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1932 Bentley 8-Litre Tourer by Vanden Plas

Body Style 850. 220 bhp, 7,983 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine with triple SU carburetors, four-speed “F”-type manual transmission, live front and rear axles with Woodhead semi-elliptical leaf springs, Hartford friction front and hydraulic rear shock absorbers, and Dewandre L3 servo-assisted four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 144 in. The ultimate 8-Litre Bentley Five owners from new; confirmed to have original chassis and engine Fitted with Le Mans-style Vanden Plas coachwork in 1938 A strong performer and delightful to drive; eligible for virtually all rallies Documented and authenticated by renowned Bentley historian Dr. Clare Hay An extraordinary performance machine with few rivals from any era The general history of the Bentley 8-Litre is well-known and documented: that it was the last “W.O.” Bentley, engineered to perfection by the company’s founder; that for effortless power, heaps of torque, and sheer impressive performance, it was utterly remarkable; and that just about nothing else built in England at the time could compare to its aura of grandeur. Yet even the great extant 8-Litres of the mere 100 built often lack that certain je ne sais quoi that makes earlier “W.O.s” strum the heartstrings of men and boys. They are comfortable, and they are swift, but they are less raw, less sporting, and more country club than country road. That offered here is not one of those cars. It is an 8-Litre crafted by Vanden Plas with all the rakish looks and racer’s soul of a 4½-Litre: those open fenders, that low beltline, that notch in the driver’s door! It never went to Le Mans, but to drive at speed and hear the sound of its engine is to have no doubt that it was capable. The thrill of power and speed is no less potent than a modern Ferrari, yet it is all mechanical, with no high technology. There are few more remarkable machines, as five lucky men have been able to attest. THE STORY OF A VANDEN PLAS 8-LITRE Chassis number YX5118 was the eighth from last 8-Litre built, and one of just 35 on the 12-foot “Short Chassis.” It was produced late enough in the production run that it remained at the Bentley Works, finished save for its coachwork, when Bentley Motors went into receivership on 11 July 1931. The company was renamed Bentley Motors (1931) Ltd., a new, wholly owned subsidiary of Rolls-Royce. The few unsold, complete, not-yet-bodied chassis were subsequently sold to London Rolls-Royce and Bentley dealers Jack Barclay and Jack Olding. This car then filled the order of Sir Everard Talbot Scarisbrick, 2nd Baronet and 30th Lord of Scarisbrick in Lancashire, and was undoubtedly delivered to his ancestral home, Scarisbrick Hall in Ormskirk. Sir Everard was indubitably a connoisseur of fine motorcars; his name appears in the history of several interesting automobiles of this time period, and this was, in particular, his third Bentley. Fitted with a four-passenger tourer body by the London coachbuilders Mayfair, it was delivered to the Baronet in May 1932 and underwent almost continuous fine-tuning in his ownership. A Jaeger speedometer and rev counter were fitted in July of 1932, followed in February 1934 by a higher-ratio 15/53 crown wheel and pinion, and three SU fuel pumps in lieu of the original Autovac. The car was acquired shortly thereafter by the second owner, J.C. Babcock of London, in whose ownership it was maintained for over 30 years. Mr. Babcock had the engine and chassis overhauled in 1936 and replaced the rear axle with a special high-ratio 16/53 type. In 1938, with a new body in mind, Mr. Babcock approached coachbuilders Vanden Plas of London, renowned for their sporting bodies on Bentley chassis, most famously the fabric-sided “Le Mans tourers” that have been ruthlessly recreated on numerous original cars since. By this time, Vanden Plas had turned its attentions in a more luxurious and less sporting direction, and the few bodies they produced for 8-Litres were generally convertibles of a comfortable vein. Not so for their body for YX5118, which had all the élan of a Bentley Boy’s 4½-Litre “Blower” with its cut-down driver’s side door, low-slung waistline, and simplicity of detail. It was a body that commanded attention and emphasized that this was no mere automobile, but a powerhouse that could chase and pass anything that dared to challenge it. The only similar 8-Litre body of this era was that fitted by Vanden Plas to Vivian Hewitt’s infamous YX5119—a car that, the reader will note, was built immediately following this one, and which is today considered the most valuable 8-Litre. Comparisons also follow in that Captain Hewitt maintained and enjoyed his 8-Litre regularly well into its spell as a “classic car,” as it did Mr. Babcock, who in 1949 entered this car into the 1949 Bentley Drivers’ Club Kensington Gardens Concours. An original British registration document on file confirms Mr. Babcock’s multiple years of ownership while also importantly identifying the body in his care as a “four-seater sports,” that which is currently mounted. In 1967, following some 30 years of ownership, Mr. Babcock passed his Bentley to L.R. Beakbane, in whose ownership it remained for only one year. It was then sold in 1968 to Hans Dieter Holterbosch, the American importer of Löwenbräu beer and a noted enthusiast of great performance machines. The Holterbosch stable included superb, well-restored, and properly maintained examples of the best Classic Era motorcars. Significantly, this was the only Bentley. The car was restored in the United Kingdom by Don McKenzie, son of renowned Bentley tuner L.C. McKenzie, with the body refinished and re-trimmed by Hooper & Company in Westminster, successor to the grand old coachbuilder, then returned to the United States to take its place in the Holterbosch stable. There the Bentley remained, occasionally used and maintained but largely out of sight to the public, for 45 years. Several years ago the car was acquired by its present caretaker, in whose ownership it has been sympathetically returned to robust running order, as was demonstrated for an RM Sotheby’s specialist in a recent road test. It is a robust and incredible thrill to drive. This 8-Litre is accompanied by a comprehensive 24-page report, compiled by Dr. Clare Hay, the foremost authority and single most knowledgeable living expert on “W.O.” Bentleys, using photographs and documents from throughout chassis number YX5118’s long history. She notes that the engine stamping on the front bearer is original and in unusually good, clear condition, itself an indication of the quality work and maintenance that the car has had over the years. Underhood finishes are to original specifications, with the exception of an upgraded modern coil and three SU carburetors, all of which are desirable modifications for modern touring. Dr. Hay’s conclusion is that the car retains its original engine and chassis, thus confirming what one would suspect from a car with such a known, unblemished history. Today offered by only its fifth enthusiast owner since new, chassis number YX5118 is truly in a class by itself, even among other 8-Litres. Well-documented and lovingly kept for its entire life, it is a marvelous paradox: smooth yet raw, powerful yet controlled, and sporting yet comfortable, with those classic Vanden Plas lines that look the enthusiast in the soul and shout “Bentley” with the first kick of its six giant cylinders. If it is possible for a 1930s automobile to be called a supercar, this is it. Chassis no. YX5118 Engine no. YX5118 Body no. 3612

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1962 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II by Pininfarina

240 bhp, 2,953 cc single overhead-camshaft 60-degree V-12, triple Weber 36 DCS two-barrel downdraught carburetors, four-speed synchromesh manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with unequal length upper and lower A-arms, coil springs, an anti-roll bar, and Koni hydraulic shocks, solid rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, trailing arms, and Koni hydraulic shocks, and four-wheel Dunlop hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4 in. Offered by an enthusiast owner of 35 years One of only 200 Series II Cabriolets The only example originally finished in Rosso Cina Extremely rare factory hardtop; showing 41,000 actual miles Consistently well maintained and enjoyed The 250 series was Ferrari’s crowning achievement of the 1950s and early 1960s. The high watermarks of this series have defined the Prancing Horse in the decades since. In many ways, the 250 set the stylistic and cultural tone for Ferrari, which has grown exponentially model after model. From the lovely Lusso and the sporty California Spider to the Tour de France and, of course, the Series II Cabriolet, the basic construction formula was nothing short of perfect and included a high-revving, powerful V-12 engine, a shiver-inducing exhaust note, and an almost unbelievably sexy design by the best Italian coachbuilders that would clothe a chassis in two-door form. From the outset, personalization and the owner’s wishes were paramount at Ferrari, as they influenced everything from the color and leather choice to the mechanical specification. As the years progressed, those bespoke touches have served to distinguish one example from another, and they have catapulted certain models into particularly rarified air. The stunning 250 GT Cabriolet Series II is no exception. It debuted in 1959 with a Pinin Farina design that was crafted completely by hand, and it was executed entirely at the discretion of the designer’s senses of touch and sight. The lines, smooth and flowing from front to rear, exhibited an air of sophistication, which was complemented by four exhausts at the rear, a hood scoop, sporting wire wheels, and all the trappings that defined the finest Ferrari “grand touring” cars. The Ferrari offered here is the 186th of 200 Cabriolet Series IIs produced, and it is noteworthy as the only example originally finished in Rosso Cina (Chinese Red). This Cabriolet was equipped with a Nero Connolly leather and vinyl interior when it was delivered in late July 1962 to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York. It was sold in August to its original owner, Frank O’Brien Jr., who was the second-generation leader of Philadelphia’s O’Brien Machinery Company, suppliers of power-generating equipment, and a prominent local socialite with a 70-acre horse farm in Chester County. Its entire ownership history since has been traced, with its early life spent in Pennsylvania. After three owners, the Ferrari moved to Illinois in the fall of 1975. In 1980, it was sold by Joe Marchetti’s International Autos Ltd. to its current owner, a long-time Ferrari enthusiast and connoisseur of the marque, who recalls the trip home as such: We picked up the car at about noon on November 1, 1980, in Chicago. At the time, we lived in Monmouth, Illinois, 215 miles away. We left Chicago in early afternoon, stopping on the way at an airport to watch skydivers. Outside the Quad Cities, it began snowing. We stopped at a Mexican restaurant for dinner, sitting by a window so we could keep an eye on the car; it was the only one in the parking lot. Then, we brushed the snow off and drove the last 40 miles to home, getting in around 8:30 p.m. It was a really great day. This Cabriolet has been well-maintained over the years, showing no mistreatment or evidence of accident damage. It has received a thorough mechanical service and inspection within the last 1,000 miles, as well as a recent clutch replacement. Cosmetically, the upholstery was renewed in 1979 in tan leather, which now reflects light use and patina. The Ferrari has received two repaints, with the most recent being in elegant Nero in 2007. However, it has not been restored and has never required major disassembly or work. It still retains all of its original components, down to the smallest hardware bits, with no known modifications or missing parts. Most importantly, it is still equipped with its original, extremely rare factory removable hardtop, which is a seldom-seen option that enables the true enthusiast to enjoy this Ferrari on road trips and tours in all weather conditions. In addition to the hardtop, the car is offered with the original tool kit and the original leather folder for manuals, which is actually rarer than the manuals themselves. An extensive binder of documentation (with interview notes) records the car’s history, as researched by noted Ferrari historian Dyke Ridgley. The binder documents the mileage and all services back to the 1970s and includes copies of factory build sheets (including extremely rare dynamometer test records), Pininfarina factory record sheets, receipts, and purchase information. During its lifetime, the car has been driven 41,000 actual, documented miles, but as a proud “driver,” it has never been shown at a major concours event. Most importantly, the owner reports it to run and drive well, something in which he takes considerable pride. For 35 years, the owner of this wonderful Cabriolet has enjoyed the Ferrari hobby alongside many of today’s best-known experts. He is proud to offer the car here to a new home and with the hope that it will be enjoyed with the same passion for decades to come. Chassis no. 3633 GT Engine no. 3633 Body no. 29986

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1966 Shelby 427 Cobra

Est. 410 bhp, 427 cu. in. Ford V-8 engine with single four-barrel carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel coil spring independent suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. Only 1,819 original miles The second to last 427 Cobra produced History since new documented by the SAAC Registry An exceptional road going Shelby Cobra Incredibly authentic with unquestioned purity, including original “sunburst” wheels and blue dot tires Formerly owned by noted collectors John Mozart and Lawrence Bowman The thundering Shelby Cobra is unquestionably one of the most important American performance icons of the 20th century. Rooted in the brilliant racing career and boundless grit of its creator Carroll Shelby, the Cobra singlehandedly vaulted Ford Motor Company’s “Total Performance” corporate racing program onto the international stage and marked a crucial step in Ford’s eventual dominance over archrival Ferrari at Le Mans during the 1960s. Under Shelby’s leadership, the era’s top drivers, and a “dream team” including Ken Miles, Phil Remington, Pete Brock and many other racing luminaries in the background, the Ford-powered, AC Ace-derived Cobra was brutally quick and dead reliable, quickly earning its stripes and winning virtually everywhere it appeared. The Cobra won the U.S. Manufacturer’s Championship three years running in 1963, 1964, and 1965, and with sleek Pete Brock-designed Daytona Coupe bodywork, Shelby American Inc. won the hotly contested 1965 FIA World Manufacturer’s Championship. Although the 289 Cobra was proven and immensely successful, more power was needed to stay competitive. Since Ford’s 289 V-8 reached its reliability limit at 385 bhp, Shelby’s stalwart driver and engineer, Ken Miles, surmised an even bigger engine might work within the trim confines of the Cobra. If there was any doubt about the need, it evaporated when the Shelby team went to Nassau for the 1963 Speed Week, where Chevrolet’s new Corvette Grand Sports were lapping more than nine seconds quicker than the small-block Cobras! However, while Shelby was initially promised a new aluminum-block version of Ford’s 390 FE engine, internal resistance from the NASCAR faction within Ford forced a switch to the heavier cast-iron 427. Although powerful, proven, and reliable at 500 bhp and beyond, it was heavier and therefore necessitated a complete redesign of the Cobra’s chassis to ensure proper handling. The new chassis measured five inches wider, with coil springs all around, and with development help from Ford’s engineering department, the 427 Cobra was born. The cars were brutally fast. Driving one continues to be a mind-bending experience. One of the most memorable stories about the 427 Cobra involves a test arranged for Sports Car Graphic magazine by Shelby’s Ken Miles. A few years earlier, Aston Martin claimed that their DB4 was capable of accelerating from zero to 100 mph and back down to zero in less than 30 seconds. Miles had the idea to restage the test using the new 427 Cobra. The result, according to SCG editor Jerry Titus, was an astounding 13.2 seconds! Shelby’s big-block cars were never mass-produced, with just over 300 built. In all forms, the 427 Cobra was a mighty racing car and virtually unbeatable on the road. CHASSIS NUMBER CSX 3359 The Shelby American Automobile Club World Registry documents chassis number CSX 3359 as having been the next-to-last 427 Cobra produced. It was billed to Shelby American on December 14, 1966, equipped with a 427 V-8 with single 4V carburetor and finished in red with black interior. In other words, it was ordered as, and has always remained, a road car, one that has been enjoyed and preserved on the street/ It was then sold to Pletcher Ford, of Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, at $1,000 off dealer cost, and was trucked to Jenkintown on October 16, 1967. Pletcher Ford repair order no. 2020 records minor storage and shipping damage having been incurred, necessitating repair of the left hand rocker panel, the Cobra emblem on the trunk lid, and replacement of the spare wheel and tire at a cost of $211.95. The Cobra’s first owner was Frank W. Hultslander, of Norristown, Pennsylvania, who rarely drove it before consigning it to Hexagon Motors, of London, in November 1971; Hexagon Motors imported the car “across the pond” and purchased it themselves. It remained in storage from 1972 until 1976, when its existence in England was widely reported, and the car found a new owner in Richard Buxbaum, of Hinsdale, Illinois. Remarkably, when Mr. Buxbaum advertised his Cobra for sale in 1978 at $85,000, it had recorded only 512 original miles! The car was sold to Jerome A. Shinkay, of Janesville, Wisconsin, who in the early 1980s advertised it for sale. It was passed to James S. Ward, of Atherton, California, who resold it to the Ferrari dealer in Los Gatos. From there, it passed through the hands of Timothy Lewy into the ownership of renowned collector John Mozart, whose stable includes some of the finest performance automobiles ever built. In 1998, the Cobra was acquired by another well-known enthusiast of Ford performance products, Lawrence Bowman, in whose ownership it was pictured on page 111 of John McClellan’s The Classic AC’s. In 2004, Mr. Bowman elected to have the car restored by the well-known Cobra expert, Mike McCluskey. The entire drivetrain, including engine, transmission, differential, drive and half-shafts, and suspension, was rebuilt to original specifications, with everything pertaining to reliability and drivability being repaired and replaced only as necessary. The body was left on the chassis, so great was its originality, but was stripped to the bare frame and body shell, metal-finished, primered, and repainted the original Monza Red. Much of the interior remains original, including the wonderfully well-preserved seats, vinyl, wheel arches, and doors. Always a well-kept road car, it still wears its original “sunburst” wheels shod in the original Goodyear blue dot tires and is accompanied by a second set of Trigo wheels. Now recording only 1,819 original miles, this incredible Cobra remains as-restored, in beautiful show-worthy condition and robust running order, having been well cared for in one of the West Coast’s finest collections. As beautiful as it was when new, yet preserving so many of the original features often squandered in even the best restorations, it is an exceptional example worthy of the finest Shelby collection. Chassis no. CSX 3359

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1936 Delage D8-120 Aerosport Coupe

The Delage D8 120 Aerosport we have the pleasure of offering is the 1937 Salon Paris Show Car and is regarded as the Prototype example as the first one built. With exceptional provenance, a beautifully preserved presentation and just 36,000 kms from new, this Aerosport represents the last and only fully unrestored example in existence. Specifications: 105 bhp 4,303 cc overhead valve inline eight-cylinder engine, Cotal four-speed electromagnetically actuated transmission, independent front suspension with transverse leaf spring and trailing arms, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 133.4" The D8-120 Nineteen thirty-five was a pivotal year for Delage & Cie. A less-expensive six-cylinder car, the D6, had been introduced in 1930, and a 4-cylinder D4 in 1933, but both they and the D8 were struggling as the deepening Depression reached Europe. There was insufficient money for new product development; in fact Delage was forced to sell off his showroom on the Champs Elysées. Delage tried to interest Peugeot in part of the business, to no avail. Various refinancing efforts were tried, but eventually, in the early part of February 1935, a receiver was called in. At liquidation, many of the assets of Delage & Cie. were bought by Walter Watney, the Paris distributor. He in turn sold the manufacturing rights to Delahaye, resulting in cars that were essentially Delahayes, but with Delage hoods, radiators and grilles. Of noted exception were the hydraulic actuated brakes a system employed on prewar Delages and not on the parent manufacturer Delahaye 135 until postwar. Delahaye did not build eight-cylinder engines, but engineer Jean François developed them from his race proven pushrod overhead valve Delahaye 138 and 135 sixes. The D8-100 series of 1936-37 used a 4.3-liter pushrod ohv eight, developing 105 bhp. The D8-120, introduced in chassis form at the October 1935 Paris Salon, used this engine initially, later adopting a 4.7-liter version producing 115 bhp. The D8-120 became the jewel in Delage’s new crown, neatly nestling into its predecessor’s niche on the concours circuit. Letourneur & Marchand Jean-Arthur Marchand was a country boy from a village on the Côte d’Or. Jean-Marie Letourneur was from Le Creusot, a city of iron foundries. Both had come to Paris at the turn of the twentieth century to learn the art of coachbuilding. They met in the shops of Henri Binder, where Letourneur had been hired and the younger Marchand was completing an apprenticeship. Both men were ambitious, so they decided to strike out on their own, taking the workshops of a body company that had gone bankrupt. In the beginning they did contract work for other coachbuilders –Labourdette, Franay, and their old boss Binder – and supplied a few complete bodies to manufacturers like Darracq. By 1907, the partners were doing a good trade in bodies for private customers, and built nearly 1,500 by the outbreak of World War I when Marchand was mobilized. After the war, they resumed operations, and in 1923 were able to secure display space at the Hotel Claridge on the Champs Elysées. But, seeing that one-off styles would be an increasingly difficult business, they started producing some series-customs for automobile manufacturers under the name “Autobineau.” The first of these was for Delage, a run of 2,000 bodies for DI chassis. Work for other manufacturers soon followed. By 1930, Letourneur & Marchand were turning to streamlining. Their masterpiece in this regard, the “Coach JELM,” also known as “Coupé Panoramique,” was created by Letourneur’s son Marcel. Commonly called the “Yo-Yo car” from the Art Deco accent line on its body, its hallmark was a sweeping sidelight extending from the door into the rear quarter, with overlapping glass and no center pillar. Similar bodies were built on the Delage D6 chassis and for Hispano-Suiza during 1935. Both the “homologation mule” and test car for the D8-120 series (chassis 50774 and 50789, respectively) received JELM bodies. A third example, also the last of its kind, would subsequently be built adorned with the same coachwork. The D8 Aérosport. If there is any car that deserves the nickname “Super Delage,” it is the Aérosport Coupé. For the D8-120’s first formal introduction at the 1936 Paris Salon, a special presentation was called for. Louis Delage himself entrusted Letourneur & Marchand with the task of drawing a more radical design, to be both more aerodynamic and sporting in appearance than their already well know JELM design. This car, chassis 51012, is the very car that was the prototype for the short run of these striking bodies. The chassis arrived at Letourneur & Marchand’s premises on August 19th to be bodied for the upcoming “Salon de Paris 1936,” which opened on October 1st; the body number assigned to the car by Letourneur & Marchand was 2912. Addendum Please note that a 2.5% import duty is payable on the hammer price of this motor car should the buyer be a resident of the United States. Chassis no. 51012

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-08-17
Hammer price
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1994 McLaren F1

Less Than 3,300 Miles From New and 49 State Legal 627bhp, 6.1 liter quad-camshaft, 48 valve V12 engine, six-speed manual gearbox, independent suspension via double wishbones with light alloy dampers, co-axial coil springs and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 107" The McLaren F1 was conceived in 1988, when Ron Dennis, Mansour Ojjeh, Creighton Brown and Gordon Murray were discussing production cars in an Italian airport lounge. When their plane finally took off, it had been decided that McLaren, already a dominant force in Grand Prix racing, would build the finest performance car in the world. In December 1992, just 34 months after the design team came together, the first prototype McLaren F1 was driven. Within four years they had succeeded. Another milestone was reached when in December 1993 the first production F1 was completed. While not originally intended by Gordon Murray to race, racing success was nevertheless reached in June 1995, when the GTR racing version won Le Mans in its debut outing, taking four of the top five places. Finally, in March 1998 the F1 established a new speed record for a production car at 240.1 miles per hour (386.7 kph). In June 1998, the last F1 was completed, a total of just 107 cars, a figure that includes all preproduction prototypes, competition cars and road going variants. Before getting started, Murray and his design team decided that the McLaren F1 would not only have to be ultra lightweight like a race car and exhibit awesome performance, but also be reliable, comfortable and safe for everyday use. With vast experience in World Championship Formula One technology, the engineers behind the McLaren F1 created the first ever road car to feature an all carbon composite monocoque chassis structure. This exotic material combines the ultra low weight necessary for performance with exceptional strength and stiffness to exceed demanding industry safety requirements. Further design elements incorporated from Formula One were a central driving position (center seat), “Ground-Plane Shear” suspension geometry, “Intelligent” brake cooling, fan assisted ground effect aerodynamics and an air-brake foil which enhances aerodynamic stability under braking pitch-down. Because of his strong relationship to BMW’s Paul Rosche from Murray’s days as chief designer for the world-championship-winning Brabham Formula One Team, McLaren Automotive approached BMW who were more than happy to design and build a V12 specifically for the F1. The finished product, BMW S70/2, a 6.1 liter, quad cam, 48 valve V12 power unit produces no less than 627bhp and drives through a bespoke six-speed transverse gearbox. Standard options on every F1 road car include full cabin air-conditioning, Sekurit electric defrost/demist windscreen and side glass, electric window lifts, remote central locking, Kenwood CD stereo system, cabin access release for opening panels, tailored document case, cabin stowage department, four lamp high performance headlight system, rear fog and reversing lights, courtesy lights in all compartments, map reading lights, remote battery charging point, Facom titanium tool kit, external battery charger, a McLaren F1 owner/drivers handbook and exclusive hand made luggage in soft leather. In March 1998, after achieving a record top speed of 240.14 miles per hour, the McLaren F1 confirmed that it was the fastest production car in the world. This record remained unbeatable until March 2005 when the 1001hp Bugatti Veyron was recorded at 253 miles per hour. McLaren’s achievement was particularly spectacular because the car was never conceived to achieve this record. The top speed record was merely a consequence of its unrivalled focus and supreme engineering as the ultimate drivers’ car. In May 1998, after building, selling and delivering 100 customer cars, McLaren ceased production. Of the 107 total cars constructed, seven were preproduction prototypes, 64 were F1 road cars, five were F1 LM road versions built to commemorate victory at Le Mans in 1995 (where five GTRs finished), and three were F1 GT road going versions of the long tail 1997 F1 GTR race car. The remaining 28 were F1 GTR race cars built for private customers competing in the FIA GT series and the ultimate test of machine, the 24 Hours of LeMans. Although McLaren is no longer producing the F1 models, they are still running an elaborate servicing and support network for the cars. Primary support is provided by one of many local authorized service centers throughout the world (two are in the USA). If necessary, McLaren will fly a more specialized technician to your car or service center. Finally, in the rare case that major structural repairs are required, the car can be returned to McLaren. There are eight McLaren Authorized Service Centers around the world. Each one has technicians who have attended a dedicated training course at McLaren. For diagnostic purposes, every F1 is fitted with a modem, which enables McLaren headquarters to communicate with any F1 in the world. Not only can the technicians read any logged errors in the ECUs, they can carry out a series of diagnostic procedures on items such as central locking system and the air-conditioning. The McLaren F1s are regarded as true automotive icons and they are arguably the Ferrari 250 GTOs of our generation. Several years down the line, it is easy to speculate that they will be worth several million dollars each. There is nothing else like them. No other supercar has the purity of purpose, focus and driver involvement of a McLaren F1. In fact, when compared to the upcoming 4,000lb 1001bhp Bugatti Veyron 16.4, the McLaren F1 is nearly as fast from 0 to 300 km/h (0-187.5 miles per hour). The McLaren does 0 to 180 mph in 20.3 seconds, while the Bugatti does 0 to 187.5 miles per hour in 16.7 seconds. By comparison, the Enzo does 0 to 187.5 miles per hour in 26.8 seconds and the Carrera GT does it in 34.2 seconds. The example presented here is in full 49 state EPA/DOT compliance (which in itself is an extremely time-consuming and costly process) and has been recently serviced by BMW North America in New Jersey, which is the official East Coast McLaren service center. Please note that the interior is solid black, except for the driver's seat (tall/wide size), which has a yellow insert. Further good news about this 3,224 mile yellow McLaren F1 is that it was constructed prior to 1996. Of the 64 F1 road cars, only 40 were built prior to 1996. This is of notable importance as the EPA mandates that for any 1996 (and later) car to be road legal in the U.S. it must be equipped with OBD-II (i.e. 2nd generation on-board diagnostic electronics). In the past, it has been economically unfeasible (i.e. $100,000 to $150,000!) to retrofit such a system to a vehicle not originally equipped/embedded with it from the manufacturer. Apparently, it is now possible to fit such an OBD-II system at a reduced cost, but still quite expensive. The next owner can rest easy knowing he can enjoy the car in its present form without modification. However, please note this example is a 49 state car and does not meet california EPA/DOT requirements. It is complete with all ancillary items as delivered – luggage set, manuals and vehicle build sheet. The beautiful yellow paint and black leather interior are nearly flawless. As a special bonus, Michael Schumacher's signature (dated 12/03/96) is on the left side doorsill. For the F1, it requires a few moments of thought to come to terms with the fact that only 64 of these exquisite cars will ever exist. Their rarity is guaranteed, and consequently, their value is likely to increase with time. The McLaren F1 remains as one of the world’s true modern supercars and in recent months private sales of similar examples have occurred in excess of the published auction estimate making the to possibility to purchase a virtually brand new, 49 state car such as this dramatic example a rare opportunity in all respects. Addendum In mid-2002, the car benefitted from a massive $50,000-plus comprehensive service carried out by McLaren Cars Limited in the United Kingdom. This included replacement of the fuel cells. Since arriving Stateside shortly thereafter, the car has been regularly serviced by BMW of North Americ, LLC in Montvale, New Jersey, the official east coast service and repair arm of McLaren Cars Limited, without regard to cost. All of the service work receipts can be found in the extensive documentation file. Chassis no. SA9AB5AC4R1048014

