferrari l’opportunité d’expérimenter les mêmes niveaux de performance et de plaisir de conduite jusque-là réservés aux pilotes de Formule 1. Ce très bel exemplaire, certifie par Ferrari Classic, a parcouru un peu plus de 30.000 km. Une F50, est la seule Ferrari qui peut vous faire entrer en majesté dans le club très fermé des propriétaires de supercar de la marque, et vous faire profiter au grand air des vocalises du 12 cylindres étroitement dérivé de la Formule 1 combiné à une boite manuelle. Que voulez-vous de plus ? Chassis no. ZFFTA46B000106825 Engine no. 45134 Gearbox no. 380 Body no. 210

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-02-03
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1939 SS 100 Jaguar 2½-Litre Roadster by Van den Plas

102 bhp, 2,663 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with dual SU carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front and solid-axle rear suspension with semi-elliptical leaf springs and friction shock absorbers, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in. Believed to be the final 1939 SS 100 2½-Litre chassis built One-off Figoni-inspired bodywork by Belgium’s finest coachbuilder Displayed at the 1948 Brussels Motor Show Offered from long-term ownership A unique coachbuilt SS 100 of considerable flair! The name Vanden Plas is most frequently seen in conjunction with Bentleys and, yes, Jaguars, but the Jaguar offered here is a “Vanden Plas” of another country. It was bodied not by the famous British coachbuilder but by its Belgian ancestor, Carrosserie Van den Plas of Antwerp, originally established in 1870 to build carriage axles and wheels. Eventually, the firm had progressed to the building of entire carriages and, by the 1930s, was reigning supreme as Belgium’s foremost builder of custom automobile bodies that, in the words of The Times of London, “had an air of distinction lacking in many of the products around them.” Yet, World War II had its effect on the firm, as it did with all other European coachbuilders. Van den Plas would survive through its own strong will and lived long enough after the war to build several further interesting bodies, with the fuller-figured curves and broad chrome embellishments that were coming into style. Evidence from these designs shows that Van den Plas looked for inspiration in this period to France, particularly the “teardrop” creations of Figoni et Falaschi, which had set the styling world on its ear in the late 1930s. According to history that has long accompanied this car, SS 100 Jaguar chassis number 49064, the last 2½-Litre chassis built in 1939 per the Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust, was purchased by Van den Plas as a basis for a custom body prior to World War II. The war prevented the project from continuing, and the chassis managed to survive the conflict. Thus, when it came time for Van den Plas to return to coachbuilding, they looked to the only chassis they had readily on hand as the basis for their first show car, an all-important creation that would hopefully attract new business during the lean immediate post-war period. However, post-war plans were that Jaguar would assemble automobiles in Belgium using part of the Van den Plas works, indicative of an increasing partnership between the two firms. This was one of two Van den Plas–bodied Jaguars displayed at the 1948 Brussels Motor Show, the other of which was even used on the back of the Belgian Jaguar distributor’s brochure for the Mark IV in 1948. Rather than chosen because it was the only chassis available, the SS 100 was likely a conscious choice, designed by the coachbuilder to show the British automaker what amazing (and highly profitable) things could come from a Jaguar and Van den Plas partnership. The completed creation nonetheless shows the juxtaposition of post-war expediency and lavish pre-war Figoni-inspired design. Sweeping fenders follow the original basic lines of the factory SS 100’s lavish curves but are fully and deeply skirted, wrapping down to the chassis frame. Broad sweeps of chrome trim reach from the front bumper up around the arches of the wheels, drip seductively down into the fenders, and then extend back to a flared droplet-shaped embellishment on the rear-wheel spat. Further delicate bright metal trim surrounds the steeply raked windshield and the upper beltline of the body; indeed, the stunning effect of the brightwork is derived from its judicious application throughout the car rather than being focused on a few moldings. Yet, close examination shows that both the SS’s original headlamps and radiator shell remain intact. They have simply been blended into the lines of the body so successfully that they look as if they were always meant to be there. As previously mentioned, Van den Plas displayed their completed creation, with considerable pride, it can be imagined, at the Brussels Motor Show of 1948, an appearance which merited mention in the February 20, 1948, issue of Autocar (p. 167) and the February 18, 1948, issue of The Motor (p. 66). The latter writer described the car as being “a really remarkable example of fine lines and good proportion. The aluminum facia [sic] panel was engine-turned in traditional style.” An interesting comment in the same Motor article reiterates the news of the planned Jaguar and Van den Plas partnership that the car was intended to signal. The SS 100 is believed to have subsequently been displayed in at least one post-war concours d’elegance, most probably in France, as a surviving black-and-white photograph shows it with an entry number taped to the front bumper. It was listed in the SS 100 Register as being with a Mr. S. Falise of Brussels, Belgium. Falise’s ownership was certainly in the ’80s and for some unknown period prior, as it is known that the Jaguar was owned by Frans van den Heuvel, who had the car for three or four years before it migrated to the United States. Photos on file taken at that time show it appearing to be largely original, although by that time, the body had been two-toned to better showcase the dramatic styling. Subsequently, the Jaguar made its way to the United States and was restored in the early 1990s by the late and well-respected California restorer Mike Fennel, in its present stunning scarlet and ebony livery, with a red leather interior and black cloth roadster top. It was displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1991 as an exhibition-only entrant, which is believed to have been its most recent show appearance. It has been maintained since in the climate-controlled facility of its long-term owner and, today, presents as a well-kept older restoration, still spectacular in its details and in its fierce and ambitious curves. One of the most significant surviving examples of Belgian coachbuilding, the Van den Plas SS 100 is joyfully something more. It was the announcement at the end of war that glorious new things were to come, carried out in sporting engineering and fluid curves. Chassis no. 49064

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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2002 Ferrari Enzo

660 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic engine management and electronic fuel injection, six-speed electro-hydraulic computer-controlled sequential F1 gearbox, limited slip differential and traction control, front and rear pushrod-actuated double wishbones with horizontal external reservoir coil-spring damper units, and four-wheel ventilated carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,649 mm Pininfarina’s 2002 Paris Motor Show car Rare and desirable original colour combination Offered with its original set of books, tools, and luggage Ferrari Classiche certified As Ferrari entered the new millennium, its Formula One team was embarking on another golden era. The team would go on to win six constructors’ titles between 1999 and 2004, and it would then go on to win a further two world championships in 2007 and 2008. After several years in the doldrums, Ferrari was back on top at the highest level of racing. In the words of Luca di Montezemolo: “The third millennium has begun with Ferrari enjoying a period of great competitiveness on the world’s racing circuits; so authentic a laboratory for advanced research as it has in recent years. To bring together our racing success and the fundamental role of races, I decided that this car, which represents the best of which our technology is capable, should be dedicated to the founder of the company, who always thought racing should lay the foundations for our road car designs. And so this model, of which we are very proud, will be known as the Enzo Ferrari”. These words were spoken at the Paris Auto Show in September 2002, during the unveiling of the Enzo Ferrari, the successor to the F50. The world was waiting with baited breath, as the F50’s successor had very big shoes to fill. The Enzo Ferrari featured the pinnacle of technology, engineering, and design, combining lessons from Ferrari’s Formula One success with a development team that strived for the best. In fact, Ferrari’s engineers spent countless hours carefully sculpting the car’s design in order to hone the perfect balance of downforce and top speed. The interior is awash in carbon fibre, but there are no superfluous elements in the cabin to distract the driver from the task at hand. Aside from the leather bucket seats, the only nod to luxury is a climate-control system. Not even a radio was available, as it would add unnecessary weight and mask the glorious sound of the 12-cylinder engine sitting just inches behind the cockpit. At the Enzo’s heart is its 660-horsepower, Tipo F140B, naturally aspirated V-12 engine. This is an all-new unit that has been developed specifically for use in this car, and when it is coupled with a six-speed, sequential F1-style gearbox, it is capable of launching the Enzo from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds, thanks also in part to its lightning-quick 150-millisecond gearshifts. If the pilot is offered a stretch of road long enough, the Enzo can accelerate to an astonishing 218 mph, making it the fastest road car Ferrari had ever produced at the time. As owners would expect of a car of this calibre, the carbon-ceramic brakes are on par with its incredible performance, and the Ferrari can grind to a halt from 80 mph in a scarcely believable 188 feet. In keeping with Ferrari’s long-held philosophy of building its flagship cars in limited numbers, the decision was made to produce just 349 examples. Ferrari invited only their best and longest-standing customers to purchase the car, as a reward for their loyalty to the Scuderia. As a result, every Enzo was spoken for before production even began. After numerous requests from clients around the world, Ferrari offered Enzos to an additional 50 customers, making for a total run of just 399. That being said, the 400th Enzo was presented to Pope John Paul II as a gift and was later auctioned off for charity on his behalf. The Enzo presented here, chassis number 129581, was produced in July 2002 and is one of just a handful of Enzos finished in striking Giallo Modena with a Nero leather interior. This car was displayed at the Paris Motor Show on the Pininfarina stand in October 2002, where the Enzo was first publicly unveiled to the world. In September 2003, it was then shown by Ferrari France at Magny-Cours. The car, along with its optional fitted luggage, was sold through Ch. Pozzi S.A to Mr Tunon Gregorio in Monaco on 17 December 2003. It received its first recorded service at G. Cavallari Monaco Motors on 19 June 2004, and at this time, its odometer displayed 10,772 kilometres. In October 2005, the Enzo participated in the first International Enzo Ferrari Rally Maranello-Modena, where it featured Monaco license plate 1111. The car was serviced again by G. Cavallari at 12,647, 19,973, and 23,538 kilometres. Additional service records note that the Ferrari was then taken to Eberlein Ferrari Kassel in Germany on 24 January 2012. Then, in January 2013, the car was serviced by Ch. Pozzi, from where it was sold new, with 26,339 kilometres showing on its odometer. Most recently, in March of this year, the car received its 30,000-kilometre service at Motor Service S.r.l in Modena. The Enzo was an instant success when new, and it has become even more desirable to collectors over time. It is undoubtedly the most collectible of the Montezemolo-era Ferraris, and whilst production of the Enzo ended a decade ago, its performance is still considered world-class. The Enzo is a product of a time when Ferrari was operating at its peak both on the road and track, and this example would be the centrepiece of any collection of modern supercars. 660 cv, 5.998 cc, motore V-12 a 65° con doppio albero a camme in testa, con sistema di gestione del motore ed iniezione di carburante Bosch Motronic, cambio sequenziale F1 con controllo computerizzato ad azionamento elettro-idraulico, differenziale autobloccante e controllo della trazione, sospensioni anteriori e posteriori a doppio quadrilatero articolato deformabile con ammortizzatori telescopici orizzontali con serbatoio esterno, quattro freni a disco auto ventilati carbo-ceramici. Passo: 2.649 mm • Esposta allo stand Pininfarina al Salone dell’auto di Parigi del 2002 • Rara, desiderabile ed originale combinazione di colore • Offerta completa dei libretti uso e manutenzione, set attrezzi e valigie originali • Certificata Ferrari Classiche Con il passaggio al nuovo millennio Ferrari, grazie alla sua squadra di Formula 1, stava vivendo un altro periodo d’oro. Tra il 1999 ed il 2004, Ferrari avrebbe vinto sei titoli costruttori di F1, ed avrebbe poi vinto ulteriori due campionati nel 2007 e nel 2008. Dopo parecchi anni di sofferenza, Ferrari era finalmente tornata ai livelli consoni di successo ai massimi livelli delle competizioni. Luca di Montenzemolo ha detto: “Il terzo millennio è iniziato con la Ferrari protagonista di un periodo di enorme competitività sulle piste di tutto il mondo; mai come oggi le corse sono un laboratorio di ricerca avanzata. Per riunire i nostri successi sportivi ed il fondamentale ruolo delle corse, ho deciso che questa vettura, che rappresenta il meglio di cui è capace la nostra tecnologia, debba essere dedicata al fondatore della nostra azienda. Un uomo che ha sempre pensato che nelle corse si debbano poggiare le fondamenta delle nostre vetture stradali. Ed è per questo che questa vettura, di cui andiamo estremamente orgogliosi, sarà conosciuta come Enzo Ferrari”. Queste parole sono state dette al Salone di Parigi del Settembre del 2002, durante la presentazione della Ferrari Enzo, nata per rimpiazzare la F50. Una vettura che il mondo aspettava con impazienza, visto che l’erede della F50 avrebbe potuto solo essere qualcosa di straordinario. La Ferrari Enzo rappresentava il meglio della tecnologia, dell’ingegneria e del design, combinando le lezioni imparate grazie all’esperienza ed ai successi in Formula 1, sviluppata da un gruppo di lavoro che, semplicemente, ambiva al meglio. Gli ingegneri Ferrari, ad esempio, hanno speso un numero incalcolabile di ore a modellare ogni singolo dettaglio della carrozzeria per ottenere il miglior risultato in termini di deportanza alle alte velocità. L’abitacolo è quasi completamente realizzato e rivestito con fibra di carbonio, ma al contempo non c’è un solo singolo dettaglio superfluo a distrarre, almeno potenzialmente, il pilota da quello che deve fare: guidare. Fatta salva la pelle che riveste i sedili, il solo altro segno convenzionale di lusso, è l’impianto di climatizzazione. La radio non era disponibile, neppure a richiesta: avrebbe aggiunto peso addizionale del tutto superfluo ed, inoltre, avrebbe potuto coprire il trionfale suono del V-12 posizionato solo alcuni centimetri dietro l’abitacolo. Il cuore della Enzo è il motore, V-12 aspirato tipo F140B, con i suoi 660 cavalli. Si tratta di un’unità tutta nuova, sviluppata appositamente per essere utilizzata su questa vettura, ed è capace, abbinato al cambio sequenziale a 6 marce, in stile F1, di far raggiungere alla Enzo i 100 km/h in 3,6 secondi, grazie anche al cambio fulmineo, capace di cambiare rapporto in 150 millisecondi. Se al pilota si para davanti un tratto di strada lungo abbastanza, la Enzo può raggiungere uno strepitoso 350 km/h di velocità massima, che la rendono la Ferrari stradale più veloce di sempre. Come è lecito aspettarsi da una vettura di questo tipo, i freni carbo- ceramici sono all’altezza delle prestazioni, e la Enzo può fermarsi da 130 a 0 km/h nell’incredibile spazio di soli 57 metri. Coerente con la scelta, ormai tradizionale, di Ferrari di produrre la sua vettura simbolo in tiratura limitata, era stata inizialmente presa la decisione di produrre solo 349 esemplari. Ferrari ha invitato solo ed esclusivamente i suoi migliori e più fidelizzati clienti ad un’anteprima della macchina, per permettergli di acquistarla come riconoscimento alla fedeltà mostrata alla Scuderia. Il risultato finale, è stato quello di vendere tutta la produzione, ben prima ancora di cominciarla. Dopo numerosissime richieste da parti di clienti provenienti da tutto il mondo, la Ferrari ha deciso di produrre ulteriori 50 Enzo, portando il totale a 399. E’ stata, in realtà, prodotta anche la vettura numero 400, da donare a Papa Giovanni Paolo II perché potesse essere messa all’asta, a suo nome, e devolvere l’intero ricavato in beneficienza. La Enzo presentata qui, si tratta del telaio 129581, è stata prodotta nel Luglio 2002 ed una delle pochissime Enzo originariamente verniciate in colore Giallo Modena, con gli interni in pelle Nero. Questa è la vettura utilizzata per l’esposizione sullo stand della Pininfarina in occasione del Salone dell’automobile di Parigi del 2002, dove la Enzo ha fatto il suo debutto ufficiale. Nel Settembre del 2003 è stata poi esposta a Magny-Cours da Ferrari France. Questa vettura, accompagnata dal suo set opzionale di valige, è stata venduta la prima volta dal concessionario Ch. Pozzi S.A a Mr Tunon Gregorio del Principato di Monaco il 17 Decembre del 2003. Ha ricevuto il primo tagliando, come da trascrizioni sul libretto, presso la G. Cavallari Monaco Motors il 19 Giugno 2004, quando il contachilometri indicava 10.772 chilometri. Nell’Ottobre del 2005 la Enzo partecipa al primo raduno Internazional Enzo Ferrari Rally Maranello-Modena, sfoggiando la targa Monaco 1111. La macchina torna poi da G. Cavallari per altri tagliandi, a 12.647 km, 19.973 km ed a 23.538 km. Le ultime note legate ai tagliandi, evidenziano come la Enzo si stata anche portata alla Eberlein Ferrari di Kassel, in Germania, il 24 Gennaio 2012. Nel Gennaio 2013 la macchina torna alle origini e viene sottoposta a tagliando presso la Ch. Pozzi, dove era stata originariamente venduta, con 26.339 chilometri indicati sul conta chilometri. Più recentemente, Marzo di quest’anno, la Enzo viene sottoposta al tagliando dei 30.000 km presso Motor Service S.r.l di Modena. La Enzo ha incontrato, sin da subito, un grande successo, e, con il trascorrere del tempo è diventata ancora più un oggetto da collezione. E’, senza ombra di dubbio, la Ferrari più collezionabile del periodo Montezemolo e, sebbene la sua produzione sia terminata circa 10 anni fa, le prestazioni sono, ancora oggi, considerate ai massimi livelli. La Enzo è figlia della tecnologia Ferrari in un momento in cui la fabbrica godeva dei massimi successi sia in pista che su strada e, questo esemplare, potrebbe essere il fulcro di ogni collezione di supercar. Chassis no. ZFFCZ56B000129581 Engine no. 111836 Body no. 8

