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1923 Miller 122 Supercharged

Specifications: 120.8 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine with supercharger, three-speed transmission, tubular front axle with semi-elliptic springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic springs, four-wheel internal expanding drum brakes. Wheelbase: 100" The Ex-Cliff Durant, Eddie Hearne, Bill Albertson To the average motorist, Harry A. Miller’s name may not ring a bell as loudly as that of Ferdinand Porsche or perhaps even Ettore Bugatti, but his impact on automotive engineering, and American racing in particular, was unparalleled. His designs stood at the forefront of emerging technology and often surpassed his European contemporaries. In fact, Ettore Bugatti acquired a Miller race car to study before producing his first dual overhead camshaft engine for the Type 50 of 1930. The Miller plant was located a few miles south of downtown Los Angeles and in appearance was much like many of the factories thriving in this industrial section of town. Its foundry was hot and dirty, and the shop was a maze of overhead pulleys and belts powering a wide array of machine tools. The second floor drafting room was cold in the winter, hot in the summer and presided over by a parrot. Today it is hard to imagine the impact the cars that rolled out of those factory doors would have on the racing community for decades to come. Complying with the new rules for 1923, which limited engine displacement to two liters and eliminated the previously required riding mechanic, Miller decided to start with a clean slate for his design. After conceptualizing the parts, Leo Goossen interpreted the ideas so that he and his staff could put them on paper as working drawings, with Goossen’s unique artistic flair. The hundreds of necessary drawings were then turned over to shop foreman Fred Offenhauser, who was a master machinist and had been with Miller since 1915. The drawings were passed on to various departments where pattern makers, foundry men and machinists turned them into actual parts made of aluminum, bronze and chrome vanadium steel. With the exception of wheels, tires, ignition parts, gauges and a few other sundry items, every single part was produced on the premises. Evidently, economy in manufacturing was not practiced at Miller’s factory. His requirements were that the part be simple, lightweight and sculptural in design. More often than not, adhering to his dictum meant that the creation of these “simple” parts required tremendous skill and patience. In Miller’s shop perfection of design and craftsmanship certainly trumped speediness. The engine design was fairly straightforward. The basic architecture of the successful 183 was retained but scaled down, with known deficiencies redesigned and everything else refined. Bore was 2.334 inches, stroke was 3.5 inches and there were two values per cylinder. The cylinder head was cast integrally with the blocks, of which there were two, each with four cylinders. These were mounted on a barrel-type aluminum crankcase, with a crankshaft rotating in five main bearings. The car itself was an absolute masterpiece. The body, a styling tour de force, was purposely narrow while the chassis can be described as automotive jewelry – there was beauty to nearly every component. The fit was to the highest standards, the finishes included gun bluing, and all the castings were hand scraped, a time consuming job that produced a near-polished finish. A total of just seven 122s were completed before the 1923 Indianapolis 500 race, of which Cliff Durant, the wealthy son of G.M. founder William Crapo Durant, purchased five examples. A sportsman with a rabid interest in auto racing and a credible driver in his own right, Cliff was Miller’s chief patron during this Golden Era. Joe MacPherson’s car seen here was one of the five purchased by Durant. Its racing career began with a fourth place finish on the bricks at Indianapolis, driven by Eddie Hearne. The car enjoyed excellent success for the rest of the 1923 season at the hugely popular board track races scoring two firsts, three seconds and a fifth. Eddie Hearne was the sole driver. In 1924 Hearne finished sixth on the Beverly Hills boards. However, a fuel line problem on the 151st lap of the Indianapolis 500 ended his day and gave him a 19th place finish. Ira Vail, Harlan Fengler and Stuart Wilkinson rounded out the driver’s roster for the remaining board track events. Fengler had the best finish with a fourth at Kansas City. In February of 1925, Stuart Wilkenson crashed the car into the upper guardrail during a race on the Culver City Board Track. While Stuart was sent to the hospital, the mangled car presumably went back to Miller’s Speed Emporium where it was rebuilt and updated with a supercharger. Earl Cooper subsequently took over as driver for the remainder of the year. Interestingly, the car was painted a striking two-tone green and named the Junior 8 Special to help promote the smaller Locomobile passenger car of the same name that had just been introduced by the Locomobile division of the Durant Motor Co. Cooper started fourth in the Indianapolis 500 and ran well, taking the lead from Ralph Hepburn on the 121st lap. On the 124th lap, however, he hit the wall on the southwest turn and was ultimately credited with a 17th place finish at an average speed of 110.487 miles per hour. Earl went on to compete in eight board track races during the remainder of the year, with his best performance being two third place finishes in the 250-mile races held at the Salem, New Hampshire and Altoona, Pennsylvania tracks. The Miller 122’s career wound down during the following season. With its engine displacement reduced to the newly mandated 1.5-liter (91 cubic inch) formula, the car participated in four board track events held early in the year. The drivers were Earl Cooper at Miami, Ralph Hepburn at Culver City and Atlantic City and Pete DePaolo at Charlotte. DePaolo dropped out of the Charlotte race with oil pressure problems. The engine may have been damaged and, since this race was held on May 10, there may not have been time to repair it for the Indianapolis 500 held later that month. The next track appearance for the car came in September of 1928. Bill Albertson of Penn Yann, New York had acquired the Miller and planned to drive it in a 100-mile race held at Syracuse, New York but bearing problems prevented him from starting. On September 16th Albertson was successful in running a 100-mile race at the Atlantic City board track, where he finished sixth. For the 1929 Indianapolis 500, Albertson’s Miller was driven by Frank Farmer. Farmer started 26th and ran as high as sixth but was forced out of the race with a broken supercharger on Lap 140. Bill was active with his Miller during the remainder of 1929, scoring first place finishes at the Lehighton and Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania tracks. The highpoint of the car’s 1930 season was Albertson’s first place finish in a 100-mile race at the Toledo, Ohio track. Tragedy struck on August 16th of that year, however. Bill Albertson was killed when the car flipped and he was thrown out during a race at the Orange County Fair track in Middletown, New York. Albertson’s Miller was not badly damaged in the accident and his widow sold it to a gentleman named Horace Shaw. In 1932 Shaw’s driver Malcolm Fox scored three second place finishes in the car running on dirt tracks. The next chapter of the car’s history is rather mysterious. Photos of the car taken in the mid- to late-1930s indicate that it was a “Reddy’s Special” with Joe Silvia driving. Unfortunately, no competition record of this combination has been found. By this time the single seat rear drive Miller race cars built in the 1920s were nearly extinct and many had been wrecked, modified and parted out into oblivion. As such, it is truly remarkable how intact and original this car remained. In its Reddy’s Special outfitting only three modifications are apparent – 16-inch wheels, an added headrest on the tail and a relocated fuel tank filler. Additionally, it is truly remarkable that the chassis wheelbase was never shortened for better handling on dirt tracks. At some point in the 1940s a man named Schwartz acquired the Miller, before selling it to Edmund Dunn in the 1950s. Thereafter, Dunn sold it to Massachusetts collector Edgar Roy in the 1960s. In 1968 Carl Bross of Michigan acquired the car and had a new body built, which unfortunately was not particularly accurate. Upon Bross’ death the car was sold to Anthony Bamford of England, where it remained until its acquisition by Bob Sutherland, a true enthusiast with an amazing collection of race cars. His remarkable collection was dispersed upon his untimely passing and the Miller 122 found its way into the collection of Joe MacPherson. A remarkable survivor, it retained its original frame rails, front end, rear axle, engine, transmission, steering components, brakes, and even pedals. In his approach to the restoration of the Miller 122, Mr. MacPherson should be considered a patron of the automotive arts. He allowed every craftsman the time and latitude not only to do his very best work, but understood that part of a historically accurate restoration involved a great deal of research and time. Greg Schneider facilitated the acquisition of this car for Mr. MacPherson and was placed in charge of its restoration, with the goal of returning it to the highest level of historical accuracy. As such, it was decided to replicate its appearance in supercharged form, as driven by Earl Cooper in the 1925 Indianapolis 500. Further research led to amazement at how the car had somehow managed to remain in such intact and original condition. Therefore, a great deal of time was spent reviewing period photographs for every aspect of the restoration. Photographs were found from many sources but the assistance of Dave Hilberry at the I.M.S. photo shop was tremendously instrumental in ensuring the accuracy of this restoration, as was Bill Sporele of the I.M.S. Museum. Furthermore, the Gordon White-administered Goossen Archive proved invaluable in providing timely access to blueprints. Surely one of the most important aspects of the research process, an amazing amount of information was gleaned by enlarging specific areas of a photo to reveal tiny details that were captured in the negative but hidden in the print. Photos also provided the needed guidance to make certain that the Miller was not over-restored for the period. The restoration began in Minnesota where Greg Schneider worked with a team of skilled craftsman to restore the chassis and build new fuel tanks. The engine and gearbox were sent to Phil Reilly & Co. to be rebuilt to the high standards for which they are known. Once the engine and gearbox were completed they were shipped to Minnesota and reunited with the chassis. In fact, the completed rolling chassis was featured in the 2004 Issue 5 of Hop-Up magazine. Jerry Weeks of Indianapolis subsequently took delivery of the chassis for body work. As Myron Stevens had bodied the car at Miller’s plant, Jerry studied the few surviving examples of Stevens’ work to learn his methods and techniques. As a result, the entire body was shaped by hand without the use of modern power tools just as Stevens would have done in the day. The car was painted in Indianapolis using period correct Nitrocellulose Lacquer. After being assembled by Jerry Weeks the car was sent to Milwaukee for the 2006 Miller Meet. It made numerous laps around the track under the watchful eye of Phil Reilly and David Wallace. Upon its arrival at Joe MacPherson’s shop after the Miller Meet, “Squeak” White, John Carambia and Julian Alvarez were waiting to prepare the car for entry in the upcoming Pebble Beach Concours. They spent several weeks making certain everything was cosmetically finished and that no detail, no matter how small, had been overlooked. Joe was rewarded for his years of patience when the car was honored with a First in Class award at the 2006 Concours d’Elegance. As presented, this Miller 122 Supercharged race car can rightfully take a place of honor in the most sophisticated and vetted of car collections. It has incredible racing history, known lineage and an amazing tale of survival. What’s more, it represents a fleeting remnant of the glorious Miller history – a story that conquered Indianapolis, gave birth to the Offenhauser legacy, and now stands worthy of its own place on the most well-groomed of concours lawns and in the most polished of climate-controlled garages. Addendum Please note that this lot is being sold on a Bill of Sale Only. Chassis no. 20

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-06-14
Hammer price
Show price

1934 Packard Twelve Coupe

Specifications: Model 1108. 160 hp, 445 cu. in., side-valve V12 engine with two barrel Stromberg downdraft carburetor featuring automatic cold-start, three-speed synchromesh transmission with reverse, and shaft drive with hypoid rear axle. Front suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and beam axle, rear suspension via semi-elliptical leaf springs and live axle, and four wheel adjustable vacuum assisted mechanically-actuated drum brakes. Wheelbase: 148" Packard: The Majestic Twelve It has long been regarded as ironic that the greatest creations of the classic era came during the depths of the recession. Although the company was in excellent financial health, Packard was deeply concerned about the devastating effect of the Depression on sales in the fine car segment. Packard’s response was to redouble its efforts, meeting the threat from Cadillac and Lincoln head on with the new Twin Six and a range of spectacular custom bodies. One of the most respected designers of the classic era, Ray Dietrich was also one of the most influential. After stints at Brewster and LeBaron, he formed Dietrich, Inc., where his smart and elegant designs attracted the attention of Packard management, and as a result, Packard became one of Dietrich’s best customers. Lacking an in house styling department, Packard incorporated Dietrich design cues in its production cars, and in fact, after 1933, all open Packards carried Dietrich body tags. Packard’s Twelve was, in many ways, the signature car of the classic era; it was the top of the line offering from America’s leading manufacturer of fine cars. It was the Brooks Brothers suit of the time: a conservative car with finely tailored lines, elegant appointments, a refined chassis, and a whisper-quiet, twelve cylinder engine. In a sense, Packard’s Twelve was never meant to be. In fact, the car’s history goes back to the Cord L-29 and the great Miller engined front drive racecars. Packard’s management was intrigued with the idea of front drive, and commissioned the construction of a prototype. A decision was made to develop a twelve-cylinder engine for this new car, as the shorter length of a V12 – compared with Packard’s venerable inline eight – allowed more flexibility in packaging the front drive chassis. Extensive testing revealed weaknesses in the front drive chassis’s design, and anticipated development costs soared. Meanwhile, Cadillac had ignited the multi-cylinder race with their exquisite new sixteen and twelve cylinder models, and Packard’s dealerships were feeling the pressure. The solution, born of necessity, created one of the defining models of the classic era: install the new twelve cylinder engine in Packard’s proven Deluxe Eight chassis. The result was christened the Twin Six, in honor of Packard’s first V12, introduced more than 15 years earlier. The eleventh series is often considered to be the ultimate Packard Twelve. It was the last car with the classic swept fender lines, before the advent of the streamlined look. The front ensemble is truly beautiful, with a graceful vee shaped radiator, and matching headlights and fender lights. And the ’34 dash is a jeweled work of art, surrounded by rich burled walnut trim – and the first to incorporate a built-in radio. The vast majority of Packard Twelves were delivered with one of many factory bodies fitted. Available in every conceivable configuration, open or closed, formal or sporting, two doors or four, it is hard to imagine anyone needing something else. Packard’s clients, however, were used to the special things in life. A new Packard was an utterly unattainable thing of beauty for even the moderately well to do. Only the truly wealthy could consider a new Packard Twelve. However, there were still some for whom a production Twelve lacked the cachet and exclusivity they craved – and it was for these discerning clients that Packard created the Individual Custom line. Crafted by the leading artists of the time – Dietrich, LeBaron, and Brunn, they were built in tiny numbers. While an extensive folio of colors and fabrics were available, for these cars, anything was possible, from body modifications to special materials and finishes. Perhaps the best known, and certainly the most successful of these cars were those built by Dietrich, Inc. Dietrich, Inc. One of the most respected designers of the classic era, Ray Dietrich was also one of the most influential. Like his future partner, Dietrich began his career as a designer at Brewster in New York. More than just a coachbuilder, Brewster was the Harrods of the trade, catering to America’s leading families – many of whom had patronized Brewster’s for generations in what was known as the carriage trade. Young, bright, and talented, Dietrich’s skills were put to good use at Brewster. As a young man, however, he dreamed of more – he wanted his own company. He developed a fast friendship with Tom Hibbard, another Brewster designer, and together they began to spend their free time planning a venture together. Unfortunately, one day in 1920 Brewster learned of the plan, and summarily dismissed the pair. Forced to implement their plan sooner than expected, they were long on ideas but short on money. They decided to spend what little they had on a first class location, and soon they were operating at 2 Columbus Circle, a prestigious New York City address that also housed the design offices of Fleetwood. They named the new company LeBaron Carrossiers because Hibbard was something of a Francophile, and they both agreed that the name sounded sophisticated. One of the interesting things about the new venture is that they chose to concentrate on design – and didn’t even have a fixed relationship with a coach building firm. After a slow start, projects began to be awarded to the talented pair, but it was proving difficult to earn a living without the profits of body building. At about this time, the owners of the Briggs Body Company made a proposal – they would trade shares and merge the companies. In effect, LeBaron would become the design arm of Briggs, while LeBaron would have the control – and profits – that came from building bodies. The deal was consummated in 1923. Just before the Briggs deal, Hibbard and Dietrich were approached by Ralph Roberts, a talented designer who wanted a job with LeBaron. In the end, they decided not only to hire him, but make him a partner as well – though his responsibility would be for business management, as the firm already had two designers. At about the same time, Tom Hibbard went to Paris to look into the feasibility of establishing a European base of operations for LeBaron Inc. While there he formed a friendship with fellow American designer Howard “Dutch” Darrin, and the two decided to create their own Parisian firm, and Hibbard and Darrin was born. Hibbard cabled Dietrich to give him the bad news. In the meantime, Ray Dietrich had met Edsel Ford at the New York Auto Salon. The two hit it off together, and what was to become a lifelong friendship was born. In the meantime, Lincoln became LeBaron’s biggest customer, designing production bodies as well as limited production series customs for Lincoln chassis. Eventually, Edsel Ford decided he wanted to integrate the design and coachbuilding business more closely with Ford’s operations, and he encouraged Murray, Ford’s largest body building firm, to approach Hibbard and Dietrich. Roberts didn’t want to take the step, concerned about their partners at Briggs. While Dietrich seemed to share his concerns, after a visit to Murray in Detroit, he decided that he couldn’t ignore the opportunity and cabled Roberts to tell him that he was leaving LeBaron to form Dietrich Inc., which would in effect become the design arm of Murray, with Dietrich owning 50% of the company. There, his smart and elegant designs attracted the attention of Packard management, and as a result, Packard became one of Dietrich’s best customers. Lacking an in-house styling department, Packard incorporated Dietrich design cues in later production cars. In fact, after 1933, all open Packards carried Dietrich body tags, recognizing the influence of Dietrich’s work. Nevertheless, Dietrich Inc. still built a few custom bodies for the senior Packards, and these special cars have come to epitomize the ultimate in classic styling. Every line is exquisite, starting with the graceful v-windshield, continuing with the Dietrich trademark beltline, and finishing with a superb and elegantly tailored roofline and tail. Mrs. A. J. Eken’s Packard The original data tag identifies the chassis as No. 1108 32, and the delivery date as November 1, 1933. The original Dietrich data tag identifies the car as style no. 4068, body no. 8232. This remarkable Packard is documented with one of the rarest of all original documents – a properly filled out service booklet entitled “Packard Lubrication Service for 10,000 miles. It identifies the car as a Model 1108, with Motor No. 901979, mileage of “00”, and a notation that this was a new car delivery. Dated November 2nd, 1933, this booklet identifies the original owner as Mrs. A. J. Eken, and the selling dealer as Morristown Packard, of Morristown, New Jersey. The next owner of record of 1108 32 was Charles Earle Theall, who bought the car on August 27th, 1957 from Valerie Motors Inc. of Mamaroneck, N.Y. He kept the car until his death in 2000, working on a restoration in a garage built for the purpose. It had, in fact, no garage door – to keep prying eyes away and make theft considerably more difficult. Ralph Marano purchased the Packard from the Theall estate, selling it to RM Classic Cars Inc. of Chatham, ON. Shortly afterwards, RM sold the car to well known Packard collector Dave Kane of Bernardsville, N.J., who intended to undertake a comprehensive restoration. Before he could begin, he had the opportunity to purchase another car he had been pursuing, so he sold the car to friend and fellow New Jersey collector, Carmine Zeccardi. The vendor – a good friend of the car’s two prior owners – had often admired the car at Rich Fass’s Stone Barn facility, where the restoration was underway. He fell in love with the car’s elegant lines and masterful detailing, and resolved to become its next owner. After several weeks of persuasion, he was finally able to acquire the car from Carmine Zeccardi. The restoration work continued unabated, and everyone was pleased with the quality of the original wood and panelwork. Minor repairs were required, but in the end, the panel fits were flawless, and the paint surfaces laser straight. Considerable research was required to determine the correct colors for the car. An original sales manual for the Individual Customs – printed in color – provided the inspiration for the color combination, a lovely two tone arrangement in green. The fabric proved by far more difficult. A small square of the original provided proof of the original materials and weave, while a period photograph determined the colors. The result is truly wonderful, with an undeniably authentic look and a lovely color combination. The balance of the restoration was carried out with exceptional attention to detail. Not only were the materials chosen for correctness and originality, but the finishes are both flawless and identical to factory. Completed in 2005, the car has been shown only once – its debut outing at the Pebble Beach Concours d’ Elegance. In an unprecedented performance, it was recognized with three separate awards: First in Class, the CCCA Award of Excellence, and Most Elegant Closed Car. Summary Given that factory historical documentation does not exist for Packards, it is rare indeed to find a car with proof of its origins; not only does s/n 1108 32 retain its original data tag, but it has the only known service booklet, which documents the car’s original engine number, original owner, and delivery details. Just four other examples exist – two in California, one in Michigan, and one in New Hampshire. Three of these are in the hands of long term collectors who rarely, if ever, sell their cars – suggesting that once s/n 1108 32 finds a new home, there is only one other car that might possibly come to market in the next several years. The results achieved by this magnificent Packard at Pebble Beach attest to the quality of the car and its workmanship. With only one event to its credit, a new owner will have the opportunity to show the car at any of the other concours events nationwide. Without question, a Dietrich Individual Custom Coupe is one of the most important of all Packards; in addition, s/n 1108 32 offers unparalleled provenance, extreme rarity, and superb quality. Together, these attributes define “investment quality”. Chassis no. 110832

