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2015 Porsche 918 'Weissach' Spyder

Paint to Sample; the only 918 produced in Porsche’s historic Arrow Blue Fitted with the desirable Weissach package Single ownership and less than 11,000 kilometres from new Outfitted with the Front Axle Lift System, painted key, and 918 photobook Recently serviced and ready to be enjoyed Delivered new to the United Kingdom and offered today from its original owner, the 918 Spyder presented here in ‘Paint to Sample’ Arrow Blue, over a Black Alcantara interior with Acid Green highlights, remains in splendid condition throughout. Outfitted with the desirable Weissach package, this only furthered the 918’s ludicrous performance. Many parts of the interior normally swathed in leather were replaced with lighter Alcantara, and carbon fibre replaced a large portion of aluminium components. Super lightweight magnesium wheels were fitted, and the windscreen frame, roof, rear wings, and rear-view mirrors were also made out of carbon fibre. Titanium-backed brake pads and ceramic wheel bearings further differentiate the Weissach cars. Together, this accounted for a reduction of 45 kilograms of weight over the standard 918 Spyder and an instantly discernible increase in performance. In the hands of its first and only owner, the 918 was used frequently but always well looked-after and maintained without regard to cost, as evidenced by its exceptional condition with just under 11,000 kilometres (6,800 miles) from new showing on its odometer. In the spring of 2017, the car received a full, scheduled service by Porsche Great Britain and at the owner’s request has been fitted with a set of new tyres and Weissach-specific brake pads to ensure that the car is instantly ready for continued enjoyment out on the open road. It has been unused since the service was carried out. Furthermore, the car is completely covered in the latest generation paint protection film. With hybrid offerings quickly becoming a mainstay in the Porsche lineup, the technologies that the 918 introduced have directly influenced other mainstays of Porsche’s lineup, namely the Cayenne and Panamera, which now have hybrid variants of their own. Like its spiritual predecessor, the 959, the 918 Spyder will undoubtedly be remembered as one of Porsche’s most groundbreaking automobiles. With the Paint to Sample 918s being the most sought-after cars and outfitted with the hugely desirable Weissach package, this particular 918 checks all the right boxes for the enthusiast looking to use Porsche’s newest and most impressive supercar as the factory intended. • Vernice su campione; l'unica 918 prodotta nella storico colore Porsche Arrow Blue • Dotata dell’ambito pacchetto ‘Weissach’ • Uniproprietario, meno di 11.000 chilometri da nuova • Dotata del sistema di sollevamento dell’anteriore, chiave colorata e libro fotografico 918 • Recentemente tagliandata e pronta per essere guidata Consegnata nuova nel Regno Unito e oggi offerta dal suo primo proprietario, la 918 Spyder qui presentata è stata verniciata in una tinta campione, Arrow Blue, con interni in Alcantara nera con dettagli in verde acido e si presenta in condizioni splendide. La vettura è equipaggiata con l’ambito pacchetto ‘Weissach’, capace di aggiungere ancora qualcosa alle gia strepitose prestazioni della 918. Molte delle parti interne normalmente rivestite in pelle sono stati ricoperte con la più leggera Alcantara, mentre la maggior parte dei componenti in alluminio sono stati sostituiti con parti in fibra di carbonio. I cerchioni sono quelli realizzati nel super–leggero magnesio e, il telaio del parabrezza, il tetto, le ali posteriori ed i retrovisori, sono stati realizzati in fibra di carbonio. Le pastiglie dei freni con supporto in titanio ed i cuscinetti delle ruote in ceramica differenziano ulteriormente le vetture ‘Weissach’. L’insieme di tutti questi lavori, rappresenta una riduzione di 45 chilogrammi di peso rispetto alle 918 Spyder “standard” ed un aumento istantaneamente percettibile in termini di prestazioni. Nelle mani del suo primo e unico proprietario, la 918 è stata utilizzata frequentemente, sempre ben curata e mantenuta senza riguardi ai costi, come dimostrano le sue condizioni eccezionali, con poco meno di 11.000 chilometri (6.800 miglia) percorsi da nuova, riportati sul suo contachilometri. Nella primavera del 2017, la vettura ha ricevuto un tagliando completo, come da programma Porsche Gran Bretagna e, su richiesta del proprietario, è stata dotata di un treno di gomme nuove e nuove pastiglie dei freni con le specifiche Weissach, per essere sicuri che la macchina sia immediatamente pronta a far divertire senza problemi il nuovo proprietario, non appena ritornerà in strada. Non utilizzata sin dallo svolgimento del tagliando è stata, inoltre, completamente ricoperta dal film trasparente di protezione della vernice di ultima generazione. Con il programma “ibrido” che si stà rapidamente affermando come uno dei pilastri dell’offerta Porsche, si può serenamente affermare che le tecnologie introdotte con la 918 hanno direttamente influenzato tutte le vetture che compongono la gamma della casa, compresi i due modelli principali Cayenne e Panamera, oggi disponibili anche in variante ibrida. Come il suo predecessore spirituale, la 959, la 918 Spyder sarà sicuramente ricordata come una delle più innovative automobili prodotte da Porsche. Con la speciale verniciatura “su campione” in aggiunta al pacchetto “Weissach”, questa 918 è, senz’altro, degna di entrare nel novero delle automobili più ambite ed in grado di soddisfare tutti i possibili desideri di un appassionato che voglia usare, proprio come previsto dala casa, la più moderna e impressionante supercar Porsche mai prodotta. Chassis no. WP0ZZZ91ZFS800537 Engine no. F01219

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-05-27
Hammer price
Show price

1933 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Special Town Car by Brewster

40/50 hp, 7,668 cc overhead valve, straight six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, fully floating hypoid bevel axle, semi-elliptic front and rear suspension, four-wheel servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 3,810 mm (150") The story of this epic Rolls-Royce began in 1933, when the U.S. economy was in the depths of the worst depression in history. Luxury items and automobiles were lacking for a market except for the very few who had somehow managed to preserve their fortunes. One of these lucky few was C. Matthew Dick of Washington, D.C., an heir to a major business machine company that attributed its continued success in part to a major increase in U.S. government spending and activity that required additional A.B. Dick equipment. He was scheduled to be married in the coming months to a beautiful young woman who was expected to take her place in the highest echelons of society. In doing so, she would be travelling between events in the formal town car. The problem was that the traditional town car was far too stodgy to fit the form and personality presented by this beautiful young woman. The solution would be to create a town car unlike any seen before. To fulfil this requirement, the prospective groom contacted Rolls-Royce and their New York coachbuilding firm Brewster & Co. to provide a totally unique town car on the legendary Phantom II chassis as a wedding present for his bride-to-be. After a variety of meetings with the coachbuilder and its top designers and artists, the work commenced on this remarkable town car, and their combined vision was eventually achieved when this Brewster-bodied Special Town Car, chassis no. 218 AMS, was delivered to its new owner in 1934. This Phantom II Rolls-Royce combines the best styling elements of the era, with its long hood, low razor edge roof design, dramatic V-windshield, sculpted windows, German silver hardware and complementing canework. The same degree of attention was paid to the custom fitted interior with its gold-plated hardware, vanity cases, indirect lighting, and lambs wool carpets. All of these elements were perfectly combined to create an exquisite town car that was tasteful, elegant and sporty and would soon directly inspire the rebody of two earlier Phantom II chassis with similar yet unique coachwork for other beautiful women. The original cost for designing and building this Brewster-bodied masterpiece was an astounding $31,000, making it the most expensive car in the world built that year and over 50-percent more than the “Twenty Grand” Duesenberg created that same year. In comparison, this remarkable amount could have purchased at that time an entire fleet of ordinary new automobiles or a full block of fine homes. Adding to the extraordinary nature of this Special Town Car is the fact that it has had only four owners from new and is a greatly original car. Mrs. Dick enjoyed the car for many years and eventually kept it at her estate in Newport, Rhode Island, where America’s wealthiest families often maintained grand summer homes. The second owner was Gerald Rolph who maintained and preserved the car for over 40 years, much of this time storing the car on his Isle of Man estate in England. The subsequent owner, a well known and highly respected Colorado-based owner, purchased the car in the 1990s and enjoyed it as one of the highlights of his personal collection over the course of the next decade. The vendor, another collector with many concours award-winning cars of his own, acquired the car in 2008 and has maintained it in his private collection ever since. This Special Town Car has been shown at exclusive concours events throughout the world, where it has won numerous Best of Show and Elegance awards, and has been a part of special displays at the foremost museums – all accomplished with a completely original interior and trim in mint condition and a body that has never been off the chassis. As a result, 218 AMS has received its coveted FIVA certification, which is a tribute to its pristine originality, and is ready to be shown at prestigious events such as the Villa d’Este Concours d’Elegance. This Special Town Car is considered by most historians to be one of the greatest Rolls-Royces ever built and quite possibly the most significant post-WWI Rolls-Royce in existence. Its one-off design was the direct inspiration for the Special Town Car bodies completed by Brewster for the actress Constance Bennett in 1935 and Dutch Darrin for the Countess de Frasso in 1938. These two examples have since become the centrepieces of the Nethercutt and Robert M. Lee collections – two of the most significant collections of automobiles ever assembled. The cost for acquisition of each several decades ago was substantial and reported to be in the multi-million dollar range. Of the three Special Town Cars completed, 218 AMS was the first example built and the only one to have been finished with its original body on the original chassis. FRENCHTEXT Moteur six cylindres en ligne 40/50 ch, 7,668 ccm à soupapes culbutées, boîte manuelle à quatre rapports, pont à couple conique hypoïde flottant, suspension avant et arrière par ressorts à lames, freins à tambours servo-assistés aux quatre roues. Empattement: 3,810 mm (150") La saga de cette épique Rolls-Royce commença en 1933, quand l’économie des U.S.A. était au fin fond d’une des pires dépressions de son histoire. Les objets et automobiles de luxe n’avaient plus de clientèle exceptés les très rares individus qui avaient malgré tout réussi à sauvegarder leurs fortunes. L’un des ces quelques chanceux était C. Matthew Dick de Washington DC, la capitale, héritier d’une importante enterprise de machines de bureau, il attribuait son succés ininterrompu à une grande augmentation des dépenses du gouvernement générant un besoin accru en équipement A.B Dick. Il allait épouser dans les mois suivants une trés belle jeune femme qui se devait de prendre sa place dans les plus hauts échelons de la société. Ce faisant elle se déplacerait alors entre cocktails et diners dans une digne « Town Car » (voiture de ville). Le problème était que la Town Car traditionnelle faisait beaucoup trop «vielle dame guindée» pour la personnalité et le style de cette belle jeune femme. La solution serait donc de créer une Town Car de type totalement inédit. Pour ce faire le futur époux contacta Rolls-Royce et leur carrossier à New York, Brewster & Co. Afin qu’ils lui fournissent une Town Car totalement unique sur le légendaire châssis Phantom II en guise de cadeau de noces a sa promise. Après plusieurs entretiens avec le carrossier et ses meilleurs dessinateurs et artistes le labeur sur cette Town Car remarquable commença et le fruit de leur vision prit vie sous la forme de cette “Special Town Car” carrossée par Brewster. Le châssis no. 218 AMS, fut livré à sa nouvelle propriétaire en 1934. Cette Rolls-Royce Phantom II réunit les meilleurs composantes de style de son époque avec son long capot, toit bas à rebord en “lame de rasoir”, spectaculaire pare-brise en V, vitres sculptées, parements en argenterie Allemande et osier. Le même soin fut porté sur l’intérieur avec des parements en plaqué or, coffrets à miroirs, éclairage indirect et tapis en laine de mouton. Tous ces éléments étaient parfaitement intégrés pour créer une Town Car exquise, de bon gout, élégante et sportive qui d’ailleurs inspira vite le re-carrossage de deux châssis Phantom II plus anciens dans un style similaire mais unique pour d’autre jolies femmes. Le cout en monnaie de l’époque pour le dessin et la création de ce chef d’œuvre carrossé par Brewster fut $31,000, une somme étourdissante, en faisant la voiture la plus chère du monde cette année là à un prix plus de 50% au dessus de la Duesenberg “Twenty Grand” créée la même année. En comparison, cette somme considérable aurait pu à cette époque là acheter toute une flotte de voitures neuves ordinaires ou un pâté de maison entier de belles demeures. Une facette tout aussi attirante de cette extraordinaire “Special Town Car” est le fait qu’elle n’a eu que quatre propriétaires en tout et est en état très original. Madame Dick en profita de longues années et finit par la mettre en service à son manoir de Newport, Rhode Island, où certaines des familles les plus fortunées d’Amérique possédaient de grandes résidences estivales. Le deuxième propriétaire fut Gerald Rolph qui l’entretint et la préserva avec amour pendant plus de 40 ans, la remisant surtout dans son château de l’ile de Man en Angleterre. Le propriétaire suivant, basé au Colorado, bien connu et respecté, acheta l’auto pendant les années 1990 et elle fut pour lui une des pièces maitresses de sa collection personnelle pendant la décennie suivante. L’actuel propriétaire, un autre collectionneur ayant lui aussi bon nombre d’autos primées dans les concours, acquit la voiture en 2008 et l’a gardée dans sa collection privée depuis. Cette “Special Town Car” a été exhibée dans les plus grands concours du monde où elle a remporté nombre de premiers prix et prix d’élégance, et dans les plus grands musées au sein d’expositions spéciales – tout ceci accompli avec un intérieur et parements complètement originaux en état impeccable et une carrosserie qui n’a jamais été démontée du châssis. Grâce à cela, 218 AMS a reçu sa très convoitée certification FIVA, un hommage à son originalité immaculée et est prête a prendre part a de prestigieux évènements comme le Concours d’Elégance de Villa d’Este. Cette "Special Town Car” est considérée par la plupart des historiens comme l’une des plus importantes Rolls-Royces jamais construite et peut être bien la plus importante des Rolls-Royce existantes datant d’après la 1ére guerre mondiale. Son dessin unique fut l’inspiration directe pour les carrosseries “Special Town Car” faites par Brewster pour l’actrice Constance Bennett en 1935 et par Dutch Darrin pour la Comtesse de Frasso en 1938. Ces deux autos sont depuis devenues pièces maitresses des collections Nethercutt et Robert M. Lee – deux des plus importantes collections automobiles jamais assemblées. Le cout d’acquisition de chacune, il y a plusieurs dizaines d’années, fut considérable et à ce qu’on en dit chiffré à plusieurs millions de Dollars. 218 AMS fut la première des trois « Special Town Cars » construite et est la seule à avoir été construite à neuf avec sa carrosserie originale sur le châssis original. Chassis no. 218 AMS

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2010-05-01
Hammer price
Show price

2015 Porsche 918 Spyder

887 total bhp (608 bhp and 279 bhp), 4,593 cc V-8 engine and dual electric motors, seven-speed PDK transmission, aluminum double-wishbone front suspension with multi-link rear axle and electric rear-wheel steering, and four-wheel carbon ceramic brakes with hybrid braking system. Wheelbase: 107.5 in. Fitted with the highly desirable Weissach package Very well optioned, including exterior paint to sample in Metallic White Under 1,500 miles from new PORSCHE’S 21ST CENTURY SUPERCAR In the 21st century, more than ever, cutting-edge automotive technology has been playing a massive role in the design and development of supercars. While the 21st century’s first batch of supercars, the Porsche Carrera GT, Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, and Ferrari Enzo, all sported large, naturally-aspirated engines, the next 10 years would see sweeping changes and developments in hybrid technology. Manufacturers quickly realized that hybrid powertrains could not only be used to reduce emissions and create highly fuel-efficient vehicles but could also be used to increase performance in ultra–high performance sports cars. By using the electric powertrain to support the conventional powertrain at its weakest, performance could be pushed to boundaries never thought possible, all while decreasing emissions in an industry becoming ever more scrutinized for carbon pollution. While McLaren’s P1 and the Ferrari LaFerrari sought to use hybrid technology to bring their customers the ultimate performance car, Porsche believed it could bring their clients a more well-rounded yet equally impressive hybrid-hypercar. Rather than taking a no-frills approach to speed and performance like the Carrera GT before it, the 918 would be a technological tour de force that was as comfortable as it is fast. Following the 959’s route of a relentless pursuit of technical innovation, the 918 Spyder offers numerous firsts for Porsche and stands proud when compared against the LaFerrari and P1. Not only did the car employ a four-wheel drive system to put its 887 brake horsepower to the ground, but it also boasted a rear-axle steering system, giving the car a smaller turning circle at low speeds and increased stability at high speeds. With electric motors at both axles, the car is able to recover energy normally lost at braking to recharge its own batteries. Like the Carrera GT, the roof can be fully removed, allowing the driver and passenger to experience the 918 as a coupe or convertible. The 918 is powered by a 4.6-liter V-8 engine, producing 608 brake horsepower, and the electric powertrain, powered by two electric motors, producing 279 brake horsepower, making for a total hybrid output of 887 brake horsepower. Mated to the incredible Porsche’s Doppelkupplung (PDK) seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox, performance is breathtaking to say the least. It could accelerate from 0–100 km/h in 2.6 seconds, onwards to a top speed of 345 km/h. Furthermore, the car can be run solely on electric power with a maximum range of 31 km. In an effort to further intensify the 918’s driving experience, buyers could opt for the Weissach package for their 918. For a price of $80,000, numerous modifications were made to make the car as light as possible. Many parts of the interior normally swathed in leather were replaced with lighter Alcantara, and carbon fiber replaced a large portion of aluminum components. Super lightweight magnesium wheels were fitted, and the windscreen frame, roof, rear wings, and rear-view mirrors were also made out of carbon fiber. This accounted for a reduction of 99 lbs. of weight over the standard 918 Spyder and an instantly discernible increase in performance. THIS 918 Produced in late 2014 as a 2015 model, this particular 918 Spider is an incredibly highly optioned example. First and foremost, it is outfitted with the desirable Weissach package, further increasing its performance. Its exterior color is a “paint to sample” Metallic White that is unavailable as a standard color, and the interior is Black with Acid Green highlights with Alcantara and seat belts with matching Acid Green accent stripes. Furthermore, the car is fitted with the front-axle lift system, the glare reducing interior package, automatic air conditioning, Porsche’s wonderful Burmester surround sound stereo system, and the optional cup holder. It was delivered new to the United States and is currently in the hands of its second owner. Sparingly driven, the car’s odometer reads less than 1,500 miles from new. Following a full clear-bra wrap, the car remains in flawless condition inside and out. As Porsche’s most high-tech supercar since the 959, the 918 Spyder is sure to become a future collectible. Yet, as a fully roadworthy and capable automobile with four-wheel drive, it is considered by many to be the easiest to drive of the hybrid-hypercar trio and could be driven on a daily basis if so desired. Presented with the Weissach package and in a paint-to-sample color scheme, this is a true collector-grade 918 and an automobile that any Porsche collector should strive to own, as it continues Porsche’s wonderful tradition of automotive innovation coupled with world-beating performance. Chassis no. WP0CA2A13FS800804

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
Hammer price
Show price

1933 Duesenberg Model SJ 'Riviera' Phaeton by Brunn

Body Style 2756. Est. 320 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC 32-valve inline eight-cylinder engine with dual Stromberg UU-3 two-barrel carburetors and a Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger, three-speed Warner Hi-Flex manual transmission, beam front and live rear axles with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5 The famous “Hot Rod Harry” Riviera Phaeton Formerly owned by Harry Schulzinger, Bob Bahre, and Noel Thompson Exquisite Fran Roxas restoration, with recent cosmetic improvements Best of Show winner at the 2011 Concours d’Elegance of America at St. John’s A sporting and dramatic Classic Era powerhouse “HOT ROD HARRY” AND THE ENTHUSIAST AGE Three Duesenberg Model Js were built with Brunn & Company’s beautiful Riviera Phaeton body, a four-door convertible sedan with gorgeous close-coupled lines and, most prominently, a disappearing convertible top. The latter was quite an engineering feat for such a large top, which bundles neatly and then swings back under the reverse-hinged rear deck. The effect is of clean lines and abundant power, which is appropriate, as two of the Riviera Phaetons were originally installed on supercharged chassis—the Phaeton offered here among them. It was originally delivered in June 1934 to Lt. Col. Jacob Schick, inventor of the cartridge razor, and in moves typical of most Duesenbergs in this period, changed hands many times within its early history. The important period for this car was not when it was new but in its “used car” years, what we would today refer to as the enthusiast age of car collecting, when the men who gathered old cars were generally not wealthy but simply eccentric gearheads with a passion for keeping old iron running. Harry Schulzinger, of Cincinnati, Ohio, was among those. He sought not a perfect Duesenberg but a car that would run and drive reliably and, most importantly, quickly. To that end, after acquiring the Schick Duesenberg in 1950, he set out to transform the car in the manner of the day, using the talents of a group of young men working out of a cinderblock garage. Together they built what was probably one of the quickest Duesenbergs of its era, a tradition that, thanks to them, lives on today. In Schulzinger’s ownership, the Duesenberg was rebuilt by Jack Irwin, a respected Duesenberg mechanic and operator of Irwin’s Tire Service in Huntington, West Virginia. Consistent with its owner’s demands for hotter performance, the original firewall, number 2551, and phaeton body from the Schick car were moved to a low-mileage chassis, number 2577. Following a spectacular failure of the engine during an unauthorized “test drive” (that involved taking a mechanic’s wife to the city for a weekend), a new engine was made for the car out of the best components in Mr. Irwin’s shop. The crankcase and bell-housing were donated by J-467, and the block came from engine J-487; Jahnes racing pistons were just for fun. Bob Roller, the sole survivor today of the men who worked on the car for Mr. Schulzinger, is still proud that the finished Duesenberg could achieve 140 mph over a measured mile along a straight stretch of road. RECENT PROVENANCE The car was retained by Mr. Schulzinger and regularly driven fast, hard, and heavy until his passing in 1974. His children note today that it made appearances at the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club’s National Reunion, where it was always well received and was somewhat renowned for its noise and power. Following Mr. Schulzinger’s passing, the Duesenberg was sold to well-known enthusiast Dr. Donald Vesley, then of Oakdale, Louisiana. Mr. Vesley restored the car, changing it back to the configuration of open fenders and removing the unusual hood vents (which reside today in the collection of Duesenberg historian Randy Ema). The engine was rebuilt to supercharged specifications and fitted with dual carburetors and a reproduction supercharger, along with the famous “ram’s horn” manifolds, continuing the Schulzinger performance tradition. In this form, the car was passed through the ownership of two further renowned enthusiasts, Bob Bahre and Noel Thompson, before enjoying a long sojourn in the Imperial Palace Auto Collections in Las Vegas, alongside many other restored Duesenbergs. The Duesenberg was purchased in 2001 by respected collector Rich Atwell, of Fredericksburg, Texas, for whom it was fully restored by Fran Roxas. Following some years of museum display, the car was returned to Mr. Roxas by its present owner for considerable cosmetic and mechanical freshening, including the installation of a new brown leather interior in the correct pattern and returning the car to fine running and driving order. It has since amassed a particularly impressive roster of awards, including Best in Class and Best of Show American at the Concours d’Elegance of America at St. John’s and Second in Class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. The car remains extremely well known among Duesenberg enthusiasts, appearing in virtually every book ever published on the marque: Dennis Adler’s Duesenberg, J.L. Elbert’s The Mightiest American Motor Car, and Fred Roe’s The Pursuit of Perfection are among them. Decades ago, “Hot Rod Harry” and a few talented men put together a Duesenberg that was faster and more beautiful than all the rest. It is that legacy, of the early car collectors, hot-rodders, and passionate gearheads, that is proudly presented here—beautifully restored and as impressive now as in 1934, or 1954! Chassis no. 2577 Body no. 2609-3 Bell-Housing no. J-528