  • CANCanada
  • 2015-05-23
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1968 Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/2 Daytona

270 bhp, 1,995 cc DOHC V-8 engine with dual-ignition and indirect fuel injection, six-speed gearbox, independent front and rear suspension by double wishbones, rear-wheel drive, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase 2,250 mm Raced in period by Nino Vaccarella, Herbert Schultze, and Michel Weber Eligible for many of the world’s greatest historic motor racing events Includes original registration documentation, its ONS Wagen-Pass, and FIA papers Beautiful example of the eight-cylinder Alfa Romeo sports prototype By the end of 1951, Alfa Romeo had decided to retire from international grand prix competition. During the early 1950s, it would win the first two Driving Championships with its Tipo 158 and 159 racers, and in 1952 and 1953, the famed Disco Volante would astonish the world, as it had an entirely new design. At the same time, Alfa Romeo was developing an intriguing two-litre V-8 prototype engine that was intended for a sporting GT car; however, this project was shelved for the time being. With Alfa Romeo and its competition arm, Autodelta, experiencing much success with the Giulia Coupé derivatives and the TZ and TZ2 throughout the early 1960s, in various touring and GT races, the decision was finally made to return to international sports car racing. The heart of Alfa’s return would be the two-litre V-8 engine, which had been abandoned 10 years earlier. This effort would encompass 11 racing seasons and result in Alfa winning the World Championship in 1977. The 1967 Fleron Hill Climb event in Belgium would mark Alfa Romeo’s triumphant return. Their new car, which featured a rather exotic H-shape chassis made of magnesium and aluminium, would finish 1st overall in this event, at the hands of Teodoro Zeccoli. With years of competitive driving experience, Teo had also built up quite a reputation. As the Autodelta test driver, he was actively involved in the Tipo 33 project, as he had allegedly tested every T33 personally. He had also been an Abarth Works driver, as well as a respected Le Mans and hill climb veteran. After its success in Belgium, the Fleron name quickly became associated with this model. Throughout 1967, Alfa Romeo won four victories, with three taking place in hill climbs and one at the Vallelunga circuit later in the year. The car offered here was delivered new by Scuderia Autodelta in 1968, and it was campaigned by the Alfa Romeo Deutschland concessionaires team. Chassis 026’s first competitive outing was on 19 May, at the 1968 Nürburgring 1000 KM. The car was driven by Herbert Schultze and Nino Vaccarella, and it claimed an impressive 3rd in class and 10th overall finish. It went on to compete for the remainder of the 1968 season, with Herbert Schultze driving, at mostly European hill climb championship events. On 17 April 1969, this car was first road-registered as F-RW 35 in Frankfurt. As noted by the original Fahrzeugbrief, which accompanies the car, it was equipped with engine 0035, which it still retains today. Throughout the 1969 season, Michel Weber competed with the car at 11 competitive events. Highlights of these events include wins at the Fassberg Hill Climb in May and the Gaisberg Hill Climb in September. Weber also competed at the famous Trento-Bondone, where he finished 3rd, and at the Mont Ventoux event in September, where he finished 8th in class. In 1970, Weber again competed with the car for Alfa Deutschland. The car was then sold to racing driver Heinz Isert in 1971. On 21 July 1971, the ONS Wagen-Pass for motor racing in Germany was delivered, and it is still presented with the car to this day. As documented in the Wagen-Pass, Isert had a roll bar fitted in 1973. He finally sold the Alfa to Florian Gerbl in 1984, and after trading hands several times thereafter, a full restoration, which included returning the body to the original short-tail Daytona specification, was undertaken. In 1998, Gregor Fisken bought chassis 026 and continued to compete in the car, including at the Targa Florio event in 2000. Its FIA papers appear to have been delivered on 19 December that year. Three years later, the car was sold to Kazumichi Goh, the founder of the Team Goh International motorsport team, which won the 1996 All-Japan Grand Touring Car Championship, and who famously went on to win Le Mans in 2004 with Audi. In August 2005, the FIA HTP papers were delivered. In 2008, the car was acquired by Mr Muroto in Japan, who retained the Alfa for several years before selling it to the present owner in 2010. This car offers a rare opportunity to purchase a genuine T33/2 Daytona race car, especially an example with such an impressive racing record. It is currently road-registered and includes valid HTP-FIA papers, making it not only eligible for the Le Mans Classic but also the Tour Auto and Modena Cento Ore. With its gorgeous, high-revving two-litre V-8, this Alfa Romeo will not only sound great running down the straights at any historic motor sport event, but it will also certainly beckon its new owner to push the limit at every turn. Moteur V-8, 1 995 cm3, 270 ch, 2 ACT par banc, double allumage et injection indirecte, boîte six rapports, suspension avant et arrière indépendante à doubles triangles, propulsion, freins assistés à disques sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 250 mm. Pilotée à l'époque par Nino Vaccarella, Herbert Schultze et Michel Weber Éligible pour la plupart des plus beaux meetings historiques du monde Comporte ses documents d'immatriculation d'origine, son ONS Wagenpass et ses papiers FIA Superbe exemplaire du fameux sport-prototype Alfa Romeo V-8 A la fin de la saison 1951, Alfa Romeo décidait de se retirer des grand prix internationaux. Au début des années 1950, la marque avait remporté les deux premiers titres au Championnat du Monde avec ses monoplaces Tipo 158 et 159 et, en 1952 et 1953, la fameuse Disco Volante allait étonner le monde avec sa forme spectaculaire, complètement nouvelle. Parallèlement, Alfa Romeo préparait un nouveau moteur V-8 de 2 litres conçu pour équiper une GT sportive, mais ce projet était ensuite mis de côté. Au début des années 1960, Alfa Romeo et son écurie de course Autodelta connaissaient de brillants succès avec les dérivés de coupés Giulia et les TZ et TZ2, en courses tourisme ou GT. Si bien que la décision était prise de retourner en compétition internationale d'endurance. Le cœur du nouveau prototype Alfa Romeo serait le V-8 de 2 litres qui avait été abandonné 10 ans auparavant. Ce moteur allait participer à 11 saisons de courses, et apporter à Alfa Romeo le titre de Championne du Monde des Voitures de Sport en 1977. La course de côte de Fléron, en Belgique, était en 1967 le témoin du retour triomphant d'Alfa Romeo. La nouvelle voiture, équipée d'un châssis assez exotique en H, en magnésium et en aluminium, remportait la victoire entre les mains de Teodoro Zeccoli. Fort de nombreuses années d'expérience, Teo s'était bâti une solide réputation. En tant que pilote d'essai Autodelta, il était impliqué de façon active dans le projet Tipo 33 et avait sans doute testé personnellement chaque T33. Il avait été aussi pilote officiel Abarth et avait pris part aux 24 Heures du Mans et à de nombreuses courses de côte. Après son succès en Belgique, le nom de Fléron est resté associé à ce modèle. Au cours de l'année 1967, Alfa Romeo remportait quatre victoires, dont trois lors de courses de côte et une sur le circuit de Vallelunga, plus tard dans l'année. La voiture proposée ici a été livrée neuve en 1968 par la Scuderia Autodelta et a été engagée en course par l'équipe du concessionnaires Alfa Romeo Deutschland. La première sortie en compétition de ce châssis 026 a eu lieu le 19 mai 1968, aux 1000 Km du Nürburgring. La voiture était alors confiée à Herbert Schultze et Nino Vaccarella, qui ont signé une superbe troisième place dans leur catégorie, terminant dixièmes au classement général. La voiture a continué à courir jusqu'à la fin de la saison 1968 entre les mains d'Herbert Schultze, participant principalement à des courses de côte du championnat d'Europe. Le 17 avril 1969, la voiture a été immatriculée pour la première fois, F-RW 35 à Francfort. Comme il est indiqué sur le Fahrzeugbrief d'origine, elle était alors dotée du moteur 0035, qui est encore celui qui l'équipe aujourd'hui. Au cours de la saison 1969, Michel Weber prenait part à 11 compétitions, remportant la victoire dans la course de côte de Fassberg en mai et dans celle de Gaisberg en septembre. Weber participait aussi au fameux Trento-Bondone, arrivant troisième, et à la course de côte du Mont Ventoux au mois de septembre où il s'adjugeait la huitième place de sa catégorie. En 1970, Weber courait à nouveau au volant de la voiture pour Alfa Deutschland. En 1971, la voiture était vendue au pilote Heinz Isert. Le 21 juillet 1971 était délivré un ONS Wagenpass, pour pouvoir courir en Allemagne, et ce document fait aujourd'hui partie du dossier de la voiture. Comme il est indiqué dans ce Wagenpass, un arceau de sécurité a été posé par Isert en 1973. En 1984, il a vendu l'Alfa Romeo à Florian Gerbl et, après qu'elle ait changé de mains plusieurs fois, la voiture bénéficiait d'une restauration complète au cours de laquelle la carrosserie était remise en état selon sa configuration d'origine, Daytona à queue courte. En 1998, Gregor Fisken en faisait l'acquisition et l'utilisait en compétition, participant en 2000 à la Targa Florio. Ses papiers FIA ont été délivrés le 19 décembre de cette même année. Trois ans plus tard, l'Alfa Romeo était vendue à Kazumichi Goh, fondateur de l'écurie de course Team Goh International qui a remporté le Championnat Super GT au Japon en 1996, et qui a décroché la victoire aux 24 Heures du Mans 2004 avec Audi. Au mois d'août 2005 était émis le Passeport Technique Historique FIA et, en 2008, la voiture était cédée à M. Muroto, au Japon, qui la conservait quelques années avant de la vendre en 2010 à son actuel propriétaire. La voiture proposée ici représente une rare opportunité d'acquérir une authentique T33/2 Daytona de compétition, qui de plus présente un très beau palmarès. Elle est aujourd'hui immatriculée pour la route et comporte ses papiers FIA, ce qui la rend éligible pour Le Mans Classic, mais aussi pour le Tour Auto et pour Modena Cento Ore. Avec son splendide et puissant moteur V-8 de 2 litres, cette Alfa Romeo non seulement émettra un son fabuleux dans les lignes droites de toute compétition historique, mais en plus elle encouragera son nouveau propriétaire à en exploiter au maximum toutes les capacités sportives. Chassis no. AR 75033 026 Engine no. 0035