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-01-18
Hammer price
Show price

1936 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Cabriolet

Specifications: 180bhp, 5401cc overhead valve inline eight-cylinder engine with driver activated and gear driven Rootes type supercharger, twin updraft pressurized carburetors, four-speed manual transmission with synchromesh on third and a dog clutch on fourth, independent wishbone coil front suspension, independent swing arm rear suspension and four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 128" The spiritual descendent of the legendary Mercedes-Benz SS/SSK models, the 540K was introduced in October 1936 as the successor to the outstanding 500K. With more than 180hp available, they were considered the fastest production automobiles in the world. Technically very advanced for their time, the 540 chassis provided a superb basis for custom coachwork, upon which some of the most striking examples of the coachbuilder’s art of this golden decade were built. LEADING UP TO THE 540K No other automobile marque has so consistently led the field, literally from the very beginning of the industry, than Mercedes-Benz. Credited with the first production automobile, the company has been manufacturing automobiles longer than any other. Steadily improving products meant that by the first decade of the twentieth century, chain driven Mercedes race cars were a dominant force around the world. On the street, the massive 90hp cars had no equal for sheer power, speed and elegance. By 1922, a six-liter engine, with the newly designed supercharger, was married to a shortened wheelbase. The result was considered the fastest touring car of its time, producing an impressive – for the day – 160 hp with supercharger engaged. The S series then began to evolve, soon to be joined by the SS and SSK models. More than any other model, it was this series of supercharged six-cylinder cars that established Mercedes-Benz’s outstanding international reputation. In its fully developed form, the supercharged 7.1-liter engine of the SSK could reach a staggering 300hp, powering lightweight streamlined coachwork to an unheard of 147mph. The overwhelming performance of the SSK model resulted in many victories for Mercedes-Benz. Perhaps the most important of these were Rudolf Caracciola’s wins at the 1931 Mille Miglia and German Grand Prix. By the late twenties, the S, SS and ultimately, the SSK chassis, was revered as a tour de force of automotive engineering. Few today remember that it was Ferdinand Porsche who developed the dominant characteristic of the engines – their superchargers. Chief engineer for Daimler (after 1926 Daimler-Benz) from 1924 until 1929, Dr. Porsche laid the foundation upon which the next generation, now to be eight-cylinder cars, would be built. But it was to be under the direction of a brilliant young engineer, Hans Nibel, that the eight-cylinder cars were created, beginning with the Type 380 – the first production car with independent front suspension. Succeeded by the 500K, then ultimately the 540K, these cars were built upon two main frame rails tapered at the front to fit the narrow radiator behind the front suspension, which had become a Mercedes-Benz hallmark. The factory coachworks at Sindelfingen had already earned a reputation for top quality workmanship – perhaps the best in Europe – producing stylish, imposing automobiles trimmed to the highest levels of luxury. The 380, the first of these supercharged, overhead valve eight-cylinder flagships, was introduced in 1933. Power output was modest, at 90bhp naturally aspirated, or 120bhp with blower engaged, but its smooth refinement made the potential clear. With its attractive Sindelfingen coachwork, 157 chassis were built. Performance, while acceptable, was not outstanding, particularly with the heavier coachwork resulting from customer demand for even more luxurious bodies. Recognizing the need for more power, in 1934 Mercedes- Benz introduced the 500K (“K” for Kompressor, German for supercharger). With power increased to 100bhp or 160bhp with the supercharger engaged, the cars were finally among the fastest grand touring cars of the time. Even though the 380 had also been supercharged, the K designation and new external exhaust left no doubt about the car’s very special chassis. 342 cars had been built before the introduction of the penultimate 5.4-liter 540K in 1936. Although similar in many respects to the 500K, the new model offered even more power – 115bhp naturally aspirated, or an impressive 180bhp with the blower engaged. Notably, a 12 inch increase in wheelbase to 128 inches improved ride quality and gave the master coachbuilders at Sindelfingen more room to create even longer and more graceful lines. The hood was lengthened and combined with a vee-shaped radiator and external exhaust pipes, endowing the car with an undeniable presence. Long sweeping fenders increased the visual length of the car, while chrome accents highlighted the lines and added a sparkling elegance. But it is with the spirited depression of the accelerator pedal that the 540K exposes its true heart. The sudden shriek of the kompressor’s 7psi boost pressure unmasks the dragon within the engine compartment, adding 65hp at 3400rpm. Mercedes-Benz chose to pressurize the carburetor on its supercharged cars, so the howl of gears, the blower itself, and the scream of air being squeezed is unmuffled, creating a siren’s roar that clears the 540K’s path with authority. According to Jan Melin in his book, Mercedes-Benz, The Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s, a mere 419 540K chassis were built before production ended in 1940. (Other references indicate there were 406 540K chassis, with just 97 completed in 1936.) A total of 11 catalogued body styles were created for the 540K by Sindelfingen, each one a masterpiece of the coachbuilder’s art. THE SINDELFINGEN SPECIAL CABRIOLET Although Sindelfingen offered a variety of Cabriolet bodies, designated A through D and F, a handful of special bodies were also built. The Special Cabriolet offered here is one of the most striking of these; it is one of just three examples produced in this style, and one of the earliest cars to be designated as a 540K. The chassis and drivetrain used for these three cars is identical to that of the iconic Special Roadster. It has the same wheelbase, set back radiator and distinctive hood with side pipes used on these legendary automobiles. At the rear, twin spares provide a hint of the look of its predecessor, the 500K Special Roadster. CHASSIS 130945, BODY 82069 This 540K Special Cabriolet features a very low windscreen and attractive open fenders. The rake of the radiator shell implies swift motion as a finishing touch. According to its DBAG build sheet (Kommission 227730), it was originally delivered to Maria Loyder of Stuttgart on 18 October, 1936. After surviving World War II, it was brought to the United States in the 1950s, still in original condition. Intervening history is unknown until it was purchased by noted Japanese collector Naohiro Ishikawa in the 1980s, who kept the car in California where he had some fettling done by Scott Grundfor Restorations. Mr. Ishikawa subsequently ran it twice in the Monte Carlo Historic Rally, covering 2000 miles and earning first place finishes in 1991 and 1994, shortly after which – also in 1994 – he sold the 540K to its current owner, a noted MB expert and MBCA member, along with the Mercedes-Benz 300SLS Prototype Roadster. A sympathetic restoration was undertaken in the mid-90s, where a full mechanical refurbishment was performed, including – among many other things – a comprehensive rebuild of the original Rootes-type supercharger. Chassis, suspension, steering, and braking systems were attended to, with all parts reconditioned or replaced. The result earned a class win at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1996, and was the subject of a centrespread feature in the November / December 2004 issue of The Star magazine. More recently, the owner has had it re-restored to international concours standards, finished now in flawless black livery with claret accents and a matching black cloth top, expertly tailored using the original as a pattern. Interior trim is black leather, with contrasting red piping to the seats and door panels, and red beading to the black carpets. The dash center is gorgeous mother-of-pearl with ivory gauge faces and switches, surrounded by polished wood. All chrome mouldings were properly repaired, straightened as needed, and triple plated. Completed in 2006, it was shown first at the Forest Grove, Oregon Concours, where it took Best of Show prior to being judged at Pebble Beach with 100 points that same year. The car has since been displayed at the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center in Irvine, California. The Special Cabriolet is an exquisite example of one of the most legendary and remarkable of all Mercedes-Benz automobiles. Although 30 Special Roadsters were built, this striking Special Cabriolet is rarer by far. The low windshield and set back radiator gives the body a rakish, sporting look, while the twin rear spares lend the design a European flair – particularly when compared to the more conventional Cabriolet A body configuration. This important motor car is therefore highly recommended for inclusion in any serious collection of prewar European classics, where its style and universal appeal will be appreciated as much as its mechanical specification, startling acceleration and surprisingly nimble handling. Chassis no. 130945

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-01-18
Hammer price
Show price

One of just two examples built with factory competition features1955 Ferrari 250 Europa GT AlloyCoachwork by Pinin Farina

One of just two examples built with factory competition features 1955 Ferrari 250 Europa GT Alloy Coachwork by Pinin Farina Chassis no. 0389 GT Engine no. 0389 GT 2,953cc SOHC V12 Engine 3 Weber Carburetors Approximately 240bhp at 7,000rpm 4-Speed Manual Transmission Independent Front Coil Suspension – Live Rear Axle 4-Wheel Alfin Drum Brakes *Highly-desirable Europa GT, factory equipped with competition features and alloy bodywork *Built for the 1955 Mille Miglia, although not completed in time for the start *Retains matching numbers engine block, bodywork and chassis *Platinum awards winning example with engine rebuilt by Patrick Ottis and paint by Brian Hoyt THE FERRARI 250 EUROPA GT Capitalizing on the raving success of his V12-engined competition cars, Enzo Ferrari began to develop exclusive road-going models for sale to private customers. Mr. Ferrari had begun planning his new car during the war and in 1946 commissioned Gioacchino Colombo to design a small-capacity V12 engine for it. By the time the doors to the 1953 Paris Auto Salon opened, it marked a new dawn for Ferrari. The Ferrari range of road-going cars was being fully renewed with two new models announced, the 250 Europa to replace the 212 Inter born in 1951 and a bigger-engined model, the 375 America. The 250 was Ferrari's first true Gran Turismo, and it was dressed in the Pinin Farina design that would come to be synonymous with how a Ferrari looked, forever intertwining the 250 with the passionate men of Maranello and Turin. The sobriety of shape and refined elegance of line exuded by the Europa were fully confirmed over and over again by Pinin Farina in later Ferrari GTs, and design cues created by the Ferrari-Pinin Farina partnership during this time, like the long, low hood and oval radiator, continue to appear on Ferrari models of the present day. It was this design that has, for decades, embodied the spirit of cruising through the French Riviera, cocooning occupants and luggage in luxury while effortlessly eating up miles. First seen at the Paris Auto Salon the following year, in 1954, the new second series Europa GT looked quite similar to the standard Europa, but in reality, the GT was a car with a wealth of new features. The original Colombo-designed short block engine had been brought up to 220bhp at a screaming 7,000rpm through its development in the competition-derived 250 model, the 250 Mille Miglia. Used in the new Europa GT's, it allowed for a shorter wheelbase. This in turn brought down the weight by approximately 10%, and nearly ten miles per hour was added to the top speed of the new Europa GT Coupe. Perhaps the most desirable upgrade to the Europa GT was the fully revised suspension of the GT, now featuring independent coil-sprung suspension with double wishbones up front, yet only fitted to the late production cars. This made for a much better handling car, with excellent road holding, cornering abilities and ride quality. Less than 15 of the Europa GT's featured this advanced suspension system. The huge Alfin brake drums were similar to the ones later fitted to Ferrari's competition GT, the Tour de France, and offered very capable stopping power. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED As one of just two Europa GT examples bodied with lightweight aluminum alloy coachwork, chassis no. 0389 GT claims an unusual degree of rarity. Also prepared with competition specifications generally unseen in the model, this car has been associated with some of the most respected names in the Ferrari niche. According to a note typewritten on 0389 GT's factory build sheets; "Per MM/55", the car was originally prepared for the Mille Miglia, but it ultimately never ran the race, as it was not completed at Ferrari's workshops in time for the start. The unusual build specifications combined elements of two different chassis types, the Type 508, which was the first of the ever-evolving 250 GT chassis, and the Type 513, which was only otherwise used on four 250 GT Speciale examples that were bodied in Super America-style coachwork. The chassis frame tubes and cross members of 0389 GT were laid out quite differently compared to the standard Europa GT chassis, and features a wider track front and rear, providing the car superior handling for road racing. The brakes fitted to 0389 GT were identical to the ones fitted to the 375 MM Spider and Berlinetta sports racing cars, offering the best available stopping power for the already light GT. The Type 112 motor no. 0389 GT (internal no. 333) was installed and tuned for competition, weight being kept to a minimum using a Type 102 magnesium gearbox casing, again similar to the componentry fitted on the 375 MM. The beautiful lightweight body was executed to the builder's handsome Europa GT Coupe design, and was configured with left hand drive steering, featuring an adjustable steering column. Clearly, 0389 GT was built for a specific purpose and was a very special automobile from its inception, even by Ferrari standards. Finished in Blu Fiat 8V and upholstered with Plastico Naturale, much as it appears today, 0389 GT was issued a certificate of origin on March 18, 1955, and on April 27 the car was officially sold to the Industrie Lampade Elettriche in Vicenza, Italy, on behalf of Luciano Cascalli. The car remained in the Rome area over the next few years before being purchased by the well-known Ferrari collector Edwin Niles of Los Angeles, California, in March 1960. Mr. Niles imported the car to the United States, and soon thereafter sold it to a local Los Angeles dentist named Robert H. Peterson, who retained the legendary Max Balchowsky (builder of the famed Old Yeller road-race specials) to install a Corvette transmission and rear axle after a clutch failure, though the original Ferrari V12 engine was retained. The Europa GT then passed to several Hollywood executives, including two different employees of Columbia Pictures, eventually landing in the purview of Malibu-based Ferrari collector Paul Forbes in 1981. A year later, the alloy-bodied Europa GT was purchased by marque specialist Steve Tillack of Redondo Beach, California, and he treated it to a cosmetic refurbishment in the correct color scheme of blue paint over a tan interior. 0389 GT was then sold to Italian resident Marco Ferre, who repatriated the beautiful car back to its native Italy. Following Mr. Ferre's passing in 1991, the 250 GT was inherited by his children, and soon offered for sale. Acquired then by Michael Stollfuss of Bonn, Germany, the Ferrari was finally campaigned at the Mille Miglia (albeit the Storica) in May 1999 wearing start number 298, some 44 years after it was originally intended to contest the Italian epic. After brief ownership by one additional German enthusiast, the car returned to the United States when purchased by Fantasy Junction's Bruce Trenery, and quickly found a willing buyer in Stephen Block of Moraga, California. Mr. Block unofficially brought the Europa GT to several major events without formally exhibiting it, including the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance and Concorso Italiano, and also ran the car in the 2002 California Mille, where 0389 GT's front fender was ligtly damaged. Hereafter, 0389 GT was repaired and treated to a proper repaint in 2002 by award winning painter Brian Hoyt and his esteemed shop Perfect Reflections. During this time, the car's matching-numbers Colombo V12 engine was rebuilt by Ferrari specialist Patrick Ottis. The car then passed to renowned Southern California collector Barry Konier, before being purchased in 2008 by the consignors, two of the most established vintage Ferrari collectors in the United States. With its rare factory competition specifications and desirable Pinin Farina aluminum bodywork, 0389 GT is ideally suited for vintage touring, and in addition to the California Mille the car has successfully completed the Colorado Grand four times. The sensational Ferrari received a Platinum Award at the FCA's May 2013 meet in Pasadena, and is accompanied by an owner's manual and parts book, a toolkit in a proper leather roll, Marcel Massini's history report, and most importantly copies of the original factory build sheets. 0389 GT's original matching numbers engine block is currently fitted with cylinder heads from a Colombo Type 128C engine, offering improved performance and serviceability. For the Ferrari purist that wishes to more authentically prepare the car, a set of Type 112 cylinder heads with individual intake ports and correct intake manifolds is included, and they claim the added superlative of having been rebuilt by renowned engine builder Bob Wallace. The Corvette transmission and rear axle installed by Max Balchowsky are long gone, and in place are correct, period Europa GT units. Featuring rare mechanical specifications, this Europa GT is one of approximately 27 examples bodied with Pinin Farina's exquisite Coupe coachwork, and one of just two such cars built in lightweight aluminum alloy. Beautifully presented in two-tone blue, with the bottom color matching car's originally applied Blu Fiat 8V, this stunning Europa looks extremely smart. The interior is correctly trimmed in neatly contrasting caramel-colored leather, and carpeting and trim throughout is correct for the model. Original specification Marchal lights adorn the fenders, and the correct Borrani wire wheels are fitted with period-correct, tall Michelin tires. 0389 GT is that rare competition-prepared Ferrari GT that was never raced or damaged in period, a car that is equally well suited for vintage touring or display on the finest Concours lawns. It is, without exaggeration, the ultimate performing example of the handsome Europa GT, having been originally intended for the 1955 Mille Miglia, subsequently restored and maintained to breathtaking condition, documented with original factory paperwork, and tended by some of the finest Ferrari craftsmen in the United States. It begs serious consideration by any dedicated collector of vintage Maranello automobiles, and would be the ideal machine, with its epic performance and spacious, comfortable cabin, to enter in the Mille Miglia Storica once more, or any other driving event such as the Copperstate 1000, California Mille or Colorado Grand.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-10
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1967 Shelby 427 'Semi-Competition' Cobra