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-18
Hammer price
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2003 Ferrari F2003-GA Formula 1 Grand Prix Car

THE EX RUBENS BARRICHELLO, JAPANESE GP WINNING LA VETTURA VINCITRICE DEL GP DEL DIAPPONE PILOTATA DALL'EX FERRARISTA RUBENS BARRICHELLO Specifications: 920 bhp (est.) @ 18,600 rpm, 2997 cc naturally-aspirated V-10 engine with seven-speed sequential electro-hydraulically-controlled semi-automatic transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with torsion springs, four-wheel ventilated carbon fiber brakes. Wheelbase 3,100mm (122"). Grand Prix racing, known for the FIA rules package under which it is run as “Formula 1”, is the most important, successful, competitive, widely followed form of motorsport in the world. Teams have budgets that exceed the gross domestic products of small countries. The facilities that build, test, develop, prepare and race just a few cars each season rival those of the best high volume car makers. The best technicians, craftsmen, engineers, aerodynamicists, programmers and managers in the world work ceaselessly to succeed in just sixteen two-hour contests each year. That’s thousands and thousands of man-hours and hundreds of millions of dollars in facilities invested in just 32 hours of competition. Only nine two-car teams competed in Formula 1 in 2003. Only one of them, Ferrari, had competed in every season of the modern Formula 1 era. 2003 was an epic season in F1, with an unprecedented number of competitive teams and drivers. All the principal teams’ cars were evolutionary not revolutionary, so there was no technical breakthrough giving one team an advantage. The drivers were experienced. The teams were practiced. It was down to the details of construction, driving, preparation, development and race tactics. The season’s champions were Ferrari. Michael Schumacher won his sixth Drivers Championship to eclipse the immortal Juan Manuel Fangio’s record five Drivers Championships. Ferrari won the Constructor’s Championship with the F2003-GA. The team placed drivers Michael Schumacher and Rubens Barrichello first and fourth in the Drivers Championship. Ferrari started the season in fourth – in both the Drivers and Constructors Championships – and the team’s success against intense and consistent competition from the Williams-BMW, McLaren-Mercedes and Renault teams and drivers Kimi Raikkonen, Juan Pablo Montoya, Ralf Schumacher, Fernando Alonso and David Coulthard emphatically underlines a little-appreciated aspect of Grand Prix racing. Racing, and particularly Formula 1, is a team sport. Formula 1 competition is so closely balanced, so precisely perched on a knife-edge of circumstances, that there is literally no inconsequential contribution and no unimportant contributor. The person who fills water bottles helps the pit crew and team management stay fresh to react quickly and make sharp decisions. It is easy to see the contribution of the drivers, pit crew, and brain trust on the pit wall, but the team that cleans the wind tunnel to ensure that test results are consistent and repeatable also make an irreplaceable contribution and their consistency is crucial to the success of the team. So, while the season-ending Japanese Grand Prix win by this Ferrari F2003-GA, chassis number 233, in the hands of its regular driver, Rubens Barrichello, conclusively swung the season’s balance in favor of Ferrari’s victory in the 2003 Constructors Championship and Michael Schumacher’s Drivers Championship, it is the cumulative effect of a season’s efforts by Ferrari’s team – in Maranello, in testing and at the races – that allowed the Scuderia to sweep the field in 2003. The Ferrari F2003-GA The Ferrari F2003-GA was the 49th single-seater built by Ferrari to compete in the Formula 1 World Championship. An evolutionary design of the F2002, the F2003-GA recognized the contribution of Fiat patriarch Gianni Agnelli to Ferrari with the addition of his initials to the model designation. Gianni Agnelli’s enthusiasm and support was an important factor in Ferrari’s present stature as a major manufacturer of grand touring automobiles and sports cars and particularly in its consistent placement as the dominant competitor in F1. Not the least of his contribution was lending Ferrari the leadership of Luca de Montezemolo and giving the Scuderia the resources to assemble the dream team of Jean Todt, Ross Brawn, Michael Schumacher and Rubens Barrichello. Typical of Formula 1 – where no opportunity for the slightest improvement is overlooked – the F2003-GA was completely new, with particular attention paid to optimizing aerodynamic efficiency and lowering the car’s center of gravity. All areas of the F2003-GA were redesigned to maximize performance of the chassis, engine and the Ferrari team’s Bridgestone tires. Bodywork, radiators, exhausts and rear end were redesigned as was the mechanically-operated power steering and both front and rear suspensions. Materials research continued to reduce the weight and size of the engine and transmission. Ferrari technical partner Shell made contributions to the 052 series engine in both fuels and lubricants. Ferrari designed a completely new gearbox with a cast titanium case that reduced both dimensions and weight and further refined the electrically-controlled, hydraulically-actuated gear change mechanism which Ferrari pioneered and is now both nearly universal in Formula 1 and increasingly the gear change mechanism of choice in ultra-high performance road cars. Ferrari F2003-GA chassis 233 Ferrari F2003-GA chassis 233 was used in competition only twice, both times driven by Rubens Barrichello. Its first outing was at the Italian GP on September 12 where Barrichello finished third ahead of Kimi Raikkonnen in the McLaren-Mercedes. Michael Schumacher won the Monza race, beating title rival Juan Pablo Montoya in the Williams-BMW by 5.2 seconds. Both results eventually figured crucially in the 2003 season’s conclusion. It was one of the most closely-contested title chases in years and even the smallest increment eventually proved to be critical, again highlighting the contributions of tire-changers, engine management programmers and even the umbrella girls who kept the drivers cool and collected at the start. At the start of the Italian GP, only a single point separated Michael Schumacher’s first place from Montoya in second. Raikkonnen was in third, a further single point back. While the titles weren’t settled until Japan, two races later, it was Monza which made the difference, and it was Rubens’ performance in the F2003-GA s/n 233 which separated Michael Schumacher conclusively from his most implacable competitor (and eventual successor at Scuderia Ferrari for the 2007 season) Kimi Raikkonnen. The US GP at Indianapolis two weeks later was decided by another application of teamwork – and the almost psychic communication between Michael Schumacher and his team management. In difficult and rapidly changing weather conditions, it was tire changes that settled the race, tire changes that were impeccably chosen and executed by the Scuderia and which put Schumacher in the lead after a brilliant choice of full-wets put him in position to carve through the field from seventh to first in a matter of just a few laps. Michael’s win at Indy put him nine points up on Raikkonnen going to the season finale at Suzuka. With ten points for a win, Schumacher needed only a single point in Japan to clinch the title even if Raikkonnen won. In the event of a tie, the Ferrari driver had more wins. As it happened it never came to that. What did happen in Japan was one of the best races of the season. Schumacher and Raikkonnen were mired in the back of the pack at the start. If Michael stayed out of trouble – even from his 14th place on the grid – eighth place for him was like Arnold Palmer hitting a 170 yard drive, a foregone conclusion, especially since the F2003-GA had only once in the whole season failed to finish a race due to a malfunction. Japan 2003 was Rubens Barrichello’s race, and by extension, it was chassis 233’s race. Montoya and Barrichello rocketed away at the start with Montoya in the lead, an advantage that disappeared only on the ninth lap when the hydraulic system on the Colombian’s Williams failed. Fernando Alonso’s pursuit of Barrichello similarly came up short of race-winning reliability and Rubinho brought the Ferrari F2003-GA 233 home as the winner of the final race of the season, 11 seconds ahead of Kimi Raikkonnen’s McLaren-Mercedes. Barrichello’s victory in this F2003-GA, chassis 233, and Michael Schumacher’s eighth place brought Ferrari the coveted Constructors Championship, a title that was in Williams-BMW’s hands until the last race of the season, and brought Schumacher undisputed claim to the most Drivers Championship titles with an amazing total of six. This Car Subsequent to the 2003 season Ferrari F2003-GA chassis 233 has been retained by the Ferrari factory in race ready condition. It is offered here with the full support of Ferrari F1 Corse Clienti. It is race ready and will be introduced to its new owner in a full day’s program at Ferrari’s Fiorano test and development facility where it will be delivered along with Ferrari’s F1 Standard Display and Running kits including jacks, wheels, car cover, transport wheels and tires, starter, tire blanket, customized seat, external battery and connection wiring, air tank, tools and transport steering wheel. The delivery and familiarization package at Fiorano includes a full day at the track, a film record of the day, Ferrari factory F1 support, driving suit and F1 Clienti support for 2007. Ferrari values it at €36,350, but it is in essence a priceless opportunity to meet and become part of the Ferrari F1 team which has revolutionized Formula 1 racing in the past decade. The car itself, chassis 233, is uniquely important and successful in Ferrari’s and Michael Schumacher’s successful quest for the dual World Championships in 2003. Rubens Barrichello’s third place with it at Monza put Schumacher in the position to capture the title. Chassis 233’s victory in Barichello’s hands at the season-ending Japanese GP sealed the season’s landmark success for the Scuderia and its number one driver. Brilliantly powerful, responsive and capable of extremes of acceleration which beg comprehension, this is an extraordinary opportunity to acquire one of the legendary 2003 season Ferrari F1 cars which brought the Drivers and Constructors championships to the Scuderia. More than that, it is a Grand Prix-winning Ferrari driven (to victory) by Rubens Barrichello in the deciding race of the 2003 championship. Please note that the purchaser of this Formula 1 car will be required to sign an agreement with respect to the use of the various sponsor logos. Please contact an RM car specialist to review a copy of this agreement. ITALIANTEXT specifiche: 920 CV(est.) 18.600g/min di velocità, 2997cc di cilindrata, motore aspirato V10, cambio a 7 rapporti con comando semi automatico elettroidraulico sequenziale, sospensioni indipendenti sulle quattro ruote con molle di torsione, freni ventilati in fibra di carbonio sulle quattro ruote. Passo 3100 mm (122"). Il Gran Premio, denominato dalla FIA, l'organismo motoristico che lo regolamenta, come “Formula 1”, è il campionato mondiale di corse automobilistiche più famoso, competitivo e più seguito al mondo. Il budget delle scuderie supera di gran lunga il prodotto interno lordo dei piccoli Stati e la tecnologia che progetta, testa, costruisce e mette in pista un numero ristretto di automobili ad ogni stagione del campionato non ha nulla da invidiare a quella dei più grandi e rinomati costruttori di auto. Ogni anno i migliori tecnici, artigiani, ingegneri, esperti di aerodinamica, programmatori e manager lavorano incessantemente per ottenere il massimo del risultato in sole sedici gare della durata di due ore. Il tutto per un totale di migliaia e migliaia di ore di lavoro e centinaia di milioni di euro investiti in appena 32 ore di competizione. Nella Formula 1 del 2003 gareggiarono soltanto nove scuderie con due monoposto ciascuna. Tra queste, soltanto la Ferrari aveva partecipato a tutte le stagioni dell'era moderna della Formula 1. Quella del 2003 fu una stagione epica. La F1 non aveva mai visto team e piloti così competitivi. Nessun team riuscì a prevalere sull'altro con tecniche rivoluzionarie che cogliessero gli avversari impreparati. Tutti i piloti diedero prova di grande esperienza e i loro team non furono da meno. Tutto venne giocato sui dettagli di costruzione, guida, preparazione, sviluppo e strategie da adottare in pista. I titoli di campione del mondo del 2003 vennero conquistati dalla Ferrari. Michael Schumacher vinse il suo sesto titolo mondiale battendo il record assoluto, fino ad allora considerato insuperabile, di Juan Manuel Fangio. Con la F2003-GA la Ferrari vinse il Campionato Mondiale Costruttori di Formula 1 e nel Campionato Mondiale dei Piloti piazzò Michael Schumacher al primo posto e Rubens Barrichello al quarto posto. La Ferrari aveva iniziato la stagione in quarta posizione, sia nella classifica dei piloti sia in quella dei costruttori. Il successo ottenuto contro squadre altrettanto competitive come la Williams-BMW, la McLaren-Mercedes e la Renault pilotate da Kimi Raikkonen, Juan Pablo Montoya, Ralf Schumacher, Fernando Alonso e David Coulthard aveva portato alla luce nel 2003 un aspetto del Gran Premio fino ad allora poco apprezzato. L'automobilismo, in modo particolare la Formula 1, è uno sport di squadra. L'equilibro di una gara di Formula 1 dipende da tanti delicati anelli concatenati tra loro, per cui niente è di poco conto e nessuno è superfluo. Chi si occupa di riempire le bottiglie d'acqua è indispensabile per assicurare un box fresco e reattivo e un team management pronto a prendere rapide decisioni. È facile cogliere l'importanza dei piloti, della squadra del box e del management team. Per il successo di una scuderia, tuttavia, è insostituibile anche il ruolo degli addetti alla pulizia del tunnel del vento che garantiscono l'attendibilità e la regolarità dei test effettuati. Non si può negare che se nel 2003 la Ferrari ha vinto il Campionato dei Costruttori e Michael Schumacher quello dei Piloti, il merito lo si deve alla vittoria della F2003-GA (numero telaio 233) pilotata da Rubens Barrichello nel Gran Premio del Giappone conclusivo della stagione. Tuttavia, il risultato di una stagione, non è merito esclusivo di un pilota, bensì degli sforzi complessivi dell'intera squadra Ferrari a Maranello, a partire dai test fino alle gare sui circuiti. La Ferrari F2003-GA La Ferrari F2003-GA è la quarantanovesima monoposto costruita da Ferrari per gareggiare nel Campionato Mondiale di Formula 1. Presentata come l'evoluzione della F2002, la F2003-GA è un omaggio al contributo di Gianni Agnelli apportato alla storia della Ferrari, come denotano le iniziali del suo nome incorporate nel nome del modello. È infatti grazie all'entusiasmo e al supporto del patriarca della Fiat se oggi la Ferrari, oltre a essere annoverata tra i più grandi produttori di auto Gran Turismo e automobili da corsa sportive, è indiscussa dominatrice della scena della F1. Non da meno sono state la leadership di Luca di Montezemolo e le risorse offerte alla Scuderia per riunire la squadra dei sogni, composta da Jean Todt, Ross Brawn, Michael Schumacher e Rubens Barrichello. Perfettamente in sintonia con lo spirito della Formula 1 dove non si perde occasione per apportare anche il più piccolo miglioramento, la F2003-GA era completamente nuova, nel design come nella costruzione. Grande attenzione fu conferita al potenziamento delle prestazioni aerodinamiche e all'abbassamento del baricentro della vettura. La F2003-GA fu completamente ridisegnata al fine di ottimizzare il rendimento del telaio, del motore e dei pneumatici Bridgestone del team Ferrari. La carrozzeria, i radiatori, i terminali e il sistema di scarico, il servosterzo meccanico e le sospensioni anteriori e posteriori, sono stati tutti riprogettati. La ricerca di nuovi materiali ha contribuito a ridurre il peso e le dimensioni del motore e degli organi di trasmissione. Un contributo fondamentale nell’evoluzione del motore serie 052, per quanto riguarda carburante e lubrificanti, è stato dato da Shell. Con la realizzazione di un cambio in titanio completamente nuovo e rifinito, Ferrari ha ridotto le dimensioni e il peso e successivamente definito il meccanismo del cambio idraulico, controllato elettricamente, di cui era stata pioniere. Tale meccanismo è diventato nel tempo la prima scelta sia nella Formula 1 sia nelle vetture ad elevate prestazioni. Ferrari F2003-GA telaio 233 La Ferrari F2003-GA telaio 233 è stata utilizzata nelle gare soltanto due volte, sempre pilotata da Rubens Barrichello. La prima fu al GP d'Italia del 12 settembre, quando Barrichello arrivò terzo davanti a Kimi Raikkonnen della McLaren-Mercedes. Michael Schumacher vinse la corsa di Monza con un distacco di 5,2 secondi sul rivale Juan Pablo Montoya della Williams-BMW. Entrambi i risultati furono cruciali per l'esito della stagione 2003. È stato uno dei titoli più ambiti. Una corsa dove ogni minima variazione avrebbe fatto la differenza, ancora una volta a dimostrare l'importanza del contributo degli addetti al cambio dei pneumatici, dei programmatori dei sistemi di gestione motore e persino delle ragazze che riparano con l'ombrello e accompagnano i piloti alla partenza. All'inizio del GP d'Italia soltanto un punto separava Michael Schumacher, al primo posto, da Montoya, al secondo. Raikkonnen era in terza posizione, con un solo punto di distacco. Monza svolse un ruolo determinante nella conclusione del Gran Premio del 2003, avvenuta in Giappone due corse dopo. È stato, infatti, grazie alla performance di Rubens, in quell'occasione alla guida della F2003-GA s/n 233, che Michael Schumacher riuscì a staccare definitivamente il suo implacabile sfidante (ed eventuale successore alla Scuderia Ferrari nella stagione del 2007) Kimi Raikkonnen. Anche l'esito del GP degli USA a Indianapolis, due settimane dopo, fu determinato dal lavoro di squadra e dalla capacità di comunicazione tra Michael Schumacher e il team management. In condizioni climatiche difficili ed estremamente variabili, il cambio dei pneumatici ebbe un ruolo decisivo nella classifica finale della gara. Impeccabile e perfettamente eseguito, consentì a Schumacher di portarsi in vantaggio, passando dalla settima alla prima posizione in pochi giri. Con la vittoria di Indianapolis Schumacher guadagnò nove punti di vantaggio su Raikkonnen, alla volta della sessione finale del Campionato a Suzuka. Anche se vincendo Raikkonnen avesse guadagnato 10 punti, a Schumacher bastava un solo punto in Giappone per soffiare il titolo all'avversario. Anche in caso di pareggio, il pilota della Ferrari avrebbe avuto più vittorie all'attivo. Ma non fu questo l'esito del GP del Giappone. A Suzuka si disputò una delle migliori corse della stagione. Alla partenza, Schumacher e Raikkonnen erano relegati in ultima posizione. Se Michael non avesse rischiato, persino dal suo 14° posto nella griglia di partenza, sarebbe stato un gioco da ragazzi per lui arrivare ottavo. Inevitabile, visto che la F2003-GA, in tutta la stagione, non era riuscita ad arrivare a fine corsa a causa di un guasto soltanto una volta. Quella del Giappone nel 2003 è stata la competizione per eccellenza di Rubens Barrichello e di riflesso quella del telaio 233. Apre la gara la partenza fulminante di Montoya e Barrichello, con Montoya in testa, fino a quando, al nono giro, il sistema idraulico della Williams del colombiano non subisce un guasto. Anche l'inseguimento di Barrichello da parte di Fernando Alonso termina miseramente verso la fine della gara e Rubinho riporta a casa la Ferrari F2003-GA 233 come vincitore della corsa finale della stagione, 11 secondi in testa alla McLaren-Mercedes di Kimi Raikkonnen. La vittoria di Barrichello con la F2003-GA, telaio 233, e l'ottavo posto di Michael Schumacher assicurano alla Ferrari il tanto bramato titolo mondiale dei Costruttori, detenuto da Williams-BMW fino all'ultima corsa della stagione, mentre le sette vittorie consentono a Schumacher di battere il record di vincita del titolo mondiale piloti. La F2003GA Dalla stagione del 2003 la F2003-GA, telaio 233, viene tenuta dalla Ferrari in condizioni adatte ad affrontare una competizione in qualsiasi momento. Ve la offriamo ora con l'assistenza del reparto Corse Clienti Ferrari F1. Pronta per correre su pista, sarà presentata al nuovo proprietario in una giornata al centro di test e sviluppo di Fiorano, dove sarà consegnata insieme al kit racing F1 comprendente martinetto, ruote, telo di copertura, ruote e pneumatici di scorta, starter, copertura dei pneumatici, sedile adattabile, batteria esterna e cavi di connessione, serbatoio portatile, strumenti e volante portatile. A Fiorano, la consegna e il programma per acquistare familiarità con la vettura includono un giorno intero in pista, il filmato della giornata, l'assistenza da parte della fabbrica Ferrari F1, tuta da corsa e assistenza Clienti F1 per il 2007. Al di là del valore della Ferrari che ammonta a €36.350, questa che vi si presenta è un'occasione dal valore inestimabile per entrare a far parte del team Ferrari che negli ultimi dieci anni ha rivoluzionato il mondo della Formula 1. La vettura, telaio 233, è legata al duplice obiettivo della Ferrari e di Michael Schumacher di vincere il titolo mondiale nel 2003. La terza posizione di Rubens Barrichello a Monza ha permesso a Schumacher di vincere il Campionato Mondiale dei Piloti. Mentre il primo posto della Ferrari telaio 233 pilotata da Barrichello al GP conclusivo della stagione in Giappone ha segnato la vittoria della stagione da parte della Scuderia e del suo pilota numero uno. L'eccezionale potenza, la prontezza e quella capacità di accelerazione che solo la Ferrari F2003-GA può offrire vi dimostrano come quella che vi viene offerta sia un'opportunità straordinaria per acquistare una delle leggendarie Ferrari da corsa della stagione 2003 che ha valso il titolo mondiale ai piloti e ai costruttori della Scuderia. Inoltre, si tratta una Ferrari vincitrice di un Gran Premio che è stata pilotata da Rubens Barrichello nella corsa decisiva del campionato mondiale del 2003. L'acquirente di questa vettura di Formula 1 sarà tenuto a firmare un accordo riguardo all'uso dei vari marchi degli sponsor presenti sulla vettura. Vi pregiamo di mettervi in contatto con un rappresentante RM per prendere visione di una copia di tale accordo Chassis no. 233