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2014-05-10
Hammer price
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1957 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

Offered by its third enthusiast owner since new Beautiful, correct award-winning restoration by Steve Babinsky Finished in its original special-order color combination Original numbers-matching engine and drivetrain Equipped with original Rudge wheels and fitted luggage THE LEGENDARY GULLWING From his Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Park Avenue showroom, Mercedes-Benz’s United States distributor, Max Hoffman, said that there was a market in America for a fast, sensual Mercedes-Benz coupe, and a production version of the racing 300 SL, complete with the fascinating and now legendary “gullwing” doors, necessitated by the unusual, tall frame design, would be it. The “SL” moniker (translated to English as “Sport Light”) reflected the pioneering use of a welded, tubular-steel, ultra-light frame construction that weighed only 182 pounds. The car also featured fully independent suspension in addition to its fuel-injected, 3.0-liter (2,996-cc), OHC straight-six with dry-sump lubrication, and the motor was inclined to the side in order to reduce the height of the front end. The power, rated at 240 bhp at 6,100 rpm (SAE) and 215 bhp at 5,800 rpm (DIN), with the factory-optional or dealer-installed “sport” camshaft, was delivered through a four-speed manual gearbox. A 161-mph top speed and 0–60 acceleration of approximately eight seconds, depending on the rear-end ratio selected from five options, made the 300 SL the fastest production automobile of its time. Appropriate for an automobile that Max Hoffman had almost single-handedly willed into being, the production 300 SL made its debut in the United States, not in Germany, which was a Mercedes first. More than 1,000 of the 1,400 cars produced between 1954 and early 1957 were delivered through Hoffman, to whose showrooms the rich and famous flocked. The 300 SL was also raced and piloted by the top drivers of the day, such as John Fitch, Olivier Gendebien, Paul O’Shea, Prince Metternich, and, of course, Sir Stirling Moss, who holds the “forever” course record for his famous Mille Miglia finish in 1955. It all added to the romance of a car that seemed destined to become a legend the moment production began. It had all of the right ingredients: incredible exclusivity, incredible speed, and an incredible price. THIS EXCEPTIONAL 300 SL According to the registers of both Eric Le Moine and the Gull Wing Group, this 300 SL was a special order through Max Hoffman Motors, in Black (DB40) with the optional full red leather (1079) interior. Its first owner, Philip Newfiler of Allentown, Pennsylvania, later passed it to Bernard Berman, an Allentown industrialist and early collector of sporting automobiles, whose garage it shared with many fine cars from all eras. Mr. Berman maintained the Gullwing for decades before selling it to its third and current owner, also a Quaker State collector; the 300 SL has remained in Pennsylvania and, in fact, within easy distance of its original home since new. The consignor elected to have the car restored by the respected Steve Babinsky of Automotive Restorations in Lebanon, New Jersey. Photographic records of the work, which are on file, show the solid and patinaed original condition in which the 300 SL was acquired, including the original stampings and markings on many of its drivetrain components, as well as the body number stampings. It was subsequently painstakingly restored to an extremely high standard, with invoices on file reflecting over $695,000 in work. The owner notes that it retains its original, numbers-matching engine and complete original drivetrain, including its transmission, steering box, and even the set of belly pans! Further, it is equipped with an original set of Rudge knock-off wheels and proper fitted luggage. Exhibited at the 2011 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, to much admiration, this is a spectacular Gullwing, with the benefits of a desirable late-production status, many of the best possible accoutrements, matching-numbers authenticity, and an exceptional restoration. It would be a standout wherever it is driven or exhibited by a proud owner. Chassis no. 198.040.7500069 Engine no. 198.980.7500074 Body no. 198.040.7500067

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1924 Isotta-Fraschini Tipo 8A cabriolet Ramseier

1924 Isotta-Fraschini Tipo 8A cabriolet Ramseier Carte grise française Châssis n° 605 Moteur n° 604 - Provenant de la collection Albert Prost - L'exception absolue - Seulement trois familles de propriétaires - Historique suivi et exceptionnel - Mécanique et deuxième carrosserie d'origine Au début des années 1920, tous les excès sont permis et les constructeurs de voitures de prestige rivalisent de luxe et d'extravagance. Chez Isotta-Fraschini, la Tipo 8A présentée en 1924 fait suite à la Tipo 8, première voiture de série (même petite...) équipée d'un huit-cylindres en ligne conçu par Giustino Cattaneo. Accusant un poids de plus de 2 tonnes, la Tipo 8A est équipée d'un moteur de 7,3 litres, d'une puissance modeste (110 ch environ, à 2 800 tr/mn), mais offrant surtout un couple énorme permettant presque de se passer de la boîte trois rapports. Une bonne partie de la production part vers les États-Unis où les acteurs raffolent de ce genre de voiture et où l'Isotta coûte plus cher qu'une Duesenberg. Un des amateurs les plus célèbres d'Isotta-Fraschini sera Rudolph Valentino, lors de ses années hollywoodiennes : il partage sa nationalité avec cette impressionnante automobile. Voiture de représentation, l'Isotta est idéale pour rouler sur les grands boulevards, ou pour partir en voyage sur des routes larges et tranquilles, bercé par le ronronnement de son moteur peu commun. Irremplaçables témoins d'une époque d'insouciance, les voitures comme la Tipo 8A seront condamnées par la crise de 1929 et ne connaîtront plus jamais d'équivalent. L'exceptionnelle Isotta-Fraschini Tipo 8A que nous présentons est surtout connue comme "l'Isotta du marquis", surnom qui lui vient de la période où elle a appartenu au regretté Yves Dalmier. Dans son fameux ouvrage "Les roues de fortune", il a signé à propos de cette voiture des pages hilarantes sur son usage, ou plutôt sur les aventures liées à son usage. Grâce à Yves Dalmier, on apprend que, produite en 1924, cette voiture a été d'abord équipée d'une première carrosserie torpédo "boule", modèle d'origine Isotta. Quelques années plus tard, elle a été complètement démontée dans les ateliers du carrossier suisse Ramseier, à Worblaufen et, d'après Yves Dalmier, "le seul vestige de la première carrosserie en est la trace de l'ancien capot, représenté par un couple en dural, maintenant inutile, fixé sous l'actuel capot." Ramseier l'équipe alors d'une nouvelle carrosserie cabriolet avec laquelle elle est exposée au Salon de Genève 1932. De toute beauté, ce cabriolet au marchepied très incliné parvient à donner à cette imposante automobile une allure presque légère. Yves Dalmier fait l'acquisition de cette voiture en 1960 de façon presque miraculeuse, même pour l'époque, après avoir passé une petite annonce de recherche "de toute belle voiture ancienne", ou quelque chose d'approchant. Une lettre lui arrive, proposant cette imposante Isotta. Après quelques rebondissements, il réussit à l'échanger contre une Salmson S4 achetée spécialement pour séduire les acheteurs... D'après "Les roues de Fortune" où est reproduite une copie de la lettre du vendeur, datant de juin 1960, la carrosserie Ramseier a été commandée par le beau-père du vendeur, à l'époque responsable des montres Omega à Genève (d'où la carrosserie réalisé dans un atelier suisse, à Worblaufen). La lettre adressée par le vendeur à Yves Dalmier précise que "cette voiture est dans un entretien parfait." Yves Dalmier a conservé six ans cet imposant paquebot, parcourant quelque 12 000 km et réalisant quelques travaux permettant à la voiture de continuer à rendre ses services, dont une réfection du moteur. En 1966, suite à un revers de fortune (que l'on découvre dans le second volet de son ouvrage, "Les roues de misère"), Yves Dalmier doit se séparer de sa considérable Isotta-Fraschini et c'est Albert Prost qui en fait l'acquisition. Ainsi, cette voiture née dans les années 1920 n'a connu avec sa carrosserie définitive que trois familles, situation rarissime. Dans les années 1980, Albert Prost confie cette voiture à restaurer aux Ateliers de Restauration de Touraine, à Sorigny. Elle en ressort avec une mécanique remise en état et une carrosserie magnifiquement repeinte de couleur crème, après une hésitation sur la teinte du capot. Il existe à ce propos une anecdote amusante : exposée à Rétromobile, la voiture voit passer un visiteur qui s'exclame : "C'est la voiture faite par mon grand-père." Grâce aux documents du carrossier, l'Isotta a pu confirmer le bienfondé des choix de couleurs. Peu utilisée et régulièrement entretenue, cette voiture extraordinaire se présente encore aujourd'hui en état superbe. Elle est un rare témoin de la démesure des années folles, avant que la crise de 1929 ne mette un coup de frein aux extravagances des constructeurs. Sur cette Isotta-Fraschini, tout est excessif, et pourtant la carrosserie est un modèle d'équilibre qui fait paraître l'ensemble plus modeste que la réalité. On ne connaît pas, en France, d'autre exemplaire de ce modèle de légende. Avec son historique suivi, son faible nombre de propriétaires, sa mécanique et sa deuxième carrosserie d'origine, cette Isotta-Fraschini représente une occasion qui ne risque pas de se représenter avant longtemps. A vous de saisir l'occasion rare qui se présente devant vous, cette Isotta étant certainement la plus belle Isotta de grand tourisme, à la ligne charismatique, à la beauté indéniable d'un chef d'œuvre automobile. "Un capot démentiel, fantastique..." L'ouvrage d'Yves Dalmier, "Les roues de fortune", regorge d'anecdotes sur cette Isotta qu'il a utilisée entre 1960 et 1966. Après le courrier reçu du propriétaire, son premier contact avec la voiture s'est fait par le biais d'une photo. Ses premières réactions méritent d'être retranscrites : "Je reçus la photo dans les mains, comme un verre d'eau sur la bête. Certes, c'était un rêve ! Je voyais, en somme, un gigantesque cabriolet blanc et noir, semblant écraser la route où on l'avait arrêté et qui l'occupait toute. D'extraordinaires ailes bicyclettes, énormes, reliées par un marchepied courbe montant vers l'avant, une calandre de RR et, derrière, deux immenses roues de secours, plus hautes que la malle. Entre l'avant et l'arrière, un capot, uniquement, mais un capot démentiel, fantastique. Écrasé derrière lui, un "logement" d'où sortait un demi-volant. Et, au milieu du monstre, sur le dessus, un pare-brise minuscule, comme un onglet posé sur un pont de navire. Voilà les mots maladroits que me dictent, après plusieurs années, les souvenirs de ce premier contact." (Extrait de "Les roues de fortune, les roues de misère", par Yves Dalmier, illustrations de Jacques Liscourt, Éditions Automobilia, Monaco, 1991) Photos d'archives: Collection famille Prost Merci de noter que ce véhicule est vendu sans contrôle technique. Merci de noter que l'estimation de cette voiture est 1,200,000 - 1,500,000€. Le moteur de cette automobile a probablement fait l'objet d'une évolution à la fin des années 20 chez Isotta Fraschini et correspond aujourd'hui aux spécifications du moteur 8A Super Sport développant 160cv. French title Chassis n° N605 Engine n° 604 - From the Albert Prost collection - Absolutely exceptional - Just three family owners - Continuous, remarkable history - Original engine and second body At the start of the 1920s, no extravagance was too much and the prestige car manufacturers competed to offer the highest level of luxury and indulgence. At Isotta-Fraschini, the Tipo 8A, presented in 1924, followed the first series produced car, the Tipo 8, that had an inline 8-cylinder engine designed by Giustino Cattaneo. Weighing more than 2 tonnes, the Tipo 8A was given a 7.3-litre engine that while not overly powerful (approximately 110 bhp at 2,800 rpm), had an enormous amount of torque, so that it barely needed all three gears. Most of the cars built went to the US where people were crazy about this type of model, and an Isotta was more expensive than a Duesenberg. One of the most famous fans of the Isotta- Fraschini during his Hollywood years was Rudolph Valentino - he shared his nationality with this impressive automobile. A real show-stopper, the Isotta was perfect for cruising down the wide boulevards, or for a long journey on the open roads, lulled by the gentle roar of its special engine. Testimony to a carefree time, cars like the Tipo 8A were condemned to a short production run by the 1929 Crash. Nothing like these cars was seen again. The exceptional Isotta-Fraschini Tipo 8A on offer is known as "l'Isotta du marquis", a name given to it during the period it belonged to the late Yves Dalmier. In his celebrated book "Les roues de fortune", there are several hilarious pages on driving this car, or rather the adventures surrounding it. Dalmier tells us that the car, which was built in 1924, was initially given a " boule " torpedo body, original Isotta model. Some years later this was completely dismantled in the workshop of the Swiss coachbuilder Ramseier, in Worblaufen. According to Dalmier, " the only part of the first body to survive is a hint of the old bonnet, in the form of a Dural part, now useless, attached under the current bonnet." Ramseier created a new cabriolet body and exhibited the car at the Geneva Motor Show in 1932. Totally beautiful, the cabriolet body with steeply sloping running board gave this imposing automobile a lighter feel. Yves Dalmier bought the car in 1960, in rather extraordinary circumstances, even for the period, having placed a small ad asking for " any nice old cars ", or something similar. He was sent a letter, offering him this wonderful Isotta. After various twists and turns in the story, Dalmier finally took possession of the car in exchange for a Salmson S4 that he had bought to attract buyers...According to " Les roues de Fortune ", which has a reproduction of the seller's letter dating from June 1960, the Ramseier coachwork was commissioned by the seller's father-in-law who at that time was responsible for Omega watches in Geneva (the reason why the body had been built in a Swiss workshop, in Worblaufen). The letter addressed to Yves Dalmier noted that " this car is in a perfectly maintained condition ". Dalmier kept this formidable cruise ship for six years, covering some 12,000 km and carrying out work, including an engine re-build, to allow the car to continue providing good service. In 1966, following a reversal in fortunes (recounted in the second volume of his book "Les roues de misère"), Dalmier was forced to part with his substantial Isotta-Fraschini, and it was Albert Prost who bought it. And so, this car that was born in the 1920s, has known just three families with its definitive coachwork. A very rare occurrence. During the 1980s, Albert Prost had the car restored by the Ateliers de Restauration de Touraine, in Sorigny. It emerged with refurbished mechanical components and the magnificent coachwork repainted in cream, after a slight hesitation about the colour of the bonnet. There is an amusing anecdote about this : on display at Retromobile, a visitor passed by the car and exclaimed : " This is the car that my Grandfather built. " . Documents from the coachbuilder confirmed that it had indeed been the right choice of colours. Rarely driven and regularly maintained, this extraordinary car remains in superb condition today. It is a rare testimony to the excesses of the Roaring Twenties, before the Crash of 1929 put a halt to the extravagance. Everything about this Isotta is extravagant, although the perfectly balanced styling of the body makes it appear 'less' than it is. There is no other known example of this legendary model in France. With its continuous history, small number of owners, original engine and second body, this Isotta-Fraschini presents an opportunity that will not come again for a long time. It is for you to seize the exceptional opportunity that has arisen, for this Isotta is undoubtedly the most beautiful Isotta grand tourer, with the charismatic styling and undeniable beauty of an automotive masterpiece. "An insane bonnet, fantastic..." The book by Yves Dalmier, "Les roues de fortune", is full of anecdotes about the Isotta that he had between 1960 and 1966. Following the letter from the owner, the first contact he had with the car was a photo. His initial reactions are worth transcribing : " I took the photo in my hands, like a glass of water in the face. Surely, it was a dream ! In fact what I was looking at was a gigantic black and white cabriolet, appearing to fill every inch of the road it had stopped on. With extraordinary bicycle wings, enormous, connected to a curved running board sloping up to the front, an RR radiator grille and at the back, two huge spare wheels that stood higher than the trunk. Between the front and the back, a bonnet, just a bonnet, but an insane, fantastic bonnet. Squashed behind this was a " compartment " with half a steering wheel showing. And in the middle of this monster, right on the top, a tiny windscreen, like a fingernail stuck on the deck of a ship. These are the inadequate words that, after several years, describe the memories of this first contact. " (Extract from "Les roues de fortune, les roues de misère", by Yves Dalmier, illustrations by Jacques Liscourt, Éditions Automobilia, Monaco, 1991) Archives pictures : Prost Family collection Please note that this car will be sold without technical inspection. The engine of the car was probably upgraded at the end of the 1920s by Isotta Fraschini and corresponds to the specifications of the 8A Super Sport engine producing 160bhp. Estimation 1 200 000 - 1 500 000 € Sold for 1,256,000 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-07
Hammer price
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1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L 'Lusso' Berlinetta by Scaglietti