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
Show price

1937 Bentley 4¼-Litre Open Two-Seater by Carlton

126 bhp, 4,257 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox with synchromesh on the third and fourth gears, front and rear semi-elliptic spring suspension with hydraulic shock dampers, and four-wheel mechanical brakes with servo-assist. Wheelbase: 126 in. A bespoke, one-off 4¼-Litre Unique bodywork, with numerous special-order items Matching numbers, with original body, engine, and gearbox Competed in the RAC Blackpool and J.C.C. Brooklands rallies in 1939 Restored by renowned Bentley specialist Dale Powers Rolls-Royce acquired Bentley Motors from Walter Owen Bentley in 1931 and then struggled for two years to design and build an appropriate car, one that would honor the “W. O. Bentley” sporting and racing heritage, yet one that would also not be confused with the more stately cars wearing the Rolls-Royce badge. The timing couldn’t have been any worse, as this was during the Great Depression. Rolls-Royce and Bentley Motors Works’ manager at Derby, E. W. Hives, CH MBE (developer of the Merlin aero engine and later the chairman of Rolls-Royce Ltd.), headed the team that was tasked with designing the all-new Bentley, which was set out to be a sports car that would appeal to a wide range of prospective buyers. His personal notes read, “Answer to the moods of the driver…be driven fast with safety…tour without fuss and noise…maximum speed should not be obtained at the expense of acceleration…controls, steering, and brakes shall be light to operate, and the braking shall be adequate for a fast car…maximum speed of the car on the road should be 90 mph, 75 mph in third gear.” The first “Rolls-Bentley,” a 3½-Litre model, was based on the current-series Rolls-Royce 20/25-horsepower chassis, but it was reconfigured to use the 20/25’s 2¾-liter engine. In 1936, the engine output was increased to 4¼ liters by using the Rolls-Royce 25/30-horsepower engine and chassis, but it came with a higher compression ratio (6.8:1 compared to 6:1) and the Rolls-Royce Stromberg downdraft single carburetor was substituted by dual SUs. The result was a fast, silky, exciting car that soon became known as the “Silent Sports Car.” The Bentley cars that were produced in tandem with the Rolls-Royce cars of the 1930s have been, until recently, overlooked by collectors. This was due in part because they lacked the bulk and presence of the large-horsepower Rolls-Royce Phantom models, and also because so many Derby Bentley cars remained with their original owners in daily service for decades and weren’t offered for sale. They were often referred to as “Derbys,” as they were built in the shared Rolls-Royce and Bentley Motors Works in Derbyshire, England. As was the custom in the 1930s, the new owner of the rolling Bentley chassis would have it sent to one of the bespoke coachbuilders, and they would build it to his specifications. Of the dozens of Bentley coachbuilders, Park Ward, Thrupp & Maberly, Vanden Plas, H.J. Mulliner, and Gurney Nutting were most often selected. Of the 1,234 Bentley 4¼-Litre chassis produced, over 530 were bodied by Park Ward, and most of them were steel saloons. CHASSIS NUMBER B55KU Carlton, a more exclusive body builder, bodied only a few Derby Bentley cars. The company was originally known as the E.B. Hall & Company, a North London horse-drawn carriage maker, but it evolved into designing and building very special car bodies on a few select Daimler, Rolls-Royce, and Bentley chassis. After they were licensed to produce the revolutionary Weymann fabric bodies, they changed the company name to Carlton Carriage Company. Of the four Carlton bodies fitted to 4¼-Litre chassis, the car offered here, chassis number B55KU, is the only two-seater open tourer ever built. The others were a sedanca coupe, a saloon, and a four-seater drophead coupe. Carlton achieved quite an accomplishment with this exceedingly rare two-seat model, as he created a drophead that was just as attractive with the hood up as it was when lowered to its concealed-hood position. By positioning the touring spare in the front wing rather than the boot lid, the resulting profile became streamlined and elegant. The combination of Ace deluxe wheel discs (also known as “Easi-Clean”), a vintage Bentley-type fold-down twin aeroscreen (often called the Brooklands windscreen), a correct slanted Winged B mascot (which must be turned 90 degrees before the bonnet can be opened without chipping the paint), and its original Marschal headlamps and centrally mounted driving lamp result in a seriously appealing body style. Under the bonnet, the correctly restored and impeccable engine compartment properly stores the correct road tools. These are often missing, but they are preserved with this car and tidily fit in a tray under the boot floor’s carpeting. The period-correct color scheme of its midnight blue exterior and saddle tan interior is a perfect pairing. No detail has been overlooked within the interior, as it was clearly designed for the owner who loves to take the wheel. Among the special-order instruments included with this car, as validated by the accompanying Works chassis card orders, is an extremely rare Smiths tachometer with a clock built into its center top. The instrument layout is equally atypical, with the speedometer and tachometer to the left of the driver’s position, and the ignition and lamp switches have been placed even farther to the left, in front of the single-passenger seat. As the car is a one-off design, it is presumed that this may be one of the first uses for this dash layout before it became standard on later cars. This car carries no stories, nor feigned history. The entire history of the car is documented not only in original order records and Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club-supplied ownership history but also in the car’s appearance in several archival publications, including All the Pre-War Bentleys as New by Stanley Sedgwick, on page 109, and Bentley: Fifty Years of the Marque by Johnnie Green, where a photo and identifying chassis number appear on page 208. The car’s first owner was Gordon C. Wood, of Weybridge, Surrey, England, who accepted delivery from renowned Bentley dealer H. R. Owen on July 14, 1937. He clearly was one of the early car enthusiasts, as he specified the car was to be prepared “for use in town and touring.” He went on to compete in several rallies in 1939, including at the Royal Automobile Club’s Blackpool Rally and the prestigious J.C.C. Brooklands Rally. Mr. Wood sold the car to H. G. Holcroft, of Shropshire, England, on September 18, 1938. On New Years’ Day in 1956, the car was sold to R. Guy, of Wolverhampton, England, who then sold it to its first U.S. owner in 1966. Then, around 1993, well-known and highly respected Bentley owner, restorer, and driver Dale Powers, of Florida, acquired this Bentley, and over the next decade, he managed its complete restoration. Afterwards, Powers and his wife enjoyed the car and participated in numerous car club caravans, tours, and meets. They sold chassis B55KU to Bill Jacobs in 1999, and he had it refinished in its current midnight blue and saddle tan hide interior, and he also had the mechanical restoration refreshed. The current owner acquired the car approximately eight years ago, and he confirms that the car continues to perform as it should and describes it as fast and handling well. Exceptional and rare unmolested Derby Bentley cars with original engines and coachwork are in great demand by astute collectors. Honest examples like this unique, one-off two-seater open Derby Bentley are a superb investment, and they also provide great enjoyment to their owners while behind the wheel. Addendum Please note that the engine installed in this car is K7BA; it is of the correct type but not the original B7BK as stated in the catalogue. Chassis no. B55KU Engine no. B7BK British Registration no. FPJ100

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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1964 Shelby Cobra USRRC Roadster

300+ hp, 289 cu. in. pushrod overhead valve V8 engine, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with transverse leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers, four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90" - Ex-Shelby Team car, s/n CSX 2557 - Unblemished history, documented in SAAC World Registry - One of only six USRRC cars built - Cut-back door and one of two with dual side-pipes on each side - One of the most original and unmolested of all the famed Shelby Cobra 289 race cars Reproduced on the last page of Mike Shoen’s book The Cobra-Ferrari Wars is a hand-annotated typewritten page listing just 42 “Cars Built to Racing Specification.” A legend was built on the successes of those few cars. Nearly a half century after the first of them was built and more than four decades after the last of them left AC in Thames Ditton and Shelby’s Los Angeles shop, this legend still inspires the admiration and respect that makes the name “Cobra” recognized worldwide. And while many legends are embellished with the passing of time, the Cobra's iconic status is based on solid fact: the success of a few passionate guys who bested the established powers in U.S. and international road racing on the strength of their ingenuity, persistence, creativity and drive. Of those 42 “Cars Built to Racing Specifications,” only 29 enjoyed the distinction of being factory team cars, part of Shelby’s continuous efforts from the very first Cobra to discover the weaknesses of the combination of the AC Ace chassis and body with Ford’s lightweight cast iron 260- and 289-cubic inch V8 engines. As shortcomings surfaced – which they did from the very first Cobra built – they were corrected in the next series of team Cobras, then combined with the latest thinking in performance equipment, engine tuning and tires to discover a new round of improvements to be incorporated in the next series of team cars. A compact organization, with short lines of communication between Shelby in California and AC in England, the changes developed in competition were quickly incorporated in production Cobras, making it easy for the two factories and private owners to convert production cars to competition. It was the sort of continuous improvement that took decades for major carmakers to adopt. It was second nature to Shelby’s competition-focused crew and essential to realize the Cobra’s potential. It also meant that the later cars were always better than their predecessors. The last of the series, the six “cutback door” 289 factory team roadsters built for the 1964-65 U.S. Road Racing Championship series, were the best of all. The 1963-65 period saw the glorious culmination of a generation’s evolution of road racing in the years after World War II. Ferrari, Maserati, Porsche, Aston Martin, Alfa Romeo, Jaguar, Lola and Chevrolet fielded factory-backed teams to contest epic contests on purpose built road courses at Monza, Daytona, Goodwood, the Nürburgring, Bridgehampton and Montlhèry; legendary open road circuits at the Targa Florio, Rheims, Le Mans and Spa Francorchamps; the airport circuit at Sebring; and the 8-day trial that made up the Tour de France Auto. These top marques built models that are today nearly mythical in their allure and performance – GTO, 275P, 250LM, Project 214, Lightweight E-type, Tipo 151, GTZ, 904, Grand Sport – often building specific cars adapted in engine, transmission, suspension, bodywork and even wheelbase to suit the performance characteristics of a specific course, season and race length. In just a small cluster of years in the middle of the Sixties, some of the most famous, desirable and beautiful sports racing and gran turismo automobiles ever built were created and raced. Carroll Shelby pursued the same development track, creating a series of increasingly specific Cobras in just a few years but basing them on his own concept of marrying a lightweight but, by the standards of the day at least, large displacement American V8 engine with a proven chassis, suspension and bodywork. The concept wasn’t new. Railton had done it in England in the thirties with Hudson drivetrains. Jensen had used Ford V8s, impressing even Edsel Ford with their design, handling and performance. Sydney Allard also was a Ford guy before he adopted the overhead valve V8s from Cadillac and Chrysler. Shelby’s opportunity arose when Bristol stopped production of its BMW-based two-liter six. AC Cars had employed it with success for extra performance in its Ace roadster, a beautiful little two-seater built on a John Tojeiro-designed chassis with four-wheel independent suspension. Originally built for AC’s ancient (designed by John Weller in 1919) single overhead camshaft two-liter six, the Bristol’s added performance made a consistent winner of the Ace in two-liter competition, and the loss of Bristol power threatened the small manufacturer with extinction. Shelby learned of Ford’s new 260-cubic inch Fairlane V8 and talked Ford out of two of them to create a Cobra proposal. It created a sensation when launched at the New York Auto Show in 1962. Production followed swiftly, if in small quantities, as did competition. In October 1962 at Riverside, the first steps in Cobra development were undertaken after the car, driven by Bill Krause, failed to finish when a rear hub failed. The first Cobra race win was notched only three months later, also at Riverside, in the hands of Dave MacDonald. As unlikely as it sounded, Shelby set his sights on an FIA Manufacturers Championship and a parade of ever stronger, better handling, more reliable and faster Cobras began to pass through the roster of the Shelby team. Cobra historians (and for this we defer to the 4th edition World Registry of Cobras and GT40s) group the factory team cars into just seven clusters, which culminate in the 1964-65 USRRC Roadsters of which the example offered here, CSX 2557, is one. Specifications merged, consistent with constant evolution in 1963, but the evolution became clearer as the march to the 1965 Manufacturers Championship gathered momentum. The transverse leaf spring independent suspension chassis John Tojeiro designed for the two-liter AC engine in 1953 grew stronger, and its handling and steering became more predictable and setup more flexible to meet the demands of the widely varying circuits and conditions on U.S. road courses, as well as the diverse demands of the FIA’s international schedule. Engines were based on standard “K-Code” Mustang 289/271 hp powerplants with race prepared lower ends, ported and polished heads with big valves, Cobra intakes with a quartet of Weber downdraft carbs, headers, side outlet exhausts, big oil sumps with baffles and anti-surge doors and oil coolers. The cars got oversize fuel tanks with “Monza” quick release fuel filler caps, Koni shock absorbers, anti-roll bars, stiffened springs, Halibrand center lock magnesium wheels, oversize brakes, brake cooling, differential oil coolers, wider wheels and tires and many more modifications for performance and reliability. The performance of the little Ford V8 soon overpowered the standard racing tires, and Shelby, with Ford’s support, looked for better rubber. As much as Ford was battling Ferrari and Jaguar for dominance on the track, Goodyear and Firestone were locked in a desperate struggle for supremacy in the “round, black things” that put it all to work. Shelby found its solution first in the “Stock Car Specials” Goodyear built for NASCAR, getting the winged foot technicians to cut a shallow blocky tread pattern on the NASCAR slicks (that soon became slick in competition) that locked the Ford engine’s generous torque to the pavement. Eventually bigger tires required wider wheels, and by the 1964 FIA season, the narrow AC-derived 289 Cobra body no longer could claim to encompass them within even the most aggressive tacked on flares. The wide hips that would later come to characterize 427-powered Cobras made their debut on a series of 1964 FIA Cobras, and even they were barely able to shelter the 8 ½-inch wide Halibrands and their beefy rubber. The exaggerated rear fenders extended into the door area, which necessitated reshaping the doors to a radically radiused rear edge and inspired the moniker “cutback doors” that has come to characterize these cars, nearly the ultimate in small block competition Cobra development. The voluptuous fenders, huge air intakes, big wheels and tires foreshadowed the new Cobra II, the 427-powered coil spring suspension Cobras that would soon supplant the first generation. Combining the aggressive appearance of the later 427s with the lighter weight, more responsive chassis and better balance of the small block Cobras, the cutback door Cobras set a standard for aggressive appearance with performance to match which still inspires admiration. Later in 1964, Shelby completed a series of the ultimate competition 289 Cobras. Essentially constructed to FIA specs with wide rear fenders and cutback doors, they are known as the USRRC cars and were built with minor differences specifically to the rules of the U.S. Road Racing Championship. In addition to their USRRC-specific equipment, they incorporate everything Shelby had learned in three years of intense competition with the world’s most experienced and accomplished marques. CSX 2557, offered here, is one of those six 1964 USRRC cars. One of only two of the USRRC Cobras completed with dual side pipes on each side of the car, it was entered in the season-ending FIA race, the Bridgehampton Double 500 in September 1964. Driven there by Charlie Hayes, it failed to finish when a carburetor drain plug worked loose, dumping its fuel on the track and emptying the tank on lap 48 of the 110-lap race. Thereafter, it was retained by Shelby American as a spare until it was sold in April 1966 to Richard Roe, who raced it in SCCA A/Production during 1966 and then sold it to Murray Kellner in Locanto, Florida, who continued its U.S. racing although with unknown results. Its subsequent history is known and documented in the “SAAC World Registry.” It was restored to its original Shelby team appearance in Guardsman Blue with White Le Mans stripes in the mid-90s. One of the most original and unmolested of all the famed Shelby Cobra 289 race cars, CSX 2557 is in exceptional, meticulously maintained condition today, an example that exhibits nearly a half century’s careful preservation, restoration, maintenance and enjoyment. Its history is clear and unblemished by mishap, disappearance or accident. It was sampled briefly by an RM representative following its catalog photography. Starting smartly after two pumps on the accelerator and a touch of the key-actuated starter, it settled smoothly into a stable idle. The clutch engaged gently and the engine burbled happily at low rpm, a car anyone accustomed to driving a stick shift Mustang could accommodate easily. Off idle, its vastly over-carbureted engine fussed and objected until it warmed up but then displayed a willingness to rev that invited a detour onto the nearby stretch of Interstate 95, unfortunately deterred by the lack of license plates (and its custodian’s concern). The gearbox (described by Le Mans-winner Paul Frere in Michael Shoen’s The Cobra-Ferrari Wars as “finger-light” and “takes no effort”) is a delight. The unassisted brakes pull up with reasonable effort, straight and true even when cold. The unusual four-branch side exhaust system has its own distinctive gobble-gobble beat at idle, and the torque of the 289, even with big valves, headers, a cam and plenty of carburetion, comes on strongly at low rpm, easily exceeding the old, cold 7.00-15 Goodyear Blue Streak Sports Car Specials’ grip on cold pavement. Unlike many old race cars, it’s easy to drive gently and encourages experimentation with its limits. Riding in real Halibrands with seating for two, exhilarating performance and modern safety precautions including an onboard fire system, this is the epitome of mid-sixties GT race car technology. Stable in the hands of a competent driver, its potential in the hands of Shelby team drivers like Bob Bondurant, Allen Grant, Dick Thompson, Ronnie Bucknum, Phil Hill or Dan Gurney is apparent. A pair of star cracks in the paint from stones thrown up from the tires attest to its enthusiastic use; its presentation is that of a team car after practice and before the start of the Bridgehampton Double 500. By all accounts, it is the next-to-last Team Cobra built, the culmination of three years of intensive development, testing and racing in the most demanding international competition that would bring Shelby the 1965 FIA Manufacturers Championship. Best of all, it’s good enough to show – but not too good to drive. Addendum Please note this car is sold on a Bill of Sale only. Chassis no. CSX 2557

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
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1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta 'Lusso' by Scaglietti

240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC aluminium V-12 engine with three Weber 36DCS carburettors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with A-arms, coil springs, and telescopic shocks, rear live axle with semi-elliptical springs, telescopic shocks, and Watts linkage, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm Matching-numbers example; engine rebuilt in 2009 Finished in its original colour combination Includes an owner’s manual, tool kit, and comprehensive history file Submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification Ferrari’s breath-taking 250 GT/L was designed as a new offering to fill the market between the sporting 250 GT SWB and its more luxurious sibling, the 250 GTE 2+2, by combining the best features of both. The Lusso was first seen by the public at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, and many enthusiasts simply fell head over heels for the beautiful body and Kamm tail that adorned the newest 250. Fortunately, all this beauty did not sacrifice aerodynamics, as these flowing lines helped to direct airflow towards the car’s rear spoiler. As per usual for the 250 series, the design was penned by Pininfarina and bodies were constructed by Scaglietti, with the bodies being made out of steel and the doors, bonnet, and boot lids out of aluminium. The beauty of the Lusso did not just extend to its body and interior. Under the aluminium bonnet was Ferrari’s 3.0-litre, Colombo-designed V-12, topped with three Weber carburettors. Accelerating from 0 to 60 mph took just eight seconds, and the car was able to continue to accelerate until it reached its impressive top speed of 150 mph. The Lusso also borrowed its short-wheelbase chassis design from the 250 SWB and 250 GTO. As such, it was graced with the fantastic handling characteristics associated with those two models. As the final Ferrari in the 250 lineage, the Lusso would be the last car to feature the 3.0-litre Colombo V-12, effectively closing the door on one of the most spectacular engines in automotive history. The Lusso excelled as a gran turismo in every sense of the term. Cruising along at high speeds was no problem, and the car could comfortably cross long distances with ease. With slender A- and B-pillars, the interior has fantastic outward visibility, making it a much more relaxing place to be in on long trips. As the Lusso is widely celebrated as one of the most exquisitely proportioned Pininfarina-designed Ferraris ever built, it has been widely sought by hundreds of enthusiasts, each of whom wanted one to call his or her own. Celebrity enthusiasts such as Steve McQueen and Eric Clapton each owned one, only adding to the Lusso’s allure. With 350 produced by the end of the second and final year of production in 1964, this was a car clearly destined to become a future classic. CHASSIS NUMBER 5885 The Berlinetta offered here was completed in July 1964 and was one of the last manufactured, being the 338th of only 350 examples. It was finished in Grigio Argento over a Nero leather interior and was sold to its first owner through official dealer J.H. Keller AG in Zurich, Switzerland. The first owner clearly enjoyed the car and used it regularly, returning it to Modena for servicing at the Ferrari factory’s Assistenza Clienti at the Viale Trento Trieste on 30 September 1964 with 5,609 kilometres on the odometer. Three and a half years later, on 18 April 1968, the car returned for another service, this time displaying 27,758 kilometres. Later in the 1970s, chassis number 5885 was acquired by André Surmain, of Porto d’Andratx, Mallorca, Spain. Mr Surmain, a passionate sports car collector and connoisseur, had retired to Spain following many years as the creator and impresario of renowned French restaurant Lutece in New York. He enjoyed this car for over a decade. By the late 1980s, the car was under the tenure of Leo Schildkamp, a resident in Heerlen, Netherlands. It was then registered on Dutch license plates DE-14-07 on 29 April 1988. Schildkamp showed the car later in August 1988 at the AvD-Oldtimer Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, in Germany. Over the winter of 1988, the car received a bare metal bodywork restoration at Lusso Service Holland in Duiven, photos for which are included on file. The car was then again shown by Schildkamp at the FF40 meeting in Brussels and Spa-Francorchamps in September 1992. The following January, the Lusso was sold to Peter Wolthers. He clearly enjoyed this Ferrari and maintained it for an additional 14 years before it was acquired by the present owner. The car has since attended several French Ferrari Owners’ Club events, including most recently the Chevaux Vapeur Concours in Paris on 22 September 2014. During its current ownership, chassis number 5885 has been driven regularly, meticulously maintained, and in recent years has received a complete engine rebuild, again for which records are available on file. It is also fitted with a beautiful period-correct Blaupunkt AM/FM radio, manual antenna, and period-correct speaker in the rear parcel shelf. Offered in its ever graceful and original colour combination, this Lusso also retains its original chassis, engine, gearbox, and rear axle. It presents as a great opportunity to obtain one of Ferrari’s utmost luxuries. Chassis no. 5885GT Engine no. 5885 Gearbox no. 337 Axle No. 332

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-09-07
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1965 Porsche 904/6 Carrera GTS