Est. 485 hp, 427 cu. in. “medium-riser” overhead valve V-8 engine with four-barrel Holley carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent upper and lower A-arms with coil springs, Koni tubular shock absorbers, and anti-sway bars, and four-wheel Girling disc brakes with alloy calipers. Wheelbase: 90 in. • One of only 29 Semi-Competition Cobras built • Genuine and fully documented • Ex-John Mozart Collection THE S/C 427 COBRA Although the 289 Cobra was well proven in competition, by the mid-sixties it was becoming clear that something else was needed. Every year, more power was required to stay competitive, and Ford’s 289 had reached its reliability limit at around 380 or 390 horsepower. In many respects, the father of the 427 Cobra was racing driver and development engineer Ken Miles, who thought the idea of a bigger engine might work for the Cobra, especially if winning in SCCA’s A Production Class was the aim. If there was any doubt about the need, it was eliminated when the Shelby team went to Nassau for Speed Week in 1963, where they were confronted with Chevrolet’s new Corvette Grand Sport, which was more than nine seconds a lap faster than the Cobras. Although Carroll Shelby had been promised a new aluminum block version of Ford’s 390 engine, internal resistance developed from the NASCAR faction inside of Ford and Shelby and it was forced to make do with the cast iron 427. Reliable at 500 horsepower, the engine was so much heavier that a complete redesign of the chassis was required to ensure that the car would handle properly. The result was a larger chassis, which was five inches wider, with coil springs all around. The necessary work was completed with the help of Ford’s engineering department, and the formidable 427 Cobra was born. As with all his cars, Shelby intended to see that the Cobras were winners on the track. In order to qualify as a production car under FIA rules for the GT class, manufacturers were required to produce a minimum of 100 examples. Shelby’s strong relationship with privateer racers gave him the confidence that he could sell that many, and as a result, a competition spec version of the new 427 was announced. Features included an expanded body to accommodate wider wheels and tires, an oil cooler, a side exhaust, an external fuel filler, front jacking points, a roll bar, and a special 42-gallon fuel tank. Anticipating FIA approval, Shelby placed an order with AC for 100 of these competition 427 Cobras. Each was finished in primer with a black interior and air shipped to Shelby’s facilities upon completion. Unfortunately, when the FIA inspectors arrived on April 29th, 1965, they found just 51 cars completed and denied Shelby the homologation he needed. Oddly enough, the same fate befell Ferrari: his 250 LM, which was intended to replace the GTO, was also denied approval. As a result, both of these archrivals were forced to return to the previous year’s cars for the upcoming season. Once Shelby knew that the FIA was not going to allow the new 427 Cobra to compete in the GT class, he cancelled his order for the remaining competition cars, and AC reverted to the production of street cars. Meanwhile, in June of 1965, the FIA decided to juggle its classification system, and a new class, called “Competition GT,” was created, and the production requirement was lowered to 50—coincidentally, one less than the number of 427 competition cars built at the time of the FIA inspection. The rule change created another problem for Shelby: it put his Cobra in the same class as Ford’s GT40. Since Shelby was running that program for Ford, there was a clear conflict of interest, not to mention a disparity in performance. To resolve it, Shelby agreed not to campaign his own car, leaving it in the hands of the privateers. By this time, 53 competition chassis had been completed by AC (chassis number CSX 3001 through CSX 3053), and of those, 16 had been sold to private teams. The first two were retained as prototypes, and one chassis, CSX 3027, was sent to Ford Engineering. The remaining chassis were something of a problem for Shelby. Parked outside Shelby’s L.A. warehouse, they were proving difficult to sell. Seeing the cars prompted Shelby’s East Coast representative, Charles Beidler, to suggest that they be painted and completed as street cars and then marketed as the fastest street car ever built. The idea worked, and the 427 S/C, or Semi-Competition, was born. The cars were brutally fast, and driving one was an exhilarating experience. One of the most memorable stories about the 427 Cobra surrounds a test that was arranged for Sports Car Graphic magazine by Ken Miles. A few years earlier, Aston Martin had bragged that their racing cars were capable of accelerating from 0–100 mph to zero in less than 20 seconds. Miles had the idea to restage the test using the new 427 Cobra. The result, according to SCG’s editor, Jerry Titus, was an astounding 13.2 seconds. CSX 3045 A well-known and fully documented, no stories S/C, CSX 3045 is actually pictured three times in the Shelby American World Registry: in 1967, then with early owner Peter Bayer on page 252; page 251 shows a nice on-track shot (car # 288) with early-1980s owner Jere Clark at the wheel; and again in the previous owner’s driveway, shortly after taking delivery in 1995. The Cobra presented here was invoiced to Shelby American on February 23, 1965, and it was completed to S/C specification under work order number 15103. On April 21, 1966, Shelby American received an order for an S/C model, including a request to install a modified race exhaust system to be delivered to the customer, a Mr. Hall, on May 31st. Likely, “Mr. Hall” did not actually take delivery or keep the Cobra on its MSO, since the next recorded owner, Peter Bayer, acquired CSX 3045 as payment for promotional work done on behalf of dealer Larsen Ford, of White Plains, New York, and he was the first to register this car in 1967. Doug Carsen, of Rimersburg, Pennsylvania, who is believed to have raced this particular S/C in several SCCA events, became the next owner. In the mid-1970s, John Parlante, of Whitestone, New York, began some restoration work prior to passing the S/C to Geoff Howard in 1978, who completed the work, including the Guardsman Blue paint scheme. By 1979, it was offered for sale with 10,400 miles: “Fresh restoration, all competition options, polished Halibrands—expensive!” Well-known historic and Cobra collector Jere Clark, of Phoenix, Arizona, bought the car, installed Arizona plate “427 S/C,” and went vintage racing. At SAAC-5 in Dearborn, Michigan, CSX 3045 won First Place in the Competition Shelby Popular Vote category, after which Dick Smith gave a white-knuckled Rick Kopec an on-track demo-drive at 185 mph! The car eventually came into the hands of Cobra aficionado George Stauffer, of Blue Mounds, Wisconsin, in the early-1980s; he advertised it as “a real S/C; it has run at Laguna Seca several times and is ready to win more historic races. Guardsman Blue; fuel cell; not for the timid.” By 1986, it was with Carl Schwartz, of Grand Blanc, Michigan, followed by inclusion in the famous John Mozart Collection from 1988 onward. Under Mr. Mozart’s ownership, CSX 3045 was subjected to a full restoration carried out to his impeccably high standards. It was contracted to Mike Giddings, of Robin Automotive in Northern California, who refurbished the suspension, braking systems, and the rear end and transmission, as well as performing all of the final assembly and detailing work. The original engine was rebuilt, the dynamometer was tested by Elgin Cams and Tech Craft, and the paint work was handled by Scott Veazie Restoration Services, of Los Angeles, California. In December of 1994, Cobra expert Dave Dralle, of Redondo Beach, California, carried out an inspection of the car on behalf of the next owner, who purchased it from Mr. Mozart in early-1995. This proved to be money well spent, as CSX 3045 won a Gold at the 1998 SAAC Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, plus Best Cobra and Best Comp Cobra at SAAC Ann Arbor, Michigan in 1999, in addition to many regional SAAC Show First Place awards. With only 29 Shelby 427 Semi-Competition Cobras built, these raucous roadsters are seldom offered publicly. It is even more unusual to find a genuine, 18,000 mile S/C with this car’s perfect provenance and stunning appearance, providing a very tempting purchase consideration for a serious collector of American racing history. Chassis no. CSX 3045

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-01-18
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1968 Ferrari 330 GTS by Pininfarina

300 bhp, 3,967 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.48 in. An original U.S.-delivery example with rare factory air conditioning Originally delivered to record producer Baldhard Falk The replacement to the 275 GTS, the 330 GTS, was designed to be an elegant, open-top, V-12 grand tourer for Ferrari’s best customers looking for the finest automotive experience money could buy. In addition to plenty of room for two plus their luggage, the 330 GTS also boasted an incredible set of performance figures. It boasted a top speed of 150 mph and a quarter-mile time of 15 seconds at just under 100 mph, and the 330 GTS could easily outpace just about any other car on the road when it was new. Unveiled at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1966, its styling was instantly recognizable as a Pininfarina design of the mid-1960s. The 330 GTS epitomized mid-’60s Italian GT styling with its uncluttered and elegant design, from its classic nose characterized by its shallow egg-crate oval grille to its triple-louvered vents on the rear flanks of the front fenders and on to the seductive tapered tail. The impeccable style carried on to the car’s interior, which was luxuriously appointed with twin leather bucket seats and a wood-rimmed, aluminum steering wheel. With remarkably spacious proportions inside, this was the perfect place to be for a 1,000-mile road trip across Europe or for a trip across town. Aside from the obvious addition of its convertible top, the 330 GTS was identical to the 330 GTC coupe that had been unveiled a few months earlier at the Geneva Salon. However, the convertible was built in much more limited numbers than its closed sibling. While 598 of the 330 GTC were built in total, only 99 of the 330 GTS would leave the factory gates by the time GTS production concluded in 1968, making the convertible much more desirable than the coupe. Today, these 99 cars are highly sought after by collectors for their fine driving characteristics as well as their gorgeous looks. CHASSIS NUMBER 10817 One of the 99 of the 330 GTS built, chassis number 10817 was originally delivered through the official West Coast Ferrari distributor, William Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors of Reno, Nevada, finished in Argento (25090 A) over Rosso (VM 3171). The original owner was Baldhard G. Falk of San Francisco, a record producer involved in the jazz and early funk scene on the West Coast. Falk returned the car to Modern Classic Motors after it developed gearbox troubles, and it was stored there for several years, with the producer eventually trading it on a new 365 GTB/4 Daytona in 1970. In 1973, the used 330 GTS was sold by Modern Classic Motors to the late Louis Sellyi, a world-renowned Reno eye surgeon and amateur racecar driver of considerable talent. It remained in Mr. Sellyi’s ownership for several years and then was sold to Philip Otto Kraft of Oceanside, California, who listed it with the Ferrari Club of America from 1982 through 1984. In 1987, it was exhibited at the FCA’s National Meeting, held in Washington, D.C., and Summit Point, West Virginia, where it was awarded the Gran Turismo Award. That same year, the 330 GTS was sold to the well-known enthusiast William Kontes, of The Chequered Flag Collection in Millville, New Jersey. It was refinished in its present elegant shade of pale yellow with a tan interior and, as of 1991 when advertised for sale, had recorded 29,411 miles. It remained with Mr. Kontes until 1998 and was then purchased by Robert Fagenson of Oakhurst, New Jersey. The car remained with Mr. Fagenson for 17 years before its aquisition by the current consignor. The car presents extremely well overall as a very nice older restoration with only minor blemishes to the paint, decent panel gaps, and a very nice interior with only light wear to the tan leather seats; the top is in excellent condition, while the chrome is presentable throughout for a driver. The trunk has been very nicely restored, while the engine bay and underside are clean and presentable, showing only the enjoyment of the road. During its current ownership, the car has been considerably sorted, including a new radiator, adjustments to the brakes and suspension, repairs to the clutch and heater, a full tune-up, and installation of new hood springs, tubes, and tires. Today, the 330 GTS is ready for continued enjoyment, in which its unique color scheme will continue to turn heads as it has for years. It would look as at home in the Nevada desert as on the sunny streets of San Francisco. Chassis no. 10817 Engine no. 10817 Gearbox no. 716 IR

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-03-12
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1971 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV by Bertone