250 bhp, 2,953 cc single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. The 275th of 350 examples produced Matching-numbers, low mileage example Extensive concours-quality restoration completed in June 2013 Documented by marque historian Marcel Massini Last of the celebrated 250 GT models By 1962, Ferrari’s 250 GT platform had been in production for seven years, making the model Maranello’s most substantial effort yet towards regular series production. Over the course of roughly a dozen different body styles and two different wheelbase lengths, the 250 GT was gradually refined, encompassing racing berlinettas, civilized coupes and cabriolets, and dual-purpose spiders. One final great model remained in the 250 GT’s repertoire, however, and that encore of automotive genius was introduced at the Paris Motor Show in the autumn of 1962. Dubbed the 250 GT/L, the “L” denoting Lusso (or luxury), the final iteration of the vaunted 250 GT was positioned as a pure luxury grand tourer, with distinctively elegant coachwork designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti. Crafted from steel with an aluminum hood and doors, the Lusso’s body was a study in sports car perfection, and it remains one of the most celebrated automotive designs of all time. Gently curved, bulbous fenders gave way to a sleek, fastback Kamm tail, complemented by a generously glassed canopy and delicate, minimal brightwork. Mechanically, the GT/L rode the 2,400-millimeter wheelbase chassis of its immediate predecessors, and it was powered by the same 2,953-cubic centimeter short-block V-12 that was designed by famed Ferrari engineer Gioacchino Colombo. This would be the last Ferrari V-12 road car to feature the 250-cubic centimeter-sized cylinder, as displacement would increase to 275 cubic centimeters for the next development of road cars. Despite featuring essentially the same powerplant as its direct 250 GT forebears, the Lusso offered significant chassis upgrades, most significantly including quite a bit of know-how gained from the SWB and GTO competition cars. These improvements principally consisted of the use of concentric springs around the telescopic shock absorbers and a Watts linkage to laterally stabilize the rear axle; both of these features were developed on the legendary race-winning GTO. The interior of the Lusso was as luxurious as the name implied, with leather-upholstered door panels and bucket seats and a completely unique dashboard arrangement that has never been offered on any other Ferrari. The console featured a large-dial tachometer and speedometer in the central position and angled towards the driver, with five smaller gauges in the traditional instrument panel location. Concluding production in late 1964, the 250 GT/L was built in a modest quantity of just 350 examples, and the model has grown to become one of the most prized vintage Ferraris ever constructed. As the ultimate luxurious version of the seminal 250 GT, the Lusso represented a zenith for the platform, and it now routinely enjoys the focus of the world’s most discriminating Ferrari judges and collectors. This sensational 250 GT/L is the 275th example of 350 cars built, with its chassis entering Scaglietti’s plant for coachwork during February 1964. Completed in April, the Ferrari was distributed to an unidentified owner, and much of the car’s early history currently remains unknown. In the early 1980s, Ferrari Owners Club USA membership directories indicated that chassis number 5537GT was owned by Carl Walston, a foreign currency exchange and precious metals dealer residing in the Portola Valley in California. The Lusso is believed to have remained with Mr. Walston for over 20 years, as it was still reportedly in his possession in 2004, when he was living in Greenwich, Connecticut. Offered by a Florida-based collector in 2009 as a “superbly restored” example, the car was more recently spotted by the consignor, a connoisseur of 1960s vintage Ferraris who resides in the Los Angeles area. After an inspection confirmed that the brakes and suspension were in fine order, a new, correct exhaust system had been recently installed, and the motor still pulled strongly, the consignor acquired the car with thoughts of cosmetically improving the restoration to a level of authenticity worthy of FCA judging. For this task, the consignor commissioned Rex Nguyen, the lead restorer at Exclusive Motorcars, in Los Angeles, whose platinum-level Ferrari restorations have received some of the FCA’s highest accolades. Mr. Nguyen stripped the body to bare metal and then applied a fine paint finish in the classic Ferrari shade of Blu Sera. A new beige interior with astoundingly authentic leather was sourced from HVL, of Holland, one of the world’s foremost experts in the manufacture of vintage Ferrari upholstery. Mr. Nguyen correctly re-plated all of the mechanical components to original factory standards, including proper cad-plating and wrinkle finishes, while all of the brightwork was properly re-chromed, providing a beautiful complement to the correct Borrani wire wheels. Cosmetic considerations were, of course, paramount to the mechanical elements, which were properly refitted with either new or NOS hoses and clamps, all with factory-correct decals and stickers, and the engine compartment and undercarriage were similarly refinished with meticulous detail. Completed in late June 2013, Mr. Nguyen’s exacting work has left 5537GT in breathtaking condition, worthy of FCA corrals or finer national concours d’elegance and events. Invoices of his work are included in the car’s documentation. This 250 GT/L currently displays less than 44,000 miles, which are believed to be original, and it is reported by the consignor to run very strongly. It is a breathtaking, matching-numbers example of one of the most fabulous sports cars ever to roll off Maranello’s production line; it is a grand touring model by which most others are measured. Promising concours acclaim with its inimitable panache and factory-correct presentation, this finely restored Lusso would make a strong addition to the most accomplished Ferrari collections, and it will doubtlessly attract the interest of tifosi everywhere. Chassis no. 5537GT Engine no. 5537GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
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Photo copyright for main shots: Fotostudio Zumbrunn