190 hp, 1,991 cc twin-plug, OHC, air-cooled, flat six-cylinder engine with twin Weber 46IDA3C carburettors, five-speed synchromesh gearbox, independent front suspension with double wishbones and coil springs, independent rear multi-link suspension with coil springs, and hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,300 mm Offered from the Laidlaw Competition Car Collection Ex-Porsche Works team car Finished 6th overall at the 1965 Nürburgring 1000 km Works entrant to the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans Finished 1st in class at the 1967 12 Hours of Sebring Porsche’s Type 904, officially called the Carrera GTS because Porsche and Peugeot were in dispute over numeric designations with “0” in them, succeeded the RSK Type 718 as the last sports-racing iteration of the 356 series. Developed after Porsche left Formula One in 1962, the 904 (as it soon became popularly known) was also the last full-competition Porsche that could be readily driven on the street. The 904’s designer was 28-year-old Ferdinand Alexander “Butzi” Porsche III, the son of company chairman “Ferry” Porsche. “It was my favourite”, he later told Porsche historian Karl Ludvigsen, “Because I did it alone and there wasn’t this fight to change it or make it newer. It was designed and finished”. Ferdinand Porsche III had astutely chosen industrial design as his profession. As the new head of Porsche’s design department, he shouldered an immense responsibility to continue the Stuttgart firm’s fine traditions. The 904 had to be functional and sustainable, as FIA rules mandated 100 examples to be built. Porsche’s 1961 Model 718 competition coupé was the 904’s inspiration, but the new race car, with its strong, full-length character line, rakish lift-up tail, and ultra-low 41.9-inch height, was much better looking. A chassis of steel pressings embraced the well-proven, four-cam flat-four Carrera engine, which was now mid-mounted. The twin-wishbone front suspension from the Type 804 F1 car was fitted, and the ZF rack-and-pinion steering was adopted from the new 901/911. Zero to 60 mph could be accomplished in as little as 5.5 seconds, and the 904 could be geared for 160 mph, with four-wheel ATE disc brakes quickly bringing the car to a stop. To save weight, the sleek body shell was made of fibreglass, which was formed from spraying chopped fiberglass onto a mould, and then bonded to the steel chassis for added rigidity. The twin bucket seats were fixed in place, but the beautiful cast alloy pedals were adjustable, and Porsche made several seat sizes available to suit varied driver heights. A new 904 was initially priced at $7,425, directly from Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen. Competing in Sicily’s twisty 1964 Targa Florio, a pair of 904s finished ahead of the bigger-engine Ferraris and Shelby Cobras; it would not be the first time Porsche’s “giant killers” accomplished that feat. Fifty cars were required for official homologation in FIA-GT Group 3; although, it is believed that more than 100 examples of the 904, in various configurations, were actually built. All but 21 were sold in the first two weeks following the cars launch. In 1965, several examples were fitted with Type 901 six-cylinder engines (904/6), and even a few eight-cylinder, Type 771, 225-brake horsepower, 2.0-litre cars (904/8) were built. According to the Le Mans entry paperwork from 1965, a copy of which accompanies this car, 906-012 was initially built with an eight-cylinder before the two-litre flat-six unit was fitted for that year’s racing season. It was one of some half dozen cars to be so equipped. The six-cylinder cars were easily differentiated from the four-cylinder variants by the central fuel filler caps and vertical lift windows, whilst differences in brake ducts, fog lights, and side air scoops varied from car to car, as development was a continual and rapid process. The copy of the Kartex, which was provided by Jürgen Barth, confirms that 906-012 was commissioned (händler) by “WE”, or Werkes, and was painted Silbermetall, the usual Works silver grey livery. The first owner was listed as Rennabteilung, or the Racing Department. Interestingly, this was the six-cylinder engine that Porsche engineer Hans Tomala had originally specified for the 904, but not even the production 911’s engine was ready in time, so a modified version for racing had to wait a few years. Once equipped with the new two-litre six, which gave a considerable increase in power, the Carrera GTS could step up to a new level of performance altogether. This six was sufficient enough for a 904/6 that was co-driven by Gunther Linge and Umberto Maglioli to take 3rd place overall in the 1965 Targa Florio. Porsche 906-012 was entered twice by the factory team for the 1965 international racing season, both in the Prototype (up to two litres) class. Firstly, at the Nürburgring 1000 km race, on 23 May, where co-drivers Peter Nöcker and Günter Klass, with race number 22, finished a superb 6th overall and 3rd in class, which was quite an achievement for a brand-new car in its first race. Klass took to the wheel of 906-012 again, along with a new co-driver, Dieter Glemser, when they competed at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans on 19 and 20 June. Wearing number 35, they drove through the night only to retire at 7:00 a.m. on Sunday, due to valve trouble. (A copy of the Le Mans entry paperwork is provided in the history file, and it makes for interesting reading.) Between 19 and 25 July 1965, Eugen Böhringer and Rolf Wütherich shared the wheel of 906-012 at the Coup des Alpes, wearing race number 7, but they failed to finish. The Kartex then shows that 906-012 was sold on 5 May 1966, without an engine (ohne Motor), to George P. Drolsom, a talented American racing driver from Jacksonville, Florida. Drolsom had traded in a badly damaged 904 for 906-012. He then installed a correct six-cylinder engine and raced 906-012 at numerous venues, including Nassau Speed Week in the Bahamas, where he earned a 2nd in class at the Governor’s Trophy. At the 12 Hours of Sebring, driving with Bill Campbell and racing under number 47, they finished an impressive 21st overall, and, more importantly, 1st in class. Now a retired race car, 906-012 was purchased from Drolsom by Vernon Covert, of Arizona, presumably in the early 1970s. Covert elected to take the rather unconventional, although not altogether uncommon, step of converting the car to road going specifications. The roof was modified to a T-top configuration with removable panels, and the interior was treated to some rather interesting creature comforts, such as a wooden dashboard and a deep red Draylon interior (period photos of the car in this guise are included in the file). Covert reportedly drove 906-012 to California, which was a good challenge even in carefree 1970s America. David Evans, of Maryland, took ownership of 906-012 in 1990, and correspondence indicates that he wrote to the Porsche factory for information on how to restore the roof back to its correct state. In 1993, Heinz Heinrich, in the U.S.A., purchased 906-012 and then sold it to Robert Manschot, of Phoenix, Arizona. In 1998, Manschot commissioned Kevin Ryan to restore the car to original specifications. The restoration was photo-documented and appropriately included with the history file. Interestingly, 906-012 has a number of special devices, including the central latch for the rear deck, special hinges to allow it to be opened quickly, and support rods to keep it open during a pit stop. These are typical features of Works cars made for endurance racing, as they allow for quick access and intervention. In 2001, collector Phillip Ma purchased 906-012 and re-confirmed its provenance through correspondence with Jürgen Barth at the Porsche factory. Ma entered 906-012 in several historic events prior to the Tour Auto, where an incident forced retirement. After which, in 2003, it was acquired by Lord Laidlaw, along with a number of spares, including the period Elektron (magnesium alloy) crankcase that was numbered 906-012 (although it was deemed inadvisable for the rigours of modern historic tacing). Once back in the UK, Laidlaw sent the car to Classic Performance Engineering, which, as they were already well versed in 904 Porsches, gave 012 an exhaustive pre-competition build, including crack-testing all relevant components and fitting a correct, up-to-date fire extinguisher system and seat belts. Following an initial shake down, the car was further prepared and then handed over to Moto-Technique for fitment of a roll-cage and a complete re-finish in the Laidlaw racing livery. Over the ensuing years, 906-012 has been maintained in top, race-winning condition by Classic Performance Engineering and, more recently, Simon Hadfield Motorsport. Two extensive files of invoices, including many from the Porsche factory, are supplied with the car. The engine currently fitted to 012 was last built and dyno’d in 2010, and it has only been run for approximately 20 hours since. Recent testing at Cadwell Park showed it to be in excellent order and ready for road or race. The Laidlaw 904/6 quickly became one of the favourite competition cars in the stable due to its precise handling, giant-killing potential, and versatility for numerous events. This car has competed in many historic competitions, including meetings at Donington Park, Charade, Brands Hatch, Goodwood, Le Mans, Nürburgring, Silverstone, and Oulton Park, to name a few, as well as participation in multiple Tour Auto Retrospectives. Be it Sweden or South Africa, hill climb or race track, this ex-Works Porsche 904/6 is probably the most frequently campaigned example of its type. Eligible, of course, to enter all of the great historic events, including the Le Mans Classic, this beautiful and extremely rare ex-Works Porsche is at home and as competitive on the road as it is on the track. The new owner should derive much satisfaction and success in all disciplines of historic motorsport in the years to come. Chassis no. 906-012

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-09-08
Hammer price
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1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta Lusso by Scaglietti

Formerly of the Aldo Cudone collection The 306th example of 350 examples produced Finished in highly compelling dark brown over beige Matching numbers throughout According to factory records, this 250 GT/L was completed by Ferrari on 10 June 1964 and was finished in Grigio Argento (18940 M) over Nero (VM 8500). As the 306th of only 350 examples built, it was destined for France and delivered to Franco-Britannic Autos SA of Paris. It was then sold and registered to its first owner, Mr Mignaval, shortly thereafter. It remained in France until June 1980, when it was imported to Italy. Chassis 5681 GT was registered immediately after its importation to Giuseppe Medici’s company, Medici S.p.A., in Reggio Emilia. It only remained in his ownership for a short period of time and by the following year, the Lusso was noted as being re-registered in Padua under the ownership of the great Ferrari enthusiast Aldo Cudone. The Ferrari was then finished in dark brown by Bachelli & Villa with a tan leather interior by Luppi—a livery that Aldo Cudone specifically selected because his father had owned a Lusso in the same colour combination whilst he was growing up. The car was seen at Ferrari’s 50th anniversary festivities in Rome and Maranello in May of 1997. The Lusso was acquired by its current Italian owner in 1999 after Aldo Cudone passed away. Still finished in dark brown over beige, a strikingly elegant colour combination, the GT/L presents quite nicely throughout and is accompanied by a car cover and tool roll. Considered by many to be the most attractive model of the 250-series of Ferraris, the Lusso is just as wonderful to look at as it is to drive. Capable of crossing large tracts of land at high speed while cosseting its driver and passenger in ultimate comfort, the Lusso is a grand tourer par excellence and a wonderful automobile by all accounts. Thanks in part to its highly compelling colour, 5681 GT stands out from the rest as a remarkable example of the vaunted 250 Ferrari. • In passato parte della collezione di Aldo Cudone • L'esemplare numero 306 dei 350 prodotti • Finito nel piacevolissimo marrone scuro su interni beige • Completamente “matching number” Secondo quanto riportato dall’archivio della fabbrica, questa 250 GT / L è stata completata dalla Ferrari il 10 giugno 1964, nella combinazione cromatica di Grigio Argento (18940 M) su Nero (VM 8500). Vettura numero 306 delle sole 350 costruite, destinata alla Francia e consegnata alla Franco-Britannic Autos SA di Parigi, è stata poco dopo venduta ed intestata al suo primo proprietario, il signor Mignaval. E 'rimasta in Francia fino al Giugno del 1980, quando è stata importata in Italia. La vettura con numero di telaio 5681 GT è stata, subito dopo la sua importazione in Italia, intestata alla società Medici S.p.A. di Reggio Emilia, di Giuseppe Medici. Rimasta sua solo per un breve lasso di tempo, già l’anno successivo la Lusso era stata immatricolata nella provincia di Padova, divenuta proprietà del grande appassionato di Ferrari Aldo Cudone. La Ferrari è stata poi riverniciata in marrone scuro dalla Bachelli & Villa, mentre gli interni in pelle marrone sono stati realizzati da Luppi. Questa combinazione cromatica è stata scelta appositamente dallo stesso Aldo Cudone, perché, quando era ancora un ragazzo, suo padre aveva posseduto una Lusso nella stessa combinazione di colori. La vettura è stata poi usata per i festeggiamenti del 50° anniversario della Ferrari a Roma e Maranello, nel Maggio del 1997. La Lusso è stata acquistata dal suo attuale proprietario, italiano, nel 1999, poco dopo la scomparsa di Aldo Cudone. Rimasta sin da allora verniciata in marrone scuro con interni beige, una combinazione di colori straordinariamente elegante, la GT / L si presenta ancora bene ed è venduta con il suo kit attrezzi ed il telo copri auto. Considerato da molti come il modello più interessante della serie 250 di Ferrari, la Lusso è una vettura meravigliosa, sia da guardare sia da guidare. Perfetta per coprire grandi distanze in poco tempo, mantenendo sempre un elevato livello di comfort per gli occupanti, la 250 Lusso è la granturismo per eccellenza e, a detta di tutti, una meravigliosa automobile. In parte anche grazie alla sua interessante combinazione cromatica, la 5681 GT spicca sulle altre come notevole esempio di una delle Ferrari 250 più decantate. Chassis no. 5681 GT Engine no. 5681 GT

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-05-27
Hammer price
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1964 Porsche 904 Carrera GTS

Est. 180 bhp, 1,966 cc air-cooled horizontally opposed Type 587/3 four-cylinder engine with two Weber 46IDM twin-choke carburettors, five-speed manual transmission with a ZF limited-slip differential, independent front and rear suspension with coil-over shock absorbers, and front and rear disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,300 mm. Recent complete restoration to exacting standards Documented ownership and extensive successful competition history Hugely eligible for leading historic motoring events and rallies The Type 904, born of Porsche’s disappointing foray into Formula One in the early 1960s, was produced to bring the company back to its racing sports car roots. In 1962, the immensely talented Ferdinand A. “Butzi” Porsche was tasked with designing a new two-seat competition coupé that could also be driven on the street by utilising the mid-engine chassis configuration that had proven so successful with the racing department’s lightweight spyders. Porsche had hoped to have its new six-cylinder Type 901 engine ready for the new mid-engined coupé to run at Le Mans, but he was not convinced that the new engine could go the distance. Thus, most 904s were fitted with the Type 547 (1.6 litre) and Type 587/3 (2.0 litre) Carrera four-cylinder motors, and it wasn’t until the end of production that they were fitted with the 2.0-litre 901 flat-six. The beautifully balanced 904 GTS was introduced in early 1964 and would enjoy a brilliant inaugural season, scoring victories at Sebring, the Targa Florio, Spa, the Nürburgring 1000 KM, the 24 Hours of Le Mans (a 1-4 class sweep), the 12 Hours of Reims, the Coppa Inter-Europa, the Tour de France, the Bridgehampton 500 KM, and the 1000 KM of Paris. CHASSIS NUMBER 904-026 Chassis number 904-026 was originally delivered to Porsche dealer Rittersbacher in Kaiserslautern, Germany, on 19 February 1964. At this time, it was finished in Silver Metallic with blue upholstery and was fitted with safety seat belts and a sports exhaust. Clearly, the car was intended for competition. In April, Fritz Leinenweber, of Pirmasens, purchased the Porsche. Leinenweber was already a successful competitor, having been actively involved with motorsport since 1956, but he became particularly well-known for his exploits with the 904. The first outing for 904-026 was at the Hunstrück Bergrennen Revival on 19 August 1964. Leinenweber was hugely impressive, as he not only won the GT class, but he also posted the day’s best overall time and set a new hill record. He followed the dominant performance with two more 1st in class wins, one at Bergrennen Happerg and the other at Course de Côte d’Urcy, France. Bergrennen Luxemburg, which was held on 13 September, was to be the setting for Leinenweber’s fourth consecutive class victory, which was complemented by a 5th overall at the Course de Côte Merveilleuse the following weekend. The next round in which 904-026 would compete at was held in early November at the Bergrennen Viaden, in Belgium. Again, this was a hugely successful weekend, one that resulted in a 1st place finish in the GT class. The final event in the 1964 season was the Bergrennen Taubensuhl, which was held later in November, and it resulted in another overall victory and new course record, ending the 904’s first competition season in true Porsche style. The 1965 season also started with great success, with a 2nd in class and 4th overall at the Bergrennen Kautenbach. After the meeting, the car was sold to textile dealer and talented sports car driver Michel Weber, who had previously competed with the Signal Red 904-029 during the 1964 season, as well as a self-tuned 356 Carrera 1600. Weber had his sights firmly set on the 1965 German Hill Climb Championship. The first meeting for the pair was at the Bergpreis Bad Neuenahr, which resulted in a 1st in class, setting a strong tone for the remainder of the season. Four weeks later, at Taunus, Weber competed against Rolf Stommelen and Udo Schütz. Unfortunately, on this day, Weber and 026 had to settle for 3rd in class, behind both Stommelen and Shütz. Unfazed, Weber and 904-026 took three consecutive class victories in the following meetings, which took place at Bergrennen Eberbach, Sudelfeld-Bergrennen, and Spessart-Bergrennen. The biggest event of the year was held on 13 June, at the Alpen-Bergpreis Rossfeld. Weber managed to impress the crowd and secure both a 5th overall and 2nd in class finish. Two weeks later, at the Olympia-Bergrennen Axamar Lizum in Austria, 904-026 was back to its winning ways, finishing 1st in class and 1st overall. It is believed that prior to this hugely successful outing, Weber fitted wider rear wheels and tyres, which required a slight faring of the rear arches. In August 1965, Weber again won the GT class, and this time it was at the Bergpreis Freiburg-Schauinsland, where he raced ahead of Sepp Greger and Günter Klass, who were driving a Works 904, and gained points in the European Hill Climb Championship. At the next meeting, which was held at the Bergrennen Ratisbona, Sepp Gregor and Weber set identical times, resulting in a tie for top honours! Weber was able to maintain momentum one week later, and he took an overall victory, with 904-026 claiming another track record at the Hunsrück-Bergrennen Revival. The Bergpreis Rhön, which was held on 1 November 1965, was the final event of the 1965 season, and it proved to be one of Weber’s most noteworthy performances. The event was plagued by treacherous rain and fog, with the leading Works prototypes of Ferrari and Porsche lacking grip. This was the ideal setting for the agile-handling Porsche 904 to shine, and by the end of the day, the top three spots were taken by 904s, with Weber and 026 taking the outright victory. After a terrifically successful season, Weber finished in a three-way tie for 1st place in the German GT Hill Climb Championship, alongside Reinhold Joest and Siegfried Spiess. However, due to the displacement handicap regulation, Spiess was awarded the championship. For the 1966 season, Weber was beginning to focus on Le Mans, but he still continued to use his 904, and their first outing together was at the 1000 KM of Monza, which took place on 25 April. For this event, Weber teamed up with Jochen Neerpasch, who would later go on to win the 1968 24 Hours of Daytona with a Porsche 907. However, with the turn of the year came the end of the three-year GT class homologation of the Porsche 904, which resulted in the car being forced to compete in the sports car field, where Ford GT40s, a Ferrari 330 P3, and Ferrari 250 LMs could be found. The pair qualified the 904 well and headed their class by nearly three seconds over an Alfa Romeo TZ2. Unfortunately, engine problems would force the car’s eventual retirement. After this event, Weber decided to trade in the 904 for an ex-Works 904/6. He would complete the remainder of the season with that car. Jerry Pantis’ book, Porsche 904, 906 & 910 in the Americas, lists the next owner as Armando Capriles, of Venezuela, who bought the car through Porsche in 1966. During 1966 and into 1967, the car was raced by Alfredo Atencio and Armando Capriles at events in and around Venezuela. It is then believed that Flavio Espino from Caracas bought the car and raced it at Road Atlanta in October 1972; at this time, it was fitted with a six-cylinder engine, which had presumably been fitted after the engine issue Weber had encountered at Monza in 1966. Chassis number 904-026 was next seen for sale by Harem Cruz, who was based in Caracas, Venezuela. He advertised the car in a 1973 issue of Road & Track for $8,500, and at that time, it was fitted with a new factory four-cam Type 587/3 engine (number 99 099). It is recorded in Rolf Sprenger and Steve Heinrichs’ Porsche Carrera and the Early Years of Porsche Motorsport that 904-026 is the only car which engine 99 099 has been fitted to. This engine change has also been noted on the factory Kardex. Harem Cruz sold the car in August 1973 to Jim Wayman, of Hawaii, who did some work on the aging race car, which included painting the bodywork Ruby Red. He then advertised the car for sale in Panorama, with an advertised asking price of $15,000. By December 1975, the car was owned by Bill Steen in Shreveport, Louisiana. A year later, Steen sold 026 to John Robbins, of Omaha, Nebraska. Robins found some parts to be missing, so he refitted the correct pedals, taillights, and front indicator lights, as well as performed other minor modifications, and after the work was completed, he used the car on the road. In 1986, the car was acquired by Mark Chmar, of Rittermark Porsche in Savannah, Georgia, and then it was offered for sale through Nick Soprano, eventually taking residence with Raymond Perroud, who returned the Porsche to Continental Europe. Chassis number 904-026 remained in Perroud’s collection for nearly two decades before being sold to the previous owner, a knowledgeable Swiss enthusiast with a significant sports racing car collection. During this ownership, the car was completely restored by Raceline Feustel GmbH, a German company that specialises in racing Porsches. The meticulous restoration addressed every aspect of the 904 and was performed to the highest possible standard, even going so far as to use the original bench on which the first 904 chassis were assembled. In total, this owner reportedly spent $800,000 on the full restoration and preparation. In this ownership, the car was not raced, rallied, or shown post-restoration. The current owner bought the car in recent years, and it has been campaigned at the 2012 Silver Flag event in Vernasca, where it won the prize for the best GT-category car. The car received a new FIVA Identity Card in April 2014, and in May 2014, chassis 904-026 was also shown at Villa d’Este, where it looked as magnificent as it would have on any race track. Chassis number 904-026 offers a very rare opportunity to obtain one of the most successful survivors of an iconic series, as it is in stunning condition and comes with great competition history. Moteur quatre-cylindres à plat refroidi par air Type 587/3, 1 966 cm3, 180 ch env, deux carburateurs double corps Weber 46IDM, boîte manuelle cinq rapports avec pont autobloquant ZF, suspension à quatre roues indépendantes avec combinés ressorts-amortisseurs, freins à disques sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 300 mm • Restauration complète récente et de haut niveau • Bel historique en compétition et chaîne de propriété documentés • Largement éligible pour les évènements et rallyes historiques majeurs Née de la tentative décevante de Porsche en Formule 1, au début des années 1960, la 904 allait ramener le constructeur vers ses racines sportives. En 1962, l'extrêmement talentueux Ferdinand-A. « Butzi » Porsche recevait pour mission de concevoir un coupé biplace de compétition utilisable aussi sur la route, en adoptant la configuration moteur central qui s'était révélée tellement efficace avec les légers Spyder du département course. Porsche avait espéré que son nouveau six-cylindres Type 901 serait prêt pour équiper le nouveau coupé aux 24 Heures du Mans. Mais, n'étant pas convaincu que ce moteur soit capable de tenir la distance, le constructeur avait finalement équipé la plupart des 904 avec les quatre-cylindres Carrera Type 547 (1,6 litre) et Type 587/3 (2 litres) puis, seulement vers la fin de la production, avec les six-cylindres 2 litres Type 901. La superbe 904 GTS, présentée au début de 1964, allait connaître une brillante saison inaugurale, enregistrant plusieurs victoires à Sebring, la Targa Florio, Spa, aux 1000 Km du Nürburgring, aux 24 Heures du Mans (quatre premières places de catégorie), aux 12 Heures de Reims, à la Coppa Inter-Europa, au Tour de France, aux 500 Km de Bridgehampton et aux 1000 Km de Paris. CHASSIS N° 904-026 Livrée neuve le 19 février 1964 au distributeur Porsche Rittersbacher, de Kaiserslautern, en Allemagne, la voiture portant le numéro de châssis 904-026 était de teinte gris métallisé avec sellerie bleue, équipée de ceintures de sécurité et d'un échappement sport. Elle était clairement destinée à la compétition. Au mois d'avril, elle était achetée par Fritz Leinenweber, de Pirmasens. Pilote privé activement impliqué dans le sport automobile depuis 1956, sa réputation allait surtout se bâtir autour de ses exploits au volant de cette 904. La première sortie de 904-026 a eu lieu le 19 août 1964 lors du Hunstrück Bergrennen Revival. Leinenweber s'est révélé très impressionnant et, non seulement il remportait sa catégorie, mais il signait en plus le meilleur temps de la journée, établissant un nouveau record pour la montée. Il poursuivait cette domination avec deux autres victoires de catégories, à la Bergrennen Happerg et à la course de côte d’Urcy, en France. La Bergrennen Luxemburg, le 13 septembre, a permis à Leinenwebers de remporter sa quatrième victoire de catégorie consécutive, avec le week-end suivant une cinquième place au classement général de la course de côte de la Merveilleuse. L'épreuve suivante à laquelle prenait part 904-026 était la Bergrennen Vianden, en Belgique, au début du moins de novembre : un excellent week-end à nouveau, avec une victoire en catégorie GT. La dernière épreuve de la saison 1964, en novembre, fut la Bergrennen Taubensuhl, avec une nouvelle victoire de catégorie et un nouveau record pour la côte, clôturant avec succès cette première saison de compétition. La saison 1965 démarrait bien également avec une deuxième place de catégorie et une quatrième place au classement général de la Bergrennen Kautenbach. Après le meeting, la voiture était cédée à Michel Weber, négociant en textiles et pilote talentueux, qui avait déjà couru avec la 904-029 rouge pendant la saison 1964, ainsi qu'avec une 356 Carrera 1600 préparée. Weber avait en 1965 pour objectif de remporter le Championnat d'Allemagne de la Montagne. Sa première course avec sa nouvelle 904 était la Bergpreis Bad Neuenahr, qu'il terminait en tête de sa catégorie, ce qui augurait favorablement de la suite de la saison. Quatre semaine plus tard, dans le Taunus, Weber courait contre Rolf Stommelen et Udo Schütz. Malheureusement, ce jour-là Weber et 026 durent se contenter de la troisième place de catégorie, derrière Stommelen et Schütz. Mais Weber se rattrapait en remportant consécutivement trois victoires de catégorie lors des meetings suivants, Bergrennen Eberbach, Sudelfeld-Bergrennen et Spessart-Bergrennen. L'évènement le plus important de l'année s'est tenu le 13 juin, lors de l'Alpen-Bergpreis Rossfeld. Weber réussissait à impressionner la foule en signant une cinquième place au classement général, accompagnée d'une deuxième place de catégorie. Deux semaines plus tard, à l'Olympia-Bergrennen Axamar Lizum, en Autriche, la 904-026 renouait avec la victoire en terminant en tête de sa catégorie et du classement général. Il semble que, avant cet éclatant succès, Weber ait monté des jantes et pneus plus larges, ce qui avait nécessité un léger renflement des ailes. En août 1965, Weber remportait à nouveau la catégorie GT, cette fois à la Bergpreis Freiburg-Schauinsland, devant Sepp Greger et Günter Klass qui pilotaient des 904 d'usine, et ainsi il ajoutait des points au Championnat d'Europe de la Montagne. Lors de l'épreuve suivante, la Bergrennen Ratisbona, Sepp Gregor et Weber signaient des temps identiques ! Weber gardait son rythme une semaine plus tard en décrochant avec 904-026 la victoire au classement général du Hunsrück-Bergrennen Revival, tout en établissant un nouveau record. La Bergpreis Rhön, le 1er novembre 1965, était la dernière épreuve de la saison 1965. Weber y signait un de ses plus beaux résultats. L'évènement se déroulait par un temps pluvieux et brumeux qui ne convenait guère aux prototypes d'usine Ferrari et Porsche, qui manquaient d'adhérence. Pour l'agile 904, les conditions étaient au contraire idéales et, à la fin de la journée, les 904 avaient raflé les trois premières places, celle de Weber ayant remporté la victoire. Après une superbe saison, Weber se retrouvait ex-æquo avec Reinhold Joest et Seigfried Spiess pour le titre de Champion d'Allemagne de la Montagne, mais le règlement concernant les handicaps attribuait finalement la victoire à Spiess. Pour la saison 1966, Weber commença à regarder du côté des 24 Heures du Mans, tout en continuant à utiliser la 904 dont la première sortie fut les 1000 Km de Monza, le 25 avril. Pour l'occasion, Weber faisait équipe avec Jochen Neerpasch, qui allait plus tard remporter les 24 Heures de Daytona au volant d'une Porsche 907. Mais cette nouvelle saison signifiait la fin des trois ans d'homologation de la 904 en catégorie GT, si bien qu'elle se retrouvait en face des Ford GT40, Ferrari 330 P3 et Ferrari 250 LM. L'équipage parvenait à se qualifier et menait sa catégorie de presque trois secondes devant une Alfa Romeo TZ2, avant que des problèmes moteur ne contraignent la voiture à abandonner. Après cette épreuve, Weber décidait d'échanger la 904 contre une 904/6 usine, avec laquelle il terminait la saison. L'ouvrage de Jerry Pantis, Porsche 904, 906 & 910 in the Americas, indique que le propriétaire suivant, Armando Capriles, au Venezuela, a acheté la voiture en 1966 par l'intermédiaire de Porsche. La voiture était engagée en compétition en 1966 et 1967 entre les mains d'Alfredo Atencio et Armando Capriles, au Venezuela et aux alentours. Ensuite, Flavio Espino, de Caracas aurait acheté la Porsche et aurait couru avec à Road Atlanta en octobre 1972, la voiture étant alors équipée d'un moteur six-cylindres, peut-être installé après le problème moteur rencontré par Weber à Monza, en 1966. Une annonce parue dans Road & Track, en 1973, indique que la voiture était à vendre par Harem Cruz, basé à Caracas, Venezuela, pour 8 500 $, équipée d'un moteur quatre-cylindres neuf type 587/3 (n° 99 099). Il est précisé dans l'ouvrage Porsche Carrera : And the Early Years of Porsche Motorsport, de Rolf Sprenger et Steve Heinrichs, que 904-026 est la seule voiture dans laquelle le moteur 99 099 a jamais été installé. Le changement de moteur est aussi indiqué sur le Kardex d'usine. Harem Cruz a vendu la voiture en août 1973 à Jim Wayman en Hawaï, qui a effectué quelques travaux sur cette voiture vieillissante, dont une nouvelle peinture rouge Ruby. Il la mettait par la suite en vente dans Panorama, au prix de 1 500 $. En décembre 1975, la voiture était entre les mains de Bill Steen, de Shreveport, Louisiane. L'année suivante, Steen cédait 026 à John Robbins, d'Omaha, Nebraska. Robins constatait l'absence de certaines pièces et posait un pédalier, des feux arrière et des clignotants avant corrects, tout en effectuant quelques modifications mineures pour pouvoir utiliser la voiture sur la route. En 1986, elle était achetée par Mark Chmar, de Rittermark Porsche en Savannah, Géorgie, qui la remettait ensuite en vente par l'intermédiaire de Nick Soprano. Celui-ci la cédait à Raymond Perroud, qui la ramenait en Europe. Ce châssis n°904-026 restait dans la collection Perroud pendant presque 20 ans avant d'être vendu au propriétaire précédent, un passionné suisse à la tête d'une importante collection de voitures de compétition. Ce passionné faisait complètement restaurer la voiture par Raceline Feustel GmbH, un atelier allemand spécialisé dans les Porsche de course. S'attachant à tous les aspects de cette 904, cette restauration méticuleuse était réalisée selon les standards les plus élevés, allant jusqu'à reprendre l'ancien marbre sur lequel les premiers châssis de 904 avaient été assemblés. Au total, le propriétaire aurait dépensé 800 000 $ sur cette restauration complète. Elle n'était suivie d'aucune utilisation de la voiture en course, en rallye ou en exposition par ce propriétaire. L'actuel propriétaire a acheté la voiture relativement récemment et l'a utilisée pour le Silver Flag 2012, à Vernasca, où elle a remporté le prix de la meilleure GT. Le mois d'avril 2014 voyait la voiture recevoir une nouvelle carte d'identité FIVA et, en mai 2014, 904-026 était présentée à Villa d’Este où elle avait aussi belle allure que sur n'importe quel circuit. Ce châssis n° 904-026 constitue une très rare opportunité d'acquérir une des meilleures survivantes de cette série emblématique, dans un état incroyable et avec un superbe historique en compétition. Chassis no. 904-026 Engine no. 99 099