  • ITAItaly
  • 2007-05-20
Hammer price
Show price

1933 Duesenberg Model SJ Phaeton

320bhp, 420 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine with four valves per cylinder dual overhead camshafts, hemispherical combustion chambers, three-speed synchromesh manual transmission, front suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and beam axle, rear suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and live rear axle, and vacuum-assisted four wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 153.5" Many superlative automobiles have been built during the century-plus history of self-propelled travel, but few have spawned new words for our lexicon. It is a testament to the Duesenberg Model J that anything great or grand is called a “doozie” (by whatever spelling). While its designers, Frederick and August Duesenberg, are best remembered for the immortal J, they earned their reputations building racing cars. As a result, competition technology found its way into all of the high performance automobiles they built for the road. Like many in the automobile business, the Duesenberg brothers started with bicycles. Fred, a bicycle racer, worked for Thomas Jeffery, maker of Rambler bikes in Wisconsin. Returning home to Iowa, he opened a garage with Augie, and designed a two-cylinder automobile. A local attorney named Mason was impressed, and put up money so they could manufacture it. The Mason Motor Car Company of Des Moines and later Waterloo, built cars until 1914, but the Duesenbergs sold control of the firm to washing machine manufacturer F.L. Maytag in 1909. The Duesenbergs’ skill and creativity trickled down to other early American automakers. Their four-cylinder walking-beam engine, produced by Rochester, powered half a dozen marques. Eddie Rickenbacker, Rex Mays, Peter DePaolo, Tommy Milton, Albert Guyot, Ralph DePalma, Fred Frame, Deacon Litz, Joe Russo, Stubby Stubblefield, Jimmy Murphy, Ralph Mulford and Ab Jenkins all drove their racing cars. Duesenbergs, seventy in all, competed in fifteen consecutive Indy 500s, starting in 1913. Thirty-two of them finished in the top ten. The brothers became masters of supercharging and reliability. Because engines were Fred’s specialty, their engines were beautiful and performed with the best of Miller, Peugeot and Ballot. In 1921 Jimmy Murphy’s Duesenberg won the French Grand Prix at Le Mans, the first car with hydraulic brakes to start in a Grand Prix race. Duesenberg reprised this performance at Indianapolis in 1922, where eight of the top 10 cars were Duesenberg-powered. Late in World War I, Duesenberg Motors tooled up to build the Bugatti U-16 aero engine. Then the company turned its attention to the Duesenberg Model A, a 183 cubic inch single overhead cam inline eight. It would be built by a new corporation, Duesenberg Automobiles and Motors, which soon moved from Elizabeth, New Jersey, to Indianapolis. After the Model A’s design was complete, Fred and Augie began development of a 122 cubic inch supercharged straight eight for the championship series and Indianapolis. Fred Duesenberg was an intuitive and creative designer, to whom new ideas came easily. In a quarter-century he and Augie conceived and built more different, distinctive automobiles and engines – even a racing two-stroke for Indianapolis – than any other designers of the era. Duesenberg Automobiles and Motors was plucked from the post-World War I recession by Errett Lobban Cord. Cord, the savior of Auburn, had lifted the foundering Indiana automaker out of the doldrums by sprucing up unsold cars with bright paint jobs and selling them with creative marketing. In 1926, looking for the means to build a more prestigious car, he bought the struggling but very inventive Duesenberg company. Added to Cord's growing industrial empire, which also included Lycoming engines and the Limousine Body Company, Duesenberg provided a luxury nameplate with advanced engineering. The Model A became, in a sense, the wealthy sportsman’s Pierce-Arrow. For the price of a Pierce Model 36 with T-head six and mechanical brakes, one could get a sophisticated overhead cam eight and four-wheel hydraulics in a Duesenberg – and appear trendier besides. The Model J and SJ Cord, however, wanted more than a bought-in luxury car. He had also been attracted by the brothers’ engineering prowess. To realize Cord’s dream, Fred was given an assignment – build the best car in the world. More than a competitor for Cadillac or Packard, it was intended from the outset to be better than Rolls-Royce, Hispano-Suiza, Isotta Fraschini and Bugatti. The Duesenberg Model J lived up to Cord’s expectations. It was superlative in all respects. Its short wheelbase chassis was 142.5 inches, the long one nearly 13 feet. The 420 cubic inch dual overhead camshaft straight eight had four valves per cylinder and made 265 horsepower. The finest materials were used throughout, and fit and finish were to precision standards. Each chassis was driven 100 miles at high speed at Indianapolis without a body. The chassis were then clothed by the finest coachbuilders in the world. The Model J was introduced at the New York Auto Salon on December 1, 1928. It made headlines. The combination of the Duesenberg reputation with the Model J’s grandeur and elegance made it the star of the show. Duesenberg ordered sufficient components to build 500 Model Js, while continuing development to ensure its perfection. The first delivery came in May 1929, barely five months before Black Tuesday. After the Model J’s introduction, Fred Duesenberg worked to make it even more powerful, applying his pet centrifugal supercharger to the Model J’s giant eight, just as he had done so successfully to his small racing engines. Fred died after a road accident in a Model J in 1932. Augie, until then independently and successfully building Duesenberg racing cars, was retained to put the final touches on the supercharged Model J. The result, the 320 horsepower “SJ,” was the holy grail of American luxury performance automobiles. The effect of the Duesenberg J on America cannot be overstated. Even in the depths of the Depression, this paragon of power was a portent of prosperity. Duesenberg’s advertising became a benchmark, featuring the wealthy and privileged in opulent surroundings with only a single line of copy: “He drives a Duesenberg”, or “She drives a Duesenberg.” The external exhaust pipes of the supercharged models inspired generations of auto designers and remain a symbol of power and performance. While most Duesenbergs were coachbuilt to clients’ orders, often with intimate client involvement during design, construction and trimming, Duesenberg also developed an in-house line of bodies from the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg design department, most of them penned by Gordon Buehrig. Styled La Grande, Duesenberg’s proprietary designs were built by several coachbuilders and supplied to the Duesenberg factory in Indianapolis where they were mounted and trimmed either to clients’ order or for stock. Although most were built by the Union City Body Company, a few were built by other houses, including Brunn, Weymann, and A.H. Walker. Duesenberg’s La Grande bodies have stood the test of time, their classic elegance and tasteful embellishment distinguishing them among the most coveted coachwork on these great chassis. In an era of great designers and coachbuilders, this is an exceptional recognition. J510 The handsome Duesenberg La Grande Phaeton offered here, J510, has a particularly fascinating history. A supercharged example, it was tested in July 1933 by the Duesenberg test driver, one Mr. Lange, before being acquired by Mr. Ben E. Smith, Sr. of the brokers Hutton & Co. in New York the following month. The coachwork was particularly interesting in as much as it was one of just three supercharged phaetons built by La Grande, all on the long wheelbase chassis. It is the second of the three cars built, but was specified as a five passenger phaeton with accessory rear windscreen. The most likely reason for this order is that the full dual cowl configuration made entry and exit from the rear seat awkward, and the weight of the cowl and windscreen assembly was difficult for many to manage. Although fourteen La Grande Phaetons were built in total – including the short wheelbase and non-supercharged cars – just eight are known to survive. Of those, as noted above, just three were factory supercharged cars, as J510 was. By 1944, Mr. Smith’s son, Ben E. Smith, Jr., had taken the car to Mexico where it was given to Bruno Paglie, the manager of the Hipodromo built by Smith in Mexico City. After its tenure with Paglie, the car was acquired in 1950 by Valentine G. Melgarejo, a used car dealer, presumably also in Mexico. Melgarejo kept the big Model J for 18 years before passing it on to William J. Metta of Alabama, who is reported to have partially restored,it, with just 26,000 miles showing. It passed next through James Southard in 1975, a dealer based in Wisconsin. The same year it is believed to have been purchased by Thomas S. Gene Storms, who purchased a faithful Leo Gephardt reproduction supercharger in 1979. J510 has remained in California ever since, acquired by its current owner 25 years ago. As presented, the car is in excellent restored condition throughout, finished in dark red with a cream sweep panel, and reveal. The interior is beautifully trimmed in tan leather with a tan Haartz cloth top. The odometer shows less than 31,400 miles, which are believed to be original. Notable features include dual driving lights, cowl lights, a rear-mounted trunk, and dual side-mounted spare wheels and tires with hard covers and sideview mirrors. There are many, including the author, who believe that the majesty of the mighty Model J is best appreciated when seen with the largest and sportiest coachwork, on the long wheelbase supercharged chassis. Only 18 long wheelbase supercharged cars were built, and of those, only three carried Gordon Buehrig’s spectacular La Grande Phaeton coachwork, making them arguably the rarest and most desirable Duesenbergs of all. J510 is particularly appealing to collectors today because of its continuous history – just a handful of owners have cared for this magnificent automobile over its nearly 80 year history – the most recent of which has owned the car for more than 25 years alone. It is a great car not because a restorer has made it great. No herculean effort was required to bring it back from the brink of salvage – or beyond – simply because its owners have never allowed the car to deteriorate to the point that complete restoration was needed. Such cars are exceedingly difficult to find, and when they come to market, they are seldom seen again for many years. To own a Duesenberg is a great thing, but how much better it is to own a great Duesenberg! Addendum Please note that this vehicle is titled under the engine number. Chassis no. 2540

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-10-10
Hammer price
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1929 Stutz Model M Supercharged Coupe by Lancefield

Est. 185 bhp, 325 cu. in. SOHC inline eight-cylinder engine with centrifugal supercharger, four-speed manual transmission, semi-elliptical leaf springs front and rear, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 134.5 in. Offered from the collection of marque specialist Richard Mitchell One of just three extant supercharged Stutzes The most famous automobile of the A.K. Miller collection Original chassis, engine, and coachwork, as-delivered in 1929 Exceptional restoration; a major award-winner all over North America A STUTZ ENGINEERED FOR LE MANS As the dust of Le Mans settled in 1928, American manufacturer Stutz stood back and reviewed the results. The company had made its return to international racing that year, following an absence of over a decade, with a stock Stutz entered at Le Mans by a French syndicate. The car finished the race 2nd Overall, recording an average speed of 106.53 mph, a feat that historian and collector Dr. Fred Simeone notes in his book, The Spirit of Competition, would stand as the best finish by an American car at the fabled event until 1966. Stutz’s Model M engine, an overhead-cam eight aptly dubbed the Challenger, was advanced and powerful for its time, but Bentley countered it for 1929 with its new, massive, and potent 6½-Litre model. Building a bigger engine was not in the cards for Stutz, but in “Bentley Boy” fashion they decided to try supercharging. A centrifugal blower was developed, mounted at the front of the engine, between the front frame irons; a control on the dashboard would engage the blower, forcing additional induction through the carburetor by a long pipe. With the supercharger engaged, a blown Stutz could produce an estimated 185 brake horsepower. Three supercharged cars were submitted to Le Mans, sent to Europe through U.K. distributor Warwick Wright Ltd. of New Bond Street, London. One of the trio retired in 4th place, while another finished 5th Overall, behind four Bentleys. It was a bold effort and one of the most imaginative and inventive efforts by any American company to win at Le Mans – as well as one of the first American supercharged cars seen in Europe. Only three authentic supercharged Stutz automobiles are known to survive today: the former Harrah’s Weymann-bodied Le Mans tourer in the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum; a Derham-bodied convertible coupe, long prized in a well-known private collection; and the beautiful beast offered here. THE GREATEST TREASURE OF “KING STUTZ TOMB” Chassis number M-C-31312 was supplied by Warwick Wright to the United Kingdom and was mounted with its present coupe coachwork, identified on its builder’s tag as being commissioned by the London firm of Brainsby-Woolard (essentially a “coachwork broker”) to the renowned shop of Lancefield. Lancefield was known for its designs of subtle sporting elegance, and its trademark styling touches are present on the Stutz, including the low “gun turret” roofline, “helmet”-style fenders, teardrop step plates instead of running boards, and stamped louvered panels covering the sides of the chassis frame. A letter on file from U.K. Stutz historian and author of a yet-unpublished book on the subject, Norman Barrs relates that interviews carried out by him with a man who apprenticed with Warwick Wright, Ltd., established that at least four of these supercharged coupes with similar but not identical coachwork were produced by Lancefield in 1929. One of the customers is known to be a Mr. Resting, who was a senior manager for F.W. Woolworth, and another customer was a Mr. John MacAlpine. In 1946, M-C-31312 was acquired by Alexander Kennedy Miller while on a car hunting trip in the United Kingdom, which according to Mr. Barrs, came from an unknown owner in the Midlands. Extant photos supplied by the Simeone Automotive Foundation show the car outside of his uncle’s house in London prior to export to the United States, along with a late Stanley Steamer he acquired at the same time. Son and heir to a wealthy stockbroker, Mr. Miller became an enthusiast of Stutz automobiles at the time when they were still in production. Even as he moved from Montclair, New Jersey, to a rural Vermont farm, he continued to buy Stutzes and their parts, secreting them away in barns, sheds, and lean-tos on the property and selling parts to other enthusiasts in need. Well known to Stutz aficionados, he nonetheless remained something of an enigma to the outside world at the time of his passing in 1993. Three years later, his estate was sold at auction, in an epic unveiling of the long-hidden automobile collection dubbed “The Opening of King Stutz Tomb” by the media. The Lancefield coupe was the centerpiece of the collection and the featured lot of the auction, selling to well-known Canadian collector David Cohen in much the same configuration as when Mr. Miller acquired it, stripped down to the original aluminum body panels. The aforementioned photographs taken in London in 1946 have been closely examined and clearly show the bodywork to be of metal with a padded leather top, rather than the fabric Weymann-style paneling occasionally described. Mr. Cohen had the Stutz restored in black with red striping and a red interior, and proceeded to enter it in the 1997 Beijing–Paris Motor Challenge, a grueling 45-day rally. Despite the fact that the restoration was literally hours old, with no test miles, upon the car’s shipment to China, the Stutz nonetheless performed valiantly until a lack of critical spare electrical parts forced a reluctant withdraw from the event. It was subsequently invited to the 2000 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where, freshened and recovered from its Beijing–Parris travails, it was judged Best in Class and awarded the Briggs Cunningham Trophy. Later in 2000 the car was acquired by the noted sportsman and enthusiast Skip Barber, who subjected it to thorough mechanical sorting by the noted Massachusetts firm of Holman Engineering. As part of this work, the supercharger was fully rebuilt with improved modern internal components and fitted with a rebuilt proper carburetor, with other mechanical improvements between 2003 and 2005. Following a Best of Show at the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance in 2006, the car was added to the John O’Quinn collection, from which Stutz authority Richard Mitchell acquired it four years later. Mr. Mitchell examined the car’s original restoration and had his restoration shop, Old Iron Works of Montgomery, Texas, restore the Stutz anew. The shop thoroughly evaluated the mechanical aspects of the engine and chassis, returning them to original condition while re-plating the brightwork throughout and refinishing the coachwork. It was displayed in a special Stutz feature class at the 2011 Pebble Beach Concours, and gathered Best of Show awards, at the Keeneland, Ault Park, and Sante Fe Concours, as well as the Milwaukee Masterpiece and the Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival. In fact, the Keeneland Best of Show trophy was won twice, in both 2012 and 2014! The car scored 99.75 points at the CCCA Annual Meeting in 2012, and today holds Senior badge number 3027. Quite simply, every Stutz enthusiast knows and adores “The Lancefield,” which can now be considered not only one of the most famous denizens of the Miller barn, but also one of the best-known Stutzes that exists. It boasts the rarest factory supercharged drivetrain, engineered for Le Mans, and the most stunning European-designed coachwork created for a Stutz. Together they combine to make one of the ultimate performance automobiles of their age. Chassis no. M-C-31312 Engine no. 32018

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
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1956 Bentley S1 Continental Drophead Coupe by Park Ward

Body Style 700. Est. 178 bhp, 4,887 cc F-head inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 123 in. One of just 31 left-hand-drive examples built of this most desirable design Numbers-matching original engine Delivered new to American banker and socialite Edwin Jay Gould Only two registered owners; retained by its original owner until 1993 High-quality restoration by marque specialists Vantage Motorworks Complete with both original tool sets and even original keys An exceptional example in every regard Chassis number BC22LBG is the most desirable catalogued S1 Continental body style, the drophead coupe by Park Ward. Unlike the majority of Bentley convertibles during this era, this style was not an “adaptation” from factory design stampings, but rather a fully custom body, built from the ground up by Park Ward’s craftsmen, handcrafted in aluminum. It is distinguished by smooth, subtle body lines, with the long, fully “flow through” fenders that flow from the front to the rear “hips,” and rear fenders that kick up slightly to form tiny tailfins. Park Ward built this design on only 31 left-hand-drive S1 Continental chassis, and the survivors are among the most fiercely prized of all post-war Bentleys. The car offeredƒre was ordered by Edwin Jay Gould, great-grandson of railroad tycoon Jay Gould, and later to become a prominent New York real estate investor and socialite in his own right, who distinguished himself as a sportsman and conservationist. Only 25 at the time that he took delivery of his Bentley, Mr. Gould specified the car with sealed-beam headlamps, special fender lights, and Windtone horns, as well as the usual U.S. features, including a speedometer in miles-per-hour. Mr. Gould’s Bentley was delivered into his care at Rose Hill Plantation in Bluffton, South Carolina, his mother’s estate. Interestingly, the Rolls-Royce Phantom II Croydon Convertible Coupe and Newport Town Car also on offer this weekend were owned by Mr. and Mrs. Gould; thus, we have the unusual and coincidental good fortune to offer three automobiles that were once owned by the same family – father, mother, and in this case, son. The S1 Continental remained with Mr. Gould, its original owner, until his passing in 1993. It was in solid and original condition, with just over 40,000 actual miles recorded, and was titled in Palm Beach, Florida, to which it had relocated in 1990. Well-known Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialist Richard Gorman was successful in acquiring the car from the estate, and his respected Vantage Motorworks of Miami proceeded to give it a sympathetic restoration. An attractive livery of Gunmetal Grey over Mason’s Black, with Dove Grey Connolly leather interior piped in black and an English mohair top, was chosen. While the car is believed to have changed hands twice since, Mr. Smith was only the second private owner to title the car, in 2010, and therefore is its second registered owner. As part of upgrades and improvements to the restoration in 2008, Vantage installed one of their well-known, period factory-style air conditioning conversions, making the car more suitable for enthusiastic year-round use under the Florida sun. The car retains “purdah” glass sun visors, as-original, as well as a later, period-correct radio. Importantly, at the time of cataloguing, the splendid, immaculate restoration had recorded 50,511 miles – still actual mileage, and accounting for about 10,000 miles of enjoyment in Mr. Smith’s caring hands. Accompanying the Bentley today are the original and complete sets of road and hand tools, with the hand tool tray featuring the extremely rare and desirable “Kismet” tire gauge with its original paper wrapping; the original set of keys with codes engraved; an original owner’s handbook; and documentation of its long-term care by the original owner. The offering of a correct and proper, original left-hand-drive S1 Continental drophead coupe is a great and wonderful rarity. Few, however, have such a pristine history, fine equipment, and splendid, well-sorted restoration as this low-mileage example. It is an exceptional automobile, owned and treasured since new by exceptional men. Chassis no. BC22LBG Engine no. BC21B

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
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1995 Ferrari F50

520 bhp, 4,698 cc V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic 2.7 engine management, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and unequal length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 101.6 in. The original show car used to introduce the F50 at Geneva in 1995 The last Ferrari with a five-digit chassis number Used for F50 promotional materials Delivered new to legendary Ferrari dealer Jacques Swaters Carefully maintained, with less than 1,100 miles “Fifty years of racing, fifty years of winning, fifty years of hard work.” With these words, Luca di Montezemolo introduced the stunning Ferrari F50 on March 6, 1995, at the Auto Museum in Geneva, Switzerland, in conjunction with the city’s 63rd annual auto show. Niki Lauda was on the list of prominent guests, which included various Ferrari dealers, distributors, clients, and friends. Piero Lardi Ferrari and Sergio Pininfarina removed the car cover to officially present the new car to the world. The F40 may have been a hard act to follow, but Ferrari’s designers exceeded themselves with the F50, which replaced its predecessor’s small capacity, twin-turbo V-8 powerplant with a more traditional Ferrari V-12 layout. Using technology derived from Ferrari’s Formula One V-12, the new, naturally aspirated 4.7-liter engine featured a 65-degree angle between the two cylinder banks and four overhead camshafts with three intake and two exhaust valves per cylinder. Its compression ratio was 11.3:1, and a Bosch Motronic 2.7 unit controlled the fuel injection and ignition, while a throttle valve driven by the ECU allowed for two exhaust lengths, with one tuned to achieve the greatest torque and the other for better top-end performance, reducing the backpressure on the exhaust. In fact, the self-diagnostic system even adhered to California’s notoriously strict exhaust emission standards. The crankcase itself was made of high-strength nodular cast iron, while Nikasil-coated liners and the connecting rods were made of titanium. Dry-sump oiling was used with three scavenge pumps and one supply pump. All told, maximum output reached 520 brake horsepower at 8,500 rpm and peak torque was 347 foot-pounds at 6,500 rpm. The 436-pound engine itself was durable and capable of reaching over 10,000 rpm. A six-speed longitudinal gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine, between which was mounted the oil tank for the dry-sump engine lubrication system—all reminiscent of the layout used in Ferrari’s contemporary Formula One cars. Top speed was purportedly 325 km/h (202 mph), and the 0–60 dash required merely 3.7 seconds. Covering the standing mile in just 30.3 seconds, some commentators described the F50 as a Ferrari F1 machine with a second seat and a sports car body. The comparison was far from unfounded. The chassis was made entirely of Cytec aerospace carbon fiber and weighed a mere 225 pounds. The aircraft-style rubber fuel bladder was contained within this chassis, behind the driver and in front of the engine. For the first time in a Ferrari road car, the engine/gearbox/differential assembly acted as a load-bearing structure. Large brake discs were ventilated, drilled, and fitted with four-piston Brembo brake calipers. The brakes were so good, in fact, that ABS was deemed unnecessary. Inside, the instrument panel featured a tachometer and speedometer, as well as fuel, oil, and water temperatures and oil pressure gauges, which were all controlled by a microcomputer and displayed to the driver by LCD. This computerized system also included a statistics bank, which memorized the various use and mission profile parameters of the car. Fully adjustable, the throttle, brake, and clutch pedals were all drilled for weight reduction. The gated gearshift was traditional Ferrari and, in the interest of weight, even the gear knob and lever were made of lightweight composite materials. Virtually every element benefited from cutting-edge technology. In typical Ferrari fashion, the company announced that just 349 cars would be built over two years, which was one less than the market demanded. The first 10 cars went to Europe, while deliveries to the United States began in July 1995. Each owner received a document signed by Luca di Montezemolo, attesting to the authenticity of the car, and all the owners were invited back to Modena after the last F50 was produced, in order to celebrate the evolution of the car. While the release of the F50 series was a landmark event, the example offered here, chassis 99999, is particularly significant. First of all, it marks the end of an era, as it is the last Ferrari to be assigned a five-digit chassis number. (Long-standing rumors of more than one 99999 having been built have been disproven; a simple case of misunderstanding a journalist.) It also served as a show car for Ferrari and was displayed at some of the most prestigious motor shows when the F50 was first introduced to the world. Significantly, it is not one of the 349, and it bears special mark chassis plates. First shown at Geneva in March 1995, chassis 99999 appeared at such venues as the Ferrari Days at Spa-Francorchamps and was displayed to Ferrari clients at Fiorano, followed by an appearance at the Tutte le Ferrari meeting held at Mugello. It had previously pounded lap after lap on Ferrari’s Fiorani test track, and usually wearing Italian registration ‘MO2112,’ it covered hundreds of kilometers on the roads around Maranello in the hands of such drivers as Niki Lauda and Jean Alesi. The car served as the pin-up queen for factory posters and glamour photos, such as those by Rainer Schlegelmilch; it was the basis for scale models by Bburago, Maisto, Tamiya, Revell, and others, and also cutaway drawings by Shin Yoshikawa. Its now-iconic image was used for the stock press pictures in Ferrari sales literature, books, and magazines. As might be expected, these Ferrari supercars were sold new to the company’s most important and discerning clients. Following its high-profile show career, chassis 99999 was presented to Ferrari dealer Jacques Swaters’ Garage Francorchamps SA, which is located in Zaventem, near Brussels, Belgium. Mr. Swaters, a close, personal friend of Enzo Ferrari’s and a long-standing principal of the highly successful Ecurie Francorchamps racing team, is known to have retained 99999 until at least 2006. In late October of that year, the car was advertised for sale in the Ferrari Market Letter. It was sold to the United States, and in August 2008, the F50 was displayed at Quail Lodge in Carmel, California. Under the previous owner’s care, the F50 was 49-state federalized by G&K, in Irvine, California, and has been carefully maintained and sparingly driven. Today, the odometer shows fewer than 1,100 miles. It has received a full mechanical inspection, and new tires were recently installed. As offered today, the car is in outstanding condition, fully serviced, and complete with a dossier of documents, including Ferrari Classiche certification, a hardtop with anvil case, all the books, including serial-numbered shop manuals and parts books with microfiche, and fitted luggage. Currently, 99999 is registered with a clear title on New York license plates ‘F50.’ The condition of this F50 will satisfy the most demanding collector of high performance automobiles and ensures that it will be able to provide all the remarkable performance for which enthusiasts everywhere revere in these exceedingly rare supercars. A “halo car” in the purest sense, it offers a driving experience unlike any other—at once nimble, exhilarating, and unapologetically aggressive. Chassis no. ZFFTA46B000099999

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
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1967 Lamborghini Marzal