385 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC transverse mid-mounted alloy V-12 engine with four Weber twin-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension with A-arms, coil springs with tubular shocks, and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.42 in. The only Miura SV originally finished in Bleu Medio One of five single-sump SVs sold new to the U.S. and equipped with air conditioning Recent mechanical service; an excellent driver’s Miura Original matching-numbers engine Before the introduction of the Lamborghini Miura at the 1966 Geneva Salon, the term “supercar” simply did not exist. The Miura heralded the beginning of a new age in automotive history, and visually, it looked like nothing else on the road. The designer, Marcello Gandini, was just 27 years old when he penned its stunning design for Bertone, and his work encapsulated the youthful spirit of the age and the power lying behind the bodywork. The Miura’s design was indebted to its engine placement, with the V-12 mounted transversely directly behind the passenger compartment. Not only did this allow for a highly attractive silhouette, but it also gave the Miura incredible balance and weight distribution. Like many supercars that have followed in its footsteps, the Miura evolved over time, and the last iteration, the P400 SV, was the most developed and potent. The suspension was also revised slightly to help reduce the “front-end lightness” that characterized the handling of earlier cars, and the rear bodywork was widened for a more aggressive stance. The engine was also addressed, and the SV was fitted with larger carburetors and featured different cam timing, helping to make the SV more user-friendly at lower RPMs. Needless to say, performance remained incredible, and the SV could outrun just about everything on the road when new. Producing a total of 385 horsepower, the SV could sprint from 0–60 mph in just 5.8 seconds. On a wide open stretch of road, the Miura could reach a top speed of 180 mph. Completed on October 29, 1971, this Miura SV, chassis number 4912, was originally finished in Bleu Medio over a Pelle Bleu interior and was shipped new to the United States through Modena Car U.S.A. Notably, it was the only Miura SV to be finished in that color according to Joe Sackey’s definitive tome, The Lamborghini Miura Bible. Furthermore, it is one of eleven single-sump Miura SVs to be fitted from new by the factory with optional air conditioning and one of just five examples equipped as such delivered to the United States. Chassis 4912 resided in Texas as of 1977 under the ownership of Pedro A. Rubio but had left his ownership by 1979. It is believed that the car remained in the United States until at least 1992. At that time, the car was imported from the United States to Japan by the Tokyo Pipe Co. Ltd. The car remained in Japan for the next 20 years, and during this time, it remained largely in static storage. By 2011, it was sold to a Mr. Yamaguchi of Tokyo, who sold it to its current custodian. The car has only recently arrived back stateside and is said to be in wonderful driving condition. Currently finished in Giallo Fly over Beige as refinished during an older restoration, the car has received a recent mechanical service to bring it up to superb running and driving condition. Following a test drive, an RM Sotheby’s specialist commented that the car makes great power and has very responsive steering. Driving on the roads of Los Angeles, he further commented that “it’s hard to get looks driving around LA, but a Miura continues to turn heads!” Without the Miura, it can be argued that Lamborghini might not even exist as a company today. Its importance to the automotive world as a whole simply cannot be understated. Chassis number 4912 is an excellent driver’s Miura and would surely put a smile on the faces of any driver and passenger at speed. Furthermore, considering its incredible original specification, it would be a fantastic candidate for restoration and would surely attract lots of attention at concours events around the world. Regardless, this is a Miura to be enjoyed and driven—quickly! Addendum Please note that the title for this vehicle is in transit. Chassis no. 4912 Engine no. 30673

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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The ex-Charles G. RenaudPebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Award Winning1951 FERRARI 212 INTER CABRIOLETCoachwork by Vignale – Ferrari Classiche Certifi

The ex-Charles G. Renaud Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance Award Winning 1951 FERRARI 212 INTER CABRIOLET Coachwork by Vignale Chassis no. 0159E Engine no. 0159E 2,562cc SOHC V-12 Engine 3 Weber Carburetors 170bhp at 6,500rpm 5-Speed Manual Gearbox Front Independent Suspension – Live Rear Axle 4-Wheel Drum Brakes *2nd-in-class at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance *Certified with Ferrari Classiche Red Book and Marcel Massini Report *Recent ownership for 39 years by noted collector Charles G. Renaud *Award winning two-year restoration completed in 2014 *Exquisite open-top expression of the venerable 212 Inter *FIVA certified THE FERRARI 212 Produced in multiple variations between 1951 and 1952, the 212 achieved significant racing successes but more importantly it put some 110 individual chassis in the hands of clients. The 212 was bodied in a bewildering array of styles from lightweight spyders, coupés and berlinettas to stylish and luxurious cabriolets.Carrozzeria Alfredo Vignale contributed most of the 212's coachwork but the 212 also provided the basis for the first Ferrari by Pinin Farina and important designs by both Touring and Ghia. Ferrari's original V12 designed by Gioacchino Colombo was only 1.5 liters, just 125cc per cylinder. Its displacement was first expanded to 1,995cc in the Ferrari 166, then to 2,341cc in the 1950. A further increase in the cylinder bore from 65mm to 68mm brought the individual cylinders to 212cc and the engine's displacement to 2,562cc. The chassis was Ferrari's proven design consisting of a double oval tube frame with double wishbones at the front suspended by a transverse leaf spring and a carefully located live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs. The brakes were Ferrari's large hydraulically actuated drums. The transmission was mounted directly behind the engine and had five forward speeds. There were two basic – but frequently intermingled – distinctions. The Export model, intended for racing on tighter circuits, had a wheelbase of only 2,250mm. The Inter version was typically built on a longer wheelbase chassis in both racing and Gran Turismo guise. Engines were tailored to clients' needs and to the specified coachwork with different tunes and carburation. The engine's elements were refined steadily including introduction during the 212's production of cylinder heads with individual intake ports, bringing the rated power when fitted with three 36mm downdraft Weber carburetors to 170bhp. It was also during the 212's production that the model designation changed, without notice or comment, to 'EU', foreshadowing the 250 Europa that was to follow it. While often competing against the large displacement Lampredi-engined 340 Mexico, the 212 earned its keep in racing, including first and second place finishes in the 1951 Carrera Panamericana by Piero Taruffi / Luigi Chinetti and Alberto Ascari / Luigi Villoresi. The 212's competitiveness was further demonstrated by the frequency with which their engines were updated by owners, in an effort to keep at bay newer and larger-displacement competitors. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This breathtakingly restored early Ferrari Cabriolet claims a number of noteworthy superlatives, including coachbuilt rarity, a documented history of very few owners, Red Book certification by Ferrari Classiche that verifies the presence of the car's original V-12 engine, and a recent successful visit to the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. Chassis no. 0159 E is approximately the 16th of 78 Inter examples built, and the first of four similarly styled cabriolets bodied by Vignale. The coachbuilder's exquisite design took the 212 Cabriolet to a new level of elegance, with a large open-mouth grille, chromed front fender strakes, and recessed chromed tail lamps. With almost exclusive use of aluminum alloy in the coachwork, the lightweight Inter was also capable of impressive performance. Built on a 2,500mm wheelbase, this 212 was completed at the factory in October 1951, as photographically depicted in the 2006 book Making a Difference – Coachbuilt Roadgoing Ferraris of the Fifties and Sixties, by marque authorities Angelo Tito Anselmi and Marcel Massini. According to Massini's history of chassis no. 0159 E, the car was dispatched in October 1951 to a dealership in Rome before being sold to the first owner of record, Peter Staehelin, a student in Basel, Switzerland. Staehelin was a co-founder of the Ecurie Espadon race team, which campaigned two Ferrari Formula 2 monopostos. In 1953, Mr. Staehelin commissioned the factory to upgrade the Inter's motor to a higher state of tune by modifying the one-carburetor intake to a three-carb set-up, which duplicated the competition configuration of the 212 Export variant. The car was spotted and photographed while parked at the XXIII Annual 24-Hours of Le Mans in June 1955, having been driven there by Staehelin. In December 1960, the opulent Vignale Cabriolet was purchased by a musician in Thalwil, Switzerland, named Mr. Tellenbach. Domiciled for a year or two, the car passed in 1963 to August Zumsteg, a teacher residing in nearby Kaiserstuhl. Following the cancellation of Mr. Zumsteg's registration in January 1969, the 212 was acquired by Rob de la Rive Box, the noted Dutch dealer and automotive writer. Photographs of the car taken during his ownership were eventually published in books by Marcel Massini and Mr. De la Rive Box. Purchased in January 1971 by L.J. Roy Taylor of Shropshire, England, the elegant Inter was registered in the United Kingdom, and when later tested in August 1973 by Woores Garage Ltd. the car still displayed only 69,788 kilometers. In October 1973 the Ferrari was sold to Charles Gaston Renaud of Cortaillod, Switzerland, a former Bugatti privateer racer and friend of the first owner, Mr. Staehelin. Mr. Renaud owned the car for several decades, and it was featured in an article about his collection in the December 1999 issue of the French magazine Automobiles Classiques. In 2002 the owner began to disassemble the cabriolet for restoration, but he unfortunately passed away four years later with the refurbishment still underway, and 0159 E was domiciled within his estate until 2012. When the rare cabriolet was acquired then by the consignor, the odometer still displayed just 71,628 kilometers, which are believed to be original. Seeking to confirm 0159 E's provenance and originality, the consignor contacted the Ferrari factory regarding production records and received an email from Ferrari Classiche's Marco Arrighi that engine internal no. 72 corresponded with the car's original V-12 motor. In October 2012, the Inter was submitted to Sahli Karrosserie in Zurich to receive a new paint finish in the original color of Rosso Bordeaux, and a fully invoiced and photo-documented mechanical and interior restoration was also undertaken. Completed in spring 2014, this work resulted in outstanding factory-correct detail and properly performing systems. Following the factory issuance of prestigious Ferrari Classiche Red Book certification in April 2014, 0159 E was accepted and presented in August at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, where it was awarded second-place in its class. Of great note is the fact that the class winner, chassis no. 0402 AM (the Scaglietti-bodied 375MM originally owned by film director Roberto Rossellini), eventually won Best of Show, making the cabriolet's second-place award a particularly honorable mention. Still displaying the immaculate benefits of the comprehensive restoration, chassis no. 0159 E is an exquisite postwar Ferrari with exceedingly rare coachwork (the first of four Vignale Cabriolets, and the only one to feature the elegant chromed fender strakes). It is accompanied by factory certification, books and tools, and numerous photographs (including period images taken at the Vignale factory upon its completion, and over 2,200 restoration photos). A sensational example of the early luxury roadcars that Maranello was marketing to support its legendary racing efforts, this superb 212 Inter would crown nearly any collection of Ferrari roadcars, and would make an ideal acquisition for any discerning Italian sports car aficionado.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-15
Hammer price
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1993 FERRARI F40LM VIN. ZFFGX34X000097893

1993 FERRARI F40LM Coachwork by Michelotto - Design by Pininfarina VIN. ZFFGX34X000097893 2,936cc DOHC Twin-Turbocharged V8 Engine Weber-Marelli Electronic Fuel Injection 700bhp at 8,100rpm 5-Speed Manual Transmission 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *The ultimate iteration of the ultimate Enzo-era Ferrari *One of a small handful of California-delivery F40LM's *The 18th of only 19 F40LM's produced *Never raced, extremely low mileage example *Sensational factory original condition throughout THE FERRARI F40 For Ferrari's 40th anniversary as a constructor under his own name, Enzo Ferrari gave his design team a very simple instruction: "Build a car to be the best in the world." Time has shown that they complied. A mid-engined, two-seater Berlinetta, the F40 was a development of the limited-production 288GTO and like the latter - but unlike the preceding 308/328 series - mounted its power unit longitudinally rather than transversely. A four-cam 3-liter V8 with four valves per cylinder, the F40 engine employed twin IHI turbochargers to liberate 478bhp at 7,000rpm. For the seriously speed-addicted this could be boosted by 200bhp by means of a factory tuning kit. Of equal, if not greater, technical interest was the method of body/chassis construction, the F40 drawing on Ferrari's Formula 1 experience in its use of composite technology. A one-piece plastic molding, the body was bonded to the tubular steel chassis to create a lightweight structure of immense rigidity superior to an all-metal structure. The doors, bonnet, boot lid and other removable panels were carbon fiber. Pugnaciously styled by Pininfarina, the wind tunnel-developed F40 incorporated the latest aerodynamic aids in the form of a dam-shaped nose and high rear aerofoil. Despite the need to generate considerable downforce - and with a top speed higher than the take-off speed of many light aircraft, the F40 needed all the downforce it could get - the result was a commendably low drag coefficient of just 0.34. The F40's interior reinforced its image as a thinly disguised racecar, with body-contoured seats, an absence of carpeting and trim, and sliding Plexiglas windows. When it came to actual competition, race-prepared F40s more than held their own and in the Global GT series proved quicker on many circuits than McLaren's F1 GTR. Electronics were important, but they served the engine only. There was no ABS, no traction control, no electro-hydraulic paddle shifting and no stability control – it was a raw car whose fate rested entirely with the skill of the driver. With a 201 mph top speed and sub-4 second 0-60 time, no one was disappointed with the F40. Ferrari proposed only a limited run of 400 or so F40s but the model's reception was overwhelming, even at over $250,000 apiece, and the run kept growing until 1,315 were built by the time production ended in 1991. THE FERRARI F40LM Competition was not in Ferrari's original plan for the F40 but Daniel Marin, managing director of French Ferrari importer Charles Pozzi SA, took the initiative and induced Ferrari to authorize Michelotto, the famed Padova Ferrari service center whose previous credits included the 308 GTB Group 4 and Group B racing cars, to construct a series of F40-based cars for racing under IMSA rules in the U.S. The resulting F40LM – LM for "Le Mans" – was a car far more rare and exclusive than a normal F40. These ultra rare F40LMs were originally built only for Ferrari's most favored clients. Heavily developed for competition by Michelotto, the F40LM sported a reinforced chassis, even more aggressive bodywork including a deeper front air dam and larger, cockpit adjustable rear wing, a racing interior, stiffer suspension, up-rated brakes, competition gearbox, wider wheels and a specially prepared engine producing between 850-900bhp. Not to be confused with the standard road-going F40, or cars up-rated subsequently on behalf of their owners, just 19 factory F40 LMs were originally built and they are today highly coveted and rarely seen. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This F40LM, #97893, is the penultimate example produced, the 18th built out of a total production run of 19 cars. According to Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, the F40LM was delivered new on June 8th, 1993, through Ferrari North America to their new Ferrari of San Francisco dealership, located just a few miles north of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge in picturesque Mill Valley, California. #97893 is therefore one of very few F40LMs delivered new to the United States, nevertheless California. There were only a very small handful of these cars, perhaps two or three at most, delivered new to California. Not coincidentally in the slightest, the Ferrari of San Francisco dealership was newly opened, a project funded and owned by the Ferrari factory itself – at the time the only factory owned store located in the United States. The breathtaking and sublime F40LM must have spent much time drawing admirers sitting at the center of the showroom, itself a perfectly crafted Tuscan farmhouse complete with Italian tile driveway. The Michelotto-bred F40LM must have felt quite at home. Having seen no mileage, the still as-new F40LM was sold in November of 1994 to Art Sport of Osaka, Japan, and the car shipped to them. A copy of a Japanese Customs document from this time appears to show the car arriving on Japanese shores in March 1995. The car remained with Art Sport, still in as-new condition, before being sold to a well-known private Japanese Ferrari collector, who kept the car until about 2007. It was then acquired by the consignor, a noted Japanese collector with examples of some of the world's most exclusive supercars in his impressive collection. During his long-term ownership, the F40LM has remained in Japan. It has seen no use during this time beyond occasional starting. 97893 was brought back to California for this year's Quail Lodge Auction for the first time since it was sold new here nearly 20 years ago. The chance to acquire an F40LM is extremely rare. Many have in the care of long-term owners, with original clientele including the likes of the Sultan of Brunei. Furthermore, the F40LM is a rarer commodity than even the priceless 250GTO with which it shares ancestral roots. Of the 19 F40LMs, many were run hard in competition, raced in international GT racing series such as the Japanese JGTC and American IMSA, while other cars were often campaigned at Ferrari events by their private owners. 97893 is a rare F40LM that has not been raced or tracked. It is an opportunity to acquire a virgin example of the ultimate iteration of the F40, the car that redefined the term "supercar" for a generation of enthusiasts. Today, the F40 remains as one of the most graceful yet aggressive shapes to ever adorn an automobile. The ultimate F40LM version, as offered here, was the pinnacle of achievement for Ferrari and Michelotto both in terms of design and performance; it is the peak of engineering development for the model. With fewer than 20 examples originally produced, the chance to acquire F40LM #97893 today should not be missed.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
Show price

The ex-Filipinetti/ex-Dominique Martin Team ZITRO, Tom Armstrong,1966 Ford GT40 Chassis no. GT40P/1033