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-04
Hammer price
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1948 Tucker 48

166 bhp, 335 cu. in. OHV horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine, Tucker Y-1 four-speed pre-selector transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 130 in. Formerly of the Bob Pond Collection An American legend on wheels One of 51 built Decades of known history Equipped with the rare Tucker Y-1 transmission Road & Track magazine’s founder, John R. Bond, once said, “A little knowledge about cars can be dangerous.” Preston Thomas Tucker was an industry veteran with a lot of knowledge about cars, and he used that knowledge to dream bigger than just about anyone else in the U.S. automobile industry after World War II. The reasons why he did not succeed remain controversial, but success is not only measured in dollars and production numbers. It is also measured in lasting memories, and for many, the Tucker 48 remains a rolling symbol of the American dream and one of the most advanced early post-war automobiles. Tucker’s concept for his car was revolutionary. He intended to use a Ben Parsons-designed rear-mounted engine with all-independent Torsilastic rubber-sprung suspension and disc brakes on all four wheels. Drive was to be by twin torque converters, one at each rear wheel. The body design was penned by former Auburn Automobile Company designer Alex Tremulis, and it incorporated numerous safety features that Tucker promoted, including a windshield that would pop out in an accident, a wide space under the dash pad into where front seat passengers could duck before a collision, and a center-mounted third headlight that would turn with the front wheels. Early in the production cycle, the Tucker saw some of those dreams evaporate. The safety features survived, but the Parsons 589 engine and direct torque converter drive proved impractical. Tucker purchased Air Cooled Motors, a New York manufacturer of small aircraft engines, and reworked their product for water cooling. He installed it in his car, along with a four-speed transaxle borrowed from the Cord 810 and 812. Eventually, 51 examples of the Tucker 48 were assembled, and of those were the original “Tin Goose” prototype and 50 pilot-production cars. Public acclaim and desire for the new design was at a fever pitch. Unfortunately, it was all for naught. The Tucker Corporation came under the scrutiny of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The wheels of government ground slowly, and by the time Tucker and his executives were eventually declared “not guilty” in early 1950, the public had lost faith and Tucker had lost his factory. The car once nicknamed the “Torpedo” had been, effectively, torpedoed. A little knowledge about cars can be dangerous, but it can also result in something so full of passion and fascination that it can survive bureaucracy and time to become an icon of its age and the ultimate validation of its creator. It is the American dream on four wheels. TUCKER NUMBER 1036 A factory report dated October 28, 1948, held in the Tucker archives at the Gilmore Car Museum, indicates that chassis number 1036 had been completed on October 20, with body number 33 and engine number 335-85, and it was one of a dozen cars painted Maroon (paint code 600). No transmission was listed, as it is believed that this was one of the over a dozen Tuckers that remained unfinished and were waiting for transmissions when the factory closed. This is confirmed by the final factory inventory, dated March 3, 1949, which shows the car being in factory building number four with no transmission and having a price/value of $2,000. Along with the other cars, chassis number 1036 was eventually completed by faithful Tucker employees somewhat “off the record.” On October 18, 1950, this car, along with the other Tuckers built and all the other contents of the factory, went to auction at a sale conducted by Samuel L. Winternitz and Company, which took place on site at 7401 South Cicero Avenue. The car is believed to have been sold to the St. Louis area, where it was finally outfitted with a transmission and made roadworthy. Around 1951, this car and a second Tucker were given to Ova Elijah Stephens, of Denver, Colorado. Stephens was known to the Denver public as “Smilin’ Charlie,” a nickname bestowed because the well-known underworld figure was never known to smile. He accepted the two Tuckers as down payments on the sale of the Silver Star Saloon, a watering hole and brothel in the small Centennial State town of Flippin, as is documented in surviving IRS records, copies of which are on file. Smilin’ Charlie had no real use for the Tuckers, and chassis number 1036 was sold through Hugo Sills Motors, a Hudson dealer in the town of Littleton, to Rex McKelvy. In a lengthy interview for the August 12, 1988, issue of the Rocky Mountain News, McKelvy recalled the Tucker as “a fabulous car and good performer,” which had only 20 miles recorded when he purchased it! With Preston Tucker’s downfall still fresh in the public’s consciousness, one of his cars was a “must” for the roadside antique automobile museums popping up all over America in the 1950s. Accordingly, when Denver businessman Arthur H. Christiansen opened his Colorado Car Museum at the foot of Lookout Mountain in 1958, he purchased Tucker number 1036 from McKelvy. Unfortunately, Christiansen’s museum lasted for only a year before its doors were shuttered and its cars were sold at auction. Tucker number 1036 was acquired at the auction for $3,500 by Wayne McKinley, a successful Chevrolet dealer from O’Fallon, Illinois, and charter member of the Tucker Automobile Club of America. Mr. McKinley would be the Tucker’s longest-term owner, selling it after a quarter century in 1986 to Ken Behring’s Blackhawk Collection in Danville, California. In December 1989, the car was restored to its present appearance by Bob Holland’s Phaetons and Fins, of Menlo Park, California. A year later, it passed to Nobuyo Sawayama, of Osaka, Japan, for a figure widely reported as $500,000, which is believed to have been the highest price paid for a Tucker at the time. In 1997, the Tucker was acquired by Bob Pond. For a decade, it remained as the centerpiece of his legendary collection, spending many years on prominent display, alongside his other most prized possessions, at the Palm Springs Air Museum. The car is still wearing Mr. Holland’s restoration and is finished in an eye-catching shade of metallic bronze, which believed to be the 1966 Ford Emberglo. Its chrome and paint still have a nice shine, and the correct broadcloth interior shows only light wear; in fact, the broadcloth is believed to be the original material from 1948! Importantly, the car retains not only a proper Tucker Y-1 transmission—the gearbox that it was meant to have when new—but also the correct, proper late dashboard switchgear and Kaiser-sourced door handles. Only 1,914 miles are recorded, likely the actual mileage covered since new in the ownership of Smith, McKelvy, McKinley, Behring, and Pond. To acquire one of the most legendary American cars is a rare opportunity. To acquire one with such well-known and utterly fascinating history is especially priceless. The saying remains as true today as in 1948: “Don’t Let a Tucker Pass You By.” Special thanks to Mike Schutta. Chassis no. 1036

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Berlinetta

170 bhp at 7,000 rpm, 1,984 cc double overhead camshaft four-cylinder engine, two Weber 50 DCO3 carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent double wishbones and transverse leaf spring front suspension, De Dion rear axle with transverse leaf springs and Houdaille hydraulic shock absorbers, four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 88.6" - One of two Berlinettas built - Three-time Mille Miglia entrant (1955, ’56 & ’57) and Tour de France entrant - 1986 FCA National Meet Best in Show - Ferrari Classiche certified - Guaranteed Mille Miglia entrant After the Second World War, Enzo Ferrari told a friend, “If I save anything, if they don’t take everything away from me, then I am absolutely certain that the moment will come when I will be able to devote myself exclusively to the manufacture of racing cars and I will be able to see them racing every Sunday simultaneously in two or three places around the world. Two or three wins in one day – don’t you think that’s a good plan?” It was a prophetic statement. In 1947, after Ferrari’s contract with Alfa Romeo had expired, the first real Ferrari, the 125, was built, and this legendary marque which has provoked so much passion ever since was underway. Just three years later, in 1950, the Formula 1 World Driver’s Championship began. Ferrari won the Mille Miglia, and in May, Enzo’s vision became reality. In Italy, France, Switzerland and the United States, Ferrari took four victories in one day. Briggs Cunningham’s win at Suffolk County was Ferrari’s first in America. The fifties made Ferrari. The first year of the decade saw Ferrari beating Alfa Romeo for the first time when Froilan Gonzalez won the British Grand Prix at Silverstone. Ferrari had seen the success that Stirling Moss was having with the four-cylinder ALTA-powered HWMs, and when it was announced that the 1952 World Championship would be run under Formula 2 regulations, priority was given to the development of the Aurelio Lampredi-designed four-cylinder engine. Alberto Ascari took Ferrari’s first World Driver’s Championship, winning six of the eight races driving the Type 500. It was an important year in the Scuderia’s history. Not only did they take their first World Championship, but the year also marked the first collaboration between Ferrari and Pinin Farina. Ascari won the championship again in 1953, and Marzotto, Farina and Ascari won the World Constructors’ Championship for Sports Cars – a feat that they would repeat in 1954 with drivers Farina, Maglioli, Gonzales, Trintignant and Hawthorn, racing 375 MMs and 750 Monzas backed up by the 500 Mondials in the two-liter class. At the same time that the three-liter Monza was being developed, work had begun on the two-liter Type 500 Mondial, named to commemorate Ferrari’s back-to-back championships with Ascari. The 500 Mondial made its race debut in the 12 Hours of Casablanca in 1953, finishing second behind the 4.5-liter 375 MM. The 500 Mondial would go on to take second place and a class win in the 1954 Mille Miglia with Vittorio Marzotto at the wheel. S/N 0452MD With the stunningly aggressive front-end treatment reminiscent of the thunderous 375 Plus, this extremely competitive and lightweight four-cylinder Ferrari racer is downright stunning. Given its period Mille Miglia history, it will be guaranteed a place at the start of the very popular Mille Miglia retrospective as well as all the great historic races and events the world over. Beautifully restored, completely original and Ferrari Classiche -certified with full matching numbers, it is described as having excellent compression and leak-down numbers and drives magnificently. It is finished in the classic if unconventional color combination of French racing blue with a minimalist tan interior, and given its prestigious racing history, it represents excellent value when compared with the vast sums commanded by its 12-cylinder brothers. Owner History S/N 0452MD is the 16th of 22 Series I Mondials built and the second of only two berlinettas built (the other is chassis no. 0422MD). It was completed on July 9th at Pinin Farina and sold new by Enzo Ferrari to the first owner, Francesco Marchesi of Modena, on August 26th, 1954. On that same day, the car was registered on Italian license plates “MO 33732” in Modena. On April 23rd, 1956, 0452MD was sold through Ferrari dealers Mario Camellini in Modena and Gastone Crepaldi in Milan to the second owner Roberto Montali, son of Ulderico Maidati Spontarsi, and re-registered on May 15th, 1956 on Italian license plates “AN 24656” in Ancona. On May 13th, 1958, 0452MD was sold by Montali to third owner Silvio Tuccimei. He re-registered the car on Bologna plates “BO 97994.” Tuccimei didn’t own the car long, selling it in 1959 to another Bologna resident, Ernesto Freddi. Later, on November 24th, 1959, Freddi sold the car to ISCA International Sports Car Associates in Paris, France and Vaduz, Principality of Liechtenstein. ISCA shipped 0452MD on April 27th, 1961 to Detroit, Michigan for its new owner, Charles E. Sherman. In July 1961, he advertised the car for sale in Road & Track magazine, page 95. Shortly after, on July 5th, 1961, he resold the car to Norman Appleman, another Michigan resident, who re-registered the car on Michigan license plates “BE 3047.” Two years later, Appleman decided to sell the Ferrari and advertised it in the April 1963 issue of Road & Track. In May of 1966, Appleman sold the car to Carl Bross of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. In December of 1966, Bross sold the car to Peter Snow Sherman of Silver Spring Mountain, Colorado. In 1968, the car had two owners: first, George Sterner of York, Pennsylvania and, later, John D. Iglehardt. Later that year, 0452MD was temporarily fitted with a Ferrari 500 TR engine, but the original engine #0452MD was retained by Iglehardt. In 1980, the Ferrari was sold by Iglehardt to James P. McAllister’s Grand Prix SSR of East Setauket, New York before passing to Jeff B. Lewis’ Foothill Beverage Co. in Pomona, California on February 28th, 1980. During his ownership, the car was fully restored by Scott Grundfor’s Scott Restorations of Panorama City, California and repainted French racing blue with a tan interior. On December 16th, 1985, Lewis sold the car to Gerry Sutterfield’s GTS Motorcars, Inc. of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. Later that year, Sutterfield sold the Ferrari to Don Marsh’ D & J Automotive Enterprises, Inc. of Dublin, Ohio. On October 21st, 1987, 0452MD was sold by Marsh to Mike Sheehan’s European Auto Sales, Inc. in Costa Mesa, California. Next, on November 18th, 1987, Sheehan sold the car to Takeo Kato of Japan. The car remained in Japan until Michael Sheehan repurchased it on July 5th, 1988, brokering it three days later to Albrecht G. Guggisberg's Oldtimer-Garage Ltd. of Toffen, Switzerland. About a month later, Albrecht resold the car to René Maspoli of Villeneuve, Switzerland. On April 7th, 1990, the Ferrari was shown by Maspoli at the Club Ferrari Suisse Anniversary meeting at Montreux, Switzerland. In May of 2003, 0452MD was sold to the vendor, an Italian gentleman, for whom it formed part of his Ferrari collection, one of the most prominent in the world. Race History 0452MD was entered for its first race at the 4th Annual Tour de France on September 3rd-12th, 1954, driven by Leon Coulibeuf and co-driver Robert Aumaitre, race #235. Unfortunately it was a DNF. 0452MD’s last race during Marchesi’s ownership came February 27th, 1955 when it raced at the Grand Prix of Agadir in Morocco, driven by Clemente Ravetto and also a DNF. 0452MD’s first race in the hands of Montali came on April 28th, 1956, when it was raced at the XXIII Mille Miglia by Roberto Montali, using race #530 and resulting in another DNF. His second race took place May 11th, 1957 at the XXIV Mille Miglia, driven again by Roberto Montali, on race #505, this time placing 59th. 0452MD was driven by Iglehardt at the VSCC of America meeting in Bridgehampton, Long Island on July 11th, 1970 and again at the Lime Rock Park race track in Connecticut. Show History On August 23rd, 1984, 0452MD was shown by Lewis at the International Ferrari Concours d’Elegance at Rancho Cañada Golf Club, in Carmel Valley, California. On August 24th-25th, 1984, the car was again shown by Lewis during the 11th Annual Monterey Historic Automobile Races in Laguna Seca, California. Finally, on August 26th, 1984, it was shown by Lewis at the 34th Annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. On May 15th-18th, 1986, 0452MD was shown by Sutterfield during the 24th Ferrari Club of America Annual Meeting in Palm Beach, Florida, winning Best of Show. On April 22nd, 2005, the car was shown by its current owner at the renowned Villa d’Este Concours in Cernobio, Italy. The last appearance made by 0452MD was during the 60th Ferrari Anniversary Concours at the Ferrari Factory at Pista di Fiorano on June 24th, 2007, where it was shown by the current owner. Summary Long considered one of the prettiest racing cars of the era – perhaps almost defining the term “berlinetta” – the 500 Mondial enjoyed tremendous success as a customer car for Ferrari’s racing department. It was light, quick and very durable, and a wide variety of gentlemen racers of the time managed to notch up victories for themselves and for a rapidly growing Ferrari. Although never built in volume, quite a few were sold. Most survive today, a testimonial to the car’s durability. Not only is this particular example show-quality, it is also one of the few that retains its original engine, gearbox and coachwork. The integrity and originality of the car has also resulted in its achievement of Classiche Certification, the “gold standard” of judgment against which any Ferrari can be measured to determine its authenticity as backed by the Factory. It has also benefited from top flight professional restoration, earning it one of the most coveted awards in Ferrari concours circles – a Best in Show at the Ferrari Club of America National Meet. In combination with Classiche certification, continuous ownership history, and outstanding racing provenance with three years as a Mille Miglia entry, there can be little doubt that 0452MD must certainly be one of the finest remaining examples of the type. Addendum Please note that should the buyer be a resident of the United States an additional duty of 2.5% is payable on the final sale price of the vehicle plus buyers commission. Chassis no. 0452MD

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
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1928 Mercedes-Benz SSK Roadster

Estimate: €1,452,000 - €2,179,000 Estimate: $2,000,000 - $3,000,000 Engine No. 72337 (Original Type SSK) UK Registration No. GC1939 From the Collection of Mr. Bernie Ecclestone Specifications: 250bhp, 7,020cc overhead camshaft six-cylinder engine with alloy block and cast iron cylinder head, Roots type supercharger, four-speed gearbox, semi-elliptical springs and beam axle front suspension, semi-elliptical springs and torque tube live axle rear suspension, four-wheel drum brakes with centre lock Rudge wire wheels. Wheelbase: 116.1in. (2,950mm). The SSK It was the outstanding popularity of hill-climb events in Europe that lead directly to the development of the most legendary pre-war sports racing car built by Mercedes-Benz – the SSK. It began with the chassis of the Type S, and the engine from the new SS, the company’s top of the line chassis, but the wheelbase was reduced to 116.1in. The chassis – already low – was lowered even further by mounting the rear axle above the springs rather than below. New Houdaille shock absorbers were fitted with fins for improved heat dissipation. A racing camshaft with higher lift and longer duration, and a new 10psi ‘elephant’ blower increased engine output – with blower operating – to 225 bhp. Even naturally-aspirated output was impressive, at 170 bhp. Later, increased compression and a higher output 12psi ‘elephant’ blower would raise peak horsepower to more than 300 bhp – a staggering figure at the time, and impressive even today. The first outing for the new car came on 28 July 1928, when this Teutonic apparition thundered up Gabelbach hill, setting a new record time, with a charismatic Rudolf Caracciola at the wheel. More successes followed, and the factory was persuaded to begin production. Within the next year, 31 cars were built (other sources suggest up to 35). Inspection Report Like many surviving Ss, SSs, SSKs, and all SSKLs, the example offered here is composed of a variety of original S Series Mercedes-Benz components. While many are probably original to the car, others are replacements taken from other cars as needed. Chassis. Upon examination and paint removal by RM staff, no numbers were found anywhere on the chassis frame. Unfortunately, for unknown reasons, many original chassis frames left Mercedes-Benz without numbers stamped in them, which makes it difficult to draw any conclusion from the absence of such numbers. In view of the absence of any chassis stamping, and the importance of the car and its potential value, RM elected to commission a closer examination in order to determine whether the chassis is an original SSK, since it is possible to shorten an S or SS chassis to the length of an SSK. The consensus among those familiar with the Types S, SS, and SSK is that, while it is possible to shorten an S or SS chassis to the proper length for an SSK chassis, this must be done in one area, ahead of the rear wheel arch. This is the only portion of the frame that is both straight and parallel. At any other point, the tapering and curving nature of the chassis frame would make shortening extremely difficult, if not impossible. Consequently, the decision was made to remove the paint and conduct acid testing from this area, as well as the adjacent areas extending from the rear wheel kick-up to the point where the frame narrows and arcs upwards to clear the front axle. No evidence of any welding on the chassis rails was found. Perhaps equally important, the original ‘mill finish’ characteristic of the mild steel that was used to stamp original frames is also completely undisturbed. It should also be noted that part of the chassis frame has been boxed and gusseted for additional strength at some point in the past. The nature and quality of the workmanship make it clear that this was not done by the factory, and the most likely conclusion is that it was done in the late pre-war or early post-war period to stiffen the chassis for hill-climbs or racing. All the work is additional to the original chassis frame, which should make it relatively easy to remove. In all other respects including rivets and other aspects of the detailing that can be used to identify an original frame, the chassis frame appears to be of all original construction. Suspension. The front axle is an original piece, and is of the correct S series type, including the associated brakes. It should be noted that it is of the anti-shimmy type, fitted with dampers to prevent high-speed oscillations. The rear axle is also original, and of the correct type. The shock absorbers are the standard Houdaille units used on the S Type chassis, mounted to correct SSK mounting points on the frame. Since most suspension and chassis components carry no specific markings, it is not possible to determine whether they are original to any given chassis. Engine and Drivetrain. Close examination of the engine, its castings, and RB numbers (Mercedes-Benz’s internal build or assembly numbers) confirms that it is indeed an original SSK unit, and, in fact, it is the Nash SSK engine, number 72337. It is interesting to note that the engine carries a number of magnesium components, including the carburettor tops. These were customarily fitted to racing chassis because of their lightness, but they were also available for purchase from Mercedes-Benz for installation on any chassis. The 15 fin supercharger, the oil sump pan, intake manifold, cylinder head and cover are correct parts, identical to what would have been fitted originally to an SSK. The balance of the major engine components appear to be correct SSK components, and are probably original to the Nash SSK, including the twin carburettors and original Bosch ZR6 Magnetos. The radiator has a new core but is a correct SSK style radiator. The transmission is a correct SSK or SS transmission, however the torque tube has been shortened to fit the shorter SSK wheelbase. Bodywork. On close examination, the body appears to be the ‘twin cowl’ classic English-style roadster body mounted on the Nash SSK (see section to follow). Today, the twin ‘cowls’ or instrument binnacles, have disappeared, perhaps in an effort to make the body more closely resemble the factory style SSK coachwork. Nevertheless, the original English windscreen is still fitted. Examination of the coachwork under the top of the cowl shows evidence of these modifications, and it has been suggested that the work was done by the firm of Koeng, Basel in the 1970s. Except for the results of these modifications the body appears to retain its original wood, panels, and castings. There is evidence that it has been restored at least once. Paint quality is quite serviceable, though it is an older restoration and shows signs of age. The steering wheel and dash are correct; all the gauges – which are mainly Jaeger – are incorrect British units (probably dating from the installation of the English-style coachwork) with the exception of the correct ignition switch, the magneto switch, and the Ky-gas unit. In addition, the clock is of the correct type although the face is incorrect. The headlights on the car are Bosch units of slightly later manufacture, although very close to correct in appearance. After reviewing the information it reveals, the inspection report can be summarized as follows: 1) Despite extensive investigations, RM has been unable to find any evidence that the chassis is not an original one. 2) The engine is an original SSK unit, number 72337. 3) Even though the chassis appears to be an original one, it remains un-numbered, and therefore it could be any one of many unaccounted-for SSKs. Bidders are advised to rely upon their own inspection and evaluation of this, or any other auction lot. RM Auctions Limited is not an expert in the construction of Mercedes-Benz automobiles, and any inspections commissioned or carried out by RM Auctions are provided solely as additional information, and should not be relied upon to determine the authenticity or originality of the lot. Operational Condition The vendor advises that a variety of maintenance has been undertaken since the car arrived in the Ecclestone Collection. The fuel system has been recently rebuilt, the radiator replaced, the brakes have been checked, and correct type Bosch friction dampers were made for the rear of the car. At the same time, the oil sump was removed, the bearings checked, and the oil passages cleaned. During a recent road examination, steam was found to be present in the exhaust, which may indicate a crack in the cylinder head or a gasket problem. Provenance The example offered here consists of two major components: 1) The engine (No. 72337) from the Nash SSK, with ownership paperwork and other documentation that is in agreement with this engine number. The Nash SSK. The original SSK with engine number 72337 and chassis number 36244 was ordered by British Mercedes Ltd of London under commission number 42709 as a chassis-only delivery. It was delivered to London on 6 April 1929, and then to the Mercedes-Benz dealership at Park Lane. Shortly afterwards, this new SSK chassis was sold to a Mr Nash, who commissioned Vanden Plas coachbuilders of Kingsbury, London, to design a most remarkable roadster in the very fashionable ‘windblown’ style. The result was unmistakable, easily one of the most distinctive of all the SSKs. Although it is believed that Nash retained the SSK for a number of years, no record exists of the date when he sold the car. It may have been shortly after the war, during the rise in popularity of various forms of racing utilizing the best surviving pre-war chassis. It was at this time that new coachwork was installed in a very classic English twin-cowled roadster style. The car remained in the UK until the early 1960s when it was shipped to New York City for Charley Stitch, a private New York dealer, via Dr Sam Scher. Stitch sold his SSK to noted restorer and collector Tom Lester, who passed the car on to Earl Finnebecker of Latham, New York, in 1962, at which point it still carried the British roadster coachwork finished in classic white paint and fitted to the original Type SSK chassis. In 1967, Finnebecker sold the SSK to Raymond Jones of Birmingham, Michigan, for $6,000. In a recent conversation with Mr Jones, he confirmed that he owned the car only briefly, and did not modify the car in any manner. Jones sold the car within a month or two of buying it to Robert Morgan of East Orange, New Jersey, for $7,500. The following year, Morgan sold the SSK to noted collector Richard Payne of Seal Cove, Maine, who kept the car for many years. Clearly, at some point, the engine was removed from the chassis, as it is now installed in the SSK offered here. Historians have suggested that this may have been done either by Robert Morgan, or by Raymond Jones (who denies having done so). The Julio Berndt SSK. The chassis of the SSK offered here is not numbered. Many other S series cars also had un-numbered chassis, so it seems that relatively little importance can be attached to this fact, apart from the difficulties it poses in identifying the chassis. Consequently, the only clue to its identity is the paperwork that accompanies the car, most of it dating from the mid-1990s, when the car was imported to the UK after its acquisition by the Ecclestone Collection. Included are the importation papers, as well as the UK registration documents, and a letter from Vernon R. Cox, archivist for the Mercedes-Benz club at the time. Examination of the known history of the Berndt car (No. 36246) indicates that it was delivered to Julio Berndt of Buenos Aires, Argentina, in October 1928. Configured and sold as a Rennenwagen (one of a very few SSKs designated as racing cars by the factory), wearing factory coachwork, the car became one of the most successful racing SSKs. The car was subsequently raced or owned by Carlos Zatuszec, followed by Olivari and then Brosutti in Argentina before being purchased and exported to America by the Edgar Allan Jurist, owner of the well known “Vintage Car Store”.Today, a car with chassis No. 36246 exists, and belongs to a German collector. Given the ease and frequency with which parts have been exchanged among various S series Mercedes-Benz cars, it is very difficult today to trace the ownership history of chassis and engines, as well as complete cars. Summary Tracing the history of an SSK can be difficult, and experts often disagree. In the case of the example offered here, there now seems little doubt that the car includes both an original engine and chassis. With only a little over 30 examples made, that in itself makes this an exceptionally important car. During the SSK’s tenure at the Ecclestone collection, extensive research has resolved many questions, but the mystery of the origin of the chassis remains. As historians continue to work on researching each individual chassis, the day may well come when the original identity of this SSK is revealed. Once the provenance of the car is clarified, it will be possible for it to take its rightful place among the surviving examples of the world’s most desirable pre-war Mercedes-Benz sports cars. Chassis no. 72337