175 bhp, 1964 cc six-cylinder in-line engine, three Weber 40DCOE carburettors, five-speed gearbox, independent front and rear suspension with triangular wishbones, coil springs, telescopic dampers and anti-roll bars, four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,620 mm (103.1") - From the Collection of Bertone S.p.A. - Unveiled at Geneva Motor Show (March 1967) - One-off Lamborghini four seat, gullwing concept - A futuristic Marcello Gandini design with unique, prototype engine - Predecessor to the Espada production car “A Bertone design so fresh that everything else looks old fashioned,” was Road & Track’s opening comment in its July 1967 report on the stunning Lamborghini Marzal show car. Introduced at the Geneva Motor Show four months earlier, the P200 Marzal was the result of a close collaboration between Bertone and Lamborghini. In fact, it was the materialisation of a common ambition shared by Nuccio Bertone and Ferruccio Lamborghini: to give birth to a true GT with comfortable seating for four, offering high performance and redefining the very concept of grand touring. Suitably named after a strain of fighting bull, the Marzal featured a unique prototype engine developed by Lamborghini that would never see production. It was a transversally mounted in-line six-cylinder which was essentially a rear bank of a Miura’s 3,929-cc V-12, fed by horizontal Weber carburettors and mated to the standard five-speed transmission. The engine was turned 180 degrees compared to the Miura’s layout so that it was behind the rear axle, therefore making it more of a rear- than mid-engined layout. This obviously freed up interior space so that four passengers could sit comfortably. The radiator was fitted right at the rear, which meant the passengers could take some luggage too, as the long front bonnet housed 11 cubic feet of loading space, along with a 21-gallon fuel tank. The chassis was based on a much-modified Miura chassis, its wheelbase extended by 120 mm to accommodate those extra two passengers. As the overall length was still relatively compact, Marcello Gandini elected to use a pair of long gullwing doors rather than a constrained four-door layout. This enabled him to fit large windows which, combined with a lightly smoked glass roof, helped create a very airy feeling inside the cabin. Bertone helped engineer the air-conditioning system made mandatory by such a large amount of glass surfacing, which totalled 4.5 square metres (48.4 sq. ft.) and was supplied by Belgian company, Glaverbel. Famously, Ferruccio Lamborghini objected to those doors, in particular the lower windows mounted below the waistline which would “offer no privacy: a lady’s legs would be there for all to see.” Supporting the weight of those hefty gullwing doors when open were a pair of long transverse springs at the rear of the engine bay operated by a pulley and shaft system which relied in part on cleverly-recycled steering column components. The one-piece rear engine cover was hinged at the bottom rear, and for all the glass employed in the cabin there was no rear screen, replaced as it was by a panel made of aluminium slats riveted together. The assembly allowed for rear visibility as well as air circulation to help with engine cooling. The interior was highly futuristic, with a hexagonal honeycomb theme on the dashboard and centre console housing most instruments and controls. The hexagon theme was carried over even in the general shape of the seat’s cushions and backrests, whilst their trim literally stood out with a highly reflective finish. This space-age arrangement may even have inspired the great French-American designer Raymond Loewy, whose designs for the Skylab space station, developed from 1967 onwards, would rely heavily on hexagonal patterns. It must be noted that the interior underwent some variations in period, presumably both before and after the car’s unveiling, as elements such as the steering wheel, gear knob, instruments and the trim itself were modified in stages. The configuration of the car as it stands now still dates back to the 1960s. The Campagnolo magnesium wheels of the Marzal – complete with gorgeous three-eared spinners – were a true masterpiece in themselves, their elaborate, sporting design echoing that of the Miura’s wheels only with added elegance. Even the form of the holes was a continuation of the hexagonal theme seen throughout the interior and on the rear window slats. The slender nose featured six Marchal quartz-iodine headlamps, likely the smallest available at the time, to fit between the lip of the bonnet and the innovative black rubber bumper. The body was made of steel, with the massive front bonnet crafted in aluminium, presumably to make it more manageable to lift. Styling-wise, the car was full of detail touches which converged to make the shape more dynamic. Note the polished metal sills running the length of the car to make the body appear even slimmer and the perceived proportions even more dramatic. Clever surface sculpting is evident throughout, such as in the way the upper wing’s edge, although interrupted by the large side window, is picked up again above the rear wheel arch, adding just the right amount of volume over the rear wheel and creating a subtle housing for a cleverly-concealed side intake feeding the engine. The lip of the front wheel arch peaked right at the edge of the bonnet, contributing once again to its very slim look. Four years later, Bertone’s chief stylist Marcello Gandini would have the lip overlap on the bonnet altogether for an even more pronounced effect on the Stratos Stradale. Whereas Gandini’s earlier projects for Bertone (Miura, Montreal, Fiat Dino Coupé) may still have been tinged with some of Giugiaro’s own design flair, the Marzal entirely broke away from that mould and was the car that confirmed Gandini’s position as a star designer in his own right. The softly-spoken man declared: “Basically, the Marzal was drifting towards what science-fiction writers had been promising. With these prototypes a public declaration was made of our way of seeing the cars of the future.” Certainly, a whole generation of kids fell in love with the Marzal thanks to the models produced in numbers by the likes of Matchbox, Dinky Toys, Politoys, Penny and others. The Marzal made a notable appearance at the Monaco Grand Prix on May 7, 1967, where it was driven around the circuit by Prince Rainier together with Princess Grace. Features followed in the international press, topped by a proper test drive by Italian magazine Quattroruote, which noted the engine’s liveliness in its October 1967 issue. Although never fully developed by Lamborghini, the Marzal was estimated to be good for a 225 km/h top speed (140 mph). The respected Automobile Year annual noted that four members of its staff had spent an entire day driving in the car, adding that if it were to spawn a production version, they would have no hesitation in naming it their “Car of the Year.” The Marzal was indeed followed into production the following year by the Lamborghini Espada four-seater coupé, which retained the Marzal’s general aesthetics but did away with the rear-engine layout and glass doors. The initial Espada pre-series prototypes still sported gullwing doors, but those too had disappeared by the time the final car reached production. That the Espada remained in production until 1978 is a testament to the Marzal’s novelty. The show car was influential enough to still have an impact on car designers decades later. Bertone itself adapted the concept with its 1994 Karisma concept, which replicated the rear engine layout and long gullwing doors giving access to a plush interior seating four, this time on Porsche mechanicals. The future owner of the Marzal will not only possess a landmark example of design by Italy’s dominant post-war coachbuilding industry, one the illustrious British journalist LJK Setright described as “perhaps the most extravagant piece of virtuoso styling to have come out of Europe since the war,” but with it a very unique prototype Lamborghini engine, the only one of its type ever made. This lot is subject to VAT (at 20%) on the full purchase price (both on the hammer price and the commission). ITALIANTEXT 175 cavalli, motore 6 cilindri in linea di 1964 cm3, tre carburatori Weber 40DCOE, cambio manuale a cinque marce, sospensioni a ruote indipendenti ant./post. a bracci triangolari, molle elicoidali, ammortizzatori telescopici e barre antirollio, freni a disco. Passo: 2.620 mm - Dalla Collezione della Bertone S.p.A. - Presentata al Salone dell’Automobile di Ginevra (marzo 1967) - Esemplare unico a quattro posti e portiere con apertura ad ala di gabbiano; motore prototipo - Stile avveniristico firmato da Marcello Gandini - Prefigurazione dell'Espada di produzione “Una creazione Bertone così fresca da rendere tutte le altre vetture fuori moda.” Con queste parole si apriva la recensione pubblicata dall’autorevole rivista statunitense Road & Track nel luglio 1967 sulla favolosa Lamborghini Marzal. La vettura, presentata appena quattro mesi prima al Salone di Ginevra, era il frutto di una stretta collaborazione tra Bertone e Lamborghini. Con essa si materializzava infatti un’ambizione comune sia di Nuccio Bertone che di Ferruccio Lamborghini, ossia di dare vita a una vera GT in grado di ospitare comodamente quattro persone e di offrire grandi prestazioni, ridefinendo così lo stesso concetto di gran turismo. Ufficialmente denominata P200 Marzal (nome di una razza di tori da combattimento), la vettura era motorizzata con il prototipo di un propulsore a sei cilindri in linea sviluppato dalla Lamborghini, ma che non avrebbe avuto nessuno sbocco in produzione. Si trattava essenzialmente di una singola bancata del motore V12 e 3929 cm3 della Miura, istallato anch’esso trasversalmente ma girato a 180 gradi e in posizione arretrata rispetto all’assale posteriore. Era alimentato da tre carburatori Weber orizzontali e abbinato alla trasmissione a cinque rapporti della Miura. L’architettura a motore posteriore garantiva ampio spazio nell’abitacolo, che accoglieva quattro persone in ottime condizioni di comfort. Il radiatore era posto dietro al motore per liberare un vano bagagli anteriore di 311 dm3, con spazio anche per un serbatoio di 80 litri. Per il pianale si era partito da un telaio Miura profondamente modificato e allungato nel passo di 120 mm per accomodare i due passeggeri in più. La lunghezza totale relativamente contenuta condusse lo stilista Marcello Gandini ad adottare due lunghe portiere con apertura ad ala di gabbiano piuttosto che una soluzione a quattro porte tradizionali molto più vincolante. Fu così in grado di allestire le porte con grandi pannelli trasparenti che, in combinazione con il tetto in vetro fumè, conferivano una sensazione di grande leggerezza alla cellula abitativa. La Bertone partecipò allo sviluppo dell’avanzato impianto di climatizzazione interna reso necessario dall’ampia superficie vetrata. I cristalli, realizzati dalla società Belga Glaverbel, avevano uno sviluppo totale di ben 4,5 m2. Ad onor del vero, Ferruccio Lamborghini non era entusiasta di quel dispiego di vetro, in particolare dei lunghi finestrini collocati sotto la linea di cintura vettura, che secondo lui non “proteggono l’intimità: le gambe di una signora sono date a vedere a tutti.” Per reggere il peso delle portiere aperte e facilitarne il movimento erano stati disposte lunghe molle nel vano motore con un articolato sistema di rinvio costruito con elementi di sterzo appositamente riciclati. Tutta la parte posteriore della carrozzeria si apriva all’indietro in un pezzo unico, incernierato alla base. In contrasto con l’uso di vetro estensivo dell’abitacolo, al posto del lunotto vi era un originale pannello composto da pezzi di alluminio rivettati insieme, con aperture esagonali che servivano sia alla visibilità posteriore che al raffreddamento del motore. Gli interni erano decisamente avveniristici, con motivi a nido d’ape sulla plancia e sulla consolle centrale che ospitava vari strumenti e comandi. Anche i sedili riprendevano una forma esagonale nel contorno della seduta e dello schienale, mentre il loro rivestimento spiccava per l’uso di finta pelle così riflettente da sembrare quasi metallica in pieno sole. In piena era spaziale, forse questo stile marcatamente futuristico ebbe qualche influenza sul noto designer franco americano Raymond Loewy, il quale usò forme esagonali ricorrenti nel concepire gli interni del veicolo spaziale Skylab, progetto al quale partecipò dal 1967 in avanti. Occorre notare che gli interni furono soggetti ad alcune variazioni all’epoca, presumibilmente sia prima che dopo la presentazione ufficiale della vettura. Elementi quali il volante, il pomello del cambio, la strumentazione di bordo e la selleria vennero modificati in tempi successivi. La configurazione in cui viene oggi presentata la vettura risale comunque agli anni Sessanta. I cerchi in magnesio della Marzal, completi di stupendi gallettoni a tre alette, furono realizzati dalla Campagnolo. Costituivano di per sé un capolavoro di stile: il loro design elaborato richiamava i cerchi della Miura, se possibile con un’eleganza ancora maggiore. Persino la forma dei fori riprendeva il tema dei motivi esagonali evidenziato negli interni e nella copertura del lunotto. Il frontale esile era caratterizzato da sei proiettori allo iodio Marchal, i più piccoli disponibili all’epoca, che erano alloggiati tra il becco del cofano e l’innovativo paraurto di gomma nera. La carrozzeria battuta a mano era in acciaio, tranne l’imponente cofano che era in alluminio per renderlo più agevole da muovere. Dal punto di vista estetico, la Marzal era piena di piccoli accorgimenti che ne rafforzavano le forme dinamiche. Ad esempio, le parti inferiori della carrozzeria erano in lamiera spazzolata per far sembrare più sottile il profilo generale e accentuarne visivamente le proporzioni slanciate. I volumi erano finemente modellati: lo spigolo dei parafanghi anteriori veniva interrotto dalle porte vetrate, ma riprendeva più in alto al posteriore per dare più “muscolatura” sopra il passaruota, creando allo stesso momento il giusto volume per integrare una presa d’aria motore seminascosta. Il filo superiore della palpebra del passaruota anteriore coincideva con lo spigolo del cofano, contribuendo ad alleggerire ancora il profilo. Marcello Gandini si sarebbe spinto oltre a questo limite due anni dopo con l’Autobianchi Runabout, con la palpebra che saliva addirittura sopra al cofano: lo stesso accorgimento sarebbe poi stato adottato sulla Stratos Stradale. Mentre si potrebbero vedere nei primi progetti che Gandini eseguì per conto di Bertone (Miura, Montreal, Fiat Dino Coupé) alcune tracce dell’eredità stilistica lasciata dal suo predecessore Giugiaro, con la Marzal fece definitivamente tabula rasa di queste influenze e si affermò come un maestro del design a pieno titolo. Uomo di poche parole, dichiarò: “Fondamentalmente, la Marzal si muoveva verso quello che gli autori di fantascienza avevano anticipato. Quei prototipi furono un manifesto con il quale descrivemmo il nostro modo di vedere le automobili del futuro.” Ne può testimoniare una intera generazione di ragazzi che si innamorarono della Marzal grazie ai modellini prodotti in grandi quantità dalle varie Matchbox, Dinky Toys, Politoys, Penny e altri. Il 7 maggio del 1967 la Marzal fece un’apparizione di rilievo al Gran Premio di Formula 1 di Monaco, quando fu guidata in pista dal Principe Ranieri con a fianco la Principessa Grace. Fra i numerosi articoli pubblicati sulla stampa internazionale, spiccava un prova su strada eseguita da Quattroruote, che sottolineava l’elasticità del motore nel suo numero dell’ottobre 1967. Anche se non fu mai sottoposta ad un programma di sviluppo approfondito da parte della Lamborghini, alla Marzal veniva attribuita una velocità massima di 225 km/h. La nota pubblicazione svizzera L’Année Automobile dichiarava che quattro suoi redattori avevano passato un’intera giornata a bordo della vettura, e aggiungeva che, qualora la Lamborghini l’avesse messa in produzione, non avrebbe avuto alcuna esitazione a nominarla “Auto dell’Anno.” La Marzal fu di fatto seguita in produzione dall’Espada, coupé quattro posti che ne manteneva le linee generali ma non il motore posteriore né le aperture ad ala di gabbiano. I primi prototipi della Espada proponevano quest’ultima soluzione, che fu poi scartata nella sua veste definitiva. L’Espada rimase in produzione fino al 1978, a testimonianza di quanto il suo stile fosse all’avanguardia. Tant’è vero che a decenni di distanza stimolava ancora la creatività di altri stilisti. La stessa Bertone rispolverò il concetto fondamentale della vettura con la Karisma, una dream car del 1994 che riprendeva l’architettura a motore posteriore, le lunghe porte ad apertura verticale e i quattro comodissimi posti, questa volta su base Porsche. Il celeberrimo giornalista inglese LJK Setright definì la Marzal “possibilmente l’espressione di stile più spinta e più eccelsa uscita dall’Europa dalla fine della guerra.” Di certo il futuro acquirente della Marzal potrà onorarsi di possedere non solo uno degli esemplari più eclatanti dell’Arte della Carrozzeria italiana della seconda parte del secolo XX, ma anche il prototipo di un motore Lamborghini costruito in esemplare unico. Questo lotto e imponibile Iva (20%). L'imposta verra calcolata sul prezzo di acquisto totale (prezzo di aggiudicazione piu commissione). Chassis no. 10001

  • CANCanada
  • 2011-05-21
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1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II by Pinin Farina

240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC 60-degree V-12 with three Weber 36 DCS carburettors, four-speed synchromesh manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with unequal length upper and lower A-arms, coil springs, an anti-roll bar, and Koni hydraulic shocks; solid rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, trailing arms, and Koni hydraulic shocks; and four-wheel Dunlop hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm The 33rd of 201 examples built Delivered new to Italian oil magnate and Internazionale owner Angelo Moratti Beautifully restored by marque specialists Kessel Classic Wonderful original colour combination Displayed at Villa d’Este in 2014 Ferrari Classiche certified; original engine and gearbox Intended for a different customer and style of driving than Ferrari’s other open-top offering, the 250 GT California Spider, the 250 GT Cabriolet was a true gentleman’s Ferrari designed for high-speed touring in comfort. With the performance one would expect from Maranello’s finest, the cabriolet gave no concessions to luxury and was exquisitely trimmed and appointed to please Ferrari’s demanding clientele. With a spacious boot that could hold more than enough luggage for two for a long-weekend trip, this was the ideal touring car for the California coast or the South of France. A second-series cabriolet first debuted at the 1959 Paris Motor Show and showcased a number of stylistic and mechanical updates over its predecessor. Visually, these cars featured open headlamps with a slightly more rounded nose and rear fenders with elongated tail-lamp lenses. More interior space was added to provide both the driver and passenger with additional comfort, and the trunk was made slightly larger as well. With the 250 GT Cabriolet Series II, Ferrari took the opportunity not only to upgrade the car’s looks, but also to improve the overall driving experience. In addition to being fitted with all-wheel disc brakes, Ferrari installed its latest iteration of the Colombo V-12 engine, designated Tipo 128F. The spark plugs were relocated to the outside (rather than in-between the V as in prior iterations), and the coil-valve springs were substituted for hairpins. This new architecture allowed for more head studs per cylinder and non-siamesed porting. This resulted in a better breathing engine with improved torque and reliability. To boot, the 128F also facilitated far easier and quicker changing of the plugs, to the enduring relief of both mechanics and owners alike. By the end of production in mid-1962, 200 examples of the 250 GT Cabriolet Series II had been constructed, far outselling the first series of 250 GT Cabriolets. CHASSIS NUMBER 1881 GT The records of renowned marque historian Marcel Massini record that chassis number 1881 GT was a relatively early car, as the 33rd 250 GT Cabriolet Series II produced. The chassis was delivered to Pinin Farina on 24 March 1960, and the car completed on 7 June, after which it was delivered to the original owner, Angelo Moratti of Milan. Mr Moratti was the patriarch of the renowned Italian oil family, as the founder of Saras SpA, known for its massive refinery in Sardinia, and was also the owner and president of the Serie A football club, Internazionale. He was certainly a man who was in the best possible position to acquire the latest and greatest new Ferrari. The car’s known history continues in Switzerland, where it remained for many years, including single ownership from 1987 to 1996. It was subsequently acquired in 2005 by a Monaco-based collector, then by a Dutch collector, who in 2007 sold it back to Switzerland, the country in which the car has spent so much of its life. The new owner had the car serviced and maintained by the well-known marque specialists Kessel Classic of Lugano. As part of this work, the car, already the subject of a proper restoration, was refinished in its original colour scheme, the exciting and unusual Grigio Acciaio (Savidin 20259) with a Rosso (VM 3171) interior. With this work completed, the beautiful Cabriolet Series II was presented at the Concorso de Eleganza Villa d’Este at lovely Lake Como in May 2014. Furthermore, in its current ownership, the car has been accorded Ferrari Classiche certification, with the Red Book on file, noting that it retains its original matching-numbers components, including the engine, as-delivered in 1960. The car recorded 63,286 kilometres at the time of cataloguing, and as would be expected from a recent entrant at Villa d’Este, is accordingly in superb condition throughout, ready to be shown at the next event of its new owner’s choosing. The paintwork is rich and deep, with a spectacular shine, accented by beautiful brightwork, including the dual fog lights and Borrani wire wheels. Similarly, the interior is beautiful and well-presented, down to the crystal-clear Veglia gauges and properly restored wooden steering wheel. The Cabriolet Series II is widely regarded as one of the finest and most enthralling road-going Ferraris of its era. This beautifully restored example, in wonderful original colours and with the best equipment, will allow a new owner to experience why it is so renowned. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue description, this car is not accompanied by an original hardtop. Chassis no. 1881 GT Engine no. 1881 GT Body no. 29733

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2016-09-07
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1928 MASERATI TIPO 26B/M 8C 2800 GRAND PRIX TWO SEATER RACING CAR

The ex-Officine Maserati, Marquis de Sterlich, Luigi Arcangeli, Rene Dreyfus, Rome GP Winning 1928 MASERATI TIPO 26B/M 8C 2800 GRAND PRIX TWO SEATER RACING CAR Chassis No. 33/2515 Engine No. 2515 Racing red with brown leather interior Engine: eight cylinders, in-line, twin overhead camshaft, Roots-supercharged, 2,800cc, 205bhp at 5,500rpm; Gearbox: four-speed manual; Suspension: semi-elliptic leaf springs front and rear with Andre-Hartford friction-type shock absorbers; Brakes: four wheel mechanical drum. Right hand drive. From 1926 the Maserati brothers' factory was in full operation, producing their sports and racing cars stemming from the original concept of the twin-cam straight eight engines of 1,500cc capacity. They had adopted the badge that was to become a renowned trademark with the Trident motif from the City of Bologna, where the original factory was situated in Pontevecchio. Two years after their inaugural success in the Targa Florio with the first of the Type-26 models, it was perceived necessary to increase the engine capacity for the cars contesting the major International and European events such as the Grand Prix, Mille Miglia and Targa Florio, firstly with 2-litre and subsequently 2.5 litre sized engines. As a result of developments to these cars, their record of achievements was manifested in no less than seven major victories during the 1930 season. This car started life in 1928 as a production model of the type 26B, frame number 33, which was driven by the Marquis de Sterlich, a personal benefactor to the Maserati consortium, and would have had the 2-litre engine as original equipment for this chassis, while this engine was the first to be supplied with the new magnesium alloy crankcase, supercharger, differential-case and steering-box components. Initially run as a Works car, it would appear that de Sterlich actually purchased it in 1929, when the factory was going through one of its many financial crises. He first ran it in the Targa Florio on the 6th May 1928 followed by the Reale Roma event for Grand Prix cars run in heats and a final, but did not feature in the results. At this time the Works teams were competing in too many events, which did not allow time for proper preparation, dogging Maserati's attempts for victory in major events during this period, although in hill-climb and sportscar races, they did enjoy better success. Nevertheless, de Sterlich persevered, probably giving further financial support in return for drives in the high-profile races, and during 1929 he contested the Reale Rome GP, Circuit di Mugello, San Sebastian and Marseilles Grand Prix, and although being placed did not achieve a major result. At the end of the year the car reverted to the factory-team and was rebuilt in 2.5 litre form during 1930, where for most of the season it was driven by the more professional Luigi Arcangeli, who showed a greater skill and determination than his aristocratic benefactor. His initial outing in the Tripoli Grand Prix resulted in a very fine second place on the fast Mellaha Circuit. He next competed at Monaco and in the Targa Florio, but failed to finish in either, his luck returning in greater measure in the Grand Prix of Rome event where he took his first major victory against full opposition in a prestigious event. The last Grand Prix of the year was at the famous Monza track, where again he made a significant impact against the Alfa Romeo and Bugatti teams, finishing second in both his heat and the final, making a most satisfactory conclusion for 'Officine Maserati'. However, not complacent and knowing the growing opposition, they sought to strengthen their capability with new cars and drivers for the following year and with Luigi Fagioli already signed up, they were able to entice the French ace Rene Dreyfus away from Bugatti with the promise of a new car. To this end they announced a new two-car team to contest the 1931 Grand Prix season, but problems with production and finance saw only one new chassis ready in time for the start of the season for Fagioli. A solution was achieved for the second car by taking the chassis of the former de Sterlich/Arcangeli car and re-stamping it with the new current series, numbering it 2515, so that Dreyfus was inducted alongside Fagioli for the principal races on the European calendar. The season-openers were traditionally in North Africa, but in both the Tripoli and Tunis races of 1931, Dreyfus was unable to finish. Back on the Italian mainland, however, in the Reale Roma races, he finished 3rd in his heat and 2nd in the final. Following this, he achieved fastest lap in practice for his favored Monaco circuit and, although starting from pole, he had to settle for 6th place due to fuel-feed problems experienced midway through. The active season continued seeing the team contesting the Targa Florio and German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, where in both rigorous events Dreyfus was forced to retire. A shared drive with Bouriat in the French Grand Prix on June 21st netted 8th place; it was for this event that Maserati uprated the Fagioli car to 2,800cc. For the next event a similar shared drive, this time with Fagioli in the Coppa Acerbo race at Pescara secured 5th place for the team. The season closed with the Grand Prix at Monza, for which the factory also uprated the Dreyfus car to the new 2.8 litre specification, where he finished a creditable 6th overall, having been placed second in his heat. The pace at which such a number of events were contested was relentless and again for 1932 Dreyfus was retained and continued to drive 2515, as the Works were also preparing new 3-litre cars which were not yet ready for the new season. The season started with two hillclimbs in the south of France including winning his class at La Turbie. The first major outing was at Tunis, where a shared drive with Fagioli classified the team in 7th place. This was followed up by Dreyfus claiming some credit with 5th in heat and 1st in the reperchage at the Reale Roma races, and a good run to finish 2nd twice in both the Grands Prix of Marseilles and Nimes. Midway through the season when the new 3-litre cars were available, 2515 was entrusted to Dreyfus' friend Jean de Maleplane who finished both the races at Casablanca and La Baule in 5th place, failing to finish at Marseilles, but achieving 5th at Monza at the end of another busy season. A year later the car was still proving competitive with de Maleplane placing 7th at Pau, while Zehender took it to Tunis and finished 3rd, and although subsequently in use in lesser events, its last recorded outings in major races appear to have been at Monaco and Montlhéry with Zehender, but no classified placings resulted. It is likely that it continued some action in the South of France and North Africa until war broke out and indeed this appears borne out by the fact that it was alleged to have been secreted in a cave in Algeria during this time, from whence it re-emerged in 1945 - the car in fact being road-registered on 22nd June 1946 by the Automobile Club Marocain. This original interesting document survives, and is included with the history file on the car denoting that car chassis no. 2515 was registered to a M. Henri Courtille. Its next recorded change of ownership was in 1955, again on a document within the file, when it was purchased by Louis Salis in the Seine et L'Oise region of France. Subsequent immediate history suggests that it was laid-up in an aircraft hangar until being re-discovered by an American collector. Its latter storage had resulted in some deterioration of the crankcase and supercharger casing. When passing to the current vendor in the early 1980s, it was prepared ready to resume some historic racing action. This highly sympathetic restoration necessitated the institution of a new crank-case and supercharger, while the original components have been retained with the car - of especial note is the fact that the old crankcase still bears the original maker's plate stamped with the number 2515 inscribed to the front. The chassis bears both numbers clearly marked, thereby showing the original dual-identity and underlining its continued history. The seat upholstery has had to be replaced, but the interior still retains the original brown leather trim panels. Painstaking attention was taken to ensure that every original panel (see 'as found' photographs) was carefully retained or refurbished where necessary. The owner was meticulous in ensuring that many of the old parts removed were saved for future reference and these accompany the car. They include some original horsehair from the upholstery, the badly rotted dashboard and several examples of the con rods and pistons clearly stamped with the trident emblem. While the car has undergone restoration work, it is still a fine testament to originality and patina that extends even to the evidence of long since dead woodworm in the rear view mirror support! The original steel undertray is also still fitted to the car, restored examples are usually finished in aluminum, but the grueling long distance races on very poor road surfaces demanded a tougher material for protection. Another interesting history lesson is that the early rectangular radiator badges were made by a jeweler from solid silver and bear a tiny hallmark. Maserati racing cars at this period were very much hand built to tool room standards and, unlike Bugattis and Alfa Romeos which were mass produced, the Maserati work was second to none. This car has been driven since its rehabilitation, but has not been seen in public during the current ownership. Indeed, this remarkable car has not really been seen in a public forum since the 1950s. It is also believed that this car could be the oldest running Maserati in the world, there being an older but non-running example in the Biscaretti Museum. Should the new owner prefer not to use the car, other than for very gentle use, it could quite easily be re-united with its original crankcase. Similar examples to this car have been run in the historic Mille Miglia (where lights and wings are required) and the Colorado Grand. This is a truly remarkable and historic car found 75 years after its inception in this condition after a long and distinguished racing career and it represents a unique opportunity to purchase what amounts to the ultimate and most original example of any Grand Prix racing car of this configuration.