Photo copyright for main shots: Fotostudio Zumbrunn Photo credit for detail shots: Tony Baker/Classic & Sports Car The 1995 Pebble Beach Best of Show Winner 1931 ISOTTA FRASCHINI TIPO 8B VIGGO JENSEN CABRIOLET d'ORSAY COACHWORK BY DANSK KAROSSERI-FABRIK Chassis No. 869 (1720) See text Engine No. 821 (see text) Maroon with maroon leather to front, ostrich skin upholstery in the passenger compartment and maroon soft top Engine: L-head, straight eight cylinders, 7,370cc, 160bhp at 3,000rpm; Gearbox: three-speed manual; Suspension: semi-elliptic leaf springs front and rear; Brakes: four-wheel servo-operated mechanical, foot and hand brakes operating on all wheels. Right hand drive. If Alfa Romeo was the greatest Italian sports car in the 1930s, then the Isotta-Fraschini was its luxury counterpart. This was the true thoroughbred of Italian motor cars in its day. Established as an automaker in 1902 by Cesare Isotta and the brothers Fraschini (Oreste, Vincenzo and Antonio), from around 1920 to the early 1930s Isottas were more popular in the United States than any other foreign marque except for Rolls-Royce. One of the world's most innovative automakers, IF introduced four wheel brakes in 1909, and the Tipo 8 series, unveiled in August 1912, featured an in-line eight cylinder engine, the first of its type put into series production anywhere in the world. The Tipo 8A series, introduced in 1924, offered 115hp, a redesigned frame and suspension and Isotta's highly regarded three-speed synchromesh transmission. In America, where nearly a third of Isottas were sold, the price of an 8A exceeded even that of a Model J Duesenberg; a chassis alone was priced at $9,750, and coachbuilt models were demanding upwards of $20,000. Isottas were owned by the likes of King Faisal, the Queen of Romania, the Agha Khan, Pope Pius XI and William Randolph Hearst among others. The 8A models are often seen with a hooded cobra radiator ornament inspired by a similar mascot fitted to the hood of film star Rudolph Valentino's Isotta-Fraschini 8A Coupe de Ville. The original was given to the actor by friends Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. when Valentino completed the 1925 Paramount film, Cobra. There were other movie connections too; in Sunset Boulevard, Gloria Swanson was driven around by Erich von Stronheim, and in the 1956 epic film Giant, James Dean playing Jet Rink drove an Isotta. The Isotta Fraschini Tipo 8A had the most powerful production straight eight engine when it was introduced in the mid-1920s. Most models were mounted on a very long 145" wheelbase chassis. There was an original guarantee that these cars would do 90mph, with the capability of running at both 90mph and 2½ mph in the same gear. About 950 Tipo 8As were built during the 1925-1931 model run. By 1931 the company was struggling as the Great Depression in the USA had severely affected sales of expensive vehicles. Thus, in order to boost sales, the company introduced a new model, the Tipo 8B. The changes were not dramatic and largely involved engine and chassis/suspension improvements. The engine refinements included a heavier crankshaft, larger valves, lighter valve gear, H section connecting rods, double separate exhaust manifolds and twin Zenith carburetors that resulted in raising the horsepower to some 160bhp at 3,000 rpm. A new stronger chassis frame was utilized and this came with additional cross members for greater rigidity. At the same time softer elliptic springs and double-acting hydraulic shock absorbers were employed. Smaller wheels were fitted using larger tires (20 x 7in) and the radiator was made deeper and the shell now carried shutters. It is believed that only around 28 Tipo 8Bs were ever built. The company was nearly saved by Henry Ford who was anxious to produce Isottas in Detroit and have his cars built in Italy, but the Italian government blocked this deal. Instead in 1932 the aircraft maker Count Caproni di Talideo, who considered the aero engines as indispensable for his own business, acquired the company. Car production virtually ceased that year and apart from a brief attempt at a rear engined V8 vehicle in the post-war period, Isotta Fraschini disappeared from car manufacture. This particular car has an intriguing history and according to the past President of the IF club in Italy, Nunzio Ferrari, this rare 8B model was probably built in January 1931. Owing to the precarious state of the company some creative chassis and engine numbering occurred in order to avoid customs duties and to provide the sales manager with an added bonus! As built, this 8B should have been numbered 1720 for both engine and chassis. Its retail price would have been 125,000 Italian Lire. However, as the price of an 8A was some 75,000 lire, the sales manager sold the car to the Swedish importer/concessionaire at the 8A price and he had the car plated as an 8A and the engine stamped as an 8A using the following numbers: Chassis No. 869 and Engine No. 821. The importer in Sweden pre-sold the car new to Denmark and charged the full 125,000 lire price and split the difference with the sales manager. The export papers had to show an 8A chassis at the 75,000 lire price. It was assumed correctly that customs officials would not have known the difference between an 8A or 8B. The Swedish importer's client was the Danish Consul General Mr. Carl Glad and he chose the relatively unknown coachbuilders Dansk-Karosseri-Fabrik of Copenhagen to build the bodywork to a design by Viggo Jensen. Initially a closed Coupe de Ville was constructed, although no pictures of this car have survived. In about 1933 the car was either re-bodied or considerably modified to a full cabriolet when he gave it a folding top over the passenger's (rear) compartment. In the late 1930s the fenders were modified by the addition of skirts. This stunning car was painted pale beige and was used extensively by Mr. Glad for his professional and diplomatic needs, parades, processions and other official ceremonies. The Isotta was also used on many long distance trips including one taken by the diplomat's son, Robert, to the Arctic Circle in 1939. The car returned the day before war broke out. In addition, the car became well known within the Scandinavian Territories and was used for ceremonial parades by King Christian X. The Glad family retained the Isotta until the late 1960s when they sold it to some close family friends and neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Erik Orth. They participated in a few antique car shows in Denmark during the 70s. After that the car was displayed in a Copenhagen museum which then closed, and the car disappeared into storage. In 1986 it was rediscovered in a lamentable condition in the back of a garage and was sold by the daughter of Erik Orth. It was brought shortly after to the Hershey Autojumble where it was spotted and immediately purchased by the current owners. After carrying out some research on the history of this vehicle, which in reality had just had two owners from new, and realizing it was a unique and highly imposing car, the decision was made to fully restore the car beginning in 1991. This exhaustive and meticulous restoration, documented by photographs, took nearly five years to complete and the entire vehicle was disassembled down to the last nut and bolt and rebuilt. New front fenders were made as the original ones had been modified and made to look much heavier. No expense was spared for the restoration and when the owner decided he wanted a full set of Grebel headlights to match the driver's spotlight (many Isottas had Grebel lights from new), a set was acquired at a cost of $25,000! When the interior was stripped out a piece of leather was found hidden under the rear seat and his upholsterer identified it as ostrich. Naturally the owner wanted to restore the car to its former glory and therefore the passenger compartment was finished using ostrich skin. Matching this splendid upholstery is beautiful inlaid birdseye maple and mahogany woodwork, art deco grab handles and cut glass decanters and glasses in the rear drinks cabinet. The attention to detail is quite exquisite down to making, from original drawings, a beautiful rear license plate holder. The unusual front bumper is made from solid brass and, like all the brightwork on the car, is finished in polished nickel. Rich maroon paintwork was chosen and complements the coachwork and fixtures and fittings in a remarkable fashion. Proportionally the Isotta Fraschini is a visual delight from the beautiful radiator and mascot through the long hood to the very low and raked front and rear windshields, sweeping fenders, side mounted spare wheels, wooden running boards and tool trays, monogrammed wheel spinners, neat rear roof line with landau irons and a rear mounted trunk. This stunning restoration was duly rewarded at the 1995 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance when the just completed Isotta Fraschini was given top honors, winning the coveted Best of Show award against stiff competition. The following year the car traveled to Europe and was variously shown or displayed at a number of prestigious events including Retromobile in Paris, Techno Classica Essen in Germany, the Louis Vuitton Classic at The Hurlingham Club in London (where it took the Best in Show award), the Cartier Style et Luxe at Goodwood and the Concours Automobiles Classiques et Louis Vuitton au Parc de Bagatelle in Paris (where it won the Prix Automobiles Classiques). More recently the car was again seen at the 2000 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. This fabulous Isotta Fraschini is still in concours condition and has only been driven some 100 miles since the restoration was completed. The current belief is that there are only three Tipo 8B models left anywhere in the world and this car would be a prized edition to any world class car collection.

  • USAUSA
  • 2002-05-18
Hammer price
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THE EX-ASCARI, SCUDERIA FERRARI 1952 CARRERA PAN AMERICANA

THE EX-ASCARI, SCUDERIA FERRARI 1952 CARRERA PAN AMERICANA FERRARI 340 MEXICO BERLINETTA COACHWORK BY VIGNALE Chassis No. 0226 AT Rosso Corsa Carrera livery with tan cloth interior Engine: V12, single overhead camshaft per bank, 4,101.66cc, 280bhp at 6,500rpm; Gearbox: five speed manual; Brakes: four wheel hydraulic drum; Suspension; front, independent with transverse leaf springs, rear semi-elliptic leaf springs. Right hand drive. To this day, few vehicles entice more excitement and passion than Ferrari's mid-50's, big engined Sports Racers. Developed during a period of triumph and passion, they personify every aspect of Ferrari's road racing legend. While development of Columbo's original small block V12 continued in a variety of various displacements, significant horsepower gains stagnated in early 1952. In 1953, the adaptation of the all-new Lampredi 4.1 liter Grand Prix derived 'big block' engines took Ferrari in a completely new direction. As every American 'hot rodder' knows, "there is no substitute for cubic inches." Not simply a further development of the early 166 and 250, the new 340 shared only its earlier sibling's namesake. The engine design itself had already proven successful in Grand Prix competition over the previous three years. At the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa in June 1950, a 3.3 liter Lampredi was fitted to an existing 125F1 chassis. Quick development and rapid success saw a bore and stroke increase, resulting in a total displacement of 4.1 liters. In 1952, the final year of the '1.5 liter supercharged 4.5 liter naturally aspirated' Grand Prix Formula, Ferrari monopostos dominated nearly every race entered. Although sufficiently developed and a proven winner, the 1953 season saw a completely new application of the Lampredi 'big blocks'. By combining the 4.1 (and the later 4.5 liter engines) to an all new 'Sports Racing' chassis, Ferrari moved in a completely new direction for the first time since the inception of his company just eight years earlier. Ferrari built only thirty five 340's in various guises, each one differing in some way from the next, as was the fashion of the day with these expensive, hand-built machines. The 340 America in GT guise provided several important race results for Ferrari, notable amongst them the victory by Luigi Villoresi in chassis 0082A in the 1951 Mille Miglia and the Coppa Inter Europa at Monza. Later on, in 1953, Mike Hawthorn won the Daily Express Trophy at Silverstone and Villoresi, partnered by Cassani, won the Tour of Sicily, both in 340 MM's. Ascari and Farina took another 340 and won the Nrburgring 1000 kilometre race in the same year. During 1951, the 340 America was developed as a racing sports car and with it, Ferrari beat the previously victorious Jaguar XK120's and Cadillac powered Allards which had been doing most of the winning in American Sports car events. In the hands of drivers such as Carroll Shelby, Bill Spear, John Fitch and Ernie McAfee, these Ferraris proved to have the torque necessary to beat the American engined Allards which had previously ruled the track. A very small run of Tipo 342 cars were built for the road and they featured stronger, four-speed gearboxes and re-enforced rear axles. Using the 340 America as a base, Ferrari produced the 340 Mexico with which to compete in the 1952 'Carrera Pan Americana', a race held at the end of the season using the new road which linked the south of Mexico with America. This race was run over some five stages and covered over 2,000 miles, the distance of two Mille Miglias. In 1951, Ferrari 212 'Sedans' had won the first Carrera, placing first and second respectively, Taruffi/Chinetti, (0171 EL), and Ascari/Villoresi, (0161 EL). They had averaged over 88mph using their fifth gear 'overdrive' to motor away at 130 mph from the opposing American 'stock' sedans. Taking the 340 America, Ferrari's engineers developed it further to produce a claimed 280bhp. A higher compression ratio of 8.5:1 and a different camshaft profile were the main modifications to effect this increase in power. This engine was then placed into the new chassis, called 'American Tubolare', hence the designation: 'AT'. This chassis was made up of smaller tubing than normal for lightness and a superstructure was built onto it which incorporated the windshield pillars and which, presumably, braced the whole structure. Sadly, Ferrari rejected the possibility of using the current 'road' specification 342 four-speed gearbox and rear axle in favor of employing the lighter 212-type running gear. The capacity of this transmission to absorb the extra torque of the 4.1 liters was however marginal. Luigi Chinetti noted later that he was not able to use the power that the engine was capable of, as severe vibration in the race limited him to using only 5,600rpm. To clothe this 340 Mexico, Ferrari turned to Carozzeria Vignale. Giovanni Michelotti, their chief designer, drew a most impressive shape which was, and still is, something that makes people look twice whenever and wherever the car is seen. Featuring an impossibly long tapering hood, equal in length to the cabin and trunk combined, this Berlinetta featured front fenders which reached forward, protruding into the airstream ahead of the ovoid radiator air intake. The headlights nestled in between these fenders and the intake. At the rear, the Berlinetta featured a sharply sloping 'fastback' design with small fins on top of the rear fenders. At the sides, the 340 Mexico had slots in front of the rear wheels to cool the rear drum brakes with a spoiler mounted on each door, presumably to help channel air into these cooling slots. Three Berlinettas, 0222 AT, 0224 AT,and 0226 AT were entered in the Carrera Pan Americana, as was a single 340 AT Spyder 0028 AT, but this car did not start the race. The building of these cars, incidentally, was financed by Luigi Chinetti in New York as the wealthy Texan, Allen Guiberson, had promised to buy two of the cars from him. Albert Ascari, the Grand Prix World Champion, and Giuseppi Scotuzzi, one of the Scuderia Ferrari's mechanics, shared 0226 AT in the Carrera Pan Americana of 1953. The cars were entered under the auspices of the Gustalla Racing Team from Milan, Ferrari's Rome dealership, but it is almost certain that this was a thinly-disguised Works factory team effort. 0224 AT was to be driven by Luigi Chinetti and Jean Lucas, 0222 AT was driven by Luigi Villoresi, (winner of the 1951 Mille Miglia in a 340 MM) and Franco Cornacchia who was an enthusiastic racer, having driven at the Le Mans 24-Hours plus numerous other international races. For Ascari and Scotuzzi, the race was an anti-climax. They were out on the first stage after just 92 miles, Ascari rolling the big coupe. Luckily neither occupant was hurt. The best result of a 340 Mexico was that of Chinetti and Lucas who finished in third place behind the two victorious Mercedes 300 SL's, despite having averaged 128mph over the 231 mile final stage to Cuidad Juarez. After the race, 0226 AT was returned to the factory where the crash damage was repaired. As previously mentioned, Allen Guiberson bought 0226 AT and, after using it for only a short time, he sold the car. Carroll Shelby and Ernie McAfee drove it to a second place at Offutt Air Force Base and the 340 then retired from an event in Sowega. In the late 1950's, after passing through the hands of a succession of owners, 0226 AT was sold to Larry Nicklin, a General Motors stylist. Mr. Nicklin owned the car for some ten years before selling it to Bill Marriott. After a complete nut and bolt restoration, the Berlinetta was awarded the 'Best of Show' Trophy at the Ferrari Club of America's national meet at Elkhart Lake in 1988. In more recent times, the 340 Mexico has enjoyed a prominent place in an important European collection of sports and racing cars. Ferrari 340 Mexicos are rare, just four having been made. 0226 AT is arguably the finest of the four with the distinction of having been raced by a World Champion. Emblematic of the 'Golden Era', this is one of the greatest big block Ferraris. This important Ferrari is eligible for all the significant historic and road race events.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-08-29
Hammer price
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1968 Bizzarrini 5300 GT Strada