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2007-10-31
Hammer price
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1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet A by Factory Sindelfingen

115/180 bhp, 5,401 cc OHV supercharged inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual gearbox, coil spring double-wishbone independent front suspension, swing axle rear suspension with coil springs, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,980 mm (117.3") - Built for 14th Maharajah of Indore - 540K – the ultimate specification in desirable Cabriolet A form - Concours-quality restoration by RM Auto Restoration - Very original, complete car before restoration - Multiple concours awards including Pebble Beach The rulers of India’s Princely States were legendary for their love of fine motor cars. Typically possessed of great wealth, they bought lavishly, Rolls-Royce being a favourite marque, but their tastes were also wide-ranging and embraced such European cars as Mercedes and extended also to the American Duesenberg. Pre-eminent among these collectors of fine cars was the Maharajah of Indore. Maharajah of Indore Prior to the 1947 independence, the British Indian Empire comprised some 570 states, each ruled by a family dynasty. Indore, presently a city of about 1.5 million in the state of Madhya Pradesh in West Central India, was ruled during the Empire period by the Maratha Maharajas of the Holkar dynasty. His Highness Yeshwant Rao Holkar II ascended to the raj in 1926, becoming the 14th Maharajah upon the abdication of his father, H.H. Tukojirao Holkar. With great riches from the fertile lands and industrial strength of his princely state, the new Maharajah indulged his cravings for jewels and automobiles. The latter became regarded as the most spectacular collection in India, comprising numerous cars, all ordered to his special tastes. In 1936 alone, he purchased three superb cars, a 4.5-litre Lagonda, a Bentley coupé and a supercharged Duesenberg, all painted in the Holkar colours of sunglow saffron and black. The Duesenberg, bearing the highest recorded Model J chassis number, was a long-wheelbase chassis bodied by J. Gurney Nutting as a streamlined art deco right-hand drive roadster. It is the most renowned of his cars but does not completely overshadow the remainder of the collection, which comprised such vehicles as a Hispano-Suiza J12, Bugatti, Delahaye, Pierce-Arrow and three Alfa Romeos. Most were painted in the dynasty colours and were equipped with red and blue running lights to indicate who was driving: red for the Maharajah, blue for his wife, the Maharani. Chassis no. 154081 In 1937, H.H. Yeshwant Rao Holkar II ordered a Mercedes-Benz 540K from the factory in Untertürkheim, Germany. The 500K and 540K were a development of the Typ 380, which was the work of engineer Hans Nibel, who had developed a straight-eight of pushrod OHV design with 3,823 cc displacement. The new Typ 380 had all-independent suspension; a double-wishbone design with coil springs was used in front, with coil-sprung swing axles at the rear. The 380, however, proved to be somewhat underpowered, making 90 bhp when normally aspirated and 140 with the double-vane Roots-type supercharger – a bit underwhelming for a two-ton car. Nibel then came up with a larger 5-litre engine giving 100/160 bhp, introduced in 1934 as the Typ 500K, with “K” in this case meaning kompressor or supercharger. The wheelbase was extended to 3,290 mm (129.5 inches), and a range of cabriolets, roadsters and sedans was offered. Production of 500Ks totalled 354 over three years, followed by a further 419 540Ks with a larger, 5,401-cc engine. Nibel’s magic with the engine brought results. The Autocar tested a 500K and clocked a 0-60 time of 16.5 seconds (remarkable for the mid-1930s) and a top speed of 100 mph, the blower letting out “its almost demoniacal howl” when it was engaged. Motor enthused, “here is a massive ‘unbreakable’ car capable of travelling indefinitely at high speed.” Another reporter cited the “sheer insolence of its power.” For his Mercedes, His Highness specified factory Cabriolet A coachwork from the Daimler-Benz works at Sindelfingen. Styled and engineered by Hermann Ahrens, these svelte creatures display an unusual degree of élan for manufacturer-produced coachwork. Built on the short, 2,980 mm (117.3 inch) wheelbase, the Cabriolet A was a two-passenger drophead coupé, of which 83 were built. The 500K’s engine was enlarged to 5,401 cc and fitted with the same type Roots supercharger. This engaged at full throttle, raising horsepower from 115 to 180, or could be manually applied at part throttle if desired. The Maharajah drove spiritedly, so the 540K’s supercharger was just what he needed. H.H. Yeshwant Rao Holkar II died in 1961. His daughter, Usha Devi, Maharaj Sahiba Holkar XV, currently holds the title as the 15th Maharani of Indore. Her father apparently gifted this Mercedes-Benz to someone during his lifetime. In the late 1970s, Christopher Renwick found it in a Mumbai motor agent’s shop. It had been left there years earlier by its then-owner and had not run in some time, but it gave the appearance of being a low-mileage car that had seen little use. Renwick recalls that, once recommissioned for the road, it drove very well. He was able to buy it, exported it to Britain and subsequently sold it to a German collector. Some years later, it became available once more and was eventually exported to the United States, acquired by a prominent collector. The new owner immediately commissioned RM Auto Restoration to perform a nut-and-bolt rebuild, which was completed in July 2002. As acquired it had been once restored, painted a light shade of metallic blue, and was nearly complete. Even the vast majority of wood was intact and original. The only significant missing component was the spare tyre cover, which was constructed anew. In the comprehensive restoration the car was finished in a deep, deep midnight blue, with harmonising rich blue canvas hood. The odometer, which read 17,000 at the time, was reset to zero. In its maiden outing, it garnered a quick third place in the 1925-39 Mercedes class at the 2002 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. The following year it snared a triple crown at Meadow Brook Hall: the David Holls Memorial Designers Choice Award, the Most Significant Mercedes-Benz and the Founders Trophy for Best of Show. As presented it has near-flawless brightwork, tan leather interior with blue carpet and a highly-varnished burl walnut dashboard with mother of pearl inlay. The VDO instruments are black-on-beige, illuminated in a light orange glow at night. Rear wheel spats and understated blackwall tyres complete the car’s elegant appearance, allowing the eye to focus on the car itself and not its rolling rubber. In the world of collector cars, one seldom finds the opportunity to acquire an automobile as important as a pre-war supercharged Mercedes-Benz. Add to that a superb, award-winning restoration with royal provenance, and the astute collector is presented with a very rare opportunity indeed. ITALIANTEXT 115/180 cv, motore otto cilindri in linea di 5.401 cc con valvole in testa e compressore, cambio manuale a quattro marce, sospensione anteriore a ruote indipendenti con due trapezi e ammortizzatori a molla, sospensione posteriore con assale indipendente e ammortizzatori a molla, freni a tamburo sulle quattro ruote con servofreno a depressione. Passo: 2.980 mm (117.3") - Costruita per il 14° Maragià di Indore - La massima evoluzione della 540K, con la desiderabile carrozzeria Cabriolet tipo A - Restaurata in condizioni da concorso dalla RM Auto Restoration - Restauro totale di una vettura assolutamente originale e completa - Vincitrice di molti premi ai concorsi, incluso quello di Pebble Beach I Signori dei Principati Indiani diventarono leggendari per il loro amore per le belle automobili. Notoriamente in possesso di grandi ricchezze, spendevano senza limiti: la Rolls-Royce era una delle marche preferite, ma i loro gusti erano variegati e spaziavano dalle vetture europee come le Mercedes, a quelle americane come le Duesenberg. Uno dei maggiori collezionisti fu il Maragià di Indore. Il Maragià di Indore Prima dell'indipendenza proclamata nel 1947, l'Impero Britannico delle Indie comprendeva circa 570 stati, ognuno governato da una dinastia di famiglia. Indore, attualmente una città di circa 1,5 milioni di abitanti nello stato di Madhya Pradesh nell'India centro-occidentale, era governata durante il periodo dell'Impero dal Maragià di Maratha della dinastia Holkar. Sua Altezza Yeshwant Rao Holkar II ascese al trono nel 1926, diventando il 14° Maragià dopo l'abdicazione di suo padre, Sua Altezza Tukojirao Holkar. Dotato di grandi ricchezze grazie alle sue fertili terre e alla forza industriale del suo Principato, il nuovo Maragià assecondò la sua passione per i gioielli e le automobili. La sua divenne la più spettacolare collezione di automobili dell'India, composta da numerose vetture, tutte costruite secondo i suoi gusti particolari. Solo nel 1936 acquistò 3 superbe vetture, una Lagonda 4,5 litri, una Bentley coupé e una Duesenberg con compressore, tutte verniciate nei colori del casato Holkar, zafferano brillante e nero. La Duesenberg, l'ultimo numero di telaio del Modello J, era una versione a passo lungo, con guida a destra, carrozzata da J. Gurney Nutting con una carrozzeria roadster aerodinamica in stile art deco. E' la sua vettura più famosa anche se non oscurò completamente le altre automobili della collezione, che comprendeva una Hispano-Suiza J12, una Bugatti, una Delahaye, una Pierce-Arrow e tre Alfa Romeo. La maggior parte erano verniciate nei colori del casato ed erano equipaggiate con luci intermittenti rosse e blu che specificavano chi stesse guidando: rosse per il Maragià, blu per la sua consorte. Il telaio n. 154081 Nel 1937, Sua Altezza Yeshwant Rao Holkar II ordinò una Mercedes-Benz 540K direttamente presso la fabbrica di Untertürkheim, in Germania. La 500K e la 540K erano l'evoluzione della Tipo 380, progettata dall'ingegnere Hans Nibel, che aveva sviluppato un motore di 3.823 cc 8 cilindri in linea con valvole in testa comandate da bilancieri. La nuova Tipo 380 aveva le sospensioni a ruote indipendenti, con due trapezi con ammortizzatori a molla all'anteriore e assale indipendente con ammortizzatori a molla al posteriore. La 380 si dimostrò sotto-motorizzata con 90 cv con l'alimentazione normale aspirata e 140 cv con il compressore a due lobi tipo Roots, sicuramente poco per una vettura di due tonnellate. Nibel passò quindi ad un più grosso motore di 5 litri, che forniva da 100 a 160cv, che fu presentato nel 1934 sulla 500K, dove “K” stava per kompressor, ovvero compressore. Il passo fu allungato a 3.290 mm e fu offerta una gamma completa di carrozzerie cabriolet, roadster e berline. La produzione totale in tre anni di 500K fu di 354 unità, quella della 540K, con il motore portato a 5.401 cc, fu di 419 esemplari. La magia di Nibel con il motore produsse i suoi frutti. La rivista The Autocar provò una 500K accelerando da 0 a 100 km/h in 16,5 secondi (un notevole risultato a metà degli anni Trenta) e raggiungendo una velocità massima di oltre 160 km/h, con il compressore che emetteva un urlo demoniaco quando entrava in funzione. La rivista Motor era entusiasta: “è una vettura indistruttibile, capace di viaggiare ad alta velocità per un tempo indefinito.” Un altro giornalista scrisse di “pura arroganza della sua potenza.” Sua Altezza richiese una carrozzeria Cabriolet Tipo A, costruita dalla fabbrica Daimler-Benz di Sindelfingen. Disegnate e progettate da Hermann Ahrens, queste creazioni mostrano uno slancio inusuale per una carrozzeria costruita in serie. Costruita sul telaio a passo corto di 2.980 mm, la Cabriolet A aveva due posti e fu costruita in 83 esemplari. Il motore 500K fu portato a 5.401 cc e dotato dello stesso compressore tipo Roots. A piena apertura dava da 115 a 180 cv, ma, volendo, poteva essere regolato manualmente con apertura parziale. Il Maragià guidava in modo focoso e la 540K era proprio quello di cui aveva bisogno. Sua Altezza Yeshwant Rao Holkar II morì nel 1961. Sua figlia Usha Devi, Maharaj Sahiba Holkar XV, assunse il titolo di 15° Maragià di Indore. Sembra che suo padre, quando era ancora in vita, avesse regalato a qualcuno questa Mercedes-Benz, che alla fine degli anni Settanta fu ritrovata da Christopher Renwick in un salone di vendita a Mumbai. Era stata lasciata lì anni prima dal suo proprietario e non era utilizzata da tempo, ma dava l'impressione di essere una vettura poco usata e con pochi chilometri. Renwick ricorda che, appena rimessa su strada, funzionò molto bene. Egli la acquistò, la esportò in Gran Bretagna e la rivendette ad un collezionista tedesco. Alcuni anni dopo, la vettura tornò sul mercato e fu quindi esportata negli USA, acquistata da un noto collezionista. Questi commissionò immediatamente alla RM Auto Restoration un restauro integrale, che fu completato nel luglio 2002. Quando era stata acquistata, la vettura aveva già ricevuto un precedente restauro, era stata riverniciata in blu chiaro metallizzato ed era praticamente completa. Anche la quasi totalità dei legni era intatta e originale. L'unico significativo particolare andato perduto era la copertura della ruota di scorta, che fu costruita nuova. Durante il completo restauro, la carrozzeria fu riverniciata in blu molto scuro, in armonia con una capote blu. Il contachilometri, sul quale si leggeva la cifra 17.000, fu portato a zero. All'esordio in un concorso, quello di Pebble Beach del 2002, conquistò facilmente il terzo posto nella classe Mercedes 1925-1939. L'anno seguente, ottenne tre premi alla Meadow Brook Hall: il premio David Holls Memorial Designers Choice, quello per la Most Significant Mercedes-Benz e il Founders Trophy per la Best of Show. Attualmente si presenta con cromature praticamente prive di difetti, interni in pelle marrone chiaro con tappetini blu e un cruscotto in radica di noce ben verniciata con intarsio in madreperla. Gli strumenti VDO, neri su fondo beige, sono illuminati di sera da una tenue luce arancione. I copriruota posteriori e i poco appariscenti pneumatici neri ben si adattano all'eleganza della vettura, permettendo di focalizzare l'attenzione sulle sue linee e non sulle gomme. Nel mondo delle automobili da collezione, raramente si ha l'occasione di acquistare una vettura importante come una Mercedes-Benz ante-guerra con compressore; se a ciò si aggiunge il superbo restauro, in grado di vincere premi ai concorsi, e la regale provenienza, al collezionista più attento si presenta davvero una rarissima opportunità. Addendum Contrary to what is stated in the catalog, this lot is not subject to VAT on the full purchase price. It is eligible for import into the UK at 5% VAT. Please note that this car is also eligible for import into the UK at 5% VAT. Chassis no. 154081

  • CANCanada
  • 2011-05-21
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1929 Duesenberg Model J 'Disappearing Top' Convertible Coupe by Murphy

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed Warner Hi-Flex manual transmission, beam-type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5 in. Offered to benefit the programs of Hillsdale College One of the most iconic Duesenberg body designs Formerly of the Melvin Clemans and Gifford Oborne Collections One of 25 original ?disappearing top? Murphy Convertible Coupes built Driven round-trip from Florida to Auburn, Indiana, in 2010 Recent mechanical service and freshening by Classic & Exotic Service The Walter M. Murphy Company of Pasadena, California, produced about 60 Convertible Coupe bodies for the Model J Duesenberg chassis. Early versions of this design had a top that folded down into a low pile that was exposed behind the driver?s seat in the fashion of most convertibles of the time. Roughly 25 of these were produced, followed by a handful of cars, mostly one-off designs, in which the top folded down into a well behind the seat and was covered by a low leather tonneau secured by button snaps. This eventually evolved into a true ?disappearing top? model, in which a flush-fitting metal lid replaced the tonneau, creating a smooth, flat line that ran from the edges of the hood to the doors and down over the rear deck. This top, coupled with Murphy?s signature thin ?Clear-Vision? window pillars and disappearing side windows, gave the convertible coupe the sporting appearance of a genuine roadster. Unlike the earlier standard convertible coupes, which were often produced for Duesenberg factory stock, the disappearing top models were all fully custom, as recognized by their 900-series body numbers, and they were individually built for their original owners. This special status, along with their spectacular lines, has made the Murphy ?Disappearing Top? Convertible Coupe arguably the most iconic body on the Model J chassis. A DRIVER?S DUESENBERG The story of this particular Convertible Coupe is one of enthusiasts and drivers, a story that begins in Chicago in 1934 with one of the earliest Model Js built, engine number J-119 and chassis number 2144. The car had been sent back to the Duesenberg Factory Branch in that city by its original owner, O.W. Hunke, to have its Derham Sedan body dressed up with updated styling and mounted on a new supercharged chassis. This left Duesenberg with a gently used chassis and engine needing new coachwork. To make the car sell more quickly, the Los Angeles Factory Branch was called upon to supply a Murphy ?Disappearing Top? Convertible Coupe body, number 922. This body, in stock at the time, had several unusual specially ordered features, most prominently a full trunk rather than a rumble seat, with the interior of the luggage compartment finished in polished woodwork! While the car has since been reconfigured with a rumble seat, this unusual original specification provides an interesting possibility for a new owner. With its sporty Murphy body installed, the car was sold to P.P. Willis, the Chicago advertising man whose firm held the contract for Auburn Automobile Company and its marques, Duesenberg included. The Willis Family, a large Chicago clan, was prominent in several other industries as well, and its members were known for acquiring fine automobiles in the Classic Era. The Model J was right at home. The car enjoyed several other Chicago-area owners, including being dealt by the well-known used Duesenberg dealer John Troka. In the late 1940s, it was purchased from James E. Hanger III of Leonardtown, Maryland, by the well-known West Virginia Duesenberg enthusiast Melvin Clemans. Mr. Clemans owned multiple Model Js over the years, which he drove for decades, believing that their engineering had been unequaled since. In need of restoration by the time of Mr. Clemans? acquisition, the Murphy Convertible Coupe was rebuilt with frame number 2551 and firewall number 2577. In 1963, the Duesenberg passed into the ownership of Elmer DiPiero of Ohio, then through the hands of Allen Bittner and Dr. Patrick J. Frank in Pennsylvania. It then spent several years in New Jersey, including time in the renowned collection of Gifford Oborne, known for his ownership and preservation of some of the finest American Classics. Even today, Mr. Oborne?s name is a byword for excellent, quality automobiles, with cars from his collection now treasured by some of the United States? foremost connoisseurs. The Model J was eventually purchased from Mr. Oborne by Eric Bardeen of Deland, Florida, perhaps the most significant caretaker in its long history. Mr. Bardeen had owned Duesenbergs since the early 1950s and had been a member of the Auburn Cord Duesenberg (ACD) Club since its earliest days. He drove his first Model J, a Judkins-bodied Coupe, over 20,000 miles, and while he sold that car later in the 1950s, he never lost his passion for the marque. Eventually he purchased this Convertible Coupe and enjoyed being behind its wheel for a quarter of a century. In Mr. Bardeen?s ownership, in fact, this Model J became one of the most-driven Duesenbergs of modern times. He used it regularly during the car show season in Florida, frequently participating in the ACD Club?s annual Citrus Meet, where he was known for offering other enthusiasts the opportunity to ?test drive? his beloved Model J at the speeds for which it had been intended. In 2010, with the Club celebrating the Year of the Duesenberg at its Annual Reunion in Auburn, Indiana, Mr. Bardeen was invited to bring his car back to its home state. He did so in the only way he knew how, driving it from his home in the Sunshine State to Auburn, running the Duesenberg on modern highways over a period of several days with a young navigator at his side. His achievement was recognized with the Mayor?s Trophy at the Reunion?s award ceremony and was memorably described in the ACD Club Newsletter. After the return trip to Florida, the Duesenberg was submitted for a well-deserved restoration effort, which included beautiful new maroon paintwork and a fresh leather interior. Nonetheless, even after its restoration, the car was no ?trailer queen,? and Mr. Bardeen kept on driving and enjoying it as he always had, until very recently. The car recently underwent comprehensive servicing at Duesenberg expert Brian Joseph?s highly regarded Classic & Exotic Service of Troy, Michigan. In examining the car, it was confirmed that all of its components are original and authentic Duesenberg pieces, and that the body even retains the majority of its original wood, stamped ?922? on the floorboards. A test proved compression to be good in all cylinders, between 100 and 110, and the engine is fitted with newer steel Carillo rods, an improvement to the original aluminum units that are prone to failure. A WORTHY CAR FOR A WORTHY CAUSE The Duesenberg is offered today to benefit the operations of Hillsdale College, an independent, classical liberal arts college to which Mr. Bardeen is a generous donor and longtime supporter. The offering of the ?Hillsdale Duesenberg? at auction makes available an excellent example to benefit an extraordinarily worthy cause that is local to this auction and undoubtedly important to the hearts of its attendees. It is a car to be enjoyed with the knowledge that its acquisition will benefit not only the owner, in the joy of driving a Duesenberg, but also in supporting the independence of one of Michigan?s finest institutions of higher education. Chassis no. 2551 Engine no. J-119