The ex-Filipinetti/ex-Dominique Martin Team ZITRO, Tom Armstrong 1966 Ford GT40 Chassis no. GT40P/1033 * 302-cid V8 * Gurney-Weslake heads with 48IDA Webers * Fully authenticated by Ronnie Spain * Ex-Geneva Auto Show Car * Extensive international race record * Restored by Phil Reilly * Proven vintage race car * Offered from the Tom Armstrong Collection * Impressive spares package Ford GT40 P '1033' was shipped to Geneva, Switzerland, from the Ford Advanced Vehicles Ltd production plant at Slough, Buckinghamshire, England, on January 14th, 1966. The car was shipped unpainted and incomplete, as it was destined for the Graber coachworks, where it was to be completed, trimmed and prepared as a very special road car for Georges Filipinetti, patron of Switzerland's celebrated Scuderia Filipinetti racing team. As entered by FAV on their contemporary Production Car Record Sheet, '1033' was intended as a "Road Car. Sent with std. race engine and transmission to be changed later." Graber's work was completed early in 1967, the car finished in light metallic blue with minimal over-rider-style nose protectors, electric door windows, full leather interior and that most sensible GT40 option, air-conditioning. The car featured on the front cover of the British 'Car' magazine issue of February 1967, and was displayed at the Geneva Salon the following month. Mr Filipinetti immediately offered it for sale through Geneva Ferrari dealer Jean-Jacques Weber, who found an eager buyer in Bolivian tin millionaire Jaime Ortiz-Patino who at that time resided in Geneva. On May 5, 1967, '1033' was Swiss road registered for him as 'GE 136999'. In subsequent correspondence with premier GT40 authority Ronnie Spain, Mr Ortiz-Patino confirmed that he had driven the car quite often in Switzerland and France before having all its special trim removed and the car converted into a pure race car for his godson, Dominique Martin to drive in competition. This aspiring young French racing driver initially gained experience in the GT40 by contesting a series of minor-league national hill-climb events, as at the Col de la Faucille and at Beaujolais in 1968. He qualified for a full competition license and raced the car at Montlhery, outside Paris. Into the new year of 1969 Dominique Martin then entered '1033' for a series of major international endurance races, including the Le Mans 24-Hours. Co-driving the GT40 with the more experienced Frenchman Jean-Pierre Hanrioud, Martin appeared at the Le Mans Test Weekend on March 29-30, 1969, the still pale blue car then wearing prominent 'ZITRO' lettering across its nose, reflecting its Ortiz-Patino family sponsorship. On Italy's Liberation Day – April 25 – the Martin/Hanrioud pairing raced '1033' in the Monza 1,000Kms round of that year's FIA World Championship of Makes, and finished 15th overall. Their Le Mans ambitions were foiled by a major engine failure during practice which prevented them taking the start, but on October 12, 1969, Martin and Pierre Maublanc drove the car well in the Montlhery 1,000Kms and finished ninth overall, fourth in their class. The following weekend saw '1033' contest the Hockenheim 300-Miles in Germany, again finishing ninth. Into 1970 Dominique Martin shipped the now well-developed Ford to Buenos Aires, Argentina, for the opening round of the new year's World Championship series. In a preliminary 200-mile event at the Buenos Aires Autodrome on January 11, Martin retired due to transmission failure, but on January 18 placed twelfth overall in the Championship-qualifying Buenos Aires 1,000Kms there. Back in France that March, '1033' contested the public road Rallye de l'Ouest, Martin finishing second overall with navigator Chini by his side. Dominique Martin then decided to change sporting direction and the ZITRO Ford GT40 – surplus to his requirements - was subsequently repainted in a non-metallic pale blue and was offered for sale via ex-Scuderia Filipinetti mechanic Michel Berney. Unfortunately, on October 26 that year while driving it between his home and garage premises, Michel Berney had the car catch fire. He escaped unscathed, but could only watch the fire take hold. The local fire brigade arrived in time to save the GT40's steel-panelled chassis virtually intact, but almost everything else within the car that would burn had burned. M. Berney subsequently stripped and cleaned the monocoque chassis and photographed it 'for the record'. Most significantly, his photos have survived and would enable Ronnie Spain to identify the surviving monocoque structure absolutely as this individual GT40 – '1033'. As Mr Spain writes: "Very importantly...when the chassis was repaired in England several years later, the necessary work as told to me was the fitting of a new floor and outer sills, and a new outer roof skin". He then points out that "...apart from the roof skin, the floor and outer sills are work that has been necessary on quite a few GT40s..." – since these still-skinned monocoque cars have proved notoriously prone to corrosion. A pair of as-original perforations in this GT40's left-front tub structure are amongst other detail features which have proved unique to '1033' as now offered here. These distinctive perforations are clearly visible in M. Berney's 1970 photographs of the fire-damaged tub, and also visible in photography of the cleaned-up and painted structure in 1972 when it was subsequently owned by fellow Scuderia Filipinetti alumni Franco Sbarro. The same entirely distinctive identifying feature then appears upon photography of the same tub when celebrated Californian preparation specialist Phil Reilly began serious restoration of it – under alternative (and mistaken) chassis identity - in 1983. Meanwhile, from Sbarro the chassis had gone to legendary British racer David Piper in 1974, the Swiss description of the car claiming it to be the Filipinetti team GT40 that had burned out at Monza in 1967 (which was actually 'GT40 P/1040'). David Piper sold the car under that mistaken identity to American Paul Chandler, and the chassis was part-restored during this period by British specialists John Etheridge, Paul Weldon and Reg Chapple. Ronnie Spain observes: "The inner roof panel had sagged slightly during the fire and that minor sag is also still in the car today as further proof of its originality...". The car was then sold to new American owner Bud Romak – still mistakenly identified as '1040' - and it was entrusted to Phil Reilly for full restoration in 1983. Mr Romak subsequently enjoyed vintage racing the car for several years before deciding to sell it in 1988, when he asked Ronnie Spain to verify its true identity. Having established its absolute provenance as the ex-Martin Team ZITRO car, '1033', Mr Romak then sold the car to prominent American connoisseur Tom Armstrong who has retained it ever since. In his hands the car has made multiple appearances at the Monterey Historics and numerous other US vintage races, including Elkhart Lake, Sears Point and Portland International Raceway amongst others. This simply gorgeous Ford GT40 car has long-since become established as one of the most exquisitely well-prepared and most familiar within the American treasury of these now intensely desirable and hugely useable competition/street masterpieces. With the appended internationally accepted confirmation of authenticity to support its self-evident quality as offered here today, 'GT40 P/1033' is a gleaming example of Ford's 'sixties Le Mans-winning legend. This example can be regarded as being instantly acceptable for such world-class circuit racing events as the Goodwood Revival Meeting, or for such European public road rally/races as the French Tour Auto, or for such hugely attractive American events as well as virtually any historic race meeting Stateside. The full wording of respected Ford GT authority Ronnie Spain's statement in regard to '1033' here, verifying its identity absolutely as Ford GT40 serial '1033', is as follows. He writes: "I began researching the GT40 in 1978, and...have been researching the GT40 extensively for over three decades now, have seen 106 of the 134 original GT40s and variants that were ever built, and have amassed an unparalleled amount of documentation, information and detailed photographs of the cars' chassis. All of this has armed me with an unequalled knowledge of each individual car's history, as well as the ability to positively identify an individual car by the absolutely unique details to be found in its chassis. (This) has fortuitously proved possible due to the very nature of the car's construction around a monocoque chassis built of sheet steel. By the very hand-built nature of its construction, each chassis has absolutely unique seam & spot 'weld-patterns' throughout, as good as DNA, where the around 250 individual panels were welded together. On top of this the basic chassis configuration underwent numerous modifications over the six years of GT40 production. All of this, plus the knowledge of factory modifications carried out to convert certain of the chassis to a different road specification, as well as the knowledge of the modifications carried out on all the chassis raced by the different 'works' teams, enables me to absolutely and positively identify the genuine original chassis of any GT40 for which I have unearthed sufficient detail. "My book, 'GT40: An Individual History and Race Record', was published by Osprey in 1986, and has been re-issued three times. I am currently in the final stages of a much larger, much more detailed, and much more thoroughly illustrated new GT40 book. I have been consulted by GT40 owners and buyers, car magazines, police forces, lawyers, the FBI. You name them, I've been consulted by them. "In this capacity, I state here, categorically and absolutely, that the car which is to be auctioned by Bonhams at Quail Lodge on August 12th this year is the one and only genuine 'GT40 P/1033', and has absolute provenance from me as such. More than that, of all original GT40s, GT40 P/1033 comes with one of the top provenances I have ever been able to supply. "By request, this document has been kept to the most basic statement on the authenticity of 'GT40 P/1033'. I have a detailed document which gives the full history of 'GT40 P/1033', including details of the absolute proof of the car's authenticity, which I will be happy to supply to any interested parties." Ladies and gentlemen – we present Ford 'GT40 P/1033' – for your delectation.

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-08-17
Hammer price
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1969 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta Alloy by Scaglietti

The only road-going ‘Alloy’ 365 GTB/4 Daytona in existence Matching numbers and offered in complete ‘barn-find’ condition Discovered in Japan after being hidden for nearly 40 years Documented with history and 2017 personal inspection notes by marque expert Marcel Massini The ultimate road-going Daytona; ideal for a fresh concours restoration or preservation class exhibition Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche THE UNKNOWN DAYTONA – A ONE-OFF ALLOY BERLINETTA With over 1,200 versions of Ferrari’s powerful 365 GTB/4 ‘Daytona’ produced from 1969–1973, only five lightweight Alloy competition cars, which dominated the 24 Hours of Daytona, were built. Further to those, Ferrari commissioned only one street version of the Daytona with an aluminium body, the very car offered here today, a sure-fire standout in any Ferrari collection as the only example of its kind and a car many thought did not exist, bearing the hallmarks of collectability in every regard. A unique car that no other collector can claim ownership to, this Daytona holds distinct ties to its competition brethren yet never turned a wheel in anger and was instead preserved for decades. Presented here in remarkable unrestored condition, having been domiciled for many years and never significantly refurbished, there is no better Daytona for the discerning connoisseur, as it offers limitless opportunities for enjoyment. Chassis no. 12653 is approximately the 30th car in the Daytona numbering sequence, wearing Scaglietti body no. 32. Other than chassis number 12547 (which was comissioned by Luigi Chinetti to run the 24 Hours of Le Mans), this car was the only standard-specification Daytona that clothed for alloy coachwork. Completed in June 1969, this Daytona was equipped with desirable Plexiglas headlamps and power windows, in addition to its tailor-made aluminium coachwork, and finished in Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) over a Nero (VM 8500) leather interior. In September, the car was distributed for retail to the Bologna dealer Motor S.p.A. di Carla Allegretti, from whom it was purchased later that month by Luciano Conti, the founder and publisher of Autosprint magazine. Mr Conti’s company sold the Ferrari in September 1970 to Guido Maran of Verona, who in turn re-sold the car a month later to Carlo Ferruzzi of Ravenna. In July 1971, the Daytona’s Italian registration was cancelled and the car was imported by a Japanese dealership three months later. Chassis number 12653 was then featured in the January 1972 issue of Car Graphic, a Japanese enthusiast magazine. In May 1975, the Berlinetta was purchased by Goro Guwa of Gifu, Japan, and in April 1979 it passed to Tateo Ito of Nagoya. Almost a year later the car was acquired by Makoto Takai, and he hid the car away for nearly 40 years. It was fabled and known by very few collectors to exist, but many true Ferraristi were unaware that such a special and important car existed, period. Several tried for years to purchase the car, but to no avail. It is offered here for the first time in decades, ready and waiting for a new owner. Currently in a barn-find state of condition, the Ferrari has clearly been in storage for a number of years, and in June 2017, it underwent a through evaluation by marque expert Marcel Massini. He confirmed the presence of the matching-numbers engine and transaxle, per stampings that correspond to factory build records. While the various Japanese owners conducted a number of minor cosmetic modifications, 12653 remains remarkably authentic in many other ways. The interior in particular displays impressive originality, with good condition confirmed in the door panels, sun visors, interior rear-view mirror, seats, carpeting, gearshift knob and the headliner. Mr Massini also noted that the aluminium panels he examined were stamped with proper matching Scaglietti body numbers and that the original spare wheel appeared to have never been used. When asked about the car, Massini commented, ‘What a super scarce Daytona barn find, the only remaining aluminium-bodied production GTB/4, sold new to Luciano Conti, a close friend of Commendatore Enzo Ferrari.’ Currently displaying 36,390 kilometres, which are believed to represent actual use, this rare 365 GTB/4 is an ideal acquisition for the consummate Ferrari enthusiast searching for absolutely the most unique example of any given model. It may be presented at preservation class venues or, for the collector prepared to underwrite a full restoration, chassis number 12653 offers an unprecedented opportunity to refurbish the only street-specified alloy Daytona. • L'unica 365 GTB/4 Daytona stradale in alluminio • Numeri di serie corrispondenti e offerta nella sua condizione di “barn-find” • Scoperta in Giappone dopo essere stata tenuta nascosta per quasi 40 anni • Storia documentata e note dell'ispezione fatta dall'esperto Marcel Massini nel 2017 • La Daytona stradale per eccellenza, ideale per un restauro da concorso o da esibire come pezzo conservato • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche LA DAYTONA SCONOSCIUTA, L'UNICA FUORISERIE IN ALLUMINIO DELLA MITICA BERLINETTA Con oltre 1.200 esemplari della potente 365 GTB/4 “Daytona” prodotte dal '69 al '73, in alluminio ne sono state costruite solo cinque, quelle che hanno dominato alla 24 Ore di Daytona. In aggiunta, Ferrari ha commissionato solo una versione stradale della Daytona in alluminio, la vettura offerta oggi, un pezzo da novanta per qualsiasi collezione Ferrari. Unico esempio del suo genere, un'auto che molti pensavano non potesse neanche esistere, ha tutte le caratteristiche per essere un pezzo incredibile da collezione. Una vettura unica che nessun altro collezionista potrà rivendicare, questa berlinetta ha uno stretto legame con le sorelle da pista, nonostante non abbia mai messo una ruota in un circuito. Anzi, è stato nascosta per decenni. Presentata qui in splendida condizione conservata, essendo stata tenuta ferma per anni, senza mai essere restaurata in maniera importante. Non esiste al mondo una Daytona migliore, anche per il più esperto conoscitore, un esemplare che offre infinite opportunità di divertimento. Il telaio numero 12653 è approssimativamente l'auto numero 30 nella sequenza di numerazione delle Daytona e ha la carrozzeria Scaglietti n° 32. Oltre al telaio numero 12547 (che era stato commissionato da Luigi Chinetti per correre la 24 Ore di Le Mans), quest'auto è l'unica Daytona con specifiche stradali carrozzata in alluminio. Completata nel giugno del 1969, questa Ferrari Daytona era dotata di fanali coperti in plexiglas e finestrini elettrici, abbinati alla carrozzeria in alluminio su misura, verniciata in Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) con interni in pelle Nero (VM 8500). Nel mese di settembre la vettura è stata consegnata al concessionario di Bologna, la Motor S.p.A. di Carla Allegretti. Qui viene comprata alla fine del mese da Luciano Conti, l'editore di Autosprint. Nel '70, l'azienda di Conti la vende a Guido Maran di Verona che, un mese dopo, la rivende a sua volta a Carlo Ferruzzi di Ravenna. Nel luglio del '71 viene cancellata dalla motorizzazione italiana per essere importata da una concessionaria giapponese tre mesi dopo. L'auto, con telaio numero 12653, pubblicata sulla rivista giapponese Car Graphic (gennaio 1972), nel maggio del '75 viene acquistata dal nipponico Goro Guwa di Gifu e, nell'aprile del '79, passa al suo conterraneo Tateo Ito, di Nagoya. Quasi un anno più tardi finisce a Makoto Takai, che la terrà nascosta per quasi 40 anni. Esemplare conosciuto da pochissimi collezionisti, molti Ferraristi ne ignoravano addirittura l'esistenza. Qualcuno, nel corso degli anni, ha cercato di accaparrarsela, ma senza successo. Finalmente viene offerta qui per la prima volta dopo decenni, in attesa di un nuovo proprietario. Nella sua condizione di “barn-find”, questa Ferrari è stata chiaramente dimenticata in un deposito per anni finché, nel giugno 2017, è stata sottoposta ad una valutazione dell'esperto del Cavallino, Marcel Massini. Massini ha confermato la corrispondenza con i registri di fabbrica di motore e del gruppo cambio-differenziale. Nonostante i vari proprietari giapponesi abbiano apportato una serie di modifiche cosmetiche minori, questo rimane un esemplare autentico sotto molti altri punti di vista. Gli interni, per esempio, presentano un'impressionante stato di originalità, con buone condizioni riscontrabili in pannelli delle portiere, alette parasole, specchietto retrovisore, sedili, moquette, manopola del cambio e nel rivestimento del cielo. Massini fa notare che i numeri di serie dei pannelli in alluminio combaciano con la numerazione della carrozzeria di Scaglietti e, infine, che la ruota di scorta originale non sembra essere mai stata utilizzata. Con 36.390 chilometri totali, considerati realistici, questa rarissima 365 GTB/4 è un'acquisizione ideale per l'appassionato di Ferrari a caccia dell'esemplare unico. Può essere presentata ai concorsi per il suo stato di conservazione o, per chi fosse disposto a sostenere un restauro completo, il telaio numero 12653, offre un'irripetibile opportunità di poter riportare agli antichi fasti, l'unica Daytona stradale in alluminio. Addendum Please note that the seller of the Daytona has confirmed that they will be responsible for all costs associated with obtaining Certification from Ferrari Classiche. Additionally, a full restoration is not necessary nor required for Certification. For additional information, please inquire with an RM Sotheby’s representative. Si fa presente che il venditore della Daytona si è impegnato a sostenere tutti i costi associati all'ottenimento della certificazione da parte di Ferrari Classiche. Si ricorda inoltre che il restauro completo dell'auto NON è necessario, né richiesto, ai fini della certificazione. Per ulteriori informazioni, si prega di rivolgersi a un rappresentante di RM Sotheby's. Chassis no. 12653 Engine no. B 18 Gearbox no. N 32 Body no. 32