1968 Bizzarrini 5300 GT Strada Carte grise française Châssis n° : 1A30301 - Rare Bizzarrini au passé 100% français - Voiture à l'historique connu - Propriété d'un passionné de la marque depuis 45 ans - Authenticité indiscutable - Même propriétaire depuis 1970 Giotto Bizzarrini, transfuge de Ferrari, dont il a été un des plus brillants ingénieurs fait ensuite partie de l'éphémère aventure ATS en Formule 1, puis il fonde Autostar, entreprise d'étude et de construction de moteurs, qui se charge notamment de concevoir le premier V12 Lamborghini, qui équipera la 350 GT. Il s'associe ensuite avec Renzo Rivolta, pour rapidement concevoir l'ISO A3C, genèse de la future Bizzarrini 5300 GT. Un châssis digne des meilleures Grand Tourisme de l'époque, un moteur V8 d'origine américaine (Chevrolet Corvette) en position centrale avant, tous les ingrédients sont donc réunis pour en faire un engin redoutable aussi efficace que beau à regarder. Cette voiture a été vendue neuve en mai 1968 en France à M. Jalut, distributeur de flippers, billards et juke-boxes qui, charmé par la ligne de la Bizzarrini, a alors décidé de se séparer de sa Maserati. La voiture porte encore l'immatriculation (provisoire) 306 W 02, que l'on retrouve sur les photos prises lors du Concours d'Élégance du Touquet, où la voiture est présentée deux mois après son achat. Elle est finalement immatriculée 1 NK 02 le 14 août 1968 et il est amusant de noter que la préfecture de l'époque ne devait pas souvent immatriculer ce type de bolide car trois erreurs de frappe ont été commises à l'époque : un seul "z" et un seul "r", Bizarini au lieu de Bizzarrini, et " Srada " (sans le "t") en guise de modèle. Elle est revendue au bout d'un an à la Société Inter Franco Suisse, immatriculée à Paris 9930 VP 75, puis est achetée via la Société Sport Service Roger Loyer par un M. Pages de Saint-Cloud qui ne la garde que quelques mois pour être finalement acquise en mai 1970 toujours auprès de Roger Loyer par le propriétaire actuel, un jeune enthousiaste parisien de la marque, âgé alors de 28 ans. Elle est immatriculée 2062 WL 75, immatriculation qu'elle conserve encore aujourd'hui. Elle avait alors parcouru environ 25 000 kilomètres. Son compteur en affiche maintenant 109 905. Peu de collectionneurs peuvent dire qu'ils ont parcouru prés de 85 000 km en Bizzarrini et pendant cette longue période, la voiture mène une vie agréable, faite de fréquents voyages en Italie. Bien que son propriétaire nous ait confié qu'il s'était fait quelques frayeurs avec l'auto, il n'a jamais connu d'ennuis. Profitant de ses nombreux séjours en Italie, il la fait entretenir chez Diomante, avec lequel se noueront des relations amicales dès cette époque. C'est le même établissement qui se chargera de sa restauration en 1991, qui porte sur la peinture, l'électricité et les moquettes. Des photos et les factures sont disponibles, au même titre que le dossier d'entretien. Elle est équipée de son moteur d'origine. L'intérieur est magnifiquement préservé et présente une superbe sellerie en cuir, d'origine également. Détail sympathique, elle est équipée d'un " musicassette ". Elle est chaussée de pneus Michelin XWX qui sont neufs. Au début des années 1970 son passionné de propriétaire décide de faire la connaissance de Giotto Bizzarrini, le fondateur de la marque, ce qui lui impose de faire quelques recherches. Son enquête le mène à Livourne chez Catarsi, un constructeur de bateaux qui était un ami du constructeur automobile. Ce dernier va lui fournir les coordonnées des parents de Giotto. Lesdits parents vont donc recevoir notre collectionneur, bien évidemment au volant de la 5300 GT, et Madame Bizzarrini mère va le mettre en relation son fils. S'ensuivra une relation d'amitié entre le constructeur et le propriétaire de la voiture qui se perpétue encore aujourd'hui. French title Chassis n° : 1A30301 - Rare Bizzarrini with 100% French past - Car with known history - Property of a marque enthusiast for the last 45 years - Indisputable authenticity - Same owner since 1970 Giotto Bizzarrini, the defector from Ferrari, where he had been one of the most outstanding engineers, became involved in the short-lived ATS adventure in Formula 1, before setting up the engineering firm Autostar. The company was notably responsible for designing the first V12 Lamborghini engine that was used in the 350 GT. Bizzarrini went on to collaborate with Renzo Rivolta in designing the ISO A3C, the origin of the future Bizzarrini 5300 GT. A chassis worthy of the best GT cars of the day, and an American (Chevrolet Corvette) V8 front-positioned engine were the ingredients that came together to produce a formidable machine as efficient as it was stunning to look at. This car was sold new in May 1968 in France to Mr. Jalut, who sold pinball machines, pool tables and jukeboxes. He loved the design of the Bizzarrini, and so decided to part with his Maserati. The car still carries the registration 306 W 02 (provisional), that can be seen in photos taken at the Concours d'Élégance in Le Touquet, where the car was shown two months after he bought it. It was finally registered 1 NK 02 on 14 August 1968 and it is amusing to note that the authorities at that time were obviously not used to registering this type of car, as there were three typing errors : only one "z" and one "r", Bizarini instead of Bizzarrini, and " Srada " (missing the "t"), for the model. The car was sold a year later to the company Inter Franco Suisse, registered in Paris 9930 VP 75, and later sold through Société Sport Service Roger Loyer to a Mr. Pages from Saint-Cloud. He only kept the car a few months before finally being sold in May 1970, again through Roger Loyer, to a young marque enthusiast from Paris, then aged 28 years. It was registered 2062 WL 75 and retains this number today. At that time, it had covered approximately 25,000 km. Today the odometer reads 109,905. There are few collectors who can say they have covered close to 85,000 km in a Bizzarrini and during this time, the car enjoyed an agreeable life, making frequent trips to Italy. Although the owner has confided to us that he has managed to scare himself a few times in the car, he has never had any trouble with it. Taking advantage of these trips to Italy, he had the car maintained by Diomante, with whom he developed a good relationship. This was the same business that was responsible for restoring the car in 1991, a project that included new paintwork, wiring and carpets. A file including photos and invoices is available. The car is fitted with its original engine. The interior is magnificently preserved and the original leather displays a superb patina. An amusing detail, it is equipped with a " musicassette ". The Michelin XWX tyres are new. At the start of the 1970s, the car's passionate owner decided to make the acquaintance of Giotto Bizzarrini, the marque founder, which required him to carry out some research. His investigation led him to Livorno and a boat builder called Catarsi who was a friend of the automobile manufacturer. Catarsi gave him the details for Giotto's parents, who welcomed the Frenchman, naturally with his 5300 GT too, and Mrs Bizzarrini senior put him in touch with her son and this was the start of a friendly relationship between the carmaker and the owner of this car that continues to this day. Estimation 550 000 - 650 000 € Sold for 1,244,400 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-06
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1953 Fiat 8V Supersonic by Ghia

115 bhp, 1,996 cc OHV V-8 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, four-wheel coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel Alfin hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Believed to be the 1954 Geneva Motor Show car Originally delivered to American powerboat racer Lou Fageol Five owners since new; former ownership for four decades Spectacular and highly authentic restoration to original condition One of the very finest of only 15 8V Supersonics built “THE BIGGEST SURPRISE OF THE YEAR” Fiat’s most legendary, significant, and storied production model, the 8V was aptly described by Road & Track in 1952 as being “the biggest surprise of the year.” Although the company traces its roots to 1899 and built competition cars both massive and magnificent in the early twentieth century, after WWII the company was known largely for its mass-produced automobiles for the common man, vehicles like the tiny “Topolino” that had put a nation on wheels and become among the most popular in Europe. Therefore, it came as a shock to the automotive world when FIAT suddenly introduced a powerful sports car with an advanced overhead-valve light alloy V-8 engine, Siata-fabricated chassis, and four-wheel independent suspension, which could be and was successfully raced by privateers all over the world. Like most sophisticated chassis of the time, the 8V lent itself handsomely to custom coachwork, which Fiat encouraged. Carrozzeria Ghia of Torino accounted for approximately 30 to 40 of the 114 8V chassis built, of which the most striking were the 15 bodied to Giovanni Savonuzzi’s stunning Jet Age design, known, simply and appropriately, as the Supersonic. The Supersonic design had originally been proposed for an Alfa Romeo racing car, which Savonuzzi gave a steeply raked, long windshield; a curved nose that formed a straight-through beltline, ending at small tailfins flaring off lights intended to resemble jet afterburners; and a low, glassy greenhouse. Similar styling on an 8V chassis was subsequently ordered by American designer Paul Farago, and 14 more copies followed, all of which had detail differences but remained largely true to Savonuzzi’s original and dramatic design. They are considered the most sought-after and desirable 8Vs, as they boast the best combination of avant garde design from the Jet Age. THE SPEED KING: LOU FAGEOL’S 8V SUPERSONIC According to Tony Adriaensens’ definitive 2005 book on the 8V, chassis number 000049 with engine number 000085 was released from the Fiat factory on Wednesday, 14 July 1953, and received the tenth Supersonic body built (stamped on the body as “810”). According to previous owner Gerald Farber, the car is believed to have been that shown at the 1954 Geneva International Motor Show. It was actually exported to the United States by Chrysler chairman K.T. Keller, amusing for a man who famously dictated that the roof height of his products had to accommodate a gentleman’s hat. For all his conservatism, however, Keller also encouraged his stylists to collaborate with Ghia, spawning numerous collaborations. So, his bringing the 8V to the United States may well have been in that spirit. He subsequently arranged the sale of the 8V to its original owner, Lou “The Speed King” Fageol, a three-time Gold Cup-winning powerboat racer, as well as one of the brothers whose Twin Coach bus company built several interesting twin-engined racing cars. Mr. Fageol exhibited his staggeringly futuristic new toy at the 7th Annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, then just a sports car show on the Monterey Peninsula, where the Supersonic was shown in Class D, “European Sports Cars over $10,000.” He then customized the car, including riveting Imperial-style fins on the rear fenders and adding a “continental kit” – both, fortunately, made as “add-ons,” with no cutting of original metal, and both reversed by Mr. Fageol’s son following his father’s passing in 1961. The Fageol family sold the 8V in 1968 to Ed Hieshetter, who passed the car in 1976 to none other than Paul Lazaros, the former employee of Paul Farago and a well-known 8V enthusiast. In 1979, Mr. Lazaros sold the ex-Fageol 8V Supersonic to Mr. Farber, who put it into proper storage while planning to restore it back to its original condition. Content to take his time and ensure that the work was done properly, he scrupulously researched the car, assembling a book of period photography and documentation that remains with it today. He was also able to locate the original engine, number 000085, replaced earlier in the car’s history with a Chevrolet engine, and reunited it with his correct chassis. Mr. Farber finally began the long-awaited and well-researched restoration effort in March of 2007, aided by the extensive knowledge of Mr. Lazaros, who allowed his personal car, the unrestored original 8V Supersonic commissioned by Paul Farago, to be studied extensively as a basis. The tail lamps and wheel discs missing from the Farber car were precisely remanufactured using those of the Farago-Lazaros car as patterns. Lazaros Engineering itself handled the majority of the mechanical restoration of the car, including rebuilding the transmission, suspension, and drivetrain, as well as the dashboard switches. Dick Nuss’s Engine Machine Service of Englewood, California, a shop respected for its 8V expertise, rebuilt and upgraded the original Tipo 104 engine, so that the famously fragile engine would last well into the future, with upgraded rods, pistons, bearings, and valve springs. The body’s dents and dings were smoothed by Scutchfield Metal Shaping of Ray, Michigan, and properly refinished in the car’s unusual, gorgeous original green hue by Brian Joseph’s Classic & Exotic Service, a renowned shop whose upholsterer, Ken Litchfield, contributed leather interior paneling, the proper wool headliner, and Wilton wool carpeting. The seats were properly reupholstered in correct Italian doeskin leather, while the original Borrani wire wheels were restored by Dayton Wire Wheels. Orin Smith acquired the now-pristine 8V at the completion of its eight-year restoration effort and wasted no time in bringing the stunning beauty to the show field. It received the People’s Choice Award here at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2016 and was judged Most Unique at Classic Sports Sunday at Mar-a-Lago the same year. Consistently well maintained in his private museum when not on the show field, it remains spectacular, fresh, and ready for continued appearances at further national and international concours d’elegance, where it will undoubtedly be warmly welcomed by judges and spectators alike. Alternatively, it is ready for participation in the Mille Miglia Storica, Colorado Grand, or any number of other historic rallies for which such a significant automobile is always eligible. Then as now, the Supersonic is a showstopper. No other car can come close – even when it’s at rest! Addendum Please note that the Elegance at Hershey has kindly extended an invitation for this car to attend their event on June 9-11, 2017. Please refer to an RM Sotheby's representative for additional information. Chassis no. 106 000049 Engine no. 104.000 000085 Body no. 810

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
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1965 Shelby 427 Cobra "CSX 3178"