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-07-30
Hammer price
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1962 Maserati 5000 GT Coupe by Allemano

340 bhp, 4,941 cc DOHC 90-degree V-8 engine with Lucas mechanical fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs and tubular shock absorbers, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers, and four-wheel Girling disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in. One of twenty Allemano-bodied 5000 GTs produced Perhaps the most significant and glamorous road-going Maserati Best in Class at the 1997 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Thanks to the commercial success of the 3500 GT, Maserati had been pulled away from death’s doorstep and was beginning to get back on its feet. The 3500 GT challenged Ferrari’s legendary 250 GT models and quickly became highly desirable automobiles to own, drive, and enjoy. It quickly proved to be one of the marque’s most successful models. Of course, it was only natural that a 3500 GT would attract the attention of one of the world’s most prolific and well-heeled car enthusiasts, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the Shah of Iran. With a garage filled with the finest automobiles money could buy, there’s no doubt that the Shah wanted a 3500 GT for himself, but he believed himself to be above the “standard” model and deserving of something more special. Looking for a bespoke automobile to call his own, the Shah inquired if Maserati might create for him such a car, but one that was also equipped with the powerful five-liter V-8 that was developed for the mighty 450S sports racing car. Eager to please, Maserati began designing such a car and tasked engineer Giulio Alfieri to reinforce a 3500 GT chassis and fit it with an unused 450S motor. The chassis was then fitted with disc brakes, and Carrozzeria Touring was selected by the Shah to clothe the Maserati in rakish coachwork that hinted at the car’s combination of performance and unmatched elegance. Maserati unveiled their newest creation at the Turn Motor Show in November of 1959. Following the Shah’s own car, two more cars were built to identical mechanical configuration. After these first three cars, Alfieri modified the design to make the 5000 GT more agreeable in everyday road-going conditions, as the 450S engine was famously unruly. To make the powerplant more compliant, the bore and stroke were brought to a slightly larger displacement, while the Weber carburetors were replaced with a Lucas fuel-injection system, and the noisy gear-driven camshafts were replaced with a triple-strand cam-chain. All said, this was a more refined, responsive, and sophisticated powerplant befitting of such an automobile. As such, the roster of individuals who purchased a 5000 GT new was quite extraordinary and included Giovanni Agnelli, the Aga Khan, and Briggs Cunningham, in addition to the Shah. Of course, all this extravagance came at a price—nearly twice that of the 3500 GT. The 5000 GT was bodied by eight different coachbuilders; with just 34 examples produced, this was an automobile with few peers and perhaps best directly compared with Ferrari’s incredible Superamerica models. Completed by the factory on April 15, 1962, chassis number AM103 040 was originally finished in Blue Sera with a Red leather interior and delivered new to Switzerland through the Swiss Maserati Importer Martinelli & Sonvico of Chiasso. It was subsequently purchased new by Dr. Adriano Gorni, a lawyer also based in Chiasso. It remained with him until 1966 and, at that time, was sold to an unknown owner and exported from Switzerland. By the 1970s, the car had been imported to the United States via another Swiss Maserati dealer, Garage Ruf-Oftringen. In 1978, it was noted as being in the ownership of Benjamin Bauer of Houston, Texas. Chassis AM103 040 then passed into the ownership of Norbert Reuter of Switzerland, who commissioned Richard Gorman of Vantage Motorworks to refurbish the paint and upholstery and rebuild the motor. In 1997, the car was displayed by Mr. Reuter at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, appearing in the Custom Coachwork – Postwar class, in which it handily won. Following Reuter’s ownership, the car was sold to another collector in the United States and has remained there ever since. With only 34 examples produced over the course of the car’s production run, the 5000 GT is one of the most compelling cars ever produced by Maserati. Perhaps the most illustrious automobile to wear the trident, it was an automobile reserved for the most select individuals for whom only the best would do. Today, AM103 040 is said to present very nicely, and its restoration has held up well over the years. Due to its significance, rarity, and overall importance to the marque, it will certainly attract both attention and admiration wherever it goes. Chassis no. AM103 040 Engine no. 103 040

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
Hammer price
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1936 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Special Cabriolet by Sindelfingen

115/180 bhp, 5,401 cc overhead-valve inline eight-cylinder engine with accelerator-actuated Roots supercharger, twin-updraft pressurized carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent wishbone and coil-spring front suspension, independent swing-arm rear suspension with trailing arms, double coil springs, and lever-action shocks, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 128 in. A fully unique commission from Sindelfingen Styling cues inspired by the Autobahnkurier Built for American aristocrat William A.M. Burden Jr. Six enthusiast owners from new Well known, respected, and one of a kind The Burden family made its original fortune in horseshoes, reportedly shoeing the entire Union Army during the Civil War. For obvious reasons, the bottom eventually fell out of the horseshoe business, but William A.M. Burden Sr. and his brother, James, both preserved the family’s good standing by marrying Vanderbilts. William’s nuptials were to Florence Adele Twombly, who had inherited not only Vanderbilt wealth from her mother but also a railroad fortune from her father and who was raised at the legendary Florham, a New Jersey estate so vast that it eventually became a college campus. The funds that the Burdens curated would be preserved and maintained by their son, W.A.M. Jr., also known as “Bill,” who established one of the first “family offices” in Manhattan, to manage his family’s wealth through investments and careful accounting. When not overseeing the family finances, Bill Burden was active in Republican politics, serving as the United States Ambassador to Belgium from 1959 to 1961. He was a New York society stalwart who could count on a table at La Caravelle and whose well-honed taste was reflected both in his presidency of the Museum of Modern Art and in his personal automobiles. Over the years, the Burden carriage house was home to an ever-changing range of the finest cars that money could buy. Bespoke commissions from all the great coachbuilders flowed through the family office for Bill Burden’s approval: pencil drawings of suggestions from Waterhouse, blueprints from Brewster for the latest Rolls-Royce, and original designs by Gordon Buehrig to tempt the prospective Duesenberg owner. Burden did, indeed, buy a Duesenberg, as well as a Hispano-Suiza J12 and a fully one-off, black-on-black Speedster that had been dreamed up with Harry Miller and combined front-wheel-drive and a Miller-built V-16. In 1936, planning on travels in Europe, Burden went to Mercedes-Benz for a 540 K, and as with his other cars, standard bodywork for the car was simply out of the question. Reportedly, his request was for a design influenced by the factory’s great racing cars of the era. By the time it evolved into metal, Sindelfingen’s commission, number 219611, had become the Special Cabriolet shown here. After being delivered to Paris in August 1936, the Burden 540 K in its final form bore little resemblance to the contemporary W125. Instead, the influence of the car’s owner and the Miller-Burden Speedster is apparent in the separate fenders, its lack of running boards, and the monochromatic black-on-black color scheme, as well as the blackwall tires and very little exposed bright metal trim. French design influences also crept in, with a wonderfully sloped and flared grille, which channels period Delahayes, and curvaceous fender lines drawn to a teardrop taper, which were nearly identical to those found on the famed Autobahnkurier Coupes. Even the usual 540 K hood louvers took on a gentle roundness. The car borrowed the idea of a spare inset and flush with the rear deck from the 540 K Special Roadster, keeping the wheel out of sight except from a direct rear view. Yet, with plans for “grand touring” in Bill Burden’s mind, provisions were made to mount a second wheel on top of the first, as is shown in some period photographs of the car. Burden’s European touring in the car was cut short by the advent of World War II, and when he returned to the United States, his 540 K came with him. Later in the 1940s, the car was sold to its second owner, of Queens, New York, in whose ownership it was a daily driver until his passing two decades later. In 1963, a young stylist in General Motors’ Oldsmobile design studio, Herbert Roy Jaffe, was introduced to the second owner’s widow by his friend Herb Lozier, author of the Mercedes-Benz tome The Car of Kings. Soon after, Mr. Jaffe was able to acquire the supercharged Mercedes, much to his thrill. Years later, while being interviewed for Car Collector magazine, he recalled that the car as-purchased was complete, aside from a missing front spotlight and the two shock absorbers, one of which was gone and the other broken. He was able to authenticate its history with both Mr. Burden and Mercedes-Benz, and he spent some 20 years preparing for restoration, eventually finding a pair of the rare shock absorbers one day while browsing Hemmings Motor News. After some three decades, Mr. Jaffe commissioned the unique 540 K’s return to original condition at the hands of LaVine Restorations, of Nappanee, Indiana. Using copies of original factory photographs, the car was returned to very much its original appearance and condition; only the colors of the interior upholstery and top fabric and the finish of the wheels were changed. Work was completed in 1993, and the car went on to be shown at numerous events, with award-winning results, before Mr. Jaffe finally sold it in 2003, after 40 years of loving stewardship. After time spent in the care of respected collector John Groendyke and another enthusiast in the American West, it was acquired by its present owner, the sixth since new. As one of the most well-known, unique 540 Ks, the Burden-Jaffe Special Cabriolet has been widely featured over the years in numerous publications, including in Michael Frostick’s The Mighty Mercedes and in both volumes of Jan Melin’s Supercharged Mercedes-Benz 8: The Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s. It was the subject of a feature article in the December 1995 issue of Car Collector, which was written by Dennis Adler, who went on to picture the 540 K in his book, Speed & Luxury: The Great Cars. This spectacular Mercedes-Benz, being offered today to its seventh caretaker, is one of few truly unique 540 Ks, as it was custom-tailored to the whims of an American aristocrat by the legendary craftsmen of the Werk Sindelfingen. Chassis no. 130913 Engine no. 130913 Body no. 200338

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1955 Ferrari 750 Monza Scaglietti Spyder

Chassis no. 0502 is a superlative, well-known example. Originally driven by Ernie McAfee, it was a successful competitor on the West Coast, winning 8 straight races consecutively. With a known history from new and recent Ferrari Certification received in 2005, 0502 remains one of the best examples of its kind. Specifications: 260bhp, 2999.62 cc inline four cylinder engine with two twin choke Weber 58 DCOA/3 carburetors, five speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with A-arms, coil springs and Houdaille lever hydraulic dampers, de Dion solid rear axle with transverse leaf springs, four wheel hydraulic drum brakes with cooling fins. Wheelbase: 2250mm. The essence of Ferrari has always been motor racing. Indeed, for the first two decades of its existence, the production and sale of road cars was an evil necessary to finance the racing effort. In 1952, Aurelio Lampredi was emerging as the dominant voice of the design staff and under his direction Scuderia Ferrari embarked upon an ambitious direction for the sports racing program. They developed two types of cars to compete at different types of race courses; powerful 12 cylinder cars for the very fast tracks, and high torque 4 cylinder cars for tight or mountainous venues. The first of the 4 cylinder cars to be produced in any meaningful numbers were those of the 510 Series: the 500 Mondial (2 liter) and the 750 Monza (3 liter). Although entered and campaigned by the Scuderia through most of the 1954-55 seasons, the Monza especially became a favorite of the privateers. The chassis was very sophisticated for the day with beautifully balanced handling, yet the car was robust and sturdy. The 3-liter engine produced terrific power for shorter races, but proved to be somewhat unreliable in the very long (24 hour) events. Despite this, the Mondial/Monza series cars proved their mettle in perhaps the most grueling event of all, the Mille Miglia, finishing 2nd overall in 1954 and 6th in 1955(against Moss, Fangio et al in factory Mercedes 300 SLRs). Italian cars, especially those produced up through the 1950s and 1960s were as much an artistic creation as a product of engineering. Enzo Ferrari insisted that the appearance of a racing Ferrari must epitomize the purposeful (and Italian) beast that it was - fierce, but with an economy of line and elegant proportions. The 510 series cars represent the first collaboration between Ferrari and Sergio Scaglietti - a collaboration that lasted for the rest of Enzo Ferrari's life (and endures today). The coachwork has simple, organic flowing contours that became the hallmark of the legendary 1950s sports racers. The example presented here, 0502M was ordered new from the factory by Mr. William Doheny of Los Angeles, CA for his driver Ernie McAfee. This is the only 750 Monza constructed without a headrest. In his order, Mr. Doheny stipulated that the body not be fitted with a driver's head fairing because he drove the car on the street between races and felt that the headrest would attract the unwanted attention of the police. It gives 0502M a unique low line appearance that is particularly alluring from the rear 3/4 perspective. The car was delivered with the Ferrari team cars at Sebring, Florida in March of 1955 in US racing colors of white with blue stripes. Doheny entered it for Ernie McAfee and co-driver Harold Wheeler. The car had an off-course excursion during Wheeler's first stint and 0502M didn't finish the race. After Sebring, the car was transported to McAfee's shop in Los Angeles, repainted Dodge Lancer Blue and given race number 76(Mr. Doheny was a director of Union 76 Oil Company). 0502M was raced extensively by McAfee in many California venues through the end of 1955 with great success. It is recorded that McAfee won eight individual races against strong opposition (Phil Hill in another 750 Monza, Masten Gregory and others). McAfee's last race of 0502M was at Palm Springs, California in December 1955. He finished 2nd in the final behind Phil Hill in Tony Parravano's Maserati 300S. In 1956, Mr. Doheny ordered a 121 LM from Ferrari for McAfee to race and the 750 Monza was sold to Temple Buell. Drivers Masten Gregory and Dabney Collins raced it in 1956 with some measure of success. In 1957, the car was driven by drivers Lou Brero and Jack Bates in some California events. They achieved some solid results, but by this time newer and stronger opposition outclassed the car. 0502M was sold to Frank Jarman of Tennessee and then resold to Harry Washburn of Shreveport, Louisiana. Show Results For the 1955 Ferrari Monza, Chassis no. 0502M • 2003 Radnor Hunt, Chairman's Award. • 2004 Cavallino Classic, Outstanding 4 Cylinder car. • 2004 Amelia Island Concours, Spirit of Ferrari Award. • 2004 Greenwich Concours, Best Italian Sports/Competition car 1945-1957. • 2004 Reading Concours, Best of Show. • 2004 Hartford Concours, Best of Show. • 2005 Cavallino Classic, Outstanding 4 Cylinder Car. • 2005 Palm Beach Jet Aviation Center, Bella Macchina Cup Outstanding Ferrari Present. • 2006 Radnor Hunt, Best Historica Post war Sports Racing Car. 0502M featured in the following publications: • Ferrari Road and Racing, Winston Goodfellow. • Triumph and Tragedy, The 1955 World Sports Car Season, Yves Kalterbach. • American Sports Car Racing in the 1950's, Lynch, Edgar and Parravano. • The Fabulous Fifties, Sports Car Races in Southern California, Art Evans. • Feature article in FORZA magazine 2003 In the late 1950s, racecars with big American power plants were doing quite well in competition, so it was not uncommon to see Ferraris powered by Chevrolet Corvette engines. In addition to needing the power of an American V8, Ferrari parts purchased from US importer Luigi Chinetti were very expensive. Ferrari's converted to V8 power were allowed to compete in the Modified class designation in the US. Thus Washburn converted 0502M to Corvette power and ran the car in amateur events during 1959-60. By the early 1960's, 0502M joined the legions of retired old warhorses. It was raced in a number of low level amateur events and was eventually retired from competition. The last reference found from this period is a classified ad offering 0502M for sale in Tennessee in 1964. Thereafter, the car dropped out of sight. In 1979, Ferrari collector and four-cylinder enthusiast Bruce Lavachek of Arizona discovered 0502M still in Tennessee. He negotiated the purchase of the car from the parents of the deceased owner and had it sent back to his home in Arizona. As Lavachek started to gather the components necessary to restore the car, he learned that his friend/Ferrari historian Richard Merritt had the original engine of 0502M in his hoard of Ferrari engines. The engine was in need of a complete rebuild, but the original block was sound and undamaged. The transaxle was a more difficult proposition as the original (#12S) could not be found. Lavachek located another type 510 transaxle (#10S) from Will Haible of California who had purchased it in a large lot of Chinetti spare parts in the late 1970s. Sometime in late 1980, Lavachek began to restore 0502M. It was a restoration that was to take more than 20 years to complete. In the early 1980's, Bruce Lavachek decided to sell 0502M in its unfinished state and found a buyer in David Cottingham of DK Engineering in England. Cottingham in turn sold the car to Roderick Brierly who retained DK to complete the restoration. From what can be determined, it seems that all of the restoration work in England was actually contracted to Hall & Fowler (now Hall & Hall) by DK. Again during this restoration and prior to completion, Brierly also decided to sell the car and in 1993 0502M was sold to two Japanese collectors, Mr. Utsuki and Mr. Yamaguchi. Utsuki and Yamaguchi continued the restoration work but at some point dissolved their partnership, and Utsuki purchased Yamaguchi's interest in the car. Sadly, Mr. Utsuki died very suddenly in 1995. The present owner contacted Mr. Utsuki's father in 1997 and traveled to Japan to negotiate the purchase of the car. The owner’s original intention was to complete the restoration and then campaign the car in some historic racing events. When he got the car back to the US and had a chance to thoroughly examine it, he was dissatisfied with much of the work that had been done. After much deliberation, he decided to send 0502M to Modena, Italy for a comprehensive restoration. The mechanical work was performed by Sport Auto Modena, Diena e Silingardi; bodywork was done by Carrozzeria Auto Sport, Bacchelli e Villa in Bastiglia (MO). His instructions were simple and direct--restore the car to the way that it was when it left the factory--and he believes that his instructions were carried out to the letter. The restoration was completed in June of 2003 and 0502M has been shown with great success including being awarded "Outstanding 4 Cylinder" at both the 2004 and 2005 Cavallino Classic. Most importantly, this example has been fully certified by the Ferrari Classiche department as recently as 2005. This inspection required a meticulous examination of every number, stamping and part to properly authenticate the car for its overall correctness. 0502M is in its original configuration with its original engine and correct type transaxle. In April of this year it was one of 80 vintage ferraris invited by the Ferrari factory to participate in the 60th Anniversary Concours in Maranello, Italy. It is eligible to compete in the Mille Miglia, Le Mans Historic, all Ferrari Challenge events and virtually every historic sports racing event or tour throughout the world. The 750 Monza represents a fascinating technical period of the world's most iconic marque--Ferrari--and via careful and passionate hands 0502M was returned to its original glory for all to appreciate. RM Auctions is pleased to present this wonderful car at the 2007 Monterey Sports & Classic Car Auction. Chassis no. 0502M

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-08-17
Hammer price
Show price
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JAGUAR TYPE C