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
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Ferrari 275 GTB berlinette 1966

Ferrari 275 GTB berlinette 1966 Carrosserie Pininfarina Châssis n° 08973 Moteur n° 08973 •Rare et désirable version nez long, modèle à tube de transmission et avant dernière 'deux arbres' •Livrée neuve en Europe •Numéros de châssis et de moteur concordants •Historique continu, victoire de classe en concours d'élégance •Demande de certification Ferrari Classiche en cours - rapport Massini au dossier « La 275 GTB est une automobile... superlativement vigoureuse, très agile et très rapide. Son confort, sa qualité de finition, ses lignes originales et sa carrosserie justifient son prix exceptionnellement élevé, car c'est une automobile exceptionnelle. » José Rosinski, Sport Auto, juillet 1965. Quand la série à succès des Ferrari 250 a été remplacée par la 275 en 1964, Pininfarina avait été une fois de plus sollicité pour faire fonctionner sa baguette magique pour le compte de Maranello, créant un dessin sportif d'un grand classicisme pour la 275 GTB. Un nez plongeant, un long capot, des ouïes d'aération fonctionnelles, une haute ceinture de caisse et un arrière tronqué à becquet étaient les ingrédients de la recette, le résultat étant toutefois bien plus que leur simple addition. Le becquet arrière et les jantes en alliage témoignaient des dernières évolutions des voitures de compétition de la marque, tandis que sous la tôle on trouvait d'autres preuves que la compétition améliore la race, comme la suspension arrière indépendante – pour la première fois sur Ferrari de route – faisant appel à des doubles triangulations et des ressorts hélicoïdaux similaires à ceux utilisés sur les 250 LM de compétition. L'installation d'une boîte à cinq rapports transaxle combinant boîte de vitesse et différentiel dans le même carter améliorait la répartition des masses, une caractéristique qui allait devenir traditionnelle sur les futures Ferrari à moteur avant. La construction des carrosseries était confiée à Scaglietti, proche voisin de Ferrari à Maranello. Porté à 3, 3 litres, le V12 à 60° était le Colombo bien connu délivrant 280 ch à 7 600 tr/min dans sa version de série. Une version préparée - de 300 ch – équipée de six carburateurs Weber était proposée et fut utilisée sur la poignée de 275 GTB/C (competizione) à carrosserie en alliage d'aluminium construites, bien que les clients d'une version routière aient aussi eu la possibilité de spécifier la carrosserie aluminium ou les six carburateurs à la commande. Malgré son allure quasiment parfaite, les modifications à la ligne originale ne tardèrent pas. Un avant plus long, une lunette arrière agrandie et des charnières de coffre apparentes firent leur apparition vers la fin de l'année 1965. Mécaniquement, le seul changement notable était l'adoption d'un tube de transmission pour protéger l'arbre de transmission. Ceci améliora considérablement le comportement de l'auto vu la nouvelle disposition souple des fixations liant le moteur et le châssis. La version ultime du modèle – la 275 GTB/4 – fut dévoilée en octobre 1966, le suffixe 4 soulignant la présence de quatre arbres à cames en tête au lieu de deux. Malheureusement, en 1968, les nouvelles réglementations sur les émissions mirent la 275 GTB et ses équivalentes hors la loi sur le marché le plus lucratif de Ferrari, les États-Unis, et le modèle fut abandonné plus tard en cours d'année, après qu'un total de 460 exemplaires aient été construits. Le châssis n° 08973 à conduite à gauche fut achevé en 1966 avec une carrosserie en acier avec des ouvrants en aluminium, un nez long, un tube de transmission et vendu neuf à son premier propriétaire M. Sapico, un habitant de Bologne, en Italie, en septembre de la même année. Les registres d'usine montrent que sa couleur originale était gris argent avec une sellerie intérieure en cuir noir et des moquettes bleues. Il s'agit de l'avant dernière 275 GTB construite avant l'apparition des modèles GTB/4 quatre arbres. À la mi-février 1967, la voiture avait fait deux visites à l'atelier de l'Assistenza Clienti à l'usine à Modène pour son entretien, le compteur affichant 15 406 km à la seconde visite. Dans les années 1970, la Ferrari fut exportée d'Italie au Canada. En 1978, elle fut vendue par l'agent officiel Ferrari Yonge Steele Motors de Toronto, au Canada, à M. G. C. Bell de Thunder Bay, dans l'Ontario, puis passa ensuite aux mains de Gerry Layer puis dans celles de G. J. Amaroso en Californie, aux États-Unis. Entre le début 1998 et juin 1999, la Ferrari a été restaurée en Californie pour un coût de 225 000 $, repeinte en bleu foncé et regarnie de cuir fauve. Elle fut alors proposée à la vente par Dane Prenovitz de Foster City, en Californie, et en 1992 fut vendue au collectionneur bien connu le Dr Evin F. Lyon de Lexington, dans le Massachusetts. En la possession du Dr Lyon, la Ferrari fut exposée au second Cavallino Classic à Palm Beach en février 1993, remportant un 2e prix de classe (Ferrari 275) et au même événement l'année suivante reçut une plus haute récompense, le trophée de 1e de sa classe. Début 2006, le Dr Lyon vendit la Ferrari à Christopher Lynch du Massachusetts, chez qui elle resta jusqu'à sa vente à l'actuel propriétaire en Suisse, via Paul Russell qui en avait assuré la maintenance pendant 15 ans, en 2009. Un reportage photo documente les révisions importantes de la boîte, du moteur et de l'allumage lorsqu'une révision complète a été confiée au Garage Costantini à Zürich, spécialiste Ferrari, en avril 2014 avec un kilométrage affiché de 67,454km estimé être celui d'origine. Désormais immatriculée en Suisse, cette voiture à l'historique bien documenté est vendue avec son titre américain et une grande quantité de factures, notices, dossiers, etc, ainsi que des reportages photographiques de sa peinture effectuée sur métal nu et de la réfection de son moteur précédemment effectuée aux États-Unis. La voiture qui est l'avant dernière « deux arbres » à être sortie de chaîne est accompagnée de ses livrets et de ses outils, de son carnet de bord en cuir, etc et devrait avoir reçu sa certification Ferrari Classiche au moment de la vente. Plus rare – et plus rapide- que la 250 GT châssis court pourtant considérablement plus chère qu'une 250 GTO, la très séduisante 275 GTB à tube de transmission est un modèle phare dans l'évolution technique des Ferrari de route et aussi l'une des plus belles. 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Berlinetta Coachwork by Pininfarina Chassis no. 08973 Engine no. 08973 •Rare and very desirable long nose, torque tube, penultimate two cam model to leave the factory •European delivery new •Matching chassis and engine numbers •Continuous history and past concours class winner •Ferrari Classiche certification in progress - Massini report on file 'The 275 GTB is... a superlatively vigorous, very agile and quick automobile. Its comfort, the quality of its finish, the original lines of its bodywork all justify its exceptionally high price, for it is an exceptional automobile. It is a thoroughbred, with luxury devoid of excess, and a fiery temperament... ' Jose Roskinski, Sport Auto, July 1965. When Ferrari's highly successful '250' series was superseded in 1964 by the '275', Pininfarina was once again called upon to work his magic for the Maranello concern, creating a true classic of sports car design for the 275 GTB. Penetrative nose, long bonnet, purposeful side vents, high waistline and short be-spoilered tail: these were all ingredients of the recipe, yet the result was so much more than merely the sum of its parts. The tail spoiler and cast-alloy wheels echoed developments first seen on Ferrari competition cars, while beneath the skin there was further evidence of racing improving the breed, the independent rear suspension - seen for the first time on a road-going Ferrari - employing a double wishbone and coil-spring arrangement similar to that of the 250LM racer. The adoption of a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle combining the gearbox and differential in a single unit helped improve weight distribution, and this feature would characterise future generations of front-engined Ferrari road cars. Body construction was entrusted to Carrozzeria Scaglietti, Ferrari's close neighbour in Maranello. Now enlarged to 3.3 litres, the 60-degree V12 engine remained the familiar Colombo type, in standard form producing 280bhp at 7,600rpm. A higher - 300bhp - state of tune employing six Weber carburettors was available, and this was used for the handful of aluminium-alloy bodied 275 GTB/C (Competizione) models built, though customers purchasing a 275 GTB for road use could also specify aluminium coachwork and/or the six-carburettor engine Despite its near-perfect appearance, revisions to the original 275 GTB were not long in coming: a longer nose, enlarged rear window and external boot hinges being introduced towards the end of 1965. Mechanically the only major change was the adoption of torque tube enclosure for the prop shaft which vastly improved the car's way of delivering its power to the chassis in view of the no longer rigid engine mounts. The model's ultimate incarnation - the 275 GTB/4 - appeared in October 1966, the '/4' suffix denoting the presence of four, rather than the original's two, overhead camshafts. Sadly, by 1968 the progress of automobile emissions legislation had effectively outlawed the 275 GTB and its like from Ferrari's most lucrative export market, the United States, and the model was phased out later that same year after a total of only 460 cars had been completed. Left-hand drive chassis number '08973' was completed in 1966 in steel bodied form with alloy doors, bonnet and boot, long nose, torque tube and sold new to the first owner Mr Sapico, a resident of Bologna, Italy, in September of that year. Factory records show that its original colour scheme was Argento (silver) with Nero (black) leather interior upholstery and blue carpets. It is the penultimate 275 GTB built before the introduction of the '/4' quad-cam model. By mid-February 1967, the car had twice visited the factory's Assistenza Clienti facility in Modena for servicing, the odometer reading on the second visit being recorded as 15,406 kilometres. In the 1970s the Ferrari was exported from Italy to Canada. In 1978 it was sold by the official Ferrari dealer Yonge Steele Motors of Toronto, Canada to Mr G C Bell of Thunder Bay, Ontario, subsequently passing to Gerry Layer and then to G J Amaroso in California, USA. Between early 1989 and June 1991, the Ferrari was restored in California at a cost of $225,000, being repainted dark blue and re-trimmed with tan leather. It was then advertised for sale by Dane Prenovitz of Foster City, California, and in 1992 was sold to well-known collector Dr Evin F Lyon of Lexington, Massachusetts. While in Dr Lyon's collection, the Ferrari was shown at the 2nd Annual Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in February 1993, receiving a 2nd in class award (275 Ferraris) and then at the same event the following year went one better, coming home with a 1st in class trophy. In early 2006 Dr Lyon sold the Ferrari to Christoper Lynch of Massachusetts, in whose ownership it would remain until its sale via Paul Russell who had maintained the car for the past 15 years, to the current vendor in Switzerland in December 2009. A photo documented major engine, gearbox and ignition overhaul and full service was carried out at renowned Ferrari specialist Garage Costantini in Zürich in April 2014 with an odometer reading of 67,454km believed genuine from new. Now Swiss registered, this very well documented car comes with its original US title and a vast quantity of invoices, notes, files, etc, including photographs of the bare metal re-spray and full engine rebuild previously undertaken in the USA. The car which is the penultimate of the 'two cams' to come off the production line also comes with all books and tools, leather wallet, etc and is expected to have completed the Ferrari Classiche certification process by time of sale. Rarer - and quicker - than a 250 GT SWB yet considerably less expensive than a 250 GTO, the desirable 275 GTB 'torque tube' version is a landmark model in the technological evolution of Ferrari's road cars, as well as being one of its most beautiful.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-02-04
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1965 Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina

The 10th 275 GTS constructed Ferrari Classiche certified Single ownership for over 30 years Presented in its seldom seen and original colours of Nero over Nuvola Of a grand total of 200 Ferrari 275 GTSs constructed, chassis number 06819 was the 10th example off of the production line. Originally finished in a highly attractive but seldom seen colour combination of Nero (18.292) over Nuvola (VM 3015), it was sold new in its native Italy to Mrs Dino Fabbri, wife of a Milanese publisher and Ferrari collector, according to Ferrari historian Marcel Massini. It was then registered as VC 120663. The car was traded back to the original selling dealer, M.G. Crepaldi S.a.S., of Milan, in 1968 and sold to the second owner, Cesare de Lucchi, of Gallarate, Varese area, near Milan. The de Lucchi family would go on to be the loving caretakers of chassis number 06819 for over 30 years. During their ownership, it was restored in 1990 and 1991 by Scapini and Bruttomesso in Varese. It was driven by Mr de Lucchi during Ferrari’s 50th anniversary celebrations in 1997, and the interior was refurbished by Luppi in Modena in 2002. Sadly, de Lucchi passed away around that time. The car, however, remained in the family and was inherited by his son, Vittorio. The car finally left the de Lucchis in 2007 when it was sold to Marcus Wood of London, England. Shortly after its arrival in the United Kingdom, the car received a sympathetic restoration by GTO Engineering and was sold once again, in 2008, to its current owner in France. At that time, the car was showing only 35,000 kilometres from new. Since then, the cylinder heads have been modified for unleaded fuel in 2010 at a cost of €13,500. Since that time, it has always been driven and enjoyed by its current custodian and is currently showing 54,000 kilometres from new. Furthermore, the car has also received Ferrari Classiche certification, confirming that it retains its original engine, and is currently fitted with a gearbox of the correct type. A lovely car with known history, still in its original colour combination, accompanied with a tool kit and owner’s manual, and Classiche certification to its name, this is truly a 275 GTS to cherish. • Il 10° esemplare costruito di 275 GTS • Certificata Ferrari Classiche • Un unico proprietario per oltre 30 anni • Presentata nei suoi colori originali, e raramente visti, di Nero su interni Nuvola Delle 200 Ferrari 275 GTS costruite, il numero di telaio 06819 è stato il 10° esemplare a lasciare la linea di produzione, originariamente finito in una combinazione cromatica di grande attrattiva, ma raramente vista, di colore Nero (18.292) su interni Nuvola (VM 3015). Secondo quanto risulta allo storico Ferrari Marcel Massini, la macchina è stata venduta nuova in Italia, alla moglie dell’editore milanese e collezionista Ferrari, Dino Fabbri, e targata VC 120663. La vettura è poi passata di mano, sempre attraverso lo stesso concessionario, M.G. Crepaldi S.A.S. di Milano, nel 1968 e venduta al secondo proprietario, Cesare de Lucchi, di Gallarate, in provincia di Varese. La famiglia de Lucchi rimarrà poi amorevole custode della macchina con numero di telaio 06819, per oltre 30 anni. Durante la loro proprietà, la 275 è stata restaurata, tra il 1990 ed il 1991, dalla Scapini e Bruttomesso di Varese. E' stata guidata dal Sig. de Lucchi in persona nelle celebrazioni del 50° anniversario della Ferrari nel 1997 e, l'interno è stato restaurato da Luppi, a Modena, nel 2002. Proprio in quel periodo viene a mancare de Lucchi ma, la macchina rimane, comunque in famiglia, ereditata dal figlio Vittorio. La vettura lascia la famiglia de Lucchi nel 2007, venduta a Marcus Wood di Londra, Inghilterra. Poco dopo il suo arrivo nel Regno Unito, viene totalmente resturata presso la GTO Engineering e subito rivenduta, siamo nel 2008, con soli 35.000 chilometri percorsi da nuova in Francia al suo attuale proprietario. Nel 2010 la testata è stata modificata per poter utilizzare la benzina senza piombo, con un costo di € 13.500. Da quel momento è sempre stata guidata e goduta dal suo proprietario e, oggi, ha percorso un totale di 54.000 chilometri da nuova. Inoltre, la macchina ha ricevuto la certificazione Ferrari Classiche, che conferma che la vettura mantiene il suo motore originale ed è attualmente dotata di un cambio del tipo corretto. Una bella macchina con la storia conosciuta, ancora nella sua combinazione di colori originale, accompagnata nella vendita dal suo kit attrezzi e dal manuale uso e manutenzione originali e dalla certificazione di Ferrari Classiche. Questa è veramente una 275 GTS di cui bisogna prendersi cura. Chassis no. 06819 Engine no. 06819 Gearbox no. 169

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-05-27
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1966 Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina

260 bhp, 3,286 cc V-12 engine with triple Weber carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, and front and rear hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm Offered from a significant private Ferrari collection Three caring, private enthusiast owners from new Exceptional original paint and interior; under 24,000 original miles An incredibly original, unduplicatable 275 GTS Ferrari Classiche certified THE 275 GTS Ferrari?s 275 GTS, intended as a replacement for the 250 GT Series II Cabriolet, premiered alongside its closed sibling, the 275 GTB, at the 1964 Paris Auto Show. While both cars looked remarkably different on the outside, they both bore similar 3.3-litre Colombo V-12s, chassis, and suspensions underneath. The 275 GTS was largely intended for the American market, as Ferrari convertibles had sold well in climates like California and Florida, where the attractiveness and marketability of a high-performance grand touring cabriolet had long been established. While the 275 GTB?s bodywork was crafted just a short distance away from Ferrari, at Scaglietti?s facilities in Modena, the bodywork for the GTS was designed and constructed by Pininfarina at its facilities in Turin, and the car?s overall design was one of sporting elegance. Its smooth and more understated lines are handsome and display an air of sophistication, discreetly hiding the race-derived V-12 that sits under the hood. The interior displayed the same personality, yet it was perhaps more luxurious than earlier Ferraris. It still retained both a Nardi wood-trimmed steering wheel and a gated shifter?traits that would link it with its more performance-oriented siblings. One notable difference between the coupé and the spider, other than the bodywork, is the GTS?s less heavily bolstered, albeit very comfortable, seats, which were trimmed in the traditional Connolly leather. Even though the 275 GTB was perceived by many to be the more aggressive of the two, as it was better suited to high-performance driving thanks to its fixed roof, the 275 GTS was certainly no slouch. Road & Track raved about the 275 GTS in its road test, which was included in the September 1966 issue, commenting that ?with the top down, all the extraneous noises disappear and one simply exults in the purr from those beautiful tailpipes. Sheer ecstasy?. All told, only 200 examples were produced, which was equal to less than half the 275 GTBs produced. CHASSIS NUMBER 07805: ?THE LITTLE SPEED DEMON? Chassis number 07805 was delivered new to the United States via Chinetti Motors of Greenwich, Connecticut, in January 1966, and was then shipped to Loeber Motors, the Ferrari dealer in Chicago, Illinois. On 15 April 1967, it was sold for $12,400 to its original owner, M.J. Suerth, a prominent Chicago funeral director. Mr Suerth would escape Chicago?s infamous winters to a home in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and that is where his new 275 GTS was directly shipped. For the next 10 years, the car spent the winter being enthusiastically driven by its owner, with its Bianco (18934 M) over Blu (3015 VM) livery fitting right in with the sunny climate. In April of 1977, the 275 GTS was advertised by its original owner in the Ferrari Club of America Newsletter, which stated that it had 17,785 recorded miles on its Borrani wire wheels. A long-time Ferrari enthusiast saw the advertisement, contacted Mr Suerth, and purchased the car the same month for $18,000. When he picked up the car, he found that it was outfitted with some unusual accessories. There was a small cocktail bar set up over the passenger seat, and gold MJS monograms, an anniversary gift from Mrs Suerth, on the doors. The latter were subsequently returned to Mr Suerth, for sentimental reasons, by his request, as was the trailer hitch?the owner having used his 275 GTS, rather remarkably, primarily to tow a dinghy to and from his yacht. In a letter to the second owner, Mr Suerth wrote, ?I hope you will enjoy driving this little speed demon as much as I did. It has always been a dependable car?. Dependable, indeed! The enthusiast lovingly drove, displayed, and enjoyed the car frequently during his 37 years of ownership, running it to concours and club events all over the Northeastern United States, including displays at the Ferrari Club of America?s annual meet at Watkins Glen in 1990 and at the Meadow Brook Hall Concours d?Elegance in 1997. He took the time to preserve the Ferrari?s truly incredible original condition, and today, with its third owner, a prominent collector of exquisite taste, it remains an exceptional example. In fact, it ranks among the finest unrestored 275 GTS in existence. The original paintwork is in superb condition, while the interior exhibits just enough rich patina, and is, it can be testified, as comfortable as it appears. The car is accompanied by its original owner?s pouch and all books, its two original key sets (including the original Pininfarina body keys), its original and complete tool roll, the original purchase invoice from Loeber Motors, and correspondence between the first and second owners regarding the purchase of the car, confirming its three-owner history. Significantly, it has recently been awarded Ferrari Classiche certification. RM Sotheby?s is pleased and honoured to present this superb original, unrestored three-owner 275 GTS in a climate very much like the one it originally inhabited. It would not be out of character to see it spend the future once again rocketing between a villa and the marina, reliving joyous old times, now with a new caretaker proudly at the wheel. Addendum Please note that this car has recently been certified by Ferrari Classiche. Chassis no. 07805 Engine no. 07805

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2016-05-14
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1938 Delahaye 135 MS Competition Cabriolet by Figoni & Falaschi

160 hp, 3,557 cc six-cylinder engine, four-speed Cotal pre-selector transmission, independent front suspension with transverse leaf springs, live axle rear suspension with leaf springs, four-wheel Bendix drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,700 mm (106") The Type 135 model Delahaye was the first car produced after the merger in 1935 of Delage and Delahaye, enjoying tremendous success in competition, from Montlhéry to Le Mans. In 1936, the Model 135 M, or Competition version, joined the line-up with a six-cylinder 3,557 cc engine that had a larger bore and triple carburettors. In 135 MS form, with its larger exhaust valves, the Delahaye could reach 110 mph. Chassis no. 49197 With stunning Figoni & Falaschi open coachwork constructed on the 135 MS Competition-type long chassis, this unique Delahaye offers the delectable combination of the best in late ’30s French custom body design with some of the highest specification mechanicals ever offered by the company. This particular Delahaye is also somewhat unusual in that it participated in two diametrically opposed forms of motoring competition by being both a show car and a racing car. According to the Figoni archives and verification by the sales manager for Delahaye, Jean-Pierre Bernard (who later became the President and founder of the Delahaye Club), chassis no. 49197 was delivered by Delahaye to the Figoni & Falaschi works in April 1938 destined to be an exhibit on the Delahaye stand for the Paris Salon of 1939. In fact the Salon was cancelled owing to rumours, soon to be justified, about an impending war. This information was also verified by a long term owner of this car, Philippe Looten, similarly a previous President of the Delahaye Club. The beautiful two-seater cabriolet was created and finished in black and sent to the first owner, a Mrs. Chandler. The car was custom fitted with red leather interior and upholstery (which included the dashboard and steering wheel) supplied and sewn by the master craftsmen from Hermès, the renowned saddlery, luggage, silks and handbag firm. According to the records, Mrs. Chandler took delivery of her prized Delahaye Cabriolet in July 1938 with the French registration number 2354 RL9. The next entry, according to J-P Bernard, is after World War II, when the car passed to French racing driver Marcel Contet, and the registration number changed to 9654 CL75. Contet was a well-known driver in French events during the late 1930s, and he quite often competed in Delahayes, including a victory in one at the 1939 Monte Carlo Rally. According to Philippe Looten, the Delahaye was acquired by Contet before the war, and Madame Contet took top awards in 1939 at the Concours d’Elegance at La Baule and at the Concours of “La Grande Cascade” in the Bois de Boulogne, Paris. A period photograph of the car on a mountain pass with a lady posing appears in Benedict Bocquet's book on Figoni Delahayes and is captioned as “Madame Contet in 1939 at the Col du Simplon.” More black and white photographs on file show the car crossing the parade ramp at other early Concours d’Elegance events. Monsieur Contet returned the car to Figoni after the war to have the nose updated with a different grille, perhaps in an attempt to improve the cooling for racing purposes. In the Francois Jolly book on Delahaye, there is a racing photo of 49197 competing post-war (Car No. 75) at Montlhéry with this new nose fitted. Contet may have sold the car to another racing driver, Edmond Mouche, although this information conflicts with the recollections of J-P Bernard who states that in early 1955 Mr. Contet returned the car to him to re-sell, and it was purchased in February that year by a Michel Boujean, a salesman working for Mr. Bernard. Apparently Boujean kept the car only for a few months and sold it in September 1955 to a Mr. Depaie Georgas of Blvd Raspail, Paris. It was sold again the following month to the President of the Chamber of Commerce of Le Havre (registration plate 9903GF59). Later, it was sold to Mr. Andre Ziegler who was President of the Chamber of Commerce of Dunkerque. In 1960, Mr. Ziegler decided to sell the car to a scrap dealer for 500 French Francs, because it had been in storage and received damage in one of his garages. Fortunately, the car was to find a deserving new home, because the dealer’s son knew that Philippe Looten was a Delahaye enthusiast, and so he sold it to him for 700 French Francs! Mr. Looten, who was the long term President of the Delahaye Club (and is still the current Vice President), owned this important car from 1960 until 2002. During that long period of time, the Delahaye was restored twice and driven more than 160,000 kms on various rallies and pleasure trips. The original red Hermès leather interior had been almost completely destroyed during the period when the car was in storage, although a few parts did survive, including the leather trimmed steering wheel. Also of note was that the car came with racing buckets seats, which again had most likely been fitted by Contet. In 2005, this fabulous car, complete with a spare 135 MS engine and the second nose which had been fitted in the early post-war period, was sold to the current (USA) owner. The decision was taken to have the Delahaye fully restored and ready to be exhibited at Pebble Beach in 2006, where it won a class award. A frame-off, full nut and bolt restoration was undertaken with the aim of returning the car to its former show glory with the correct colour scheme it had from new. Hermès Interior Since it had originally been supplied with a custom made interior by Hermès, the owner made contact with the family-owned business in Paris. After Hermès inspected the car and consulted their archives, they readily accepted the task of supplying a new red leather upholstered interior, including the correct bench seat. Furthermore, Hermès made a set of custom leather luggage suitcases bespoke for this car, complete with exquisite crocodile leather-trimmed corners and handles. Hermès even scoured their own archives to find new old stock, period correct latches and hinges! Apparently this was the very first car interior undertaken by Hermès since before the Second World War, and they were so delighted with the project that they expressed interest in borrowing the car for their future promotional events. It is offered publicly for the first time and comes with the aforementioned spare post-war 135 MS engine, nose and original Hermès-trimmed racing seats, all of which accompany the sale of the car but will need to be collected at buyer’s expense from the U.S. This is an opportunity not to be missed by Delahaye enthusiasts! FRENCHTEXT Moteur six cylindres 160 ch., 3,557 ccm, boîte de vitesses à quatre rapports avec présélecteur Cotal, suspension avant indépendante avec ressorts à lames transversaux, pont arrière rigide avec ressorts à lames, freins Bendix à tambours aux quatre roues. Empattement: 2,700 mm (106") La Delahaye Type 135 fut le premier modèle produit après la fusion en 1935 de Delage & Delahaye, et eut un énorme succès en compétition, de Montlhéry au Mans. En 1936, le Modèle 135 M, c’est à dire la version Compétition, se joignit à la gamme avec un moteur six-cylindres de 3,557 ccm ayant un alésage plus important et trois carburateurs. En version 135 MS, avec ses soupapes d’échappement plus grandes, la Delahaye pouvait atteindre 180km/h. Chassis no. 49197 Avec sa renversante carrosserie ouverte Figoni & Falaschi montée sur un châssis long de compétition de type 135 MS, cette Delahaye unique offre l’alléchant mariage de ce qui se faisait de mieux en carrosserie spéciale en France à la fin des années 1930 allié à des caractéristiques techniques parmi les plus avancées jamais offertes par l’entreprise. La Delahaye présentée ici a aussi la particularité très inhabituelle d’avoir participé dans deux sortes de compétitions automobiles on ne peut plus différentes, ayant été aussi bien une voiture de salons & concours qu’une voiture de course. D’aprés les archives Figoni et verification par le chef des ventes de Delahaye, Jean-Pierre Bernard (qui devint plus tard le President et fondateur du Club Delahaye), le châssis no. 49197 fut livré par Delahaye aux ateliers Figoni & Falaschi en Avril 1938 destiné à être un modèle d’exposition sur le stand Delahaye au Salon de Paris 1939. En fait le Salon fut annulé dû aux rumeurs, vite avérées, de guerre imminente. Cette information fur aussi confirmée par Philippe Looten qui fut longtemps le propriétaire de cette auto et, lui aussi, précédemment President du Club Delahaye. Ce beau cabriolet deux places fut fini en livrée noire et envoyé à son premier propriétaire une certaine Madame Chandler. L’auto fut équipée sur commande spéciale d’un intérieur en cuir rouge et d’une garniture (y compris le tableau de bord et le volant) fournie et cousue par le les maîtres artisans de Hermès, le célèbre créateur de selles, bagages, soies et sacs à main. D’après les archives Mme Chandler prit livraison de sa somptueuse Delahaye Cabriolet en Juillet 1938 immatriculée en France avec le numéro de plaque minéralogique 2354 RL9. L’élément d’information suivant, d’après J-P Bernard, est daté d’après la seconde guerre mondiale, quand l’auto fut acquise par le pilote de course Français Marcel Contet, et sa nouvelle plaque minéralogique devint alors 9654 CL75. Contet était un pilote bien connu dans les courses de l’hexagone à la fin des années 1930, et il courait assez souvent en Delahaye, y compris lorsqu’il remporta rien moins que le rallye de Monte Carlo 1939 à bord de l’une d’entre elles. D’après Philippe Looten, la Delahaye fut acquise par Contet avant la guerre et Madame Contet remporta le premier prix en 1939 au Concours d’Elegance à La Baule et à celui de la Grande Cascade du Bois de Boulogne à Paris. Une photographie d’époque de l’auto sur un col de montagne avec une dame posant devant apparait dans le livre de Benedict Bocquet sur les Delahaye Figoni avec la légende “Madame Contet en 1939 au Col du Simplon.” D’autres photos noir & blanc dans le dossier la montrent sur la rampe lors de divers Concours d’Elegance de l’époque. Monsieur Contet renvoya l’auto chez Figoni après la guerre pour faire modifier l’avant avec une grille de radiateur différente, peut être pour améliorer le refroidissement dans la perspective de son utilisation en course. Le livre sur Delahaye de François Jolly contient une photo de 49197 en course après guerre à Montlhéry avec ce nouveau nez en place (elle y porte le numéro de concurrent 75). Contet aurait, peut être, vendu la voiture à un autre pilote, Edmond Mouche, cependant cette information ne correspond pas avec la mémoire de J-P Bernard qui declare que début 1955 Mr. Contet lui confia l’auto afin qu’il la vende, et elle fut achetée en Fèvrier de la même année par Michel Boujean, un vendeur travaillant pour Mr. Bernard. Apparemment Boujean ne garda la voiture que quelques mois et la vendit en Septembre 1955 a un Mr. Depaie Georgas du Blvd Raspail à Paris. Elle fut à nouveau vendue le mois suivant au Président de la Chambre du Commerce du Havre (plaque 9903GF59). Georgas la vendit par la suite à Mr. Andre Ziegler, Président de la Chambre de commerce de Dunkerque. En 1960, Mr. Ziegler décida de vendre l’auto à un ferrailleur pour 500 Francs, parce qu’elle avait été remisée et aussi endommagée dans l’un de ses garages. Heureusement l’auto fut sauvée grâce au fait que le fils du ferrailleur savait que Philippe Looten était un passionné de Delahaye, il la lui vendit pour 700 Francs! Mr. Looten, qui était donc le President à long terme du Club Delahaye (et en est encore le Vice President actuel), fut le propriétaire de cette importante auto de 1960 à 2002. Durant ces 42 ans la Delahaye fut restaurée deux fois et conduite sur plus de 160,000 km dans divers rallyes et voyages d’agrément. L’intérieur en cuir Hermès original avait été presque entièrement détruit pendant la période où elle fut remisée, quoi que quelques éléments survécurent, y compris le volant gainé de cuir. On note aussi que l’auto comprenait alors des sièges de course qui avaient très probablement étés montés par Contet. In 2005, cette fabuleuse auto fut vendue au propriétaire actuel (aux Etats Unis), avec un moteur 135 MS de rechange et le second nez installé peu après la guerre. Il fut décidé de la faire complètement restaurer à temps pour l’exhiber au concours de Pebble Beach en 2006, où elle remporta un prix de catégorie. La carrosserie fut retirée du chassis et un travail total de restauration (y compris le retour au nez initial) fut exécuté dans le but de ramener l’auto à sa gloire passée de concours et course d’époque et dans ses couleurs d’origine. Intérieur Hermès Puisqu’elle avait originellement été livrée avec un intérieur spécial fait sur mesure par Hermès, le propriétaire contacta la maison mère de l’entreprise familiale à Paris. Après avoir inspecté l’auto et consulté leurs archives, Hermès accepta avec joie le challenge de fournir un nouvel intérieur en cuir rouge, y compris la banquette correcte. Hermès réalisa aussi un jeu de malles et valises sur mesure pour cette auto, avec des poignées et angles exquis en cuir de crocodile. Le personnel de Hermès fouilla même leurs propres vieilles archives pour trouver des serrures et gonds neufs d’époque! Apparemment ce fut le premier intérieur de voiture réalise par Hermès depuis l’avant guerre, et ce projet les enthousiasma vraiment, au point qu’ils exprimèrent leur désir d’emprunter la voiture pour leurs futurs évènements promotionnels. Elle est ici offerte en public pour la première fois et est donc vendue avec un deuxième moteur de rechange 135 MS, son nez d’après guerre et les sièges de course originaux revêtus de garniture Hermès. Tous ceux-ci font partie du lot mais devront être récupérés aux Etats Unis à charge de l’acheteur. Ceci est une opportunité à ne pas manquer pour les passionnés de Delahaye! Addendum This car is sold with an old French registration but is not EU taxes paid. Chassis no. 49197