385 bhp, 428 cu. in. V-8 engine with dual four-barrel carburetors, three-speed Ford C-6 automatic transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length upper and lower wishbones, coil springs, and telescopic dampers; independent rear suspension with unequal-length upper and lower wishbones with additional lower trailing links, coil springs, and telescopic dampers; and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. Carroll Shelby’s personal 427 Cobra The big block sister car that shared the stable with CSX 2000 Offered from the Carroll Shelby Foundation Fitted with an automatic transmission for regular use by Shelby himself When the 289 Cobra was first tested by Road & Track, it posted a blistering 0–60 time of only 4.2 seconds – a staggering achievement for a car in that period and the most extraordinary combination of take-no-prisoners Anglo-American sports car performance. Uncompromising and fiercely aggressive on the racetrack, Shelby’s Cobra was an instant icon. Racing success built on racing success with the Daytona Coupes winning at Le Mans and the roadsters taking home both the 1965 and 1966 USRCC Championships. This was the all-conquering caldron into which the mighty 427 was born – a big block monster of almost otherworldly horsepower that moved the needle to a point never thought possible. The development of such a car is entirely fascinating. A small block chassis was at first used with an aluminum 390 V-8, which was quickly upgraded to an iron 427 after the Ford NASCAR gentlemen got wind of the project. Debuting at Sebring in 1964 and driven by Ken Miles, early handling challenges clearly needed addressing, but the power delivery and tremendous performance potential was unmistakable. As such, the 427 Cobra was born, but not after a substantial amount of engineering work, which included a new chassis with four-inch tube frame and seven-inch wider body with larger fender flares. A highly sophisticated coil-over suspension was crafted by Ford engineers using the same computer as on the GT40, all sitting on the same 90-inch wheelbase. Termed the 427 Cobra in a staff meeting on 7 April 1965, many of the cars began life with 428 engines, but regardless of the power plant, production continued through March 1967. It goes without saying that the new Cobra’s performance was mind-bending. In a road test with Sports Car Graphic a few years prior to the 427 Cobra’s release, Aston Martin had claimed that its DB4 was capable of accelerating from 0–100 mph and back down to zero in less than 30 seconds. Ken Miles had the idea to restage the test using the new 427 Cobra. It would handily beat the DB4 in 13.2 seconds! CSX 3178 As per the Shelby American World Registry, CSX 3178 was shipped to Shelby American in Los Angeles in Grey Primer with a black interior and a 428-cubic inch V-8 in late 1965. The work order for the car was opened on 7 January, after the new year, and closed two months later before the car was billed to Horn-Williams Ford in Texas. In fact, however, the only known owner of the car is Carroll Shelby, in whose care it remained his entire life. Originally fitted with an automatic transmission, he enjoyed the car quite regularly, undoubtedly driving it with spirit and with the talent and speed one might expect from a former Le Mans 24-hour winner! By 1972, Shelby commissioned a restoration from highly respected Cobra expert Mike McCluskey and, at that time, the car was finished in Guardsman Blue with a gold stripe around the nose. Upon Shelby’s direction, McCluskey also installed the custom rollbar, which the car still carries today. According to Gary Patterson, Vice President at Shelby, a more recent restoration was carried out in house by none other than the Shelby team in the early 2000s. Shelby Production Supervisor at the time Tom Di’Antonio, since retired, spearheaded the project, during which the car was assembled with a single four-barrel carburetor as opposed to the dual four-barrels previously on the car. The aim of the project was to retain as much of the original equipment as possible and simply freshen the car’s presentation with considerable engine work, rebuilding of the transmission, reupholstering the interior, and refinishing the car in bright red. Carroll Shelby enjoyed the rollbar, so this was left in place and the car retained those iconic Kelsey-Hayes Sunburst-style wheels. After completion of the restoration, the car was put on display at Shelby’s headquarters, primarily in Las Vegas, where it has been maintained by expert Shelby staff ever since. Not a car for the faint of heart, the 427 Cobra’s performance still compares to many performance cars built today. The 427 solidified the Cobra’s place in American car culture, both on the road and on the track, and cemented the Shelby American legacy. It is no wonder, then, that Carroll Shelby kept his own example for the rest of his life, alongside CSX 2000, and that it is offered alongside that car here today in Monterey. It bears the indelible fingerprints of the man who created, built, and drove it, and it will remain for eternity “Carroll Shelby’s 427 Cobra.” Chassis no. CSX 3178

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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2008 Lamborghini Reventón

650 bhp, 6,496 cc DOHC 60-degree V-12 engine, six-speed, single-clutch, paddle-shift mechanical transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with hydraulic shock absorbers and coaxial coil springs, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes with ABS. Wheelbase: 104.9 in. The car that heralded Lamborghini's introduction into the ultra-exclusive limited-production supercar market The seventh of twenty examples produced Less than 900 miles from new A hugely desirable limited-production V-12 Lamborghini with jet age styling Despite our strongest desires, not all of us can be fighter pilots. Not all of us can rocket through the skies at the speed of sound, pull turns at four or five times the force of gravity, and touch the limits of earth’s atmosphere from one of the most technologically advanced machines ever built by man. But for those looking to experience similar thrills, albeit on four wheels, the obvious choice would be the Lamborghini Reventón. The example presented here, the seventh of just twenty examples built, is surely one of the finest of its breed—a motor car exciting enough to thrill any fighter pilot when on terra firma. Upon its introduction, the Reventón was the most extreme, exclusive, and expensive vehicle the company had ever produced, which is a bold statement for a company known for making extreme, exclusive, and expensive automobiles. However, it was instantly clear that the Reventón would live up to all of its promises. Just like the Miura, Countach, and Diablo before it, the Reventón coupled world-class performance with revolutionary aesthetics, as only Lamborghini could do. The results truly speak for themselves, and the Reventón carries a style and mystique all its own. It was fitted with Lamborghini’s brilliant 6.4-liter V-12 engine, and its bodywork was completely new, helping push Lamborghini’s design language to new heights. The sharp angles in its bodywork and its flat grey color were styled after modern fighter jets, to give the car an incredible presence on the road. Slide into the driver’s seat, past Lamborghini’s distinctive scissor doors, and it’s clear that the extreme theme carries through to the interior as well. The driver is met with three TFT liquid crystal displays that can be changed at the touch of a button from the classic circular instruments to a display that has more in common with that of an F-22 than an automobile. The exhaust note of Lamborghini’s 6.4-litre V-12, an engine which can trace its roots back to the V-12 in the Miura, keeps up with the car’s menacing appearance and creates a distinctive growl, which is funneled through its large, centrally mounted, singular exhaust pipe. All 20 Reventóns produced (plus one for the factory museum) were finished in the same color combination: a flat grey with a slight hint of green and mild metallic flakes and an interior swathed in military-green alcantara, black leather, aluminum, and carbon fiber. Although it retains all the creature comforts expected in such an exclusive automobile, the Reventón’s interior exudes a more focused and precise feeling than any of its peers from Sant’Agata. Appropriately, only Lamborghini’s most loyal customers were afforded the opportunity to purchase a Reventón, at a price of $1,500,000. All 20 examples were spoken for before the car was announced. This example was originally delivered to Lamborghini Dallas and sold new to its first owner, Erich Spangenburg, a Lamborghini collector and resident of Dallas. Mr. Spangenburg only kept the car for a brief period, and it was subsequently acquired by the present owner. Today, it remains in virtually as-new condition and the odometer reads less than 900 miles since new. As a result, the Reventón shows very few signs of wear both inside and out. It is accompanied by its proper set of manuals with Reventón supplement, a copy of its window sticker, additional manuals, and a remote for the car’s Kenwood stereo. For Lamborghini, it served as a striking halo car, both pleasing its best clients and drawing new fans and enthusiasts to the brand with its incredible presence and performance. As the Reventón was limited to only 20 examples, it is not only much rarer than its production sibling but also infinitely more desirable, representing the pinnacle of Lamborghini’s design language at the time. This Reventón is in flawless condition and would be an ideal acquisition for the discerning Lamborghini collector seeking one of the rarest and most sought-after modern Lamborghinis in existence. It would also be equally suitable for the enthusiast looking to experience the thrill of a fighter jet for the street. Addendum Please note that due to the low mileage on this vehicle the successful California buyer would need to accumulate the necessary mileage to complete a drive cycle to reset the computer for an emission test. Chassis no. ZHWBU77S08LA03269 Serial no. 07/20

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1961 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 hp (DIN), 250 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-camshaft inline six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical direct fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, double-wishbone independent front suspension with upper and lower A-arms and coil springs, independent rear suspension with coil springs and swing axles, and hydraulic front and rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Long-term Midwestern enthusiast ownership Freshly restored, with numerous desirable options Matching-numbers engine; believed only 17,000 original miles To many, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL is an automobile that needs no introduction. American Mercedes-Benz importer Max Hoffman was convinced that a road-legal version of the successful W194 racer would be profitable in the United States. He knew that his clients would love the performance and styling of such a vehicle, so he lobbied the top brass at Mercedes-Benz to develop the car. Luckily for him, and us, Hoffman’s wish was granted. The automobile that followed was nothing short of extraordinary. The 300 SL, sporting a chassis directly developed from lessons learned in campaigning the W194, was the first production automobile that used fuel injection as opposed to carburation, which was a technological advancement that allowed it to become the fastest street-legal car of its day. When it premiered at the 1954 New York Auto Show, the public fell in love with the car not only for its performance but also for its breathtaking good looks and proportions. The design of the 300 SL would even catch the eye of Andy Warhol in 1986, when it was featured in a painting entitled Cars, which was commissioned by German art dealer Hans Meyer. Max Hoffman wanted an open version from the very beginning, and after the success of the coupe, a convertible version of the 300 SL was released, going on to attract even more buyers towards Mercedes-Benz’s most innovative sports car. Since the 300 SL would lose its top, engineers reinforced and modified the space-frame chassis to fit conventionally hinged doors, which simultaneously allowed for greater ease of entry by lowering the height of the chassis on the door line, albeit a small forfeiture of the original model’s character. Designers used this opportunity to make several slight changes to the 300 SL’s body, and many installed new headlights and a smaller grille opening and fitted dual chrome strips on the side sills, to give the car a more streamlined and glamorous look. The roadster was introduced in 1957, and it offered the performance and style that the coupe was known for but with a dash of practicality and the thrill of open-air driving, making for a motoring experience that was second to none. In order to keep performance on par with the coupe, all roadsters were offered with the more sporting NSL engine of the coupe as standard configuration. This made the roadster capable of top speeds that ranged from 133 to 155 mph, depending on the final drive ratio specified. Production on the roadster and the iconic W198 platform stopped in early 1963, with 1,858 examples being produced, making it even more popular than its gullwinged predecessor. Also like the coupe, the roadster was certainly the item to have for the jet-set in the late ’50s and early ’60s. The 300 SL Roadsters were favored by celebrities for its style and racing drivers for its performance and brilliant engineering, and they often found homes with just about anyone who appreciated fine machinery and those who had the bank account to acquire it. With a list price of $11,000 when new, the style and performance it provided certainly came at a price. As with all great and historically important automobiles, it has retained that same persona to this day, and it remains amongst the world’s most desired cars. The 300 SL Roadster offered here was formerly part of the well-known Fred Kemp Collection of Mercedes-Benzes, which was displayed at the Kemp Automobile Museum in Missouri. After Mr. Kemp’s ownership, it was acquired by another enthusiast, who commissioned a no-expense-spared restoration of the matching-numbers car at the hands of Mercedes-Benz specialist Walter Quitte, of Costa Mesa, California. The body was removed from the frame, and all of the panels were stripped to bare metal before being refinished. The engine, transmission, and rear end were all rebuilt. Mechanical work was performed by noted father-son team Walter and Dirk Quitt. The final gear ratio was also changed to 3.25:1, to provide for high speeds at lower rpms, which is ideal for touring. The brakes were found to be of the sought-after large-version drum brakes that were developed from racing experience, which were disassembled and then rebuilt. This Roadster, finished in Mercedes-Benz Black (DB 40) over tan leather (DB 1060) and correct leather-edged boucle-style carpet, is fitted with the desirable European-style headlamps, Rudge-style knock-off wheels, and modern radial tires, as well as both a soft-top and the factory removable hardtop. The trunk houses handmade German reproduction luggage, which is supplied with the car, along with a tool roll, its original owner’s manual, and a sales catalogue. A 300 SL Roadster is perhaps the most iconic model of Mercedes-Benz’s illustrious history, and one would be a staple in any serious collection. They are beautifully engineered and designed, and they are incredible automobiles to drive, as they exhibit both timeless styling and more than respectable performance by today’s standards. Chassis no. 198.042.10.002623 Engine no. 198.980.10.002681 Body no. 198.042.10.00133

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1996 Ferrari 333 SP Evoluzione