JAGUAR TYPE C Ex Ian Stewart, 1ère Type C de l'Ecurie Ecosse, 1ère au Jersey Road Race Année 1952 Châssis No. XKC 006 Moteur No E 1008-8 Moteur: 6 cylindres en ligne, double arbre à cames en tête, 3 442 cm3; Boîte de vitesses : manuelle à 4 rapports avec synchronisation ; Suspensions: indépendantes avec barres de torsion et triangles inégaux à l'avant, pont arrière suspendu par tirants, avec barre Panhard (ci-dessous) ; Freins : quatre disques (ci-dessous). Volant à droite. Bleue métallisé, sièges en cuir noir Histoire du modèle Construite dans le seul but de remporter les 24 heures du Mans, la célèbre Jaguar Type C est donc un développement de la victorieuse XK 120. Désignée à l'origine XK 120 C, en vérité peu d'éléments sont communs entre les deux voitures, mise à part la transmission. La Type C fut améliorée avec des soupapes plus larges, des arbres à cames à haute levée, des carburateurs plus importants, ainsi qu'une direction à crémaillère, des suspensions modifiées ainsi qu'un châssis et une carrosserie allégés. Dessinée avec des courbes voluptueuses, le potentiel de cette nouvelle voiture fut très vite démontré lorsque seulement six semaines après qu'elle fut terminée, Peter Whitehead et Peter Walker remportèrent les 24 Heures du Mans 1951, avec plus de 107 km d'avance à l'arrivée. L'usine se réserva alors six exemplaires de la Type C mais le modèle était également proposé à la vente aux particuliers au prix de £1500, auquel il fallait ajouter les taxes (soit environ 50 plus cher qu'une XK 120), entraînant de nombreux achats par une clientèle déjà impressionnée par la XK 120. Histoire de la voiture David Murray, propriétaire de l'Ecurie Ecosse fut l'un de ceux qui décidèrent d'améliorer des Type C à la suite de la brillante saison de compétition 1951. Il acquit une première Type C avec le pilote de l'Ecurie Ecosse Ian Stewart, le châssis 006. M Stewart, dans une correspondance, se souvient avec nostalgie du temps où il était propriétaire de la voiture : "Jaguar avait décidé de réaliser un nombre limité de Type C pour des écuries privées et les trois premières voitures allèrent l'une à Duncan Hamilton, l'autre à Bill Cannell et Tommy Wisdom (qui faisait courir Stirling Moss) et la dernière à moi-même pour l'Ecurie Ecosse. La course sur routes de Jersey était prévue en Juillet et David Murray engagea les voitures de l'Ecurie Ecosse, espérant que la Type C serait prête à temps afin de disputer l'épreuve aux côtés des XK120. Il était alors vraiment moins une, car la Type C ne fut pas prête pour livraison avant le mardi précédant la course et il fallait encore effectuer le rodage. Ainsi, la voiture dut être transférée de Coventry au bateau avant d'être conduite à travers toutes les impasses de Jersey, endroit où les grandes lignes droites sont plutôt rares. Je pris livraison de la voiture à l'usine le mardi après-midi, que je réglais à la hâte, recevant les ultimes recommandations du maître des lieux Lofty England. Tout ce qu'il me dit en guise d'adieu fut " Regarde la victoire ! " et ma seule réaction à cette invitation fut un mélange de pressentiment et de détermination. J'oubliais tout cela rapidement tant le plaisir de conduire était fabuleux. Une Type C toute neuve, sentant encore les odeurs d'une récente peinture, sans le moindre cliquetis, c'était quelque chose d'inouï dont je n'oublierai jamais le bruit : un mélange de ce bruit grave de l'échappement et de cette résonnance métallique si particulière dans la carrosserie que je n'avais jamais entendu à bord d'aucune autre voiture. La façon d'avaler la route de ce fauve était saisissante. J'arrivais au bateau en deux temps trois mouvements, le tout dans une humeur de totale euphorie. Qui n'aurait pas voulu vivre cette expérience ? La course elle-même fut un grand moment. J'avais l'avantage d'aimer conduire sur les circuits sur route, avec des obstacles et des situations comme dans la conduite quotidienne, la limitation de vitesse en moins, et je ne me souviens pas de la moindre difficulté sur ce tracé de Jersey. Deux choses réclamaient une constante attention, le revêtement en pavés d'une part, qu'il fallait éviter à tout prix lorsqu'il s'agissait de tourner dans une rue vers une brutale bifurcation, et laisser trop facilement l'arrière déraper quand on était légèrement trop rapide. L'autre chose à éviter, c'était ce lampadaire menaçant placé à la crête d'un ressaut de la rue juste à la sortie d'une glissade de l'arrière à main droite. On aurait dit qu'ils l' avait disposé exprès à la limite des pavés et je craignais vraiment à force de l' éviter de peu à chaque passage. Cependant, les virages étaients plutôt larges et dégagés et on était sous pression de peur de sortir de la rue principale entre les maisons. Il s'agissait d'un morceau de bravoure pour un pilote ! La voiture fut parfaite pour la suite de la saison 1953, me permettant de décrocher 14 victoires dont une lutte acharnée avec Stirling Moss, la seule fois que je l'ai battu. Je ne crois pas que j'aurais pu en demander davantage. " La légendaire modestie de M. Stewart cache une collection impressionnante de victoires : Juillet 1952 : Jersey, Course sur routes. 1er, record du tour Juillet 1952 : Charterhall - 1er (deux fois) Août 1952 : Crimond - 1er Août 1952 : Turnberry - 1er dans une manche, 3ème de la finale Septembre 1952 : Wakefield Trophy, The Curragh - 1er Octobre 1952 : Castle Combe - 1er Octobre 1952 : Charterhall - 1er, record du tour (Stewart devança non seulement Moss mais aussi Salvadori) Pour la saison 53, XKC 006 fut repeinte en bleu métallisé comme les autres voitures de l'Ecurie Ecosse, et continua ses conquêtes : Avril 1953: Charterhall - 1er Avril 1953: Ibsley - 1er Mai 1953: Charterhall - 4ème (arrêt au stand alors qu'elle était en tête pour changer un fil de bougie d'allumage) Mai 1953: Thruxton - 2ème Mai 1953: Snetterton - 1er Juin 1953: Snetterton - 1er (deux fois) Juillet 1953: Leinster Trophy, Wicklow - 5ème (2ème meilleur temps des voitures à l'arrivée) Juillet 1953: British G.P. rassemblement à Silverstone - 5ème Août 1953: Charterhall - 6ème (conduite par le pilote Ecurie Ecosse Ninian Sanderson, plus tard vainqueur au Mans) XKC 006 fut alors vendue au pilote hollandaise Hans Davids pour la saison 1954 dans les mains duquel elle remporta d'autres succès : Mai 1954: Spa - 1er Juin 1954: Amiens - 2ème Août 1954: Zandvoort - 1er A la suite de cette saison, la voiture devint la propriété de Bryan Corser qui engagea la voiture dans quelques courses durant les années 1955 et 1956. Pour autant que nous sachions, la voiture devint alors propriété de M. Anthony Barrett-Greene du Staffordshire avant de traverser l'Atlantique et d'être acquise par Robert Allen. C'est au début des années 70 que cette prestigieuse automobile regagna la Grande Bretagne et fut acquise en 1974 par la famille qui la possède actuellement. Nous pensons que c'est à cette époque, juste avant son retour au bercail que la suspension arrière fut modifiée avec l'adjonction d'une barre Panhard. Etat Lors de son retour en Grande Bretagne, au début des années 70, une remarquable restauration fut réalisée par les soins experts de Lynx Engineering. Supervisée par le propriétaire de la société de l'époque, Chris Keith-Lucas, la reconstruction alla de la mécanique jusqu'à une nouvelle peinture commandée aux fournisseurs de l'époque, aux couleurs originales de l'Ecurie Ecosse. Pour faciliter son utilisation et améliorer ses performances, un rapport plus long de pont arrière fut installé, les freins à tambours furent remplacés par des disques, tout comme une culasse plus sportive aux spécifications Type D fut installée. M. Keith-Lucas, interrogé récemment, a déclaré qu'à l'époque c'est ainsi que l'on faisait. Il a également attesté de la parfaite originalité de la voiture lors de son retour au Royaume Uni. En prévision de sa mise en vente actuelle, la voiture est retournée dans les ateliers de M. Keith-Lucas pour une légère révision pour d'être réglée pour une utilisation sur routes. Lors de ces travaux, il put confirmer la remarquable originalité de XKC 006, du châssis au moteur, en passant par la boîte de vitesses et la carrosserie, impressions qui furent confirmées par d'autres grands initiés de la famille Jaguar lorsqu'ils inspectèrent la voiture. Il a noté cependant que lorsque la voiture revint des Etats-Unis, il manquait une plaque châssis mais compte tenue de l'originalité de tous les composants, ce détail ne peut pas porter à conséquence. Appartenant au propriétaire actuel depuis environ 30 ans, ayant été utilisée avec enthousiasme jusqu'en 1995, il s'agit d'une très importante et très spéciale Jaguar historique de compétition. C'est également une voiture encore plus facile à utiliser de nos jours qu'avant, pouvant être engagée dans toutes les grandes épreuves, de rallyes ou de rétrospectives comme les Mille Miglia, des courses sur circuits comme le Goodwood Revival ou Le Mans Classic, épreuve pour laquelle elle est éligible en 2006. La maison Christie's est extrêmement fière de proposer à la vente cette fabuleuse automobile aux courbes émouvantes, conservée discrètement depuis 9 ans et qui sera toujours la bienvenue quelle que soit sa prochaine destination. The Ex-Ian Stewart, First Ecurie Ecosse, Jersey Road Race Winning 1952 JAGUAR C-TYPE TWO SEATER SPORTS RACING CAR Registration No. JWS 353 (UK) Chassis No. XKC 006 Engine No. E 1008-8 Flag Metallic Blue with black leather seats Engine: six-cylinder, twin overhead camshaft, 3,442cc; Gearbox: four speed manual with synchromesh; Suspension: front, independent by torsion bars with unequal length wishbones, rear, live axle, suspended on trailing links, with Panhard rod (see text); Brakes: four wheel disc (see text); Right hand drive Model history Designed and built with the sole intention of winning Le Mans, the renowned Jaguar C-Type was a development of the already-successful XK 120. Initially designated XK 120 C, in truth little was shared between the two cars apart from the drive-train, and this was fully uprated with larger exhaust valves, high lift cams and larger carburettors, as well as rack and pinion steering, revised suspension and a lightweight chassis and bodywork construction. Clothed in voluptuous curves, the new car's potency was promptly proven when, just six weeks after its completion, Peter Whitehead and Peter Walker won the 1951 Le Mans race an immense 67 miles ahead of their competition. Six C-Types were retained by the works but the model was also available for sale at some £1,500 plus purchase tax (nearly 50 more than the 120), thus providing a natural progression for privateers already impressed with the XK120. Specific history of this car One such person was Ecurie Ecosse team owner, David Murray, who elected to upgrade to C-Types following his successful first season of racing in 1951, and began this process with the purchase, through Ecosse driver Ian Stewart, of XKC 006. Mr. Stewart fondly recalled his ownership of the car in recent correspondence: 'Jaguar had decided to release a limited number of C-Types for 'non-works' racing, and the first three went to Duncan Hamilton, Bill Cannell and Tommy Wisdom (for Stirling Moss), and my own car (destined for Ecurie Ecosse). The Jersey Road Race was scheduled for July, and David Murray entered three Ecurie Ecosse cars for the event - hoping that the C-Type would be ready in time to participate alongside the XK120s. It really was 'touch and go' because the C-Type wasn't ready for collection until the Tuesday before the race, and it still had to be run in. As a result, the car had to be driven from Coventry to the Channel, and then driven up and down every cul-de-sac on Jersey, where long open roads were in rather short supply. I collected the car at the works on Tuesday afternoon, and set off with some trepidation with the Headmaster's (Lofty England's) words ringing in my ears. All he said by way of farewell was 'see you win' and my reaction to the command was a mixture of foreboding and determination. This was soon forgotten in the joy of the drive. A brand-new C-Type smelling of fresh paint and without a single rattle was quite something, and I will never forget the noise - a combination of the deep exhaust note and that peculiar 'zinging' resonance in the bodywork which I have never heard in other cars. The way the traffic parted in front of the beast was quite something, and I managed to get it to the boat without a scratch, and in a mood of complete euphoria. Who wouldn't in that situation! The event itself was a big thrill. I had the advantage of loving real road circuits, where the features and obstacles were just the same as everyday driving (no speed limits back then!) and I don't recall much difficulty with the Jersey layout. Two features demanded constant attention. One was a pavement which had to be avoided at all costs when turning onto the main street - a narrow corner, and all too easy to let the tail slide out that little bit too far. The other was a rather menacing lamp post on the crest of a rise on the main street just after a slight right hand kink. It felt as if they had put the thing beyond the edge of the pavement, and it impressed me enough to avoid it by a foot or so each time round. Otherwise the corners were wide and open, and the thrill of blasting up between the buildings in the main street was honestly quite uplifting. Real boy-racer stuff I'm afraid! The car was very good to me for the rest of the season and throughout 1953, notching up a total of 14 wins (including a struggle with Stirling Moss - the only time I ever beat him). I couldn't really ask for more than that.' Mr Stewart's characteristic modesty conceals a fantastic run of victories: July 1952: Jersey Road Race - 1st, fastest lap July 1952: Charterhall - 1st (twice) August 1952: Crimond - 1st August 1952: Turnberry - 1st in heat, 3rd in final September 1952: Wakefield Trophy, the Curragh - 1st October 1952: Castle Combe - 1st October 1952: Charterhall - 1st, fastest lap (where Stewart beat not only Moss but also Salvadori) For the '53 season, XKC 006 was repainted Flag Metallic Blue to match the other Ecurie cars, and continued to place highly: April 1953: Charterhall - 1st April 1953: Ibsley - 1st May 1953: Charterhall - 4th (having stopped while in the lead to replace a plug lead) May 1953: Thruxton - 2nd May 1953: Snetterton - 1st June 1953: Snetterton - 1st (twice) July 1953: Leinster Trophy, Wicklow - 5th (2nd fastest finisher) July 1953: British G.P. meeting, Silverstone - 5th August 1953: Charterhall - 6th (driven by Ecosse driver and later Le Mans winner Ninian Sanderson) XKC 006 was then sold to Dutch driver Hans Davids for the 1954 season, in whose hands it notched up further successes including: May 1954: Spa - 1st June 1954: Amiens - 2nd August 1954: Zandvoort - 1st Following this season, ownership passed to Englishman Bryan Corser who competed the car in a number of sprint events throughout 1955 and 1956. So far as we understand, it then passed to Mr. Anthony Barrett-Greene of Staffordshire before emigrating across the Atlantic under the ownership of Mr. Robert Allen. It was the early 1970s before this important car returned to British soil when acquired by the present family owners in 1974. It is believed to be at some point before this "home-coming" that the rear suspension was modified with the addition of a Panhard rod. Condition Upon its return to the U.K in the early 1970s, a thorough but sympathetic restoration was undertaken by local marque experts Lynx Engineering. Overseen by the company owner at the time, Chris Keith-Lucas, the rebuild extended from a mechanical 'sorting' to a repaint in the original Ecosse livery ordered directly from the original suppliers. To enhance its usability and performance, a longer legged back axle ratio was chosen, the drum brakes were uprated to discs and a more sporting D-Type cylinder head was fitted. Interviewed recently, Mr Keith-Lucas commented on the nature of these improvements as being the 'done thing' in this period; he also favourably remarked upon the car's originality on its return to the U.K. In preparation for today's sale the car was returned to Mr Keith-Lucas's workshops for a light re-commissioning and a return to road-worthy condition. During this time he was able to confirm the highly original content of XKC 006 (sentiments that have been echoed by various luminaries within the Jaguar fraternity upon their inspection of the car) from chassis to engine, gearbox and even bodywork. He did however note that today, as when it returned from the U.S., it lacks a chassis plate, but such is the originality of the components that this is not deemed to be of much consequence. Having resided with the present owners for some 30 years and been enthusiastically campaigned until the mid-1990s, this is an extremely special and important historic racing Jaguar. It is also a model that is more usable today than ever before, enabling entry to a whole host of events from rally retrospectives such as the Mille Miglia to Historic circuit races such as at the Goodwood Revival and Le Mans Classic. Indeed it already has an entry for this latter event. Unseen publicly for 9 years, this fabulously curvaceous and thrilling car will be welcomed wherever it goes; Christie's are extremely honoured to present it for sale.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2006-02-11
Hammer price
Show price

1960 Ferrari 250 GT Cabriolet Series II by Pinin Farina

A very early Cabriolet Series II with bespoke exterior and interior features Delivered new to Umberto Agnelli Offered from single ownership for over two decades; seldom seen in public One of the few truly unique Cabriolet Series II examples Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche Only the 13th Cabriolet Series II produced, the car offered here, chassis number 1779 GT, was delivered to a very special customer, Umberto Agnelli, younger brother of the iconoclastic Fiat chairman Gianni Agnelli, the wealthiest man in modern Italy. As would be expected of an Agnelli Ferrari, the car was lavished with special features, including 250 GTE-style ‘frenched’ headlamps and a special 400 Superamerica Cabriolet-style interior, with bespoke upholstery and a unique dashboard configuration. It was finished in Bianco (MM 12435) with Nero (VM 8500) interior. Sold to Mr Agnelli in April 1960, the car was exported from Italy later in the decade and sold to Phillip Baumgarten of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. It subsequently passed in 1968 to Garrett O’Brien of Candice, New York, and remained in his ownership until 1992, when it was sold by his estate. Shortly thereafter it was acquired by a Hong Kong dealer, then in 1996 moved to Paul Barber of England, in whose ownership it was carefully restored to the original specifications. The current owner acquired the freshly restored car in 1998 and has properly stored it since in his extensive private collection. The car’s restoration is wonderfully patinaed and inviting, and it retains its original engine and gearbox, as well as the factory special-ordered features requested by Umberto Agnelli. In a world of ‘standard’ Cabriolet Series IIs, this particular example is truly unique, befitting an automobile owned by a famous and influential figure with great power in Turin and Maranello. • Una delle primissime Cabriolet della seconda serie, con finiture esterne ed interne fatte su misura • Consegnata nuova a Umberto Agnelli • Offerta dal proprietario che l'ha tenuta per oltre vent'anni; raramente esposta in pubblico • Uno dei pochissimi esemplari di Cabriolet seconda serie • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche Quest'auto è la tredicesima Cabriolet seconda serie prodotta, con telaio numero 1779 GT, è stata consegnata a un cliente molto speciale: Umberto Agnelli, il fratello minore dell'ex presidente Fiat Gianni Agnelli, l'uomo più ricco dell'Italia moderna. Come ci si può aspettare da una Ferrari di casa Agnelli, la vettura è ricca di finiture esclusive, come i fari in stile 250 GTE e l'interno ispirato alla 400 Superamerica Cabriolet, la tappezzeria non di serie e una plancia appositamente ridisegnata. Carrozzeria in Bianco (MM 12435) con interni Nero (VM 8500). Venduta ad Agnelli nell'aprile del '60, viene acquistata da Phillip Baumgarten di Fort Lauderdale, Florida, nella seconda metà degli anni '60, per poi passare di mano ancora una volta nel '68 con Garrett O'Brien di Candice (New York). Che la tiene fino al 1992, anno in cui viene venduta a un concessionario di Hong Kong. Nel '96, la GT Cabriolet ritorna in Europa con Paul Barber, che la porta in Inghilterra ripristinando le sue specifiche originali con un accurato restauro. L'attuale proprietario, che l'ha rilevata nel '98 a restauro finito, l'ha conservata con tutti i crismi nella sua collezione privata. Un restauro così fa decisamente gola. E non solo per il fatto che l'auto sembra uscita da una rivista patinata, ma anche perché conserva motore e cambio originali, oltre che le modifiche su misura, richieste allora da Umberto Agnelli. Tra tante Cabriolet seconda serie, questo esemplare è davvero “fuoriserie”, anche per il primo illustre proprietario, così strettamente legato e influente a Torino prima e a Maranello poi. Chassis no. 1779 GT Engine no. 1779 GT Gearbox no. 128 F Body no. 29712

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
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1934 Mercedes-Benz 380 K Cabriolet A

1934 Mercedes-Benz 380 K Cabriolet A Vendu sans titre de circulation Châssis n° 95364 Moteur n° 95364 - Restauration de haut niveau, matching numbers - Un des 16 construits et un des 4 survivants - Primée à Pebble Beach en 2005 - Voiture du Salon de Genève 1934 Dévoilée en février 1933 au Salon de Berlin, la Mercedes 380 innovait par plusieurs aspects. Son moteur était une évolution de celui de la 380 S "Mannheim" mais, au lieu de la distribution par soupapes latérales de son prédécesseur, son gros huit-cylindres 3,8 litres bénéficiait de soupapes en tête culbutées. Il pouvait de plus être équipé en option d'un compresseur qui faisait faire un bond à la puissance : atteignant 120 ch, elle permettait à cette voiture d'atteindre des performances plus en rapport avec son allure imposante. De nombreux modèles de Mercedes ont reçu l'appellation commerciale de 380, si bien que pour éviter toute confusion celui-ci est souvent désigné par son type W22. Mais les nouveautés ne concernaient pas uniquement le moteur, car la suspension était complètement repensée, à quatre roues indépendantes : à l'avant, par doubles triangles et, à l'arrière, par demi-essieux oscillants reliés à des ressorts hélicoïdaux, ce qui était particulièrement moderne à une époque où l'essieu arrière rigide dominait le marché. Ainsi, la 380 offrait un confort et des qualités routières supérieures à la moyenne. Les freins étaient à commande hydraulique, la boîte de vitesses comportait quatre rapports et les jantes étaient des Rudge à rayons. Plusieurs carrosseries "usine" étaient disponibles, dont trois types de cabriolets, A, B ou C : la différence provenait du nombre de places (deux ou quatre) et du nombre de glaces latérales (deux ou quatre également). Le cabriolet A correspondait à la configuration la plus sportive, à deux places et deux vitres latérales. Grâce à sa conception intelligente, la 380 allait servir de base aux Mercedes haut de gamme suivantes : elle s'effaçait en 1934 derrière la 500 K, qui elle-même précédait la fameuse 540 K. La voiture que nous proposons a été livrée neuve en février 1934 à Zürich pour être exposée au Salon de Genève le mois suivant. Elle se trouvait exactement dans sa configuration d'aujourd'hui. Nous ne connaissons pas l'histoire de cette sublime automobile jusqu'à sa découverte en Pologne au début des années 80. Ce qui restait de la voiture lors de sa découverte a été acheté par un collectionneur belge qui vivait une grande partie de l'année en Australie. Il l'avait acquise en vue de la restaurer mais son épouse décède quelques semaines après l'achat alors que la voiture était déjà en Australie. C'est alors que la mort dans l'âme, il la vend à Monsieur Wolfgang Grodd, un allemand expatrié et patron d'un atelier de restauration. Nous avons téléphoné à ce monsieur d'un certain âge qui nous a transmis tout son meilleur souvenir au sujet de cette magnifique Mercedes : " j'ai mis huit ans à la restaurer. Je me suis rapproché du Classic Center de Mercedes en Allemagne pour qu'ils me donnent tous les renseignements sur la vie de la voiture et surtout de quelle couleur elle était née. Presque 8 000 heures de travail de restauration m'ont été nécessaires pour achever une restauration parfaite et surtout conforme à l'origine. Je la voulais dans sa configuration d'origine du Salon de Genève. Après la restauration, j'ai été sélectionné pour la présenter au Concours d'Elégance de Pebble Beach en 2005. Lorsque les organisateurs m'ont demandé d'amener la voiture sur scène pour recevoir la deuxième place de ma classe, j'ai ressenti une immense fierté ; tout ce travail était couronné dans le plus grand Concours d'Elegance du Monde. Ce fut le plus beau jour de ma vie ! ". Ce splendide cabriolet 380 à compresseur a donc fait l'objet d'une restauration complète par la société Sleeping Beauties, basée à Brisbane, en Australie. Complètement démontés, tous ses éléments de carrosserie et de mécanique ont bénéficié de soins attentifs, rien n'étant laissé au hasard. En 2005, une fois terminée, elle a été présentée par son propriétaire au Concours d'Elégance de Pebble Beach dans la catégorie I (Mercedes-Benz Pre-war), et a obtenu la deuxième place, preuve de la qualité de la restauration. Monsieur Grodd, n'ayant pas les moyens de garder plusieurs voitures et ayant envie de commencer un autre projet, la confie au Mercedes Benz Classic Center en vue de la vendre. Une copie d'un V5 anglais au nom de M. Grodd se trouve dans le dossier de la voiture. C'est finalement via Axel Schuette que la voiture intégrera le célèbre Musée Rosso Bianco à Aschaffenburg, en Bavière. Sur les quelques 150 exemplaires de Mercedes 380 produits, seuls 16 ont été carrossés en cabriolet A, dont celui-ci. Il n'en resterait que 3 ou 4 encore survivants. Il s'agit d'une voiture luxueusement équipée, avec un beau tableau de bord en bois et des sièges réglables. Depuis sa restauration, qui a comptabilisé 8 000 heures de travail, cette voiture est restée impeccable avec une sellerie en cuir rouge foncé assortie aux moquettes rouges et à la peinture extérieure en deux tons de rouge, d'une très grande classe. Sous le capot, le très beau huit-cylindres d'origine présente sa forme sobre, avec à l'avant son compresseur. Moins excessive qu'une 540 K construite à 156 exemplaires, mais équivalente sur le plan technique, plus légère également, cette 380 constitue une rare occasion de s'offrir une des Mercedes les plus prestigieuses des années 1930, dans un état impressionnant et doté d'une histoire de Salon prestigieuse et très valorisante. Sold without registration documents Chassis n° 95364 Engine n° 95364 - High-class restoration, matching numbers - One of four survivors from 16 built - Pebble Beach Award Winner in 2005 - 1934 Geneva Motor Show The Mercedes 380, unveiled at the Berlin Auto Show in February 1933, was an innovative car in several respects. Its engine evolved from that of the 380 S Mannheim but, instead of its predecessor's side-valve engine, it had a larger, eight-cylinder, 3.8-litre engine with overhead valves. It could also be equipped (as an option) with a supercharger to boost power: by delivering 120hp, this enabled the car to attain performances more in keeping with its imposing appearance. Numerous Mercedes models were commercially named 380, so this one is often designated W22 after its works number, to avoid confusion. Innovations were not confined to the engine: the suspension was completely redesigned, with four independent wheels; double wishbones up front; and swing-axles linked to coil springs at the rear - very modern at the time, when rigid rear-axles were the rule. The 380 therefore offered above-average comfort and road-holding, with hydraulic brakes, four-speed gearbox and Rudge wire wheels. Several 'factory' body-styles were available, including three types of Cabriolet (A, B or C) - the difference depending on the number of seats and side-windows (two or four in each case). Cabriolet A was the most sporty, with two seats and two side-windows. Thanks to its intelligent design, the 380 served as the basis for the top-of-the-range Mercedes that came afterwards: in 1934 it was superseded by the 500 K, which in turn preceded the famous 540 K. Our sublime car was delivered new to Zurich in February 1934 for exhibiting at the Geneva Motor Show the following month. It was in exactly the same configuration as today. Its subsequent history remains a mystery until it resurfaced in Poland in the early 1980s - when what remained of the car was bought for restoration by a Belgian collector who spent most of the year in Australia. Tragically his wife died a few weeks later, when the car was already in Australia, forcing him to resell it. New owner Wolfgang Grodd was a German ex-pat who ran a restoration workshop. When we called this elderly gentleman, he waxed lyrical about his memories of this magnificent Mercedes: 'I spent eight years restoring it. I asked Mercedes-Benz Classic in Germany to send me all the information they had about the car and, especially, its original colour. It took me nearly 8,000 hours to complete a perfect restoration, conform to the original: I wanted it to look just as it had at the Geneva Motor Show. Afterwards I showed the car at the Pebble Beach 2005 Concours d'Elégance. When the organizers asked me to bring it on stage to receive second prize in my category, I felt so proud! All that work, rewarded at the greatest Concours d'Elégance in the world… It was the best day of my life!' This splendid, supercharged Cabriolet 380 underwent a complete restoration at Sleeping Beauties, Wolfgang Grodd's firm in Brisbane - it was first dismantled, then all the mechanical elements and coachwork were subjected to a degree of care that left nothing to chance. The supreme quality of this restoration was underlined when the car obtained Second Prize in Class I (Mercedes-Benz Pre-War) at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elégance in 2005. But, with Grodd about to embark on another project and unable to hold on to several cars at the same time, he gave the Cabriolet to Mercedes-Benz Classic with a view to selling it. A copy of the old Britsh V5 in the name of Mr Grodd is coming in the file of the car. Through the good offices of Axel Schuette, it entered the famous Rosso Bianco Museum in Aschaffenburg (Bavaria). Of the 150 or so Mercedes 380s ever made, just 16 were Cabriolet A's, and only 3 or 4 others are thought to have survived. Our car is luxuriously fitted, with a handsome wooden dashboard and adjustable seats. Since its 8,000-hour restoration it has remained impeccable, with dark red leather upholstery, matching red carpet and classy, two-tone red paintwork. Beneath the bonnet is the original, splendidly sober, eight-cylinder engine with its supercharger at the front. Technically the equivalent of the 540 K (of which 156 were built), but less excessive and also lighter, this 380 constitutes a rare chance to acquire one of the most prestigious Mercedes of the 1930s - in impressive condition and with a prestigious and value-enhancing motor show history. Estimation 1 300 000 - 1 600 000 € Sold for 1,380,000 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-06
Hammer price
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1953 Bentley R-Type Continental Sports Saloon by H.J. Mulliner