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-08-20
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THE 1949 SPA-FRANCORCHAMPS 24 HOURS GP OF BELGIUM WINNER

THE 1949 SPA-FRANCORCHAMPS 24 HOURS GP OF BELGIUM WINNER 1949 SCUDERIA FERRARI 166MM BARCHETTA COACHWORK BY CARROZZERIA TOURING Engine: V12, one overhead camshaft per bank, 1995cc, 140bhp at 6,600rpm; Gearbox: five speed manual; Brakes: four wheel hydraulic drum; Suspension; front, independent with transverse leaf springs, rear, semi-elliptic leaf springs. Right hand drive. In late 1946 Enzo Ferrari had completed the first of his legendary V12 engines. Working in modest surroundings with engineers Gioachino Colombo, Guiseppe Busso and eventually Aurelio Lampredi, Ferrari was quickly able to accomplish his singular vision: to develop a powerful, reliable and smooth competition motor using a V-12 configuration. In May of 1947, the Tipo 125 was first driven in competition by Franco Cortese at a regional event held at the Piacenzo circuit. Cortese led the race until the final lap when the fuel pump failed. This 125 was driven throughout the remainder of the season with success and it became increasingly evident to Enzo Ferrari that his engine provided an excellent basis for further development. The Tipo 125 was enlarged from 1497cc to 1902cc, the Tipo 159, and finally in 1948 to 1995cc, the Tipo 166-which was 166.25cc per cylinder. The 166 raced throughout the season against stiff competition from the likes of Maserati, Alfa Romeo, and Cisitalia, winning the two most important races, the Mille Miglia and the Targa Florio. Enzo Ferrari had created his first true champion with the 166, and started the single most enduring legend in motor racing history. In mid 1948 Ferrari had commissioned Carrozzeria Touring of Milan to design and build the coachwork for his next series of chassis for the 1949 season. While the 166 had proven to be a great success on the track, Ferrari went to Touring with the hope that a beautiful design to clothe his chassis would further differentiate his fantastic cars. Touring's founder, Felice Bianchi Anderloni, had just begun working on the project when he unexpectedly died of a heart attack. His young son Carlo recognized the significance that the Ferrari marque held with the recent racing victories of the Tipo 166. He knew that the Ferrari commission was critical to the future of Touring and that the first coachbuilt Ferraris would be looked upon for years to come. Carlo Anderloni recalls: I just knew that I had to win recognition for the company with a beautiful design. Just imagine if the first Ferrari I did-The Barchetta-was not a wonderful car! The result was one of the most beautiful and influential designs of the Post-War period and was introduced at the Torino Auto Show in 1948. It was affectionately dubbed by the motoring press of the day "the Barchetta", or little boat, a term which refers to the similarly rounded speed boats which were often seen in Venice. In honor of Biondetti's victory in the 1948 Mille Miglia, Ferrari named the 1949 Series cars the "166 Mille Miglia." Only 25 166 MM Barchettas were produced and of this group only a few chassis, like the one offered here, were built for Scuderia Ferrari. These cars had nothing short of an incredible racing season capturing victories in all of the major races including the Targa Florio, Le Mans, the Mille Miglia, Spa Francorchamps, and Montlhery. The lightweight team cars can be differentiated from the customer cars by a number of different characteristics. Most notably the Scuderia Ferrari cars were built with twin Marelli magnotor, rather than distributors, a spartan cockpit without "Lusso" trim on the scuttle, beautifully constructed aluminum fuel tank, rather than one made of steel, and differing instrument panels. Chassis 0010M was prepared by the Works to contest the 1949 season along side two other chassis, 0008M and 0012M. (The first series 166MM Barchettas unlike all later Ferraris, left the factory with engines numbered two digits behind the chassis number. For example, chassis 0010M is correctly fitted with engine number 0008M.) Ferrari had gone to great effort to ensure a good showing in the all important Mille Miglia that was to take place in April of 1949, and no less than nine 166s were entered, most were the customer Lusso version. Chassis 0010M was driven by Bonetto and Carpani and led the race in all of the stages to Rome. At Pescara, this furious pace had caused fading brakes and Bonetto was eventually overtaken finishing second behind Biondetti in the sister car. For the first Post-War LeMans, held on June 25/26, Scuderia Ferrari entered two cars, No. 22 driven by Chinetti and Selsdon and No. 23, (Chassis 0010M) driven by Jean Lucas and Pierre Louis Dreyfus who drove under the pseudonym "Ferret." While leading the race Ferret crashed handing the victory to Chinetti in his 166MM Barchetta. 0010M was returned to the works for repair in preparation for the Spa 24 Hour GP of Belgium held on July 9/10. Chinetti and Lucas were assigned to the car and they led nearly the entire race outperforming the Delages with engines that were twice the size of the 166. Chinetti and Lucas were the overall winners, a feat which is nothing short of heroic. Not only did they defeat cars with engines double the cubic capacity of the 166, but at one stage during the race legend has it that Chinetti hit a patch of oil left by the Delage of Louveau, lost control, crashed and injured a female spectator in the process. Chinetti jumped out of the car, gave the ailing woman first aid, jumped back in the battered Ferrari and went on to win! The Spa victory was historically very important to the newly formed Scuderia Ferrari, because it firmly proved the superiority that Ferrari had over its competitors. After its victory, 0010M was returned to the Works to repair the battle scars it had gained during competition. Its next win was in the 1950 Paris Montlhery 12-Hour Race, again in the hands of Chinetti and Lucas. It is believed that 0010M was the Paris Auto Show car. This could be where it was first seen by Jim Kimberly, a wealthy American privateer racer who was heir to the Kimberly Kleenex fortune. By the Spring of 1950, Kimberly had negotiated to buy 0010M. He had been impressed by a 166 Spyder Corsa (016C) that was owned and campaigned on the East Coast and was particularly enthusiastic about the seductive lines of the Touring coachwork. Kimberly raced 0010M five times throughout the the 1950 Season with impressive results: 4th at Bridgehampton, 1st at the Studebaker Proving grounds, 1st Elkhart Lake, 4th Watkins Glen, 2nd on index and 1st in Class at Sebring. Following this successful season in the Eastern United States, Kimberly, a Chicago native, decided that the Barchetta would be a worthy competitor to represent the Eastern region of the SCCA in the of the California Sports Car Club events. As a result, for 1951, the 166 was entered into the Palm Springs Road Races held on April 1, 1951. After seeing the entry of the 5.4 liter Cadillac Allards, Kimberly and his mechanic Marshall Lewis thought that the little 2 liter Barchetta would be totally outclassed. This marked the first ever entry for a Ferrari in a California race, and Lewis surprised everyone when his excellent driving resulted in a victory by a near two lap margin! 0010M once again demonstrated the superiority of the Ferrari marque, which until then had not been seen in the Western United States. The next race was at Pebble Beach where Kimberly crashed after hitting some oil in hot pursuit of Phil Hill's winning 2.9 liter Twin Supercharged Alfa Romeo. 0010M was returned to Chicago where it was repaired and eventually sold to Jim Simpson who raced it throughout 1952 with moderate success. Like many great race cars 0010M changed hands a few times and a comprehensive chain of ownership is known and documented. Remarkably, throughout its life it has remained largely intact and original. In 1980, collector Warren Sanke purchased 0010M from Mr. Darryl Greenameyer. Sanke restored the 166MM with the help of David McCarthy on the mechanicals and Kent White, commonly known as the Tin Man helping with the coachwork. When the paint was stripped, the many battle scars from Le Mans, Spa, and Pebble Beach were evident in the bodywork. The Tin Man's skill and great effort saved much of the original coachwork. In a recent interview, both Sanke and White recalled that the only parts that were beyond saving were the doors, parts of the grille, the floorplan and the dashboard. This painstaking restoration took a full eighteen months and was completed in 1984. Since then the Barchetta won many awards the most significant of which are as follows : 1st in class and best competition Ferrari at the International Ferrari Concours, Best in Show at the Santa Barbara Race Car Show, 1st in class and the prestigous Hans Tanner Award for the best Ferrari at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. Mr. George Jewett purchased the car from Warren Sanke and continued to both show and race the car in historic events. From 1985 until 1989, the car was looked after by the highly respected restorer Phil Reilly. During this period Reilly fully rebuilt/overhauled the engine, gearbox, brakes and suspension. In May 1987, George Jewett and his father successfully competed in the 60th anniversary of the Mille Miglia where it performed faultlessly. In 1990, the car passed to noted Ferrari collector Albert Obrist, where it had the distinction of being the earliest car as well one of his favorites in an incredible collection devoted to Ferrari cars. 0010M is one of the most significant Ferraris in existence owing to its incredible racing achievements on both sides of the Atlantic. Its success paved the way for the Ferrari marque; it signalled the start of an almost unprecedented 30 years of victorious racing. Most importantly, however, the Barchetta is a wonderfully satisfying car to drive. It will provide its new owner with an exciting entry to use on a number of different racing and touring events.

  • USAUSA
  • 1996-08-18
Hammer price
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1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II by Pinin Farina

240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC 60-degree V-12 engine with three Weber 36 DCS two-barrel downdraught carburetors, four-speed synchromesh manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with unequal-length upper and lower A-arms, coil springs, an anti-roll bar, and Koni hydraulic shocks, solid rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, trailing arms, and Koni hydraulic shocks, and four-wheel Dunlop hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4 in. The 98th of 200 examples produced Recently restored in its original color combination Includes desirable matching hardtop Original matching-numbers engine Intended for a different customer and style of driving than Ferrari’s other open-top offering, the 250 GT California Spider, the 250 GT Cabriolet was not intended to channel the emotions and driving style of Ferrari’s thoroughbred racers. This was a true gentleman’s Ferrari designed for high-speed touring in comfort. With the performance one would expect from Maranello’s finest, the 250 GT Cabriolet gave no concessions to luxury and was exquisitely trimmed and appointed to please Ferrari’s demanding clientele. With a spacious boot that could hold more than enough luggage for two for a long-weekend trip, this was the ideal touring car for the California coast or the south of France. A second-series cabriolet was first debuted at the 1959 Paris Motor Show and showcased a number of stylistic and mechanical updates over its predecessor. Visually, these cars featured open headlamps with a slightly more rounded nose and rear fenders with elongated tail-lamp lenses. Slightly more interior space was added to provide both the driver and passenger with more comfort, and the trunk was made slightly larger as well. With the 250 GT Cabriolet Series II, Ferrari took the opportunity not only to upgrade the car’s looks but also to improve the overall driving experience. Now fitted with all-wheel disc brakes, Ferrari installed their latest iteration of the Colombo V-12 engine, designated Tipo 128F. The spark plugs were relocated to the V-12’s outside surfaces (rather than in between the V as in prior iterations), and the coil-valve springs were substituted for hairpins. This new architecture allowed for more head studs per cylinder and non-siamesed porting. This resulted in a better breathing engine with improved torque and reliability. To boot, the 128F also facilitated far easier and quicker changing of the plugs, to the enduring relief of both mechanics and owners alike. By the end of production in mid-1962, 200 examples of the 250 GT Cabriolet Series II had been constructed, far outselling the first series of 250 GT Cabriolets. CHASSIS NUMBER 2153 GT Chassis number 2153 GT was the 98th cabriolet series II built. It was finished in the highly attractive color combination of Bleu Sera (16439 MM) over a Pelle Naturale (VM 3309) leather interior. The car was delivered new to Garage Francorchamps, Ferrari’s official distributor in Brussels, Belgium, on October 29, 1960, and was sold to its first Belgian owner later that year. Chassis number 2153 GT spent a short amount of time in Belgium and was soon imported to the United States in the 1960s or early 1970s, where it has resided ever since. By 1975, the car was noted as residing in Oklahoma before it moved to Texas in the 1980s. It was later sold to David Kehl of San Antonio, and at that time, it was noted as sporting green paint with a tan interior. By 1989, the car had moved to California, where it was offered for sale by the MDR Car Collection of Marina Del Rey, and it was restored to red with a tan interior. The car remained in California until 1993, when it was sold to Dan Eaton of Arizona. By the year 2000, the car was noted as residing in Pennsylvania but had returned to California in 2002. In 2003, the car was sold to well-known collector David E. Walters of Kaua’i, Hawaii, and registered on Hawaiian plates “250 GT.” Walters kept the car until his passing in October of 2009, and the car remained with his estate until 2012 when it was brought to California to be fully restored in its original livery. This Cabriolet Series II, retaining its original engine, was then entrusted by its current owner to Fast Cars Ltd. of Redondo Beach, California, in 2013. The car was fully dismantled and every component was brought back to as-new condition. No stone was left unturned in bringing this car to an award-winning standard, and the current owner was very diligent in the restoration process, visiting the car in restoration at least once a week to observe its progress. Refinished in its original Blue Sera over Pelle Naturale, the restoration was completed in the spring of 2015. Since then, the car has been driven less than 300 miles by its current owner to ensure everything is in working order. Today, it remains in spectacular condition, ready for its next custodian in all regards. Often overlooked for the more aggressive California Spiders, the 250 GT Series II Cabriolet is a wonderful car in its own right, stately, sophisticated, and full of character. Excellently restored, chassis number 2153 GT is an exceptional example of its breed. It would not only be an excellent concours entrant but would also surely perform well on the open road. In the minds of many enthusiasts, nothing can provide a better driving experience than an open-top, front-engined V-12 Ferrari, and this example surely will not disappoint. Chassis no. 2153 GT Engine no. 2153 GT Body no. 29798

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
Hammer price
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1954 Siata 208S Spider by Motto

125 bhp, 1,996 cc OHV 70-degree alloy V-8 engine with twin Weber 36DCZ carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and shock absorbers, and four-wheel finned alloy drum brakes. Wheelbase: 90.5 in. Powered by Fiat’s rare Tipo 104 alloy 8V engine The last built of 33 Motto-bodied spiders Beautiful and authentic restoration completed in 2011; original, matching-numbers engine Best in Class at Pebble Beach and Amelia Island, with awards at other international concours Race-winning chassis engineering coupled with striking coachwork rendered in aluminum Elegance and power in a lightweight package “SENSATIONAL NEW ITALIAN SPORTS CAR” The Siata 208S of the mid-1950s represented a milestone in automotive concept and practice, itself the amalgamation of multiple innovations. For one, the company SIATA was a longstanding tuning specialist rather than a traditional manufacturing concern. This made the Societa Italiana Auto Transformazioni Accessori a qualified disruption to the business of more established brands like Ferrari and Maserati, whose customer base and competition forays were directly threatened by the small company’s remarkably engineered low-volume sports cars. Furthermore, the 208S was powered by Fiat’s alloy Tipo 104 engine, an unusual two-liter 70-degree V-8 that had been responsible for driving the Turinese manufacturer’s premium Otto Vu Fiat sports car to competition victories across Europe. Only approximately 200 examples of this V-8 engine were made, and when production ceased on the Otto Vu model at about 114 cars, most of the remaining motors were bestowed to Siata (a contractor in the Otto Vu’s build process). Nearly eight years before Carroll Shelby’s Cobra set the racing world afire with a mass-production V-8 installed in a lightweight aluminum roadster, Siata created a giant killer in 1953 with the alloy-bodied 208S Spider equipped with a high-torque V-8 mated to an advanced five-speed transmission. The open coachwork was penned by Giovanni Michelotti and built by Carrozzeria Motto, a freelance coachbuilder in Turin. Motto had built one-offs for Ferrari in 166 Spider form and 212 export coupes, among others. They received the contract to body the new 208S to Michelotti’s design. With upright rear shoulder flares and a long front deck, the coachwork was a breathtaking evolution of the classic barchetta. Despite being produced in such a sparing quantity (Motto built just 33 spiders along with the two prototypes by Bertone), the 208S was a marked disruption to the SCCA competition establishment. It surprised more established Italian brands at the races while demonstrating that a small tuning company could deliver cutting-edge chassis specifications, like four-wheel independent suspension and connected steering, at a competitive price. As such, the marvelously engineered 208S was to become a consummate force in its primary purpose: competitive road racing in the popular under two-liter class. Privateers could buy an exceptionally well-balanced, handsome racecar, with a higher power-to-weight ratio than any comparable opponent, at a somewhat lower price than GT sports cars such as those from Ferrari or Aston Martin. The 208S soon became capable of winning SCCA races, and it was often seen as a cover car for California racing programs in the early 1950s. Actor and noted enthusiast Steve McQueen even entered a Siata in the 1958 Palm Springs Road Races; he called it “my little Ferrari.” The 208S also took the American motoring press to new levels of enthusiasm, with the November 1953 issue of Road & Track calling it the “Sensational New Italian Sports Car.” CHASSIS NUMBER BS 535 The featured 208S Spider is certainly one of the finest examples extant, benefiting from two long-term periods of custody and recent attention from pedigreed marque experts. Chassis BS 535 was the final example of the Motto-bodied V-8 Spider in the production sequence, and it benefits from a rare factory-equipped five-speed transmission that delivers taller final gearing and corresponding top speed. The car was purchased in 1954 by an unidentified enthusiast in Italy, who imported it to the United States the following year. In the spring of 1956, the beautiful Spider was sold to Fred Celce of Massachusetts, a U.S. Air Force pilot who flew F-100 Super Sabre jets from bases in both the U.S. and the U.K. while on patrol during the Cold War; against these, the Siata made a fitting land-based complement in both form and performance. Following Captain Celce’s 12-year ownership, the well-maintained Siata was purchased by fellow Massachusetts resident Frank Sweet, and he replaced the engine with a Ford V-8, a relatively common conversion at that time. The rare Fiat motor, BS 179, later passed to noted Siata expert Jarl de Boer, who sold it in turn to Walter Eisenstark, another marque connoisseur. Mr. Eisenstark then purchased BS 535 in 1982 and reunited the car with the original engine, entrusting a three-year restoration to the highly respected Epifani Restorations of Berkeley, California. In 2009, after 27 years of devoted custody by Mr. Eisenstark, the 208S was purchased by the consignor, a well-known enthusiast who has exhibited his cars to great acclaim at premium concours d’elegance around the world. The owner soon returned the spider to Epifani for a concours-level refinish to original specifications that was completed in the summer of 2011. The fully documented refurbishment quickly began earning awards, starting with a Best in Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2011, as well as a second special award for Design Elegance. In 2012, the 208S won a unique Chopard-encased award for the Most Elegant Open Car at the Kuwait Concours d’Elegance amidst the impressive backdrop of Kuwaiti opulence. Returning stateside, the car was featured at the Art Center College of Design’s annual show, earning the People’s Choice Award at one of the most respected institutions in automotive design. Perhaps BS 535’s most impressive exhibition accolade was achieved in May 2013 when the car, now FIVA certified, was accepted and presented at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este on Lake Como in Italy. On the stage of what is arguably the collectible automobile community’s most exclusive and discriminating event, the exquisite Siata drew a Premio d’Onore award, confirming its magnificent state of originality and overall quality. This esteemed honor was followed by one more award of note, a class win at the 2014 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, rounding out a winning portfolio at the world’s most elite judged events. Breathtakingly restored to original factory specifications, including handsome period details such as the Siata five-speed synchromesh gearbox, polished alloy wheels with chrome spokes, a competition-style center fuel filler, wood steering wheel, and leather pull-strap door releases, this 208S is remarkably well documented. It is accompanied by an extensive history file, an original owner’s manual and parts book, a tool roll and jack, a spare hood emblem, and a windscreen. The documentation also includes extensive restoration receipts and numerous photographs detailing the meticulous and period-accurate workmanship required to create an international concours winner. This fascinating Siata 208S may be displayed and appreciated for its aesthetic perfection and historical significance, an example of sophisticated engineering and light weight disrupting the status quo of brute power. Clearly, it highlights the evolution in automotive design and competition blueprint for success. The rakish Spider may also be enjoyed for its more visceral qualities, ripe for the enthusiast who may wish to experience the Otto Vu’s torquey acceleration and the connected feel of Siata’s famously athletic chassis in today’s historic racing events. The 208S changed American sports car racing’s view of the possible during the early 1950s. As a world-class collectible, chassis number BS 535 is the epitome of ground-breaking innovation coupled with stunning elegance, offering impeccable standards in rarity, design, and quality detailing—an Italian automotive jewel. Chassis no. BS 535 Engine no. BS 179

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
Hammer price
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The ex-Lou Fageol1953 FIAT 8V SUPERSONIC