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2010-05-01
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2015 McLaren P1

903 total bhp (727 bhp and 176 bhp), 3,799 cc DOHC 90-degree V-8 engine with twin turbochargers, electric motor with internal rotor cooling, seven-speed dual clutch Seamless Shift Gearbox (SSG), four-wheel double-wishbone independent hydro-pneumatic proactive adjustable suspension, and four-wheel Akebono carbon ceramic brakes. Wheelbase: 105.11 in. First and only owner; less than 250 miles from new Finished in desirable Volcano Red, a $10,850 option One of only 375 examples built; rarer than both the LaFerrari and Porsche 918 The long-awaited successor to the legendary McLaren F1 By 2013, almost 10 years after the last Ferrari Enzo, Porsche Carrera GT, and Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren had left their respective factories, it was clear to most enthusiasts that a new supercar war was brewing. Test mules were spotted out and about for the new crop of the world’s hypercars, and from what one could see and hear when spotting these heavily camouflaged beasts sprinting around test tracks, or in extreme locales for hot or cold weather testing, the hypercar had come a long way in the last 10 years. “Hybrid” was the word on everyone’s mind, and supercar marques would be developing their own hybrid technology to serve as testbeds for similar systems appearing in future production cars. These hybrid systems not only served to offset carbon emissions due to tightening regulations but also used the technology to increase performance to a level that was never thought possible. Having just returned to road-car production with the spectacular MP4-12C, McLaren was poised to produce a “new F1,” a car that would proudly reaffirm the McLaren’s place atop the supercar world. This new car would go head-to-head with the likes of Ferrari and Porsche and show that McLaren was at the forefront of automotive performance, design, and technology. THE P1 Built around a carbon monocoque chassis weighing just 90 kilograms and carbon-fiber body panels, McLaren followed a relentless pursuit to make the P1 as light as possible. The wheels, 19 inches up front and 20 inches at the rear, weigh just 7.94 kilograms and 9.27 kilograms, respectively, and are made of a high-strength aluminum alloy, offering incredible strength at minimal weight. McLaren reengineered the car’s windscreen glass to be only 3.2 millimeters thick, reinforcing it with a plastic interlayer and saving 3.5 kilograms over the windshield in the MP12-4C. The interior carpet was deemed a luxury too costly in terms of weight and was deleted entirely. McLaren even chose to leave the carbon fiber in the cockpit non-lacquered, saving a further 1.5 kilograms. The P1 weighs in at a total dry weight of just 1,395 kilograms. Boasting adjustable front and rear wings, the latter a Formula One-style Drag Reduction system, aerodynamics followed a similar pursuit of perfection. The P1 develops as much as 600 kilograms of downforce at 160 mph. The unique carbon-fiber disc brakes, developed in conjunction with Akebono, are infused with silicon-carbide, helping to dissipate heat and absorbing 50 percent more energy than those on the MP4-12C. Adding to the effectiveness of the brakes, the McLaren P1 utilizes Brake Steer, a technology originally developed by McLaren for the 1997 F1 season before it was later banned. This system applies the brakes to the car’s inside rear wheel when cornering too quickly, which brings the P1’s nose closer to the apex. While the combustion engine appears nearly identical to that seen in the earlier MP4-12C, there is in fact nothing further from the truth. The block is a completely different unit from entirely new casting and boasts dry-sump lubrication with a low-sited flat plane crankshaft. The mid-mounted 3.8-liter twin-turbo V-8 itself produces 727 brake horsepower at 7,300 rpm and 720 Nm of torque at 4,000 rpm. As in most other hybrids, the electric motor is intended to provide an alternate source of power to provide for greater fuel efficiency. However, the McLaren P1 is certainly not “most hybrids.” The electric motor in the P1 serves to “torque-fill” or supplement the normal gaps where the conventional engine would fail to produce peak performance, such as during gearshifts or at low rpms while the turbochargers are spooling up, in an effort to provide the driver with maximum power at all times. The electric motor produces 176 horsepower, bringing total output to an incredible 903 horsepower. Needless to say, performance is astounding. The P1 takes just 2.8 seconds to reach 100 km/h and 6.8 seconds to reach 200 km/h. The P1 will reach a quarter-mile in an astounding 9.8 seconds. The speedometer will read 300 km/h in 16.5 seconds, a full five seconds faster than the F1, on its way to an electronically limited top speed of 350 km/h (217 mph). What is also incredible, aside from its world-class performance figures, is the McLaren’s average combined fuel consumption in the face of its world-beating performance: 34 mpg. THIS P1 Fully specified and designed in cooperation with McLaren’s Special Operations department, this P1 was purchased new by its first and only owner, Don Wallace, whose esteemed collection of high-performance supercars it is being offered from today. Wallace is considered to have the finest collection of the rarest and fastest cars in the world, and he is no stranger to high-horsepower exotica. As the owner of two such P1s, he recently commented that “for all of the cars I have raced over the years and the supercars that I have had the pleasure of owning, this P1 is by far the fastest street-legal machine I have ever driven. It is terrifyingly quick and performance is absolutely incredible. Many thanks go to McLaren and the extra efforts they made on my behalf.” This P1 is finished in the highly desirable and stunning shade of Volcano Red, a very eye-catching metallic and a $10,850 option, with black “stealth” finished wheels. The Volcano Red finish is also featured on certain elements on the car’s interior, including the switches, vent bezels, door inserts, and contrasting red seat stitching. It has only been driven a handful of times, and at the time of cataloguing, it displayed just 248 miles and remains in as-new condition. The McLaren P1 is poised to become a future classic, rarer than both its primary rivals, the LaFerrari and Porsche 918, and it will remain as a high point in McLaren’s storied history. It is a vehicle that combines the very best technology, developed and pioneered by McLaren in Formula One, in an effort to create the most exciting, dynamic, and technologically advanced car on the planet. Chassis no. SBM12ABA5FW000292

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1995 Ferrari F50

520 bhp, 4,698 cc V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic 2.7 engine management, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and unequal-length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 101.6 in. The 59th of 349 F50s produced; one of only 55 U.S.-production examples Purchased new by 250 GTO owner Greg Whitten Only 5,800 miles from new Recent full service by Ferrari of Central Florida The last six-speed manual Ferrari supercar; a surefire future classic The only open-top Ferrari supercar Every tifosi has dreamt of piloting a Formula One car on the open road. No traffic. No stop lights. No speed cameras. Just the sound of the car’s exhaust note reverberating off buildings—let alone the feeling of sheer of speed—would be enough to tug at the heartstrings of car enthusiasts anywhere. In essence, the Ferrari F50 was just that: an F1 car at heart, but it had been designed and engineered to be driven on the road. Its engine, a 4.7-liter naturally aspirated V-12 with five valves per cylinder, was derived directly from the powerplant that Ferrari used in the 1990 F1 season. In the F50, it produced 520 horsepower at 8,000 rpm, but the 436-pound engine itself could reach an earth-shattering 10,000 rpm. The six-speed longitudinal gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine, between which the oil tank was mounted for the dry-sump engine lubrication system. The F50 might have looked drastically different from Ferrari’s F1 cars of the time, but it undoubtedly had the heart and soul of a racer. This car, chassis number 104063, was completed by the factory on December 19, 1995, and was finished in Rosso Corsa (FER 300/12 DS) over Nero (VM 8500), with contrasting red cloth inserts. It was sold new to Greg Whitten, a Ferrari collector and 250 GTO owner based in Medina, Washington, and the former chief software architect at Microsoft. Whitten kept the car for the next 10 years, and during his ownership, it was occasionally driven by him and seen at events around his home state. After leaving Whitten’s collection, the car was purchased by Russell A. Cole, of Deerfield, Illinois, and was similarly well preserved and sparingly driven during his tenure. In 2011, the car was purchased by the current collector, and it still remains in exceptional condition, with the odometer showing just under 5,800 miles from new. It is important to note that in February 2013 the car’s fuel tank bladder was replaced during a full service by Ferrari of Central Florida, with said service totaling to over $30,000. More recently, the car returned to Ferrari of Central Florida for a full service in January 2015, during which all fluids were replaced and the car’s “sticky” interior switches, a common problem with all Ferraris of this era, were refinished and reinstalled. In addition to the receipts for these services, the car is accompanied by its original road cases, as well as the car’s matching red hardtop, roll bars, black soft-top, Ferrari car cover, a pair of very rare F50 driving shoes, factory-fitted luggage, a tool kit, owner’s manuals, recent service invoices, and even a set of factory photographs documenting the car’s build process. Unlike its other supercar siblings, what enthusiasts enjoy most about getting behind the wheel of an F50 is the open-air experience it offers. Without a fixed roof, both driver and passenger get to enjoy the car’s full exhaust note, with nothing overhead to muffle the glorious sound. Although its engine holds close ties to Formula One engines of the era, it has a great reputation for being easy to drive in comparison to other Ferrari supercars, both newer and older. The F50, lauded as the last great proper six-speed manual Ferrari supercar, has very few peers, as it combines cutting-edge, Formula One-inspired innovation and technology with a road car platform. As the final generation of modern-day supercars equipped with manual transmissions begins to gain value in the collector car market, the F50 presents itself as not only an excellent driving limited-production automobile but also a very important model in Ferrari’s illustrious history. This particular example is in excellent condition following careful use, preservation, and regular maintenance in the hands of its prior custodians. For the individual looking for a collector-grade F50 or to experience the thrill of F1-inspired engineering on the street, look no further. Chassis no. ZFFTG46AXS0104063 Assembly no. 21127

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1962 Shelby 289 Competition Cobra

Est. 340 bhp, 289 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine with two Carter four-barrel carburetors, four-speed Borg Warner T-10 transmission, independent front and rear suspension with A-arms, transverse leaf springs, and tube shock absorbers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. The first racing-specification Shelby Cobra sold to the public Incredibly well preserved and presented in period livery Single ownership for over 40 years A favorite in the Andrews Collection, with numerous vintage rally outings CHASSIS CSX 2011: THE PUBLIC’S FIRST RACING COBRA Chassis CSX 2011 was purchased for $7,471 by John A. Everly, of Winfield Kansas, on October 23, 1962, and with that, it became the first Shelby Cobra race car to be sold to the public. Everley, a seasoned racer, traded his Ferrari 375 MM Spider (chassis 0376 AM) for the privilege, and it soon replaced the Ferrari as his racing car of choice, which was no doubt a decision that would have brought a smile to Carroll Shelby’s face. The car was fitted with front and rear sway bars, a roll bar, a long-range fuel tank, a flame thrower ignition, and Goodyear T-4 race tires, and it bore oblong “Shelby-AC Cobra” badges, T-handle hood latches, and 5.5-inch-wide painted wire wheels. CSX 2011 was indeed born ready for competition. The car was finished in red with a black interior when new, but it bore a unique blue and white livery when it appeared at its first competitive outing, the Nassau, Bahamas Speed Week in December 1962. In the second race of the Nassau Tourist Trophy, Everly and CSX 2011 placed 7th overall. They took to the race track once again in the Nassau Trophy on December 9, placing 26th overall out of a field of 63 competitors. Everly would campaign his new Cobra, wearing #106, in a pair of races at Nassau in 1963, finishing 6th overall and 2nd in class in Race 2 on December 1, 1963. Following a DNF on September 6, Everly and his Cobra finished 16th overall and 3rd in class out of a massive 62 entrants in the Nassau Trophy race on December 8. After a quick break for the holidays, Everley was back on the track in CSX 2011 at the Daytona Continental 2800 KM on February 16, 1964. Unfortunately, Everly failed to finish, and the car would have a string of DNFs over the next few races at Watkins Glen, Mid-Ohio, and Elkhart Lake. That same year, Everley sold the car to John Archer, of Dallas, Texas, in exchange for the wages he was owed by South West Lotus. Archer proceeded to remove CSX 2011’s original engine and install a Gemini-Ford. The car would not be left without a Shelby heart for long, as Archer soon installed a racing-specification engine from a GT350 that had dual four-barrel Carter carburetors. FORTY YEARS IN DALLAS In 1965, the car was purchased by Ron West, also of Dallas, who decided that he would return CSX 2011 to the track, betting it would prove to be quite competitive with its new motor. From 1965 to 1967, West entered the car in a number of SCCA events, where he had considerable success, finishing several races within the top five, with a handful of overall wins included! In 1967, West finished 3rd in the SCCA’s Southwest Division and subsequently received an invitation to compete in the 1967 American Road Race of Champions at Daytona. In order to adhere to an SCCA regulation, his dual-carburetor setup was replaced with a single four-barrel, and with that setup, CSX 2011 went on to finish in a very respectable 8th place. According to the SAAC World Registry of Cobras and GT40s, CSX 2011 made several “midnight runs on the streets of Dallas” before West placed the car in storage at his home. It would emerge from storage a few times over the years to be shown at several SAAC conventions, appearing in unrestored condition and still sporting an inspection sticker from the Bahamas Speed Week in 1963. The car always attracted a lot of attention at SAAC conventions, winning Second Place in the popular vote for 289s at SAAC-10 in Great Gorge, New Jersey, in 1985; Third Place at SAAC-11 in Dearborn, Michigan, the year after; and First Place, as well as Best Cobra, at SAAC-12 in Charlotte, North Carolina, in 1987. The Cobra also appeared in a handful of publications, including Tevor Legate’s Cobra: The First 40 Years and Dave Friedman’s Shelby Cobra. West eventually decided to put the car up for sale in 1996, but it still remained in his ownership and travelled with him when he moved to Oregon several years later. West continued to own the car until 2007, when it was purchased by a new owner, the car’s first in over 30 years. At the time of purchase, he decided to refresh the car for use, yet he also kept a strict eye on preservation. It was decided that the Cobra would be brought back to the same configuration it appeared in at Daytona in 1964. The owner went to great lengths to preserve the car as much as possible, even leaving the scratch it received at Daytona untouched and retaining traces of the car’s original red paint. Following a rebuild of the car’s 289-cubic inch engine—the same engine installed by John Archer in 1964—the car passed through Charles Wegner and was then purchased for the Andrews Collection. In their care, CSX 2011 has seen frequent use on vintage rallies, including the Copperstate 1000 in 2013 and 2014, as well as the 2012 Colorado Grand. It is accompanied by a handful of period photographs, several of which have been autographed by Carroll Shelby, and it remains ready for further use on vintage rallies or historic races, appearing just as it did 50 years ago. It is clear why CSX 2011 appealed to Paul and Chris Andrews. As the first Cobra race car sold new to the public, with long-term Dallas ownership and a successful SCCA career, it is the perfect example to enjoy on the open road. Even amongst the Andrews’s incredible collection, this example stands out as a wonderful example of preservation, attention to detail, and racing provenance. Chassis no. CSX2011

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L 'Lusso' Berlinetta by Scaglietti

240 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, parallel trailing arms, and Watt Bar, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.48 in. An incredible “barn find” Lusso The first time offered for public sale Original ownership for nearly 50 years Original engine, gearbox, and axles The Ferrari 250 GT/L, or the “Lusso” as it has become known over time, is widely celebrated as one of the most beautifully proportioned Ferraris ever designed by Pininfarina. Following the Lusso’s premiere at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, it was widely acclaimed as yet another triumph for both its designers at Pininfarina and coachbuilders at Scaglietti. The Lusso would be the last Ferrari to bear the legendary 250 name, and many thought that Pininfarina had saved their best design for the celebrated 250 chassis for last. Sitting on the shorter wheelbase chassis of the Ferrari 250 model range, power was delivered through the same 2,953-cubic centimeter short block V-12 that was designed by Gioacchino Colombo. As it was the last car in the 250 line, the Lusso would also be the last V-12 Ferrari road car to feature this engine, as displacement would increase to 275 cubic centimeters per cylinder for the next generation of Ferrari road cars. Additionally, the Lusso offered significant chassis upgrades, thanks mostly to lessons learned by the Scuderia in racing the 250 SWB and 250 GTO. These improvements principally consisted of the use of concentric springs around the telescopic shock absorbers and a Watts linkage to laterally stabilize the rear axle