178 bhp, 4,887 cc inlet-over-exhaust six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent wishbone front suspension with coil springs and an anti-roll bar, rear live axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanical servo braking system with hydraulic front and mechanical rear brakes. Wheelbase: 120 in. A factory left-hand-drive example with “seats and spats” Important special features, including a center-mounted gearshift Formerly owned by Glenn Mounger and James Patterson Exquisitely restored, with 68,000 actual miles One of the finest in existence Even after becoming the “Silent Sports Car” in the mid-1930s, Bentley held tight to its performance heritage. Later in the decade, the company began experimenting with aerodynamic designs, eventually evolving the Georges Paulin-designed Corniche prototype of 1940. The Corniche did not survive World War II, but its spirit did, and after the war, it evolved into H.I.F. Evernden and J.P. Blatchley’s R-Type Continental, “a car which would not only look beautiful but possess a high maximum speed, coupled with a correspondingly high rate of acceleration, together with excellent handling and roadability.” H.J. Mulliner was contracted to design and build the prototype Continental, which was based on the frame, suspension, steering, and braking components of a standard R-Type. The body, window, and seat frames were built of light alloy, resulting in a four-passenger body that weighed only 750 pounds, totaling to less than 4,000 pounds when mated to the chassis. After extensive road tests in France, the prototype’s gearbox overdriven top gear was found to be unsuitable for the rpms offered by the engine, so it was replaced by a direct-ratio top gear and lower axle ratio, which was a combination that proved best for both high-speed touring and well-spaced gear changes for city driving. Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. The Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental created a space for itself that was unique. It combined the swiftness of a Ferrari, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for the burgeoning jet set. In the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” The chassis number of the car offered here, BC16LA, identifies it as having been the 15th R-Type Continental produced as part of the inaugural A-series and as a left-hand-drive model; it was one of only twenty-four Continentals built in 1953. Its original build paperwork, copies of which are included on file, note that it was ordered with an extensive list of special features, with the most prominent being the special H.J. Mulliner lightweight seat frames, sealed-beam headlamps, high-frequency horns, fog lamps in front of the standard center driving lamp, and American flasher-type turn indicators, which were fitted using a steering-wheel-mounted stalk. Unusually, the Wilmot Breedon “export”-type steel bumpers were noted to be fitted an inch further forward than standard. The definitive register of the model, published by Stanley Sedgwick, notes this as being the first car with the optional center gear change, rather than the standard steering column-mounted shift lever. Following final testing, chassis number BC16LA was shipped to San Francisco via the S.S. Loch Garth on January 15, 1953, for display by West Coast dealer Kjell Qvale. Its original owner, Svante Magnus Swenson, was the heir to an extensive fortune that had been earned from the magic combination of Texas ranching and New York banking and was also a lifelong Rolls-Royce/Bentley customer who had been the first owner of several enviable automobiles, including many of the most desirable coachbuilt Springfield Phantoms. Swenson returned the car to England in 1954 and then flew it to Le Touquet, France, on April 26, 1954, as is recorded in the factory records. In 1965, the car was retrofitted with an updated larger engine of a 3¾-inch bore, and the original engine, BCA15, is reported to have been installed in another chassis. The car eventually found its way into storage, where it remained for many years before being sold to respected collector and past chairman of the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Glenn Mounger, who directed its painstaking recommissioning. Later, the car was sold to renowned enthusiast James Patterson before joining its current home. Today, it glistens in black over brown and is in thoroughly excellent condition, from its remarkably deep, excellent finish to its tight leather interior and sparkling chrome. Most importantly, under the hood, engine BCA15 is once again found, indicating either incorrect previous registry data or a reinstallation of the original powerplant. The combination of a smooth, powerful, no-nonsense inline six, coupled with a silky smooth gearbox and responsive handling, results in a car that is as pleasant to drive as it is to view. There are few 60-year-old cars that can maintain a cruising speed of 100 mph without undue stress or trouble, and the R-Type Continental is one of them. One is offered here, immaculately restored, in its ultimate form. Chassis no. BC16LA Engine no. BCA15 Body no. 5480

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1938 Maybach Zeppelin DS8 Roadster

This lot will be sold with the following documents: Bill of Sale August Maybach was the technical director of Gottlieb Daimler’s company until 1907, after which, he and his son Karl designed a six-cylinder car that they hoped to market to Opel. In the summer of 1908, however, Maybach wrote to his friend Count Zeppelin, proposing to make engines for airships. Zeppelin set the Maybachs up as engine manufacturers, a prosperous enterprise until the Treaty of Versailles forbade German aero production. As a result, Maybach automobiles ensued. The W3, launched in 1921, was one of Germany’s most expensive automobiles, more costly than a Mercedes 28/95, which limited its production to some 700 in six years. Karl Maybach became obsessed with multi-speed gearboxes, beginning with a schnellgang (fast speed) overdrive. Over time, this developed further to a combination sliding-gear box coupled with a separate overdrive. The effort culminated in the doppelschnellgang unit, with integral overdrive giving eight speeds forward and vacuum-assisted shifting. The ultimate development was the DS8 Zeppelin, with a 7,978 cc V-12 engine and the doppelschnellgang gearbox, also called the “Variorex”. Built from 1932 until World War II, the DS8 numbered only 25 a year through 1937, and another 25 thereafter, through 1940. One of a very few survivors of the DS8 Zeppelin Maybach, this car has the rare Variorex vacuum-change gearbox, reportedly one of about 100 manufactured. When acquired, it was almost devoid of body, as a period photograph shows. It was reconstructed with a reproduction roadster body in the sporting idiom, generally following the lines of original Erdman & Rossi bodies. Nevertheless, the elegant presence of this Maybach makes it very attractive to driving enthusiasts. August Maybach var teknisk direktør for Gottlieb Daimler’s firma indtil 1907, hvorefter han og hans søn Karl designede en seks-cylindret bil, som de håbede at kunne sælge til Opel. I sommeren i 1908 skrev Maybach dog til sin ven grev Zeppelin og foreslog, at han kunne fremstille motorer til luftskibe. Zeppelin valgte Maybach motorfabrikant, en blomstrende forretning indtil Versailles-traktaten forbød tysk luftfartsproduktion. Som resultat af dette gik Maybach over til bilproduktion. W3, som blev lanceret i 1921, var en af Tysklands dyreste automobiler og kostede mere end en Mercedes 28/95, hvilket begrænsede produktionen til 700 på seks år. Karl Maybach blev opslugt af flerhastigheds-gearkasser, startende med schnellgang (hurtig hastighed) overdrive. Gennem tiden udviklede dette sig til en kombinations glide-gearkasse med separat overdrive. Indsatsen kulminerede med enheden doppelschnellgang, med integreret overdrive, som gav otte hastigheder fremad og et vakuumassisteret skifte. Det ultimative design var DS8 Zeppelin med en 7,978 cc V-12 motor og doppelschnellgang-gearkassen, også kaldet "Variorex". Bygget fra 1932 og indtil anden verdenskrig, blev der fremstillet 25 model DS8 frem til 1937 og yderligere 25 derefter, frem til 1940. Denne bil er en af meget få tilbageværende eksemplarer af DS8 Zeppelin Maybach, og har det sjældne Variorex vakuumskift-gearkasse, som er en af omkring 100 fremstillede. Da den blev erhvervet, var karosseriet næsten helt væk, som fotografiet viser. Den blev rekonstrueret med et reproduktionsroadsterkarosseri i det sportslige formsprog, generelt følgende designet fra originale Erdman & Rossi-karosserier. Ikke desto mindre gør denne Maybach elegante fremtoning den yderst attraktiv for bilentusiaster. Addendum Please note the original coachwork of this vehicle was a Spohn Cabriolet. Engine no. 25155

  • DNKDenmark
  • 2012-08-12
Hammer price
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1964 Shelby 289 Competition Cobra

Est. 400 bhp, 289 cu. in. Hi-Po Ford V-8 engine with four Weber 48 IDM carburettors, four-speed BorgWarner T-10 manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with A-arms, transverse leaf springs, and tubular shock absorbers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,286 mm Campaigned by “Gentleman” Tom Payne in 1964 and 1965 A highly desirable Cobra “Team Specification” roadster Superb restoration of a very original car by Shelby authority Bill Murray Formerly in the Shelby American Collection for 25 years Ideal for historic racing events, such as the Goodwood Revival and Le Mans Classic GENTLEMAN TOM “Payne is one of those fearless gents who crouch snugly into the cockpit of a low-slung racing car and steer it for glory at speeds up to 180 miles per hour on flat road courses across the country”. So read the large feature story in the 7 March 1965 issue of the Daytona Beach Morning Journal, which profiled the exploits of the Ann Arbor, Michigan-based gentleman racer Tom Payne. Payne was forty-one years old and living on a farm outside Ann Arbor with his wife, Nan, and five children, along with several horses for them to ride, when he partnered with Dan Gerber the year before opening Gerber-Payne Ford, of Fremont, Michigan. Ford Motor Company was in high gear, having just unveiled the earth-shattering Mustang to rave reviews and unabashedly promoting its Total Performance program. Payne was no stranger to racing. In 1954, he first got behind the wheel of an Arnolt-Bristol whilst in Put-in-Bay, Ohio, and Sebring, and he later raced a Porsche RS61 stateside before trying his hand at Formula Juniors. Interestingly, the ambitious young businessman even tried his hand at politics on two occasions, running for Congress in 1960 and 1962, which was a campaign that attracted John F. Kennedy, who visited Michigan during a “whistle-stop” tour and spoke on behalf of the young Democratic candidate. Payne’s two worlds collided on at least one occasion, as he evidently arrived at a race track behind schedule and, without any time to change into his racing clothes, piloted his car at breakneck speed whilst still donning the Glen Plaid suit and necktie with which he had left work! He was known as “Gentleman Tom” thereafter. Payne first met Gerber at an SCCA race in Northern Michigan, where he hopped out of his RS61 and into Gerber’s Cobra, and from that moment he was instantly smitten! One year later, the two were in business, and the dealership became a Shelby sales point, with Payne himself ordering his first Cobra just two months later. The car that arrived at his doorstep was one of the most special racing machines not only in the country but also the world. Out of the 655 leaf-spring “small block chassis” Cobras finding their way from England to Carroll Shelby’s Riverside, California, shops and into the hands of sportsmen, driving enthusiasts, and all-out racers, only seven per cent were competition racing cars. Certainly, the distinction between a street car and a competition car is by no means cut and dry. Depending on the racing series in which the cars competed, the rules and regulations therein, or simply the technical evolution of the cars and the developments of Shelby’s engineers, “Competition Cobras” were produced in a variety of series and guises. Indeed, as advancements became available, earlier cars were frequently upgraded by privateers or the factory to meet the demands of the race track and the stiff competition. The Shelby American World Registry nevertheless outlines three classes of competition cars, beginning with the “Independently Prepared Race Cars” (street cars purchased privately and then converted into competition cars) and the “Factory-Prepared Competition Cars” (full-specification race cars prepared by Shelby for privateers) and then culminating into the most desirable variant of all, the “Cobra Factory Team Cars”. Only 32 of these full-specification competition cars were prepared by Shelby American, and they were either raced as “Works cars” or as independent yet factory-sponsored cars. CHASSIS NUMBER CSX 2430 Chassis CSX 2430, the Cobra presented here, is the very same one that was delivered to Tom Payne, and it is also the exceedingly rare factory team-specification roadster that was prepared by Shelby and raced as a factory-sponsored entry. On 18 June 1964, Jacques Passino, the vice president of Ford’s Special Vehicle Division, approved a work order for one “Competition Cobra for Tom Payne”, which highlighted the sizable price of $9,250 and the order to “color it RED”. With Ford’s headquarters at Dearborn merely half an hour away, Payne undoubtedly enjoyed a close relationship with its executives, and his success behind the wheel would surely be a win-win for both sides, particularly with Ford’s “Total Performance” objective of “winning on Sunday and selling on Monday”. Shelby American in Riverside began work on the car, building it into a factory-specification competition car and mirroring the equipment of the team cars with a bonnet scoop, a chrome roll bar, 6½-inch Halibrand front wheels (8½-inch at the rear), flared wings, Koni shocks, front and rear sway bars, competition brakes all around, quick-jack points, side pipes, dual long-range fuel tanks, a Monza snap-open fuel cap, a racing seat, a Sun tachometer, a fuel-pressure gauge, a differential cooler, an engine oil cooler, an electric Stewart-Warner fuel pump, and an aluminium Harrison header tank. Of course, the soul of the roadster was a full race-specification 289 V-8 that had Weber carburettors and 12:1 compression, which could deliver about 400 brake horsepower. The car was billed to Ford and delivered to Detroit in late July. It remained the property of Ford and was run as an SAI factory-sponsored entry by Payne. Just two days later, Payne debuted the car at Lynndale Farms, Wisconsin, before campaigning it throughout the Mid-West in the summer of 1964. From Illinois to Ohio and Indiana, he consistently finished on the podium. In the winter of the same year, he took the car to Nassau and fared extremely well, finishing 2nd in the GT class, 9th overall, and 1st in the GT class in the Tourist Trophy, Governor’s Trophy, and Trophy Races, respectively. Races at Mosport and Road America followed until the end of 1965, which were interspersed with piloting by Gerber, Yeager, and, most excitingly, the famed Bob Grossman, who got behind the wheel at Nassau in 1965, finishing 5th overall and 1st in the GT class. In fact, according to Shelby Cars in Detail, CSX 2430 was a Shelby entry at Nassau, as Payne had since moved on to racing a 427 Cobra. Interestingly, Grossman got behind the wheel at that race, since Payne broke several ribs during an unfortunate fall whilst looking for tyres in a dark hangar. Chassis CSX 2430 went to John “Scotty” Addison, who raced the car throughout 1966 before Dan Schlames, of Michigan, raced it in various SCCA BP events in 1967. Its ownership history is well known and listed in the Shelby American World Registry. Rick Nagel, of Texas, owned the car in the mid-1980s and raced it with some success. He won the 1984 Texas Vintage Challenge, and later in the year, we understand that Carroll Shelby got behind the wheel of it at the Texas Can-Am Challenge, which, according to the aforementioned book, is the last time Carroll Shelby got behind the wheel of a Competition Cobra and raced one on the track. A lap record at Kansas City and three more wins in SCCA races throughout 1984 and 1985 marked the end of Nagel’s ownership. Steven Volk, the principal of the Shelby American Collection in Boulder, Colorado, purchased the car from Nagel in 1985 before commissioning highly respected Cobra authority Bill Murray to fully restore the famous Competition Cobra. Stripping the body to bare metal revealed a superb condition, with the exception of minor racing damage to the front left corner that was unsatisfactorily repaired in the past. At the time, an inspection of the car revealed that the original chassis plate remained in place, as did the stampings on the passenger-side A-arm hanger, the bonnet latch, both door frames, and the boot latch. Murray’s aim during the restoration was to simultaneously restore the car to concours-ready condition but also prepare it for vintage racing, as he installed a five-point harness, a modern fuel-delivery system, a fuel cell, an updated exhaust, and adjustable A-arms. Today, the car is set up for period correctness, although the modern driver-friendly parts are still included with the car. Following its completion, the car remained on display at the Shelby American Collection for nearly 25 years, and it was featured in Shelby Cars in Detail: Cars of the Shelby American Collection. Over the years, other print accolades have included American Rodding (March 1966), Dave Friedman’s Shelby Cobra, Rinsey Mill’s AC Cobra, and Treover Legate’s Cobra. Chassis CSX 2430 is offered from a highly respected private collection, and it marks an exceptionally rare opportunity, not only for the Shelby enthusiast but also the competitive vintage racer. This would be an ideal entrant for vintage racing events around the world, including the Goodwood Revival, the Le Mans Classic, and the Tour Auto, as this individual car has already proven to be successful both in period and historic racing events. Not only has the car remained very original throughout its life and been restored by one of the most respected Cobra authorities in the world, but its provenance details some of the most distinguished names in the racing and collecting communities, including Gentleman Tom Payne, Bob Grossman, and the Shelby American Collection. Chassis CSX 2430 offers the collector an opportunity to showcase a fully restored and extremely rare factory competition-spec Cobra at virtually any concours event he desires, whilst also allowing the dedicated driving enthusiast to get behind the wheel and chase down, and usually overtake, any Ferrari or Porsche in his sights. A racing chart is available for review in both the digital and printed catalogue. Chassis no. CSX 2430

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-09-08
Hammer price
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1953 Jaguar C-Type Sports Racing Car

“Commander John Rutherford’s C-Type; clocked at 134.07 mph on the sand at Daytona Beach during the NASCAR-sanctioned Speedweek time trials in 1953.” 210bhp at 6,000rpm 3,442cc dual overhead camshaft in-line six-cylinder engine with Twin “sand-cast” 2 in. SUH8 carburetors on a special competition cylinder head offering a compression ratio of 9:1, steel tubing lightweight chassis with monocoque features, independent front suspension with torsion bars and tubular shock absorbers; live rear axle with trailing arms, torsion bar and tubular shock absorbers and Lockheed 2LS four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 96" WILLIAM LYONS & JAGUAR Like many other legendary marques Jaguar had humble beginnings. Founder William Lyons always recognized that the successful sale of an automobile depended upon its appearance - no matter how well engineered, an ugly car would languish in the showroom. At first, his Swallow Coach Building Company provided attractive aftermarket bodies for the modest 1920’s Austin Motor Car, offering the “£1000 look” for about £275. His own later “SS” cars of the early 1930’s, using various chassis, transmissions and engines continued this emphasis upon aesthetics. By 1936 the name of Jaguar was conceived and with it the first of William Lyon’s three masterpieces – the SS Jaguar range, which truly established the marque as an important maker of its own motor cars prior to the war. The war years saw production of parts for Spitfire, Mosquito and Sterling military aircraft. By October 1945, postwar production resumed under the name Jaguar Cars Ltd. although improvements to the prewar models were purely mechanical. The first truly new postwar Jaguar arrived in 1948 as saloon and drophead models as well as Lyons’ second masterpiece – the XK 120 Series. Perhaps more important than its stunning appearance was the new double overhead camshaft six-cylinder engine, variations of which were destined to power Jaguar motor cars for nearly four decades. After a roadster was clocked at 132.6 mph at Jabbeke, Belgium, the competition potential of the XK 120 was fully exploited by both factory and private entrants. Three XK 120 roadsters contested LeMans in 1950, one of them running as high as second place on distance before mechanical problems intervened. If production Jaguars could do this well, what about a purpose built racing model, wondered William Lyons. Thus, three of his new and aerodynamic C-Types were entered for the 1951 LeMans classic. The number 20 car, driven by two Peters, Walker and Whitehead, won the 24 Hour race outright after the Moss/Fairman C-Type had to retire from the lead, but not before setting a new lap record of 105.33 mph. THE C-TYPE JAGUAR Design work on the competition XK 120 began in the fall of 1950. At first designated the XK 120C (for “competition”), Jaguar’s new car was designed, built and developed in total secrecy even as further record runs and competition entries were being undertaken by the factory in stock bodied XK 120s. The chassis was completely new. Based upon cross-braced channel section main elements, extensively drilled for lightness, it was an intricately triangulated tubing assembly that relied upon bulkheads for additional torsional strength. The cowl panels also contributed rigidity to the chassis structure. The frame itself ended in front of the rear axle, with only a lightweight structure carried from the back to support the body, spare tire and fuel tank. The suspension was the standard XK 120 independent at the front with torsion bars and larger tubular shocks, although the A-arms were slightly longer and an anti-roll bar was added. Rack and pinion steering provided better response and control than the standard XK 120 recirculating ball steering box. At the rear Jaguar got innovative, creating a system that suspended the live rear axle from trailing arms with a single transverse torsion bar fixed at the car’s centerline. An upper triangular link at the right side located the axle transversely and took torque reaction. The XK 120C’s engine benefited from high lift camshafts that took advantage of a new cylinder head developed and ported under Harry Westlake’s guidance. With the fabricated 3-2-1 exhaust system installed, the XK 120C engines all delivered over 200bhp. The brakes also received attention, with self-adjusting two-leading shoe front brakes that promised more longevity during endurance races. Center-lock wire wheels were used for faster tire changes and better brake cooling. The body resembled the XK 120 but was extensively wind tunnel tested by a new addition to the Jaguar team, Malcolm Sayer, a recruit from the aircraft industry at Bristol. The tall, triangulated frame sides made doors an afterthought and eventually only one was provided, on the driver’s side, to satisfy technical inspectors. Sayer’s design incorporated another innovative feature: the whole nose of the XK 120C’s body was a single piece which hinged at the front to give the mechanics uninhibited access to the complete engine compartment. There was no mistaking the XK 120 heritage of the XK 120C, but it was also clearly a competition car, with no concession to weather protection. The works cars were tested at the Motor Industry Research Association test track and once at Silverstone, but arrived at LeMans as a complete surprise. There they lapped at times competitive with the big 4.5 liter Talbots – Grand Prix cars with fenders – and settled in for the race under Lofty England’s watchful gaze and careful planning. The three cars brought to LeMans were XKC 001, driven by Leslie Johnson and Clemente Biondetti, XKC 002 driven by Stiring Moss and Jack Fairman and XKC 003 driven by Peter Walker and Peter Whitehead. At four hours they led the race on the basis of consistently quick times and Lofty England’s carefully choreographed pit stops, with Moss/Fairman in the lead, Walker/Whitehead in second and Johnson/Biondetti in third. Suddenly, at 50 laps, Biondetti in XKC 001 came into the pits with no oil pressure, a problem that could not be fixed – as the regulations required – with the tools carried in the car. At midnight, eight hours into the race, Moss in XKC 002 also lost oil pressure, throwing a connecting rod at Arnage. By now the Jaguar mechanics had identified the problem on the Johnson/Biondetti car in the pits, a copper oil line in the sump had fractured. Walker and Whitehead in XKC 003 were alerted and continued, trying to avoid engine revs that exacerbated vibration periods. For 16 more hours they pressed on, always alert for the fatal failure as the Talbots fell behind. At 4:00pm on Sunday Whitehead crossed the finish line, bringing the XKC 120C home first in the most demanding motor race of the year and in the car’s first competitive appearance, in the process setting a new distance record of 2,243.9 miles and leading the second place Talbot by nine laps. Cooling problems, due to new bodywork, which looked more aerodynamic but did not provide sufficient airflow at speed, sidelined all three of the 1952 LeMans entries. Back to normal coachwork for LeMans 1953 where the C-Type Jaguars dominated, finishing 1st, 2nd, 4th and 9th overall and beating the favored Alfa Romeo and Ferrari teams. Just as William Lyons had planned, the international racing success of the XK-C or simply the C-Type as it became known, provided massive publicity, which in turn inspired road car sales in numbers hitherto unimagined by his small company. Only 53 C-Types were built, of which fully 42 percent were exported to North America, where its simplicity of construction, ease of maintenance and user-friendly speed made it popular with well-to-do gentleman drivers taking part in newly popular sport of amateur road racing. American drivers like John Fitch, who won the C-Type’s first trans-Atlantic victory in the 1952 Seneca Cup at Watkins Glen, New York as well as Phil Hill, Masten Gregory and Sherwood Johnston notched up many stateside victories in the 1952 to 1954 period. THE STORY OF XKC NO. 014 The history of the C-Type that RM Auctions is privileged to present at Vintage Motor Cars in Arizona is most interesting. Chassis number 014 remains as one of the most original examples of its kind in that it retains its factory chassis, body and engine and most other important parts. Although it was certainly raced, this example seems to have escaped the ravages of crashes, blow-ups and other maladies that this type of car is often exposed to. XKC 014 was sold by Max Hoffman, the New York City importer, to Commander John Rutherford, a great sporting car enthusiast. Rutherford wasted no time demonstrating his new Jaguar’s speed potential by being certified by NASCAR as having been timed at 134.07 mph on the beach at the Daytona Speedweeks early in 1953, thereby joining the exclusive “Century Club.” Commander Rutherford’s further speeding activities are not known, but in 1960 David S. Burtner purchased it from him. Burtner, a Dow Chemical Company engineer, living in Buffalo, New York, raced the car in SCCA regional racing for a few years. Sometime later, he sold the Jaguar to Ralph Steiger, an Ohio schoolteacher for the princely sum of $2,000. (Ah, the good old days!) In the early/mid 1960’s, either Burtner or Steiger, for reasons not known, fitted a Valiant slant-six engine, but fortunately, retained the original Jaguar engine, gearbox and other parts that accompanied the car to its next owner. (In any case, the Valiant slant-six was a fairly practical retrofit, being very similar in size, weight and horsepower to the original Jaguar unit and likely not requiring major chassis modifications.) The next owner of record, Berkhard Von Schenk of Germany was really the true savior of this C-Type’s provenance, for he commissioned British restorer Peter Jaye to carry out a full and proper restoration to original condition, of course utilizing the original engine. For those who do not know of Peter Jaye, it should be emphasized that he is likely the world’s foremost restorer of C-Type Jaguars and that the result of his labor is a product that is indistinguishable from that produced by the factory in 1952. The coachwork restoration was subcontracted to Bob Smith’s RS Panels firm, another standard bearer for perfection of the UK trade. In a recent interview, Peter Jaye described XKC 014 as he received it, “a nice original car with its matching engine and having most of its factory parts including the coachwork and requiring only minor chassis repairs, mostly in order to refit the original engine and gearbox.” Berkhard Von Schenk kept the car for quite some time, eventually selling it to racing school and Lime Rock racing circuit owner, Skip Barber, through Jaguar expert and Classic Jaguar Association Registrar, Terry Larson, in 2002. Skip Barber maintains a 20 car collection of esoteric and beautiful cars in Sharon, Connecticut and the C-Type quickly assumed the status of “favorite driver.” Although Mr. Barber did not race XKC 014, it is road registered and was often driven over the twisty “sports car roads” that connect his home with an office in Lakeville, Connecticut. Skip Barber will be attending the Arizona auction and is available to speak with potential buyers of this wonderfully original Jaguar. In a recent interview he explained his enthusiasm for C-Types and this car in particular, “These cars won LeMans twice and countless other major and minor races and yet it is as comfortable and practical a road sports car as one could wish for! I love the dual-purpose nature of such cars, a state of affairs that is totally bypassed by modern racing machines. The factory would often drive their cars on public roads to LeMans, race there and drive them back to England after the race. Great, just great, I think, and what a wonderful era this was!” Chassis no. XKC-014

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-01-20
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