The ex-Lou Fageol In same ownership for more than 4 decades 1953 FIAT 8V SUPERSONIC Coachwork by Ghia - Design by Giovanni Savonuzzi Chassis no. 106.000049 Engine no. 104.000.000085 1,996cc OHV Alloy V8 Engine 110bhp at 6,000rpm 4-Speed Manual Gearbox 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Alfin Drum Brakes *One of just 15 iconic and exceedingly stylish 8V Supersonics built *Displayed at the 1957 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance *In current ownership for 36 years *Exhaustive 8-year restoration completed in 2015 *Exquisitely presented example of a coachbuilt jewel THE FIAT 8V In the spring of 1948, Fiat management instructed technical director Dante Giacosa to begin developing a V-6 engine to be used in a newly planned six-passenger sedan. The attempt to produce an American-style touring sedan never advanced beyond the inceptional stage, but the engine devised by Giacosa soon morphed into a V-8 of considerable merit. Displacing just under two liters, the Tipo 104 motor featured an unusual 70° architecture, as well as advanced racing components such as a finned aluminum sump, forged crankshaft, polished intakes and ports, and tubular 4x1 stainless steel exhaust manifolds. As Giacosa later noted of the V-8 in his autobiography, "the idea of mounting it on a sports car for a small production run was attractive and aroused the keenest interest among the design engineers." And so was born the Fiat 8V, which featured the only overhead-valve V-8 that Fiat ever built during its long and storied history. Known in Italy as the Otto Vu, the new model was positioned as a luxury grand touring sports car, obviously a far cry from the automaker's niche for utilitarian mass-market cars like the 500. To maintain the necessary quality-control for such a high-end product, the fabrication of the chassis was farmed out to Giorgio Ambrosini's Siata, the tuning specialists that had long served as Fiat's in-house competition and customization department. This choice was probably further facilitated by Ghia owner Mario Felice Boano's 1950 hiring of Luigi Segre, a former Siata sales manager, as Ghia's sales director. The 8V's tipo 106 chassis was one the world's most advanced, challenging the finest offerings from Ferrari or Maserati with four-wheel independent suspension (a Fiat first), and Borrani wire wheels with Rudge knock-off hubs. Completed chassis were sent to the Carrozzerie Speciali FIAT in Lingotto, where they were clothed with an elegant new coupe design by Fabio Lucio Rapi that was aerodynamically fine-tuned in the Turin wind tunnel. The Otto Vu made its public debut at the Geneva Salon in March 1952, and immediately impressed all who saw it with Fiat's ability to produce such a jewel-like automobile. Over the following two years, about two hundred tipo 104 motors were produced (though more than fifty of these were eventually installed in the upcoming Siata roadster). The Otto Vu automobile was even more rare, with approximately 114 examples built through 1954. While at least forty of these cars were bodied with the factory coachwork by Rapi, the other chassis were clothed by coachbuilders such as Balbo, Pinin Farina, and Vignale. Zagato bodied approximately thirty Otto Vu examples, including a lightweight aluminum version that was very popular in sports car racing. In this form, the 8V earned class wins at the 1955 Targa Florio and 1957 Mille Miglia, and claimed the 1956 Italian Sports Car Championship (2-Liter Class), a huge benchmark in the model's competition pedigree. THE GHIA SUPERSONIC Of all the boutique Italian carrozzerie, however, it was Ghia that proved to be the most noted coachbuilder of the Otto Vu. Probably accounting for 30 to 40 examples, the Turinese firm built coachwork that ranged from formal and clean to flamboyant and expressive. None of these various bodies, however, could match the Supersonic, an aeronautically styled coupe crafted by the great Giovanni Savonuzzi. The designer is renowned for penning the celebrated Cisitalia 202 (one of a handful of cars recognized for design merit by New York's Museum of Modern Art), and would go on to style the famed Ghia Gilda. Savonuzzi was later hired away by Chrysler, where he contributed to the design of their lauded Turbine showcars. During his consultancy for Ghia in early 1953, Savonuzzi approached engine tuner Virgilio Conrero about the possibility of collaborating on an Alfa Romeo 1900-based racecar. While Conrero tuned the 1900's motor and chassis, Savonuzzi contributed a sleek new coupe body built at Turin featuring a long front deck and sloping fastback. The windshield was steeply raked, while the rear tailfins culminated in lamp bezels that resembled jet afterburners, and a consistent beltline accent ran through the entire length of the car. With such jet-like styling, there was little wonder that the coachwork was eventually dubbed the Supersonic. While the unique Conrero sports-racer failed to finish at the 1953 Mille Miglia for which it was built (the car was destroyed in a fire), the body design was greenlighted for additional production after Segre received favorable feedback from creative collaborator Virgil Exner of Chrysler and designer Paul Farago. The official liaison between Ghia and Chrysler, it was Farago who suggested the idea of mounting the Supersonic body on a Fiat chassis. He would later prove his faith in the suggestion when he became the first private owner of the prototype Fiat Supersonic, chassis no. 000035. According to a letter from Ghia to the consignor dated in the 1980s, Ghia built twenty examples of the Supersonic bodystyle. This included the Conrero Special, three cars built on Jaguar XK frames, and one example built on an Aston Martin DB2/4 chassis. The remaining fifteen cars were all built on the chassis of the magnificent Otto Vu, whose dimensions lent the design its most elegant stance. The Supersonic has gone on to be recognized as one of Ghia's most seminal designs. No less an authority on coachwork than Howard "Dutch" Darrin visited the Ghia factory during Supersonic production and was so impressed that he ordered two Ghia-bodied Fiats, including a Supersonic that he sold to movie star Lana Turner. Now a darling with collectors because of their impressive Otto Vu mechanicals and spectacular body design, the 8V Supersonic has evolved into one of today's most desirable collectible Italian sports cars, combining rarity, cutting-edge mechanical specifications, and coachbuilt beauty. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED According to the research of Supersonic expert Erik Nielsen, as well as Tony Adriaensens' authoritative 2012 volume on the Otto Vu model, chassis number 000049 with engine 000085 was dispatched from the Fiat factory on Wednesday July 14, 1953. The chassis was destined to receive the tenth Supersonic body built by Carrozzeria Ghia. It is believed that the car was shown at the Geneva International Motor Show in March 1954 before being exported to Chrysler chairman K.T. Keller, and subsequently sold to the first private owner, Lou Fageol. Mr. Fageol was notable in hydroplane racing as a three-time Gold Cup winner, and also owned an Indy racing team during the late 1940s. His family-owned Twin Coach bus company ideally facilitated production of the signature twin-engine racecars for which he became known, including a Porsche 356 and the double-Offy champ car he campaigned at Indianapolis. In April 1957, Mr. Fageol exhibited this Fiat at the 7th Annual Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance in one of the first appearances of the Supersonic model at the hallowed 18th hole. According to the 1957 Pebble Beach program, the car competed in Class D, for European Sports Cars over $10,000. Mr. Fageol later conducted some custom modifications to the Fiat, including the addition of Imperial-style fins on top of the factory tailfins (involving only riveting with no cut-outs of the original metal), and a continental tire kit. Following his passing in 1961, the 8V was assumed by his son, Ray Fageol, who set about a full restoration in 1965 to return the car to factory specifications. After passing through two additional interim owners, chassis number 000049 was acquired in 1979 by the consignor, an enthusiast who immediately recognized the Supersonic's rarity and long-term value as a collectable. Planning for a restoration to proper factory specifications, the consignor invested years of effort in the research and sourcing of correct parts. In the intervening period, the rare 8V was carefully garaged to minimize any possible deterioration. Discovering that the car was equipped with a fuel-injected Chevrolet motor, the consignor removed the Detroit block and began searching for a proper Fiat 8V engine. After finally finding and purchasing the rare motor, the owner received an unexpected phone call from someone in possession of the car's original powerplant, engine no. 000085. Capitalizing on this great stroke of fortune, the consignor purchased the original motor and reunited it with chassis no. 000049. In March 2007, the consignor set about the restoration in earnest, with painstaking efforts to maintain factory standards to the greatest possible degree, and the entire process photographed for a permanent record. The well-known Paul Lazaros was engaged to assist in the process, and his expertise proved to be significant to the effort. In the mid 1950s, Mr. Lazaros was an employee of Paul Farago, the original owner of the prototype Fiat 8V Supersonic (chassis 000035). Mr. Lazaros had purchased the prototype from his employer in 1955 when it was nearly new, in pristine condition, and displaying a mere 17,000 original miles. The untouched original served as a perfect case-study for 000049's restoration, as Mr. Lazaros agreed to let the consignor examine his car (including digital analysis) so that the refurbishment could be as technologically precise as possible. Scutchfield Metal Shaping of Ray, Michigan, disassembled the car, smoothing out the original bodywork as needed. Dick Nuss of Engine Machine Service in Englewood, California, who has previously refurbished several 8V motors, rebuilt and upgraded the original tipo 104 engine, bagging and saving many removed original pieces, like rods, pistons, bearings, and valve springs. Lazaros Engineering handled a bulk of the mechanical restoration and detail work, including rebuild of the transmission, suspension components, brakes, differential, steering box, and dashboard toggle switches. A handful of missing items, such as the tail lamps and wheel discs, were carefully replicated from Mr. Lazaros' car to precise original dimensions and specifications. Brightwork was re-chromed by Jon Wright's Custom Chrome Plating of Grafton, Ohio, while Bruce Woolsey of Bob's Speedometer in Howell, Michigan, restored the dashboard instruments and gauges. The seats were re-trimmed with Italian doeskin-tan leather with blue-green welting by DiGiovanni Custom Upholstery, and Ken Litchfield of Classic and Exotic Service installed identical leather interior paneling, a wool headliner, trunk liner, luggage straps, and seafoam green Wilton wool carpeting. The well-known Dayton Wire Wheels in Ohio restored the original Borrani wire wheels, and Brian Joseph's shop Classic and Exotic Service conducted a bare-metal repaint in the original shade of Ghia's blue green metallic paint, also overseeing the final surface detailing and finishing. Taking eight years to complete and totaling approximately $600,000 in invoices, the cost-no-object restoration was thoroughly documented with invoices and photographs, and returned 000049 to an exquisite state of presentation. Restored to as-new condition and accompanied by numerous original parts, this breathtaking Fiat 8V will be warmly welcomed at vintage events, eligible for rallies around the globe like the Mille Miglia Storico and the Colorado Grand, though perhaps better-suited for world class concours d'elegance like Pebble Beach, Villa d'Este, and Amelia Island. One of just fifteen examples of the Fiat Supersonic, chassis no. 000049 is a rare automobile that has seldom been displayed, and will be enthusiastically received by the Fiat 8V and Supersonic niche. Furthermore claiming a documented history of just five owners, this Supersonic promises its next caretaker a collectible of almost unmatched provenance. It is a nearly flawless example of Fiat's one and only V-8 prestige car, and should command the attention of collectors worldwide.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-15
Hammer price
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1962 Chevrolet Corvette "Gulf Oil" Race Car

360+ bhp, 327 cu in. OHV V-8 engine with Rochester mechanical fuel injection, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with upper and lower A-arms, unequal length wishbones, coil springs, an anti-roll bar, and tubular shocks, live axle rear suspension with semi-elliptic leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers, and four-wheel heavy-duty drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102 in. The 1962 SCCA A/Production champion Driven by the legendary Dr. Dick Thompson for Grady Davis’s Gulf Oil Racing team Winner of the first-ever NCRS American Heritage Award Extensively documented, authentically restored, and beautifully maintained One of the most significant of all Corvette racing cars AMERICA’S SPORTS CAR Undoubtedly the most cherished and desirable Corvettes of all time are those that took to the race track in the 1950s and 1960s, where they would do battle with Europe’s finest. In this regard, the Corvette was truly America’s sports car and a symbol of the Land of the Free’s ingenuity, tenacity, and a never-ending desire to be and beat the best. The 1962 Corvette offered here is one of the most iconic Corvettes in existence. It wrote its name into the history books over the course of the 1962 racing season, and it was associated with a number of individuals who were hugely important not only to the history of the Corvette but also American sports car racing. The Corvette was already a very desirable car by the time it came off the production line, as it was fitted with the 327/360 fuel-injected engine, a massive 37 gallon fuel tank, and the highly capable RPO 687 package, which was a package that only 246 Corvettes received that model year. This option put the car in virtually race-ready condition “as-is,” as it added heavy-duty brakes, suspension with special rear shocks, additional air scoops for the brakes, and a quicker steering ratio. After being completed, it was sent to Don Yenko’s famous Chevrolet dealership in Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, from which it was sold to Grady Davis’s highly successful Gulf Oil Racing team, who prepared it for competition in the 1962 SCCA A-Production series. A CORVETTE AND A DENTIST The racing record that followed was truly astounding. Starting with the Daytona National race on January 28, Dick Thompson, known as “The Flying Dentist” for his somewhat less glamorous day job, piloted the Corvette to a 2nd place finish in this highly competitive event. That would be just the beginning of the Corvette’s success, and the lowest place it would sit on the podium that year. It returned to Daytona a few weeks later, for the Continental 3 Hour race, and it won its class. The car would see an identical result at the 12 Hours of Sebring, with Duncan Black and M.J.R. Wylie behind the wheel, thus cementing the Corvette’s credibility on the world stage. Sebring was the only event that Thompson sat out of, but he would be behind the wheel of the Corvette for the remainder of the year. Throughout 14 races, the Corvette chalked up an incredible 12 wins following Daytona and Sebring, at such race tracks across the northeastern United States as Watkins Glen, Road America, and the Virginia International Raceway. That season helped to cement Dr. Thompson’s reputation as not only one of the greatest drivers in SCCA history but also one of the greatest drivers to have ever piloted a Corvette in competition. Following the end of the 1962 season, the Corvette returned to Yenko Chevrolet and was purchased by Tony Denman, who continued to campaign the car. It returned to Daytona for the 250-mile race, as well as the 3 Hours of Daytona, placing 6th and 22nd overall, respectively, which translated to a 2nd in class on both occasions. This was quite impressive considering that Denman had been racing for less than a year at the SCCA Driver’s School (with Thompson as his instructor). Nineteen sixty-three would be the end of the Corvette’s racing career, as it was converted to street specifications and sold at the end of the season. REDISCOVERED BY REVEREND ERNST For the next 20 years, the Corvette’s racing history remained unknown, as it was driven as a street car, repainted green, and then red, and then passed through just four owners during this time. It was purchased by Rev. Mike Ernst, a Lutheran minister and a known Corvette expert, who found the car being used as a daily driver by a college student who was completely unaware of its racing history. Ernst confirmed not only that the car was sold new with the RPO 687 package but also that it was a legendary piece of Corvette history. He was further able to confirm the car’s identity throughout the disassembly process, prior to a restoration. Although a number of the car’s racing components were missing, Ernst was able to track down the missing parts through Tony Denman, who had kept the components in his parents’ garage before selling them in 1979. Ernst was able to buy the missing parts back in May 1985, reuniting the Corvette with its original engine block, cylinder heads, exhaust manifold, Yenko heavy-duty suspension, Stewart Warner gauges, and roll bar, amongst other original components. Following the completion of the restoration back to its Gulf Oil livery in 1987, the Corvette hit the show circuit and almost instantly began receiving awards. The car appeared at Bloomington Gold in 1987, where it was displayed as part of the Special Collection, which was made up of historically significant Corvettes. That summer, it was invited to the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, where it would take to the track for the first time in over 30 years. It was only fitting that Tony Denman, the last person to race the Corvette competitively, would be invited to get behind the wheel at this event. Under Rev. Ernst’s ownership, the Corvette returned to Bloomington in 1994 and 1997, and it also received the NCRS’ first-ever American Heritage Award, further celebrating its historic significance. Rev. Ernst sold the Corvette to Vic Preisler, who had the car restored once again, and he continued to proudly show it off on the race track and at concours events. In 2003, the 50th anniversary of the Corvette, this car was quite a frequent sight at numerous events that celebrated Chevrolet’s milestone. It was displayed and raced at the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, the Corvette 50th Anniversary celebration in Nashville, the Los Angeles Auto Show, the Petersen Automotive Museum, and the Sebring Race Corvette display. Following an invitation to participate at the Corvettes at Carlisle Race Car Reunion in 2004, the car was inducted to into the Bloomington Gold Hall of Fame. The car received another restoration in 2007 and was once again invited to Corvettes at Carlisle, where it was part of the Chip’s Choice display in 2007. The Corvette was purchased by the Andrews’ in 2008, and it has remained in their collection ever since, amongst many other great performance cars of the era. This Corvette is accompanied by an extremely impressive and comprehensive file that contains documents and photos from throughout its life, and it remains ready to return to the show field or the race track, where it would be welcome with the best. Chassis no. 20867S103980 Engine no. 2103980

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1965 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS

1,991 cc air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with two Weber 40IDA triple-choke downdraft carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension, and front and rear disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90.5 in. The second from last 904 Carrera GTS built Documented ownership and extensive competition history Offered with a period-correct four-cam Carrera engine Arguably the most beautiful Porsche ever One of just four 904 Carrera GTSes built in "Series 2" specification from new The Type 904, born from Porsche’s disappointing foray into Formula One in the early 1960s, was created to bring the company back to its racing sports car roots. In 1962, the immensely talented Ferdinand A. “Butzi” Porsche, the grandson of the company’s founder, was tasked with designing a new two-seat competition coupe that could also be driven on the street; this car was to utilize the mid-engine chassis configuration that had proven so successful with the racing department’s lightweight spyders. A run of 100 cars was approved to homologate the design for the FIA’s Group 3 GT category. In short order, Butzi had laid out a boxed steel ladder tubing frame on a 90.5-inch wheelbase, which would be clothed in a sleek and very light body shell of fiberglass. This design is still widely considered one of the company’s most beautiful designs. The body material was Porsche’s first venture into plastic composites. The panels, produced by Heinkel, were glued and bonded to the steel frame, creating a semi-monocoque structure. The seats were solidly mounted, but the car offered an adjustable steering column and pedals. Porsche had hoped to have its new six-cylinder Type 901 engine ready for the new mid-engined coupe to run at Le Mans, but it was not convinced that the new engine could go the distance. Thus, most 904s were fitted with the Type 547 (1.6 liter) and the Type 587/3 (2.0 liter) DOHC Carrera four-cylinder motors, and it was only towards the end of production that the 2.0-liter 901 flat six was used. The beautifully balanced 904 GTS, which was introduced in early 1964, would enjoy a brilliant inaugural season, scoring victories at Sebring, the Targa Florio, Spa, the Nürburgring 1000 KM, the 24 Hours of Le Mans (a 1-4 class sweep), the 12 Hours of Reims, the Coppa Inter-Europa, the Tour de France, the Bridgehampton 500 KM, and the 1000 KM of Paris. In U.S. amateur racing, the 904 was considered potent enough to be classed with the much more powerful big block Corvettes and Cobras, and it still acquitted itself admirably. Over a two-year period, Porsche would produce just over 100 of these exquisite little coupes, but time and technology would not wait, and Porsche’s new space-framed 906 was deemed a superior vehicle. GTS production ended before a second 100-car run could commence. This fine example’s history is well-documented. It was built in 1965 and is the next-to-last of the four-cylinder series. It was fitted with road equipment and originally shipped to Volkswagen Islandi, a dealership in Hekla, Iceland, perhaps for promotional use. Research by factory expert Jürgen Barth and Jerry Pantis, author of The Porsche 904, 906 & 910 in the Americas, indicates that 904-107 was among just four “second-series” cars fitted with a reinforced chassis, center-filling gas tank, short doors with pull-up plastic side windows, upgraded brakes, and a reshaped tail section with a slight “Kamm” ducktail. Because these cars were built near the end of the series, more time was lavished upon them to ensure that every detail was correct. The Icelandic dealership sold this car in 1967 to Autohaus Walter von Hoff, a Volkswagen dealer in Bad Kreuznach, West Germany. In late 1967, the 904 was sold to an American amateur racing driver, Dr. Carl Armstrong of Toledo, Ohio, for about $6,000. Dr. Armstrong picked up his new car at the Port of New York City and drove it home. Available data shows that the car was fitted at that time with four-cam engine number 99 088. Dr. Armstrong did most of his own race preparation and painted chassis number 904-107 a light metallic blue. According to Pantis, who researched the car’s racing results with the help of noted Porsche historian Jim Perrin, Dr. Armstrong extensively raced the car, usually carrying #90, in SCCA Central Division contests in 1968 and 1969. On August 24, 1968, Dr. Armstrong won the A Production race at Waterford Hills, Michigan; came 2nd in class at Waterford Hills on September 14; won 1st again at Waterford on September 28 and again on October 6 at Steel Cities; and came in 4th at Mid-Ohio October 13. It appears that during Dr. Armstrong’s ownership, the car sustained some light damage to the driver’s side front fender. The transaxle case also suffered some damage, so the unit was replaced with one from a 911. It is recorded that the car’s Type 587/3 four-cam engine had a propensity for head gasket failure, so the owner had his brother fabricate a new set to resolve the problem. Pantis records that the flywheel came adrift at one race at Waterford, so Dr. Armstrong towed the car home, made an overnight repair, and returned to the track the next morning. In 1969, Dr. Armstrong raced his little coupe a few more times, but after acquiring a 906, he sold the 904 to Robert Fergus, the owner of Midwest Volkswagen (MidVo) in Dublin, Ohio. Fergus prepared the GTS for road use by repainting it white with yellow trim and installing carpeting and more comfortable seats. However, he only had the car for a short period of time, as he sold it to well-known Alabama Porsche enthusiast and collector George “Jerry” Reilly. A correct 904 transmission and a 911 S competition engine were installed, and Reilly repainted the car in its original silver. Soon after, Reilly moved to Massachusetts, and over the next 30 years, he enjoyed the car. While it wasn’t raced, Reilly says he did enter the GTS in several track events at Lime Rock Park. In 2001, Reilly reinstalled the original four-cam 904 engine (99 088) that was in the car when it was sold to Dr. Armstrong, and he offered the car for sale through Paul Russell and Company. By that point, the car had been driven less than 20,000 kilometers from new, and it appeared quite original in most aspects. The new owner, Mr. Cal Turner, took the car racing again, but unfortunately, the four-cam engine seized during a race at Summit Point, in West Virginia. Again, a 911 engine was plugged in, and the damaged four-cam was sold to Lothar Hoess, the owner of chassis number 904-100, the car in which that engine was originally installed. In 2005, the car was acquired from a private owner in Europe by DK Engineering in England, which performed what it described as a “thorough but very sympathetic” restoration that retained as much of the car’s original components as possible. Since then, the car has joined a significant Porsche and VW collection and has been used sparingly. Chassis number 904-107 is offered here in roadworthy condition, being fitted with a 1,991-cubic centimeter, magnesium-cased, single-plug 911 engine of approximate 1966–1967 vintage with two triple-throat downdraft Weber 40IDA carburetors. Quite surprisingly, it is still fitted with its original Nadella axle shafts, Eberspacher gasoline heater, fuel surge tank in the nose compartment, the coconut-fiber matting beneath the front-mounted gas tank, and a set of 1964-dated steel and alloy 5.5-inch wide competition wheels, which may be original to this car. The interior features a period-correct Les Leston wood-rimmed steering wheel. At some point in its racing career, the car’s chassis was reinforced with additional steel tubing around the rear suspension. With the exception of the chassis reinforcement, all the preceding suggests that this is a largely unmolested late 904. A recent and thorough inspection was carried out by a leading Porsche expert, and documentation from this inspection is on file and available to review. Included in the sale of this car is a correct 1964 Type 587/3 904 engine (number 99 111) of 1,966-cubic centimeter displacement, which has been mounted on a stand. It is understood that this motor is listed by Porsche as having been a spare. The engine was comprehensively inspected and tested to confirm that it is indeed in good health. It has since been removed, but it is ready to be fitted to the car once again. The 904 Carrera GTS is today considered one of Porsche’s most desirable and collectible models, and here is a fine example that would be the crown jewel in any collection of 1960s racing Porsches. Chassis no. 904-107 Spare Engine no. 99 111

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1958 BMW 507 Series II Roadster

BMW’s most important production automobile, and a landmark design A desirable Series II example with rare factory hardtop The post-war sports car in America is a thing of beauty, and the man almost singularly responsible for recognizing that American audiences would appreciate such beauty and performance was Max Hoffman, for whom the world’s automakers created art in metal for, for over two decades. He was the ultimate muse: a man who inspired beautiful machinery with a simple command, and one that had the resources and influence to back up his inspirations. It was the drumbeats from Hoffman’s New York office that led to the creation of the Porsche Speedster, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL and 190 SL, and this car, the BMW 507. BMW would have eventually recognized the performance capabilities of its engineering, or how the American market’s thirst for fast, beautiful open two-seaters had not yet been quenched, but it was actually Hoffman who spurred on the effort, by demanding stylish machinery that would bridge the divide between low-priced MGs, the Porsches, and the pricey 300 SL in his lineup. The 507 would utilize the best of Bavaria, with mechanical components sourced from the 502 and 503 series, including a 3.2-liter, overhead-valve aluminum block V-8, which had been improved with twin carburetors in order to produce some 150 horsepower. Like most great automobiles, however, it would not have become a legend if not for its flowing, downright sensuous curves. It was Max Hoffman who had final approval of the design, so he requested the services of Count Albrecht von Goertz, a protégé of famed industrial designer Raymond Loewy, whose futuristic themes for Studebaker in the early fifties had caught Hoffman’s discerning eye. For Hoffman and BMW, Goertz imagined some of the most beautiful lines ever folded into metal. The 507 design had a lightness that was combined with a hint of feline power and unmatched refinement. Its long, sinuous fenders kicked at the rear and swept elegantly towards the front, framing a glamorously stylized version of the traditional BMW “twin kidney” grille, in itself molded and refined, with voluptuous creases that were prominent from every angle. Narrow chrome bumpers did not interfere with the flowing simplicity of the design, but it instead accented its grace. Most prominent to the stylist’s eye are the intricate shark-like ventilation “gills” along the front fenders, which echo those on the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL, which was Hoffman’s earlier inspiration. It is a reminder of the visionary muse behind Goertz’s art, and it is a stylistic feature that is still visible decades later in many of BMW’s sports cars, beginning with the Z8. The 507 was hand-built at a price that eventually reached over $11,000, which was a towering sum for a car in the day, and it was discontinued after only two-and-a-half years and 251 examples. Those 251 people looked at the car, soaked up its beauty, and likely forgot the price. Elvis Presley reportedly gave one to Ursula Andress, who was entranced with it. Eventual World Champion John Surtees received a 507 from Count Agusta, the motorcycle manufacturer. The basic lines of the 507 went on to inspire the greatest modern BMW, the Z8, which became its spiritual successor in the carriage houses of the wealthy and stylish. Offered here is a desirable Series II variant with increased engine output and a little additional space behind the seats, offering those taller drivers a more comfortable seating position. It has been beautifully restored in striking Silver with contrasting handsome Green leather upholstery, making it an elegant, period-correct, and beautifully subtle alternative to the sea of white 507s more often offered. It is presented in excellent overall condition, and it has been nicely detailed, with correct steel wheels fitted and an original 507 factory hardtop. Importantly, the 507’s hardtop was “designed in” by Goertz, and the car is as striking with the hardtop fixed as it is when opened to the breeze. Most importantly, in a recent road test by an RM specialist, the car started with ease and was superb in operation, with an easy clutch, responsive brakes, and exhilarating performance. Even at 60 mph, it traveled straight down the road, and heading into a curve, it handled adroitly, just as Max Hoffman would have expected of it. In those days of the new America, as memories of World War II faded and the Baby Boom echoed through streets of prosperity, sports cars became a symbol not just of speed, but also of freedom. The BMW 507 has become an iconoclastic object of that time, and it is at home in history as it is in the garage. Chassis no. 70180 Engine no. 40188 Body no. 1179