650 bhp, 3,997 cc DOHC V-12 engine, Ferrari sequential five-speed gearbox, front and rear independent suspension by double wishbones with pushrod-operated coil-spring/damper units, and four-wheel ventilated Brembo disc brakes. Wheelbase: 110 in. As-new example of Ferrari’s return to sports car racing Displayed at Geneva and Turin shows Freshly serviced and ready for action Ferrari Classiche certified Ferrari has long catered to a reliable clientele of enthusiasts, but the Prancing Horse brand pulls out a surprise of its own every once in a while. That’s what happened 20 years ago, when Ferrari decided to return to sports car racing in the United States with the 333 SP, its first true sports car since the legendary 312 P. As history quickly proved, the 333 SP was a worthy heir to Ferrari’s prototype racing heritage. Despite Enzo Ferrari’s reservations in 1960, Ferrari jumped head first into the world of prototype sports car racing with a Formula Two 156 powered by a mid-mounted Dino V-6 engine. Just a few years later, the Italian automaker embarked on a series of sports car prototypes that would go on to dominate tracks like Sebring, Nürburgring, and Le Mans. The first 250 P shared its name and its cylinder count with the company’s road going 250-series cars, but, setting a tone for future track racers, its mid-mounted 12-cylinder engine was a distant relative to that which could be acquired at a Ferrari dealer. Instead, Ferrari used its prototype racers as test beds; for example, its first mid-engined car didn’t arrive until four years after the 250 P. Over the course of the next decade, Ferrari’s prototypes served as development tools for what would become a legendary, long-running series of rear-mounted 12-cylinder engines. However, by the early 1970s, Ferrari shifted its focus to Formula One racing. In Maranello, prototype sports car racing was left to percolate for two decades, until, as the legend goes, MOMO automotive accessory founder and amateur racing driver Giampiero Moretti walked into Piero Ferrari’s office with a grand idea. Moretti indicated to the Ferrari heir that he wanted to finish out his racing career in a sports car race, but only at the wheel of a Ferrari. With the support of Ferrari North America’s chief, Gian Luigi Butioni, the 333 SP was born. Nicknamed “The American Dream,” the 333 SP project was particularly appealing to the higher-ups in Maranello, since Ferrari’s sports car racing effort was aimed at the key North American market, because there were no F1 races in the United States at that time. Instead, there was the IMSA World Series Sports Car Championship, which was in the midst of a rule change ahead of the 1994 racing season. The business case made sense to Ferrari CEO Luca di Montezemolo, who readily approved of the plan to market the 333 SP to privateers. Predictably, Ferrari sought to integrate the 333 SP with its F1 efforts by basing the new car’s carbon fiber composite chassis on its F92 structure, although the prototype racer was widened to comply with IMSA’s two-seat requirement. Ferrari looked to Gianpaolo Dallara to design the 333 SP’s chassis. Dallara, who had started his career at Ferrari in 1959, was highly regarded among the Formula Three and F1 teams, although the firm that bore his name hadn’t been involved in sports car racing in about a decade. One of the biggest challenges facing Dallara and Ferrari was to make the design serviceable by private mechanics and pit crews, which wouldn’t benefit from consistent oversight from the Scuderia. To that end, the automaker modified its F50’s 4.7-liter, five-valve-per-cylinder V-12 to displace the IMSA-required 4.0 liters. Perhaps the most memorable modification to the F50’s V-12 was the new, nearly 12,000 rpm redline. Simply put, the 333 SP’s wail begs to be experienced, rather than simply heard. Testing for the 333 SP concluded in late 1993, and the car debuted a few months later at the IMSA GT Championship at Road Atlanta. In proper Prancing Horse style, Ferrari finished 1-2-5, with American Jay Cochran leading the way and Moretti taking 2nd. Later in the season, Ferrari took over the podium at Lime Rock with a 1-2-3 finish. Since the 333 SP wasn’t ready in time for the beginning of the season, it narrowly missed out on the overall championship. In 1995, Ferrari revised the 333 SP’s nose, and after wins at Sebring, Shearwater, the Texas World Speedway, and the Phoenix International Raceway, the 333 SP won the 1995 IMSA Championship. A year later, the 333 SP remained highly competitive, barely losing the Constructors’ Championship to Oldsmobile. Another minor update followed in 1998, when Dallara, after building nine 333 SPs, passed its construction duties to Ferrari tuner Michelotto. This would prove to be a boon for Moretti, who, along with co-drivers Arie Luyendyk, Mauro Baldi, and Didier Theys, dominated the 24 Hours of Daytona. Of the 711 laps their 333 SP completed, it led an impressive 108 of them. In addition to being one of many highlights of the 333 SP’s résumé, the race would prove to be an appropriate bookend for Moretti’s racing career. By the late 1990s, the 333 SP found its niche in European racing, until Michelotto ceased production in 2001. In total, forty 333 SP racing cars were built, five by Ferrari, nine by Dallara, and twenty-six by Michelotto. Naturally, many were modified by the private teams that raced them. That the 333 SP was designed to be a racing car rather than a road car or a museum showpiece makes chassis number 015’s history all the more remarkable. Since no 333 SP bears chassis number 013, this was actually the 14th built. Selected by Italian tire manufacturer Pirelli to grace its stand at the 1996 Geneva Motor Show, the 333 SP was also displayed at the Turin Salon a month later. That same year, 015 was featured in issue number 92 of Cavallino (April/May, 1996, pg.10–11). By the end of 1996, it passed through Ferrari Houston to noted Mexican Ferrari collector Carlos Hank Rhon, who stored it at Rissi Racing in Houston. After being placed under the care of several meticulous Ferrari enthusiasts who chose to maintain and display it rather than race it, this 333 SP was tested in Monterey in 2008 at the Pre Historics event at Laguna Seca. It conquered the challenging “corkscrew” and never left the tarmac; as such, it displays virtually nothing in the way of wear. It is, by all accounts, an “as-new” Ferrari 333 SP. Resplendent in its proper Ferrari red, this 333 SP did receive a handful of desirable upgrades to make it a state-of-the-art, race-prepped sports car. It features a later, American Le Mans series specification, six-speed Xtrac gearbox, as well as meatier 18-inch wheels and upgraded brakes. Today, it will be offered with a fresh major service by a Ferrari factory-trained technician, ready to be enjoyed by its next owner, who will follow in the MOMO-clad footsteps of Giampero Moretti. Given its known, pristine condition with no accidents and its Ferrari Classiche Red Book, it is difficult to imagine a purer example available anywhere in the world. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is a race car and will, therefore, be offered on a Bill of Sale. Chassis no. 015 Engine no. 031

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
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1970 Porsche 911S Steve McQueen Le Mans Movie Car

200 DIN horsepower @ 6,500 rpm, 7,300 rpm redline, 2,195 cc / 133.9 cubic inch horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension. Wheelbase: 102.4" - Delivered new to Steve McQueen on the set of the iconic motorsport movie Le Mans - Built to the highest available specification offered by Porsche for street models - Invoiced and assigned by the Property Master for use during filming and for McQueen’s personal use - Four owners from new, including McQueen’s personal collection in California - Excellent in highly original preserved condition - Well documented with invoices and correspondence corroborating absolute authenticity For the first three minutes and 40 seconds, Steve McQueen isn’t the only star of the 1971 film Le Mans. The steely-eyed McQueen’s co-star for the film’s memorable opening scenes is a Slate Gray 1970 Porsche 911S. This magnetic pair opens the film in convincing fashion, and the tranquil images of McQueen driving the snarling 911 through the bucolic French countryside, contemplating the complex and shifting equations of life and death in competition, are in stark contrast to the racing action that would follow. Le Mans Indeed, this film, for all its production challenges and cutting edge, budget-busting production hurdles, is considered by most motoring enthusiasts as the best racing motion picture ever filmed, joined perhaps only by James Garner’s Grand Prix. It is a film that not only allowed Steve McQueen to exercise his creative potential on his life’s foremost passion but, from a cinematic standpoint, also accurately depicted the era, the dangers of endurance racing and the magic of Circuit de La Sarthe in the French countryside, to which the American moviegoer had heretofore never been exposed. McQueen’s expressive face and limited dialogue practically play a supporting role to the visceral, high-revving wails of Porsche 917s and Ferrari 512s as they speed through sun and rain, night and day, cheating death on the 240-mph Mulsanne Straight to claim victory in the historic “24 Heures du Mans.” Such was the importance of this film, with all its real-life footage, that in the car collecting hobby, virtually any item associated with Steve McQueen – and more specifically his major films, Le Mans included – attract tremendous attention, and rightfully so. Be it something as small as the attractive Heuer Monaco wrist watch his character wore or as significant as the 917 (chassis 022) he drove, liveried in iconic Gulf Oil colors, there are certain images of motoring that are at once uniquely “McQueen” and perpetually desirable. The 917, incidentally, was sold at RM’s Monterey auction in 2000 and is now presently owned by none other than Jerry Seinfeld. McQueen’s Ownership In Hollywood, few celebrities have ever amassed a car, motorcycle and airplane collection as impressive as that of Steve McQueen. Be it a Porsche 356 Speedster, a Jaguar XK-SS, a Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Berlinetta or even a host of Von Dutch customized utility vehicles, his cars are not only legendary and highly valuable but have also been extensively written about. Porsche’s Slate Gray was a particular favorite, as he owned several Porsches in this color. The car we have the pleasure of offering here, which figures so prominently in Le Mans, was similar to a 911S McQueen already had at home, which was the same model and color but just one year older. It was likely easier, however, to acquire another car in Europe than ship his own 1969 911S twice across the Atlantic. It is also quite plausible that Porsche, which was involved in the production of Le Mans, wanted him to showcase its latest model. The car seen in the memorable opening sequences, and in several other scenes, was invoiced to Solar Productions on June 1, 1970. It was a more heavily optioned car than McQueen’s own ’69 model, including rare factory-installed air-conditioning, muffler apron, tinted glass, a Blaupunkt Frankfurt radio, the Comfort Group (which includes leather upholstery and other interior upgrades) and front fog lamps with the then-required-in-France yellow lenses. The total cost of this machine, which was the top of the 911 street machine range in 1970 with a significant horsepower increase over the base model, cost just over 30,000 DM, or $8,338.61 to be exact, a princely sum at the time. According to a letter from Porsche, “The car was driven as is directly to Le Mans by our people, for use by Steve and the Solar Productions crew. At a later date, the car was returned to our repair shop for modifications,” which included the installation of a limited-slip differential and revised gear ratios. After its starring role in McQueen’s motorsport magnum opus, during which time it was extensively photographed on the movie set in France, with McQueen always near it or aboard, the car was shipped home to Los Angeles in January 1971. Sometime later, McQueen elected to sell this one instead of his ’69. There is no clear reason why he chose one over the other, but it is widely believed that he already had installed an upgraded and costly stereo system in his first car. The Le Mans car was advertised in the Los Angeles Times and was purchased by an L.A.-based attorney. He kept the car, largely in secret, for more than three decades, during which time he documented virtually everything about the car, as letters from Solar Productions and Porsche attest. Another Southern California resident, Judge Jesse Rodriquez, then purchased it in April 2005, who has since sold it on to its current owner, a noted Porsche collector in his own right. Other than one repaint in the factory color, reupholstered front seats, new shock absorbers and a fresh windshield, it is completely original. The engine and transmission are original with all numbers matching, and the car has never suffered any rust or accident damage – a wonderful example of preservation versus restoration. It wears its original, and correctly sized, factory-installed Fuchs alloy wheels, and the odometer currently indicates less than 12,400 miles. (Total mileage is believed to be around 112,400 from new.) The car has been freshly serviced and detailed, drives on the button and has been the subject of many recent magazine stories. The ’70 “S” was viewed as such an impressive performer in its time that it was routinely compared, by contemporary magazine road testers, with the Ferrari 246 Dino and other high-end exotics. The 911, itself a successor to the wildly popular 356, entered production for 1964 and took the racing world by storm. The “S” variant was the first high performance version for the street and engendered a long line of pavement-pounding Nürburgring weapons to come, including the road-going Carreras, RS and RSRs, as well as of course the iconic Turbo. An Opportunity Not to be Missed It is rare that we are able to offer a machine so impressive on at least three different levels. Early, chrome bumper 911Ss have become extremely valuable and are prized and much sought after by Porsche aficionados the world over. Second, this car comes with an impressive file of original documentation, including letters from the Porsche factory, plus the original invoice and numerous documents authored and signed by McQueen himself. Finally, this car’s incomparable Hollywood movie and ownership provenance make it that much more an historic proposition. Steve McQueen, who passed away in 1980, was not only Hollywood’s highest paid actor with such films as Papillon, The Great Escape, The Thomas Crown Affair, Bullitt and of course Le Mans to his credit, but he was also a truly talented and highly successful racing driver on sand, road, track and everything in between. Furthermore, his reputation as the “King of Cool” – the composed anti-hero who frequently performed his own stunts – has made him a pop culture icon of Elvis Presley proportions who not only inspires Hollywood actors to this day but everything from new production cars (consider the “Bullitt Edition” Ford Mustang) and movie remakes (The Thomas Crown Affair) to fashion magazines that use his likeness to tout a turtleneck, desert boots and Persol sunglasses as the quintessentially American “look.” It is this type of attraction that renders this car quite possibly the world’s best known, most significant non-racing Porsche 911. Is it the most charismatic Porsche ever? Absolutely. It played a leading role among the to-die-for machinery in Le Mans, to many the ultimate motor racing film. Driven in the movie by its real life owner, the undisputed King of Cool Steve McQueen, it is hard to imagine another car with such glamorous, exceptional and meticulously documented provenance. Chassis no. 91103 01502 Engine no. 6302094

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-08-19
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