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
Hammer price
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1960 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

The progenitor of the modern supercar Charming provenance; two owners from new Impeccable restoration to award-winning standards Rare original accessories Film director John Lasseter once said, “The art challenges the technology, and the technology inspires the art.” If ever an automobile’s art was born from its technology, it was in the Mercedes-Benz 300 SL. The innovative space-frame chassis was literally wrapped in steel, with the aluminum doors, hood, and trunk lid providing lightness. Formed by the shape of its engineering, the 300 SL’s breathtaking good looks came naturally. Like most closed cars, the 300 SL was only improved by being turned into an open car, resulting in the Roadster, which debuted in 1957. If the original Coupe had been a legend, the Roadster was a style symbol that appealed to everyone, young and old alike, as long as they had excellent taste and a spacious bank account. It has long been said that no 300 SL Roadster ever had a boring original owner. This particular 1960 model is no exception. This Roadster was originally delivered to the legendary Mercedes-Benz dealership at 430 Park Avenue, which was a building that was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright specifically for the American importer of European sports cars, Max Hoffman, and his New York salesroom. Prominently displayed on the showroom floor, businessman Elston J. Tribble and his daughter Marthé, a sophomore at Vassar College, were walking past the dealership when the Roadster’s svelte body caught their eye. In a letter written to the current owner, Marthé recalls that “both of us were transfixed by the racing lines and elegant beauty of the car.” After having lunch that afternoon, nearby at Le Pavillon on Fifth Avenue, Elston knew that Marthé was considering dropping out of college to try to find fame in a career in fashion; this was a career path that neither mother nor father approved of. Whereupon Elston realized his opportunity: he promised to purchase that very 300 SL Roadster for Marthé, if she would in turn promise to remain at Vassar and graduate with her degree. Marthé, not immune to her father’s generous offer, quickly agreed, and the car returned home to Princeton, New Jersey. Young Marthé kept the promise to her father, and the vehicle remained with her for the remainder of her collegiate education. Her 300 SL would become a frequent sight on the roads between Vassar’s Poughkeepsie, New York, campus, Princeton, and Marthé’s future husband’s alma mater, Yale University. Early on, Elston remarked that the car’s color matched Marthé’s blue eyes, and henceforth, the car would forever be known to the family as “Blue Eyes.” Blue Eyes would go on to be cherished and enjoyed by Marthé long after her college days were over. The odometer displayed 34,646 miles when Marthé stored the vehicle in the family garage in the fall of 1986 for the coming winter. She fully intended to drive it again come spring; however, for other life priorities, the car would remain locked up and untouched for the next 20 years, until it was rediscovered in 2006. Once uncovered, the current owner purchased the 300 SL from Marthé, on the condition that the car will be restored, in her own words, “to its former glory.” Opting to first show the Roadster in its as-discovered state, Blue Eyes was warmly received on the Preservation Class show circuit in 2007 for the 50th anniversary of the 300 SL Roadster. It won The Star magazine “Find of the Year” Award at the Mercedes-Benz June Jamboree, a Silver Star for “Extraordinary Preservation of Originality” at Starfest, hosted by the Mercedes-Benz Club of America, and Best 300 SL Roadster at the Gullwing Group Convention that September. An article entitled “Reviving Old Blue Eyes,” by Contributing Editor John Kuhn Bleimaier, was the feature story in the May/June issue of The Star, the official Mercedes-Benz Club of America magazine. After a year of Preservation Class competition, the car would undergo the full concours-level restoration that Marthé so desired. After being meticulously restored by Steel Wings in Hopewell, New Jersey, for over a period of two-and-a-half years, Blue Eyes emerged in award-winning condition. As the car had rarely been used during the Tribble family’s ownership, it remained largely original, and a vast majority of its original parts could be refurbished and reinstalled. Both the original matching-numbers engine (number 198.980.10.002622) and gearbox were fully rebuilt at this time to as-new condition. While the car was originally delivered in Blue Gray (DB 166) over Cream leather (1060), the owner opted to refinish the car in a striking, later factory 300 SL color, Middle Blue Metallic (DB 396), while the interior was restored to its original shade of cream leather. He also took the opportunity to install a factory-correct soft top in Navy Blue (723), as the car was originally delivered in coupe specification with only its hardtop. The restoration team and current owner went to immeasurable lengths to obtain correct parts for the car, often in collaboration with the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center. In addition to the vast expertise of Steel Wings and the Classic Center, no expense was spared when hiring top-rated specialized subcontractors in paint, interior, and chrome. As a result, every component on the car is original as it would have been in 1960, down to the correct windshield wipers, which are engraved with the word “Germany” and cost nearly three times the price of the replacement MB Sekurit windshield they rest on. Proving to be even more successful than in Preservation Class condition, Blue Eyes soon graced the cover of the Gullwing Group’s 300 SL Star Letter. It included an article that chronicled the car’s trip to the Monterey peninsula and the celebrated The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering in August of 2010. While in California, the current owner also visited the late 300 SL expert and Gullwing Group member George “Pinky” Winther to assess the overall correctness of his freshly restored Roadster. While very impressed with the overall quality, Winther was challenged to find inaccuracies, and those few that were found have since been corrected. Blue Eyes would go on to collect numerous Best of Class trophies at such prestigious shows as the Greenwich Concours d’Elegance and the Boca Raton Concours d’Elegance, as well as an Excellence in Class Award at the Cavallino Classic Concours at Mar-a-Lago. The Roadster earned blue ribbons in the Best of Mercedes-Benz Class at the Concours d’Elegance of America at St. Johns and the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2011, where the car competed against various rare Mercedes-Benzes produced in the post-war period for the 125th anniversary celebration of the marque. Blue Eyes also took First in Class Show Roadster at the October 2010 Gullwing Group Convention in Saratoga Springs, New York. Not only do these awards confirm this 300 SL Roadster as one of the best of its kind, but also that it is one of the best of its marque in general, as it is a masterpiece of both concept and execution. Equipped with a number of original features, including the factory hardtop, tool kit roll, jack, and manuals, the car also includes its original window sticker that is addressed to 430 Park Avenue. Other features include a new soft top, a period-correct Nardi steering wheel, a Mercedes-Benz Salesman’s Databook, and a rare period set of Rudge-style accessory hub caps. Most notably, Blue Eyes comes with an original Karl Baisch two-piece luggage set that perfectly matches the cream interior and is in virtually new condition; this is a rare period treasure that would be nearly impossible to source today. Three leather bound books that document the entire restoration process through photographs, showing the car as-found, in restoration, and post-restoration, are also included with the sale, providing a fantastic visual timeline of the Roadster’s entire restoration process. The overall condition of the car is truly something to behold. The paint is a perfect showcase of the amount of effort and money put into the restoration, and the interior shows no signs of wear whatsoever, requisite of a vehicle so highly acclaimed by concours judges. Blue Eyes is truly a low mileage example, as it has only traveled 35,500 miles since new, with 800 of them largely being accumulated in post-restoration road testing. When recently asked about her experiences with the car, Marthé fondly replied, “Needless to say, whenever I was out with Blue Eyes, I got a lot of ‘looks’ in that car.” While Mercedes-Benz produced only 1,858 of their 300 SL Roadsters, this example truly stands in a class of its own. With only two owners in the last 53 years, it is incredibly well-documented, immaculately restored, and has countless concours trophies to its name, both from Preservation Class and full concours judging—characteristics that are almost unheard-of in any single show vehicle. This 300 SL Roadster is truly flawless, and it represents a classic automobile that sits squarely at the intersection of historical importance and objective beauty. Chassis no. 198.042.10.002562 Engine no. 198.980.10.002622 Body no. 198.042.10.00072

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
Hammer price
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1965 Aston Martin DB5

325 bhp, 3,995 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with triple Weber twin-choke carburetors, ZF five-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with upper and lower control arms, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar, live rear axle with Watt linkage, radius rods, and coil springs, and four-wheel power-assisted hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98 in. Factory left-hand-drive, matching-numbers, late-production example Extremely rare factory air conditioning Vantage-specification engine rebuilt by top marque specialists Fully equipped from new, with exceptional accessories Includes rare Continental touring kit, original tool roll, and owner’s handbook Recently completed comprehensive cosmetic restoration by Kevin Kay Restorations The Aston Martin DB5 epitomized the success of the company’s mission to produce a world-class GT sports coupe with the English gentleman in mind. The car was hand built and improved upon the advanced engineering that began with its groundbreaking predecessor, the DB4. Superior materials were used in manufacture, such as aluminum-alloy body panels mounted over a skeleton of small-diameter tubing, which was patented by Touring of Milan as Superleggera construction. Its race-proven engine was also made of aluminum, including both the block and its twin-cam hemispherical cylinder head. Then, of course, the interior was upholstered in the finest Connolly leather, which was complemented by deep-pile Wilton carpets. The net result was a car of unmatched power, elegance, and luxury. BUILT FOR A PRINCE Prince Abdul Ilah Bin Abdulaziz was the son of King Abdulaziz, of Saudi Arabia, and he was known for being a car enthusiast, serving as the chairman of The National Motor Company. In 1965, H.R.H. Prince Abdul, already an accomplished entrepreneur at the age of 28, ordered his fully outfitted Aston Martin DB5, DB5/2270/L, direct from Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd. The delivery address for the car was listed as “behind the Royal Palace, Jeddah.” DB5/2270/L is a very late production example that displays the sixth from last DB5 chassis number, and there are indications that it may have actually been the last example to be completed, such as it being delivered in 1966 and being supplied with separate signal indicators and running lights in the front, which were to become standard with the imminent launch of the DB6. More interestingly, 2270/L was unusually specified with a full complement of factory accessories, many of which are rarely seen, and virtually all of which exist with the car today. According to its factory build sheet, these consist of the following: • Normalair air conditioning • A Motorola radio with a power-operated aerial • Two Marchal fog lamps • Two wing mirrors • Two Britax lap and diagonal safety belts for the front seats • Two Britax belts for the rear seat • A DB5 Continental parts kit • A heated rear screen • Three-ear hub caps • Detachable head rests It is believed that fewer than 35 DB5s were delivered with air conditioning. The specified system remains intact on the 2270/L and features a modern compressor for reliability. The Motorola radio was replaced, very evidently in period, by a Blaupunkt twin-band unit with a matching shortwave module mounted under the dash. One can imagine the young prince’s desire to listen perhaps to the BBC while domiciled in the Middle East. The Marchal fog lamps are correct NOS items that have been mounted per factory specification underneath the front bumper. Both sets of original Britax seat belts are included with the car. It is especially unusual to see rear seat belts in a DB5, but again, one can imagine the prince’s concern for the safety of his young children while in the car. Of particular note is the inclusion of the Continental parts kit, which is often referred to as the Continental touring kit. It is also unusual to find one listed as a delivered accessory, as the common practice was for the factory to “lend” the kit, whose box fits neatly in the boot, to long-distance travelers and to charge them only for any parts used when returned. Again, the remote domicile of 2270/L demanded full ownership, and clearly cost was not a deterrent to the lavish specification of the car when ordered. The heated rear screen, which is a feature that is also rarely seen today, is intact, indicating that it is its original glass. The attractive three-ear hub caps (aka knock-offs or spinners), which can easily be seen in accompanying photographs, secure a brand-new set of chrome wire wheels, fresh Avon Turbosteel radials, and a properly profiled and modern version of the original Avon Turbospeed bias-ply tires. Ownership history is quite well documented. The first known owner after H.R.H. Prince Abdul was William C. Mullins, Esq., of Dallas, Texas. (A copy of the original Texas title is supplied in the history file, as well as factory correspondence with Mr. Mullins, which dates back to 1978). Mr. Mullins sold the car to Joel Stein, of Ft. Lauderdale, in the early 1990s. (Again, a copy of the Florida title is supplied.) Circa 2005, Dr. Stein sold 2270/L to noted collector George Bunting, of Hunt Valley, Maryland, where it resided with other significant Aston Martins in his museum. The history file also includes an impressive collection of service records that spans the past 20 years. Dr. Stein had the DB5 mechanically refurbished and serviced by Performance Tuning and Restoration, of Pompano Beach, Florida, with documentation from this process, starting in 1993, available in the accompanying file. This outfit, run by former Aston Martin Vintage Race Services chief Robert Clerk and his son, Jon, were commissioned by Dr. Stein to rebuild the engine to the elevated and venerated Vantage specification (including triple side-draft Weber carburetors, which are a not-uncommon, desirable, and ultimately reversible upgrade). Today, Jon, now a principal at Steel Wings in Ivyland, Pennsylvania, is highly regarded as one of the country’s top Aston Martin specialist engine builders, and he recalls doing the work on the Aston Martin. Invoices for regular “whatever it needs” service by Mr. Bunting from Treasured Motorcar Services Ltd., of Reisterstown, Maryland, are also scrupulously catalogued. The current owner acquired 2270/L from Mr. Bunting in 2013 and embarked on an extensive cosmetic restoration at award-winning marque specialist shop Kevin Kay Restorations. The work performed during the restoration included stripping the paint and performing expert metal work, as necessary, and blocking and sanding in preparation for the return to the car’s original color of Caribbean Pearl. The bumpers were perfected, rechromed, and refitted, and much of the other brightwork and the scuff plates were either replaced or renewed. The lightly scratched windscreen was replaced with fresh glass, and great attention was given to the engine bay in order to restore it to show standard. Finally, a concours-quality retrimming was also completed. During this process, fresh, correct Connolly-type leather in the original Navy Blue hue was installed, even on the door panels and the headrests, as was the complementary and luxurious grey Wilton carpet piped in Navy. Receipts for this work, which additionally addressed numerous small details where necessary, are also included, indicating a recent expenditure of approximately $140,000. In addition to the arresting fresh appearance of its delightful, striking original colors, the well-maintained mechanical systems were tested and are in fine order. An RM specialist test-drove the car and reported that it starts easily and runs strong. The gearbox is reported to be lovely, and the car stops as well as it goes. Plus, the A/C blows cold! The full complement of factory accessories, which significantly includes the Continental touring kit, is augmented by a correct-type jack (beautifully restored) and hammer, an original owner’s handbook, a technical sheet for the Blaupunkt shortwave unit, a period factory sales brochure, the now-unobtainable original and virtually complete factory leather tool roll, and a set of spare keys. This Aston’s indicated mileage is under 63,000 and believed correct, as it ties with the long string of service invoices. Any DB5 is a blue-chip Aston Martin, and they are just as joyful to drive as they are to admire in a serious collection of sports and GT cars. Chassis 2270/L was built to the unique specifications of a connoisseur prince, and amazingly, it is offered nearly 50 years later with its special features still available. Without a doubt, 2270/L is one of the finest DB5s extant, and it represents a singular opportunity to acquire a rare example that is in the ultimate specification, has numerous desirable factory options and a solid history of mostly known owners, and has had a fresh restoration by expert craftsmen. As such, this stunning DB5 invites close inspection. Chassis no. DB5/2270/L Engine no. 400/2321

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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1971 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

352 hp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber 40DCN17 carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension by coil springs and wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Star of The Gumball Rally Formerly the property of Mel and Noel Blanc Featured in Road & Track and Motor Trend Classic Offered from a private Southern California collection Perhaps the most famous Daytona Spider in the world And now, my friend, the first rule of Italian driving: what’s behind me is not important. It was 1976 when the late Raul Julia, in character as Italian racing driver Franco Bertolli, spoke those words from behind the wheel of a Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider, confirming them by snapping off the car’s rearview mirror and casting it casually over his shoulder. The quote summed up the spirit of both the movie in which Julia and the Ferrari appeared, the madcap racing comedy The Gumball Rally, as well as the ethos of the Daytona Spider itself. Owning a Daytona Spider meant something. Out of the 1,406 Daytonas produced between 1968 and 1973, only 121 were spiders; they were the official factory-built convertible versions of the car that a Cavallino article describes as “a sight to behold, mean looking and muscled, weaving dramatically on its overworked suspension, shaking and darting under heavy braking in a corner, literally pushing air and dirt aside, leaving a wake and making its own weather, loud as hell and scattering birds to the four winds.” Add the feeling of an open roof, the wind whipping one’s hair, the sun casting upon one’s face, and you had a car that was the Enzo of the 1970s—an ultimate Prancing Horse status symbol. By 1976, when The Gumball Rally was released, the Daytona Spider had been out of production for three years, but it was still the only car in which a self-respecting Italian racing legend, fictionalized or not, would be seen. The car offered here, chassis number 14829, was the Spider used in The Gumball Rally, but that is only part of its story. Equipped by the factory as a left-hand drive U.S.-specification car with air conditioning, seats with red inserts, and instruments reading in miles, this Spider was originally delivered through Bill Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors, of Reno, Nevada. Its original owner, a Mr. Nicholson, had the nose band repainted silver metallic grey, an iconic feature that this particular car, and only this car, retains to the present day. Not long afterward, the Spider was sold to Ferrari mechanic and racing driver Joseph Crevier, of Mission Viejo, California, who made it available for sale through classifieds in the Los Angeles Times and AutoWeek in 1975 and 1977, respectively. Crevier also made the car available for The Gumball Rally, and after filming, it returned to his ownership; the nose, repainted red for the movie, was returned to its original grey afterwards. During his bankruptcy in 1982, Crevier reportedly spent 20 days jailed on Terminal Island for refusing to tell the bankruptcy court the whereabouts of this car! Despite its owner’s best efforts, the Spider was eventually sold by Crevier’s court-appointed trustee in 1983 to Walt McCune, who rapidly traded it to Noel Blanc, son of Mel Blanc, “The Man of a Thousand Voices.” Many of the most famous characters from Warner Brothers’s golden era of animation, including Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, and Yosemite Sam, were all voiced by Mel Blanc, whose career behind America’s favorite cartoon characters lasted for over 60 years. Blanc was an active and beloved member of the Hollywood social scene, where he was known not only for his voices, but also as a devoted motorhead who stabled some of the movie colony’s fastest, most enthusiastically driven cars—a roster that rivaled Steve McQueen’s in its number of fabulous Ferraris, Corvettes, and other treasures. The collection was shared with his son, who continued to lovingly maintain and enjoy the cars after his father’s passing. While in the Blancs’ collection, the Spider was serviced and road-tested by Modena Imports of LaBrea, repainted red by Bill De Carr and the renowned Junior’s House of Color, and reupholstered by hot rodding legend Tony Nancy. Enjoyed by the Blanc family for 14 years, it appeared in a 1983 issue of Road & Track magazine, as well as at the Rosso Rodeo Concours in Beverly Hills in June 1995. It was reportedly driven only three times a year, spending the rest of the time properly serviced and maintained in their climate-controlled garage. Noel Blanc sold the Ferrari in 1997 to the present owners, a private collection in Southern California. It has been regularly displayed, including at the 38th Ferrari Club of America National Meeting and Concours at Century Plaza in Los Angeles in 2002 and also at the Blackhawk Museum in 2005. For a feature article in the July/August 2006 issue of Motor Trend Classic, it was reunited with the Shelby 427 Cobra that was its co-star in The Gumball Rally, 30 years later. Today, the Spider remains very much as the Blancs sold it and as it appeared on screen. It retains its Tony Nancy upholstery and its distinctive trademark silver snout, while the body now wears fine yellow pinstriping, rectangular reflectors below the taillights, and a white reverse light below the rear license plate frame. The odometer shows under 15,000 actual miles, which is believed to be original mileage since new and is a figure that is verified by the car’s wonderfully honest condition throughout. If it were only a Daytona Spider, this would be an important automobile, as it has low mileage and is in well-preserved condition. Yet, this particular car has surpassed that, with its status as a star of one of the all-time greatest “car movies,” as an automobile driven and enjoyed by one of Hollywood’s most beloved voices and passionate motorists, as the canvas on which Junior and Tony Nancy created art, and, finally, as part of one of the great car collections. It is now a centerpiece of Southern California car culture, and it is, perhaps, the most famous Daytona Spider in the world. What’s behind you is not important. Titled as 1972. Chassis no. 14829 Engine no. 14829 Body no. 688

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
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1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamica

340bhp, 3,967 cc single overhead camshaft V12 engine with Solex carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, coil spring independent front suspension with live rear axle, four wheel telescopic Koni shock absorbers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95" The high performance luxury gran turismo was a new automotive idiom in the prosperous years following World War II. The genre had its roots with the great prewar touring cars like Rolls-Royce’s Phantom II Continental and Mercedes-Benz’s supercharged 500K and 540K sports coupes. Postwar luxury gran Turismos included the Bentley Continental R-type, and later the Mercedes-Benz 300SCs. Moving into the 1960s these fast, luxurious cars continued to be the car of choice for the rich and famous. Most combined powerful engines with a highly competent chassis, were clothed in unique or limited production coachwork from inspired designers, equipped to the highest standards, and trimmed in the finest materials. Ferrari had for years offered such cars for its very best clients. Crafted in tiny quantities, they were superbly fitted and offered sparkling performance. One of the best known of these was the Superamerica and Superfast series, superb cars with price tags that exceeded even Rolls-Royce. The Aurelio Lampredi-designed V12 engine originally developed for the four-liter GP cars supplied power for the first series examples. The 410 Superamerica appeared at the Brussels motor show in January 1956 with a 4,962cc “long block” engine delivering 340 horsepower. Pininfarina’s coachwork was masterful, minimizing the car’s apparent size, while conveying the car’s performance potential. The second series 400 Superamerica was introduced at the Brussells Motor Show in 1960 when s/n 1611 SA, a two place cabriolet, was first exhibited. Later, at the Turin show in November, the Superfast II debuted – which would provide the inspiration for the Coupe Aerodinamica. Introduced in 1962 as the Superfast III, the new car would be built between September 1962 and January 1964. A total of seventeen examples were built - all on the shorter 2,420 mm chassis. Unlike the earlier 410 Superamericas, these second series cars were fitted with the latest version of Ferrari’s legendary Colombo-designed V12. The lovely design, penned by Pininfarina, featured a tapered nose and tail with an elegant streamlined look. It was this design that earned the model its name: Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamica. It is considered to be one of Pininfarina’s great designs – an artful expression of Ferrari performance with stylistic elegance. Once again, their dizzying pricetags ensured that the client base would be restricted to heads of state and captains of industry. Chassis 2841 SA was the 7th of a total of seventeen 400 SA Coupé Aerodinamicas produced on the short chassis. It was completed in September 1961, finished in Grigio Fumo (Smoke Grey) with the interior finished in Pelle Rosso Connolly (red leather). The history of s/n 2841 is well known, having been first seen in public in October 1961 at the Paris Motor Show. Later, in November of that year, the car was delivered to its first owner, Count Fritz Herbert Somsky, of Geneva, Switzerland. It remained with him for some time, but by the 1970s the car had been imported into the U.S., where it was owned by Barry Le Fave, of Santa Ana, California, who sold it to W. B. LeFace. The next owner was Walter Harris, another California resident. By this point, the car had been refinished in red with a red and black interior. Harris advertised the car for sale in the March 22, 1980 issue of the Ferrari Market Letter, describing it as “all original, numbers match, highly tuned engine, rebuilt brakes and rear end”. Presumably as a result of that advertisement, Harris sold the car (now finished in a lovely gray metallic) to the late Greg Garrison, a renowned Ferrari collector, and producer of the Dean Martin show in Hollywood. On May 12, 1999, s/n 2841 (repainted green) was sold by Garrison to C. A. Skeets Dunn of Rancho Santa Fé, CA. On May 20, 2001, the car was shown at the Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance by Skeets Dunn, where it placed first in class and won the Meguiar’s Award for best paint. Despite its obviously lovely condition, Dunn elected to undertake a complete restoration of the car, beginning in August 2003. The mechanicals were done by specialist Bill Pound, with the body and paint done by Symbolic Restoration in Sorrento Valley, California. It was one of the most exhausting and comprehensive Ferrari restorations; the car was disassembled to every nut and bolt. The body was stripped to bare metal, and every panel and piece of chrome was carefully fitted before repainting or replating. Finally, the body was meticulously refinished in Blue Sera, while the interior was carefully retrimmed in natural saddle leather. The entire restoration – costing in excess of $400,000 – was documented with reports, receipts, and photographs. Upon completion, Skeets Dunn showed s/n 2841 at the 56th Annual Pebble Beach Concours d'Elégance on August 20, 2006, where it scored 99 points in the class for Ferrari GT cars (class M-1) – a remarkable result for a first time showing. Later, on January 27, 2007, the car was shown once again at the XVI Palm Beach Cavallino Classic Concours d'Elegance at The Breakers hotel in Palm Beach, Florida, where it won a coveted Platinum award. It has since been shown many times, accumulating a string of platinum and first in class awards. Certainly it is true that any 400 SA Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamica is rare, with just seventeen made. Serial no. 2841 is all the more unique for its well known owner history, and its fresh and high point professional restoration. This beautiful and historically significant 400 Superamerica is ready to be shown at the most important events around the country, and can be driven with the utmost confidence in its supreme style. In addition, its rarity makes this 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamica the flagship of Ferrari and Pininfarina’s gran turismo offerings. Addendum Please note that this car is titled as a 1962. The serial number for this vehicle is 400SA2841. Chassis no. 400SA2841

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-15
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1959 Aston Martin DB4 GT Factory Lightweight

Superbly suitable for road or track venues, this is the rarest of rare - one of only two LHD Lightweight DB4 GTs. A matching numbers example, our Peony Red DB4 GT # 0168/L is correctly restored by Aston Martin specialists and has been a recent winner of Concours, Vintage Race and Road Rally events. Specifications: 3,670 cc twin plug, dual OH camshaft alloy engine with two distributors and three Weber 45 DCOE carburetors developing approximately 300 BHP at 6,000 RPM; four-speed synchromesh alloy-cased, close ratio gearbox; monocoque steel “punt-type” chassis with four-wheel coil-spring suspension – independent to the front, solid axle rear with trailing arms and Watt’s linkage lateral location; all-alloy coachwork to a “Superleggera” design by Touring, Milano; four-wheel Girling disc brakes; 16" Borrani alloy wire wheels with Michelin 185R-16 “X-Stop” radial tires. Wheelbase: 95" ASTON MARTIN’S DB4 AND DB4 GT SERIES The Aston Martin DB4 was unveiled at the 1958 Paris Salon. A totally new car, the introduction of the DB4 was a significant achievement for the small British manufacturer. The specification included a completely new steel platform chassis with disc brakes all around, and a freshly developed alloy twin-cam 3.7-liter straight six engine, all clothed in an elegantly proportioned fastback aluminum body designed by Touring of Milan. Overall, the DB4 was state-of-the art for its time, a masterpiece of robust British engineering in combination with exquisite Italian styling. Of all the postwar Aston Martins, Sir David Brown’s gracefully sleek DB4 is certainly one of the most admired. The chassis was engineered under the watchful eye of Harold Beech and features independent front suspension, and a live rear axle well-located by trailing arms and a Watt’s linkage. The body construction utilizes the vaunted Touring Superleggera process, which consists of a skeleton made up from small diameter steel tubing covered by hand-formed aluminum alloy body panels. The coachwork was constructed by Aston Martin under license from Touring at its newly deployed facility in Newport Pagnell. Effortlessly modern and breezily international, the DB4 hit the sweet spot between the Continent and the Crown. The competition variant of the Aston Martin DB4, the DB4 GT, was formally introduced in September 1959 at the London Motor Show, based on the race-winning prototype SP199/1, and in the year which Astons took the World Sports Car Championship title. The GT prototype won its first outing at Silverstone in May 1959 on the Bank Holiday weekend in the hands of Stirling Moss, and was one of the first cars away at Le Mans that June, in the same colors as the victorious Aston DBR1 Sports Racing Car. The GT was developed for increased performance by making it shorter, lighter and more powerful. In order to save weight, the wheelbase was reduced by 13 cm (approx. 5 inches). Altogether. weight was reduced by 91 kg (200 lbs.) The engine was extensively modified, featuring a higher compression (9:1) twin plug cylinder head and breathing through triple dual-throat Weber 45 DCOE carburetors. Power output was outstanding; 302 bhp at 6,000 rpm, a useful increase from the claimed 240 bhp of the standard car, and qualifying the GT as the most powerful British car of its era. Maximum speed was 153 mph with a 0 to 60 time of 6.1 seconds. It was also one of the first cars that could go from standstill to 100 mph and then brake to a dead stop in under 20 seconds – a tribute in part, to its upgraded Girling braking system, as used on Aston’s competition sports racers of the era. Outwardly, the GT is distinguished by faired in headlamps, a feature that was later made standard for the DB5 model. The rear screen and quarter windows were made of Plexiglas on many examples: bumper overriders were deleted and the roll-down windows were frameless within the doors. Twin, competition-style, quick-release “Monza” fuel fillers were added atop each of the rear wings, leading to a high-capacity fuel tank mounted in the boot. The immense performance and excellent roadholding of the DB4 GT renders it an ideal car for the fast, long distance driver. The sheer sensation of unlimited “urge” under perfect control is one of motoring’s greatest pleasures. Unlike the Aston’s Italian arch-rival, the SWB 250 Berlinetta, which had a rudimentary “race car” interior look, the DB4 GT’s cockpit was luxuriously appointed to Aston Martin road car specifications including Connolly hides and Wilton wool carpeting. The dash binnacle on the GTs benefited from the addition of an oil temperature gauge in addition to the standard array of instruments, which included an 8,000 RPM tachometer. DB4 GTs represented a strong challenge to the dominance of Ferrari in FIA racing and enjoyed considerable success, raced from 1959 by both the Works team as well as John Ogier’s Essex Racing Stable. Driven by the likes of Roy Salvadori, Stirling Moss, Jim Clark and Innes Ireland, these rare lightweight GTs earned their stripes on the racing circuits of the world. Despite their rarity, the GT is still a popular entrant at major historic racing events such as the Goodwood Revival and the numerous Aston Martin Owners Club Championship race meetings. The DB4 GT has proven grand for touring in many of the long distance events that have become popular in recent years, such as the Colorado Grand, Tour de France and Tour d’Espagna. Produced between 1959 and 1963, Aston Martin built a mere 75 DB4 GTs (plus another 19 of the Zagato bodied variants). Of the 75 examples, 45 were supplied in right hand drive and 30 were left hand drive. Amongst the most beloved of all Astons, the DB4 GT remains unmatched for its unique combination of performance and roadability. THE DB4 GT LIGHTWEIGHTS/GENERAL Of the 75 standard DB4 GTs, only six are known to have full Factory lightweight construction details. The lightweight concept came about when certain Aston dealers and major racing teams requested GTs that could be competitive with Ferrari’s SWB 250 Berlinettas in international Grand Touring Racing. The half-dozen lightweights are divided into two sub-species. The first of these can be described as “BUILD SHEET GTs” since they were originally ordered with this specification and are so described on the factory build sheets and in the Aston Martin Owners Club (AMOC) Registry. DB4 GT # 0168/L, the car here on offer, is one of only four BUILD SHEET Lightweight GTs – two being configured as Right Hand Drive examples and a further two, including this GT, in Left Hand Drive form. The other lightweight type is the “BESPOKE” or Service Department created GTs. Ex-Aston Martin Chief Engineer and Head of Racing, Ted Cutting wrote to this author on November 11, 1994 with a clarification of the two types: “The cars ordered and built as lightweights from the start were so described on their buildsheets and were completed by the Aston Martin Competition Department. The “Bespoke” GT chassis were modified to lightweight spec after build completion by the service shop.” The following is a listing of the “BUILD SHEET” lightweight racing DB4 GTs: CHASSIS # ORIGINAL OWNER ORIGINAL UK REG # 0124/R Tommy Sopwith 587 GJB 0125/R Ogier/Essex Racing 18 TVX 0167/L Factory Road Test Car 40 MT 0168/L Inskip/NY Dealer N/A TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF DB4 GT LIGHTWEIGHTS/GENERAL The chassis weight was reduced by aluminum replacement of the standard car’s steel parts, by “hole-cutting” and by the total elimination of certain other items. Alloy Replacement of Steel Items: 1. Door, bonnet & boot framing 2. Wheel arches 3. Engine compartment side panels 4. Upper half of firewall 5. All cockpit floor sections (4) 6. Rear parcel shelf and rear riser panels. 7. Battery & tool box lids 8. Rear boot pan 9. Front kick panels 10. Drive shaft tunnel Chassis Hole Cutting 1. Front cross-member 2. Front side rails 3. Rear watts linkage brackets 4. Brake line brackets Weight Reduction by elimination 1. Radio, speakers & heater 2. Glovebox lid 3. One of two bonnet stay rods 4. Clock 5. Windshield washer bottle, pump and fittings 6. Bumpers & over-riders. * NOTE: DB4 GT Lightweights were all different from each other in certain aspects, being ordered by customers to various specifications. # 0168/L for instance, has Plexi rear quarter and rear windows as well as a 24 hour aircraft-type clock fitted in the center of the dash, presumably as a pit-stop timing device for its intended first race – the 1961 12 Hours of Sebring. FURTHER MODIFICATIONS FOR CURRENT VINTAGE RACING OF GT # 0168/L During the total restoration carried out for the present owner in the 2001-2002 period, the following performance and safety aspects were added: • “Blueprinting” of original engine to FIA specs. • HD suspension components. • Competition brake pads. • Safety 4-pt bolt-in roll bar with seat harness brackets (removable). • Racing seat belts. • Large racing oil cooler • Weber carburetor cold-air box with front facing air duct tubing. • “ATL” racing fuel bladder and foam fitted inside the original 32-gallon alloy tank. • Five pound fire extinguisher. • Racing master electric cut-off switch in rear quarter-window. EARLY HISTORY OF ASTON MARTIN DB4 GT # 0168/L (Left Hand Drive) The Factory Lightweight DB4 GT we are here privileged to present was ordered by the handlebar-mustachioed Head of Aston Martin’s North American operations, Rex Woodgate. Woodgate, a legendary business figure in the David Brown era of Aston’s history was also a highly respected driver as well as a racing team manager and had entered # 0168/L in the March 25, 1961 Sebring 12 Hours Endurance Race. As the third car of his DB4 GT Racing Team, drivers scheduled for Aston’s Sebring effort included well known sports car chauffeurs Bob Grossman, Duncan Black, Sherman Decker and Bob Bucher. The build sheet says # 0168/L was dispatched from Newport Pagnell on March 14th, a mere 11 days prior to Sebring but, as an airfreight cargo, it should have made the race; that is until Murphy joined the Aston Team. Alas, US Customs took an overly great interest, rolling out the red tape instead of the red carpet and Woodgate’s new Aston DB4 GT was not released until the Monday after the Sebring race! However, now one can be grateful for this bad luck, since this GT was then sold through Inskip’s in New York as a Grand Touring street machine, thus escaping the tin-snips and ball-peen hammers that the 12 Hours of Sebring often inflict on innocent factory-fresh sports cars. Interestingly, the original factory build sheet further confirms this GTs intended Sebring race mission – under “Guarantee Issued”, instead of the normal one year period, is typed in capital letters: “NO WARRANTY ISSUED”. Hopefully Inskip of New York, the importer/East Coast Aston dealer, re-instated this warranty before selling the car to the first owner, H.P. Berger of Gypsy Hill, Gwynedd Valley, PA. Berger sold it on to Ed Nisbet of Stamford, CT in 1963 who kept it for four years before passing # 0168/L to E.R. Coyle of Sewickley, PA. Coyle apparently liked the GT, keeping it for some eight years prior to selling to US Army Major Douglas H. Necessary of Hopkinsville, KY in 1975. Necessary liked the DB4 GT even better since he ultimately owned it twice! In 1984 Necessary turned the Aston over to another legendary Aston Martin North American character by the name of Charlie Turner. Turner, a larger-than-life figure (literally) was a long-term Chairman of the Aston Martin Owners Club (AMOC – USA) and a great fan of DB4 GTs, owning three of them in a 25 year period. In about 1987, Major Necessary talked Turner into selling the DB4 GT back to him, keeping it for two or three years before passing it back to Turner in the late 1980s. Charlie Turner, the proprietor of Import Service & Restoration Company of Marietta, GA coveted this car because of its factory lightweight status and always said that this was his favorite. Now having covered some 54,945-road miles, according to a 1988 appraisal carried out for Turner, he decided to treat this GT to a total restoration. Sadly this was not completed in his lifetime, since Turner succumbed to a heart attack in 1990. RECENT HISTORY # 0168/L remained in the C. Turner estate for a further ten years until the present owner, another ex-Chairman of the Aston Martin Owners Club, managed to acquire it after several years of trying on April 4, 2001. At that time # 0168/L consisted of a perfectly painted body in the original color of Peony Red on its restored chassis and suspension, but with the power train not yet installed. (Its odometer read 54,989 miles – believed to be the original mileage from new). In the 2001-2002 period, Aston expert Jon Clerk of the Steel Wings Company of Ivyland, PA, restored the entire car – every aspect, again. Considering its intended use as a dual-purpose road and track car, many subtle performance, reliability and safety improvements were incorporated in this car’s engine and running gear. All of this work is now conclusively proven as no. 0168/L currently holds the Lime Rock Park lap record for “standard DB4 GTs” at a flat 1:08 as per the Aston Martin Owners Club, while still being a perfectly tractable road Grand Tourer for rallies and tours. With the odometer now registering 56,547 – having covered 1,558 miles since the recent restoration, the DB4 GT has successfully completed eight track events, three AMOC New England Road Tours and a few spirited dinner drives without missing a beat. Additionally no. 0168/L was recently returned to Steel Wings for an all systems check-over, oil service and tune-up. Now totally ready for more road and track adventures, the sale of this DB4 GT is accompanied by its Factory build sheet as well as British Motor Industry Heritage Trust Certificate no. 2006/820S and a Vintage Sports Car Club of America (VSCCA) competition log book. The subject of a recent lavish feature article in Vintage Motorsport Magazine, this Factory Lightweight Aston Martin DB4 GT presents a stunning combination of continental elegance and brute power and will be welcomed at any historic motoring event on the planet. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is a 1959. The following Aston Martin DB4 GT's are known to be Factory constructed to "Lightweight" specifications: Chassis # UK Reg # Original Owner 0124/R 587 GTB T. Sopwith 0125/R 18 TVX Ogier/Essex Racing 0151/R 17 TVX Ogier/Essex Racing 0167/R 40 MT Factory Road Test Car 0168/L N/A Inskip/NY Dealer Chassis no. DB4GT0168L

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-08-17
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1930 Duesenberg Model J Sport Berline

The George Whittell “Mistress Car" A One-Off Franklin Q. Hershey Design Coachwork by Murphy, Inc, Pasadena, California 265bhp, 420 cu. in. four valves per cylinder twin overhead camshaft inline eight-cylinder, three-speed transmission, leaf spring and beam axle front suspension, leaf spring and live axle rear suspension and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulically-actuated drum brakes. Wheelbase: 153" CHASSIS NO. 2305 The Model J Duesenberg has long been regarded as the most outstanding example of design and engineering of the classic era. Introduced in 1928, trading was halted on the New York Stock exchange for the announcement. At $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America. Few would argue that the car’s features did not support its price. Indeed, the Model J’s specifications sound current today: double overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, power hydraulic brakes and 265hp in naturally aspirated form. The story of the Model J begins in 1925, when Errett Lobban Cord added the Duesenberg Motors Company to his rapidly growing enterprise, the Auburn Automobile Company. Cord’s vision was to create an automobile that would surpass the great marques of Europe and America. Cadillac, Isotta Fraschini, Bugatti, Rolls-Royce, and Hispano-Suiza were his targets and Duesenberg was his chosen instrument. He presented Fred Duesenberg with the opportunity to create the greatest car in the world, and Fred obliged with the Duesenberg Model J. The Duesenberg Model J’s introduction on December 1, 1928 at the New York Auto Salon was front page news. The combination of the Duesenberg reputation with the Model J’s grand concept and execution made it the star of the show and the year. Duesenberg ordered enough components to build 500 Model Js while development continued for six months after the Model J’s introduction to ensure its close approximation of perfection. The first customer delivery came in May 1929, barely five months before Black Tuesday. The effect of the Duesenberg J on America cannot be minimized. Even in the misery of the Depression this paragon of power illustrated the continued existence of wealth and upper class. Duesenberg’s advertising became a benchmark, featuring the wealthy and privileged in opulent surroundings with only a single line of copy, “He drives a Duesenberg.” The outside exhaust pipes inspired generations of auto designers and remain, 60 years later, a symbol of power and performance. “She’s a real Duesy,” still means a slick, quick, smooth and desirable possession of the highest quality. Duesenbergs were expensive cars, and only men or women of means could afford them. At a time when a perfectly good new family sedan could be purchased for $500 or so, a coachbuilt Duesenberg often cost $20,000 or more. If a full size sedan sells for $25,000 today, that is the equivalent of more than $1 million dollars now. Such extravagance was born of an era of unbridled capitalism – a time when a man with vision and ability could make, and keep, a fortune of staggering size. These were the men who could afford the very best, and there was absolutely no doubt that when it came to automobiles, E. L. Cord’s magnificent Duesenberg was the best that money could buy. And as we will see, George Whittell, Jr. was a man who was accustomed to nothing less. Murphy coachbuilders The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom body industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the style and grace of the factory sheet metal was ideally suited for the execution of elegant custom coachwork. Murphy Inc., a firm of coachbuilders based in Pasadena, California is generally recognized as the most successful coachbuilder on the Duesenberg Model J chassis – both because of its timeless designs and its impeccable craftsmanship. Associated initially with Packards, Murphy built bodies that suited the California tastes of the time. They were simple and elegant, with trim lines and an undeniable sporting character. Murphy bodies seemed all the more revolutionary when compared to their contemporaries from the east coast, who built heavier, more ornate designs. The trademark of Murphy body design was the “clear vision” pillar. On these bodies, the windshield pillars were designed to be as slim as possible, creating a sportier, more open appearance, while improving visibility for the driver. In fact, Murphy advertised that their windshield pillars were “narrower than the space between a man’s eyes,” a design they claimed eliminated blind spots. While the convertible coupe is perhaps the most popular, and certainly the most common, of Murphy’s designs, closed cars like J287 more closely typify the ideals of the time. Most Duesenberg original owners were wealthy individuals, for whom a new Duesenberg was as much about comfort as it was about performance. For that reason, closed bodies were generally both more expensive and more popular. Most of these were very conservative and highly conventional in styling and design. Murphy was nearly unique among Duesenberg coachbuilders in offering closed cars (the Beverly, the Berline, the Sport Sedan and the Clear Vision Sedan) that were stylish and sporting – a combination that seems ideally suited to the ethos of the Model J – and a chassis that was supremely comfortable, but at the same time, was the fastest and most powerful production car in America. Only a very privileged few would ever be able to claim to have purchased a new Duesenberg. Only one man would claim the honor of being Duesenberg’s best customer, purchasing not one or two, but seven brand new Duesenbergs, making him by far the most prolific fan of the marque. Captain George Whittell, Jr. George Whittell, Jr. was one of America’s most colorful millionaires. Born September 28, 1881 in San Francisco, he was the sole heir to the marriage of two California fortunes. His grandfathers had earned their wealth in banking and gold mining, and his father added to it with investments in real estate and railroads. When his parents wed, it was seen as a society event, and the couple celebrated by building a mansion on Nob Hill in which to raise a family. George Jr. was wealthy enough that he never needed to work, and consequently, never saw any reason to earn a living. A rebellious young man, he caused his parents a great deal of aggravation, and more than enough embarrassment. Never one to do things by half measures, he charged through life at full speed, collecting beautiful women, fast cars, and exotic animals while spending money at a rate that shocked his friends and family. A legendary playboy, his was a life of trysts, liaisons and marriages – often at the same time. After graduating high school in San Francisco, he literally ran away to join the circus, moving to Florida to join Barnum & Bailey. While there he developed a fascination for the animals and launched a safari business to capture and supply wild animals to the circus. He and his partner Frank Buck made several trips to Africa, journeys that fueled Whittell’s love of exotic animals. Finally, under pressure from his parents, he returned home to face an arranged marriage. In typical Whittell fashion, he fell in love and eloped with a chorus girl instead, adding to his parent’s list of embarrassments. This time, his father managed to bribe the necessary officials to have the marriage annulled, and the story hushed up. Despite his efforts, the newspapers learned of it and George Jr. was front-page news. None of this slowed him down, and soon he married Josie Cunningham, a rather prominent member of the dance troupe “The Floradora Sextets.” His wandering ways – and a sharp cut in his allowance – soon put an end to his latest marriage. George Jr. was in Paris in 1914 when war broke out. He had spent the past several years attending a variety of schools (and learning seven languages) and enjoying the social life between London and Paris. He decided to join the fight, so rather than see him enlist, his parents purchased him a captaincy in the Italian army, where he drove an ambulance at the front. Later he transferred to the French armed forces, and finally to the U.S. Army when America entered the war in 1917. Decorated for valor, he was also wounded near the end of the war. Recovering in a French hospital, he met a pretty young local nurse, Elia Pascal. They fell in love, and he brought her home, where to everyone’s surprise, she met with his parent’s approval. They were married in 1919 and moved into his parent’s Woodside, California estate. In 1922, George Sr. passed away, leaving the couple an estate valued at more than $30 million. George Jr. proved an astute financial manager, growing the family fortune substantially over the next eight years. Without a doubt, his most important flash of insight came in early 1929 when he sold $50 million worth of stocks just months before the great crash of October 1929. With so many fortunes wiped out over the next two years, George’s move left him one of the richest men in America – just as Duesenberg launched the ultimate American automobile. Whittell immediately bought not one, but two cars, a convertible coupe (which was a San Francisco Auto Salon show car) and a boattail speedster, both carrying coachwork by Murphy. They would prove to be the first of seven Duesenbergs he would buy, although three of them were purchased for the use of various lady friends! A Singular Design Only one, the example offered here, appears to have been an outright gift, purchased by Whittell and immediately transferred to Jessie McDonald of Los Angeles, California, to whom it was delivered as a new car in January of 1931. Known as the “Whittell Mistress Car,” J287/2305 has a continuous history from new, and is still fitted with its original body, engine and chassis. The lovely sport Berline offered here is a one off creation, built to Whittell’s order by Murphy’s brilliant young designer Franklin Hershey. From a design standpoint, J287 was years ahead of its time. Its compact, close coupled body featured a well integrated trunk, and stunning center-opening doors that wrapped into the roof, a feature never before seen. With its striking slanted windshield, narrow pillars, and sinister side windows, it was at once supremely elegant, tastefully restrained, and a bit mysterious. Perhaps the most revolutionary feature of the design is one the casual observer will never see – its all aluminum construction. Built entirely without structural woodwork, its strength was derived from the clever use of cast aluminum supports combined with fabricated aluminum reinforcements. It was a revolutionary concept – both in its lack of wood framing and in its exclusive use of aluminum – and one that would not be seen again in a production car for decades to come. Compared to ordinary wood framed classics, J287 delivers a more nimble ride and more responsive handling – with none of the ponderousness that typifies wood-framed carriage-style construction. Outstanding Provenance After Ms. McDonald, J287’s second owner was Don Ballard, who bought the car in the late 1930s through Los Angeles consignment dealer Bob Roberts. James Foxley, of Perris California became the third owner, keeping the car until the late 1950s, when he sold it through dealer Mike McManus to noted collector, J.B. Nethercutt of Gardena, California. Sometime later, probably in the late 1960s or early 1970s, Nethercutt sold J287 to Bill Harrah, where it joined his legendary Harrah’s Automobile Collection in Reno, Nevada. After Bill Harrah’s death, ownership of the collection passed to the Holiday Inn Corporation in 1980. When they liquidated the collection in a series of three auctions, J287 was sold (in the second sale, September 28, 1985) to Ralph Englestadt, where it briefly became part of the Imperial Palace collection. Several weeks later, New Jersey collector Oscar Davis bought the car through Philadelphia Pennsylvania dealer Mark Smith. Sometime later, Davis traded J287 back to Smith, who resold the car in the late 1980s to Paul Lapidus, a real estate investor from Long Island, New York. In the early 1990s, Lapidus sold J287 to Robert McGowan, of Branford, Connecticut. The vendor acquired J287 from McGowan in 1996, and commissioned Maine restorer Chris Charlton – who restored noted collector Bob Bahre’s award-winning stable of Duesenbergs – to undertake a comprehensive professional body-off restoration, which was completed in 1998. Meticulous storage and careful maintenance have preserved the restoration, and the deep blue-violet Duesenberg remains in stunning, high point condition. Very few Duesenbergs can claim to retain all their major original components. Fewer still have had the quality of restoration, care, and maintenance that J287 has seen. Although some Duesenbergs are better looking than others, not many exhibit the beauty and grace of Franklin Hershey’s Sport Berline. Only a handful of these can boast a known and continuous history from new. But only one car – this one – was built to order for the legendary George Whittell, Jr. as a gift for what we may presume was a very special lady. Addendum Please note that following restoration, J287 was shown at the ACD club National meet in Auburn, IN, where it was awarded Best in Class, Best Duesenberg, and the coveted Best in Show trophy. Please note that this car is titled by the Engine No. J287. Chassis no. J287

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-18
Hammer price
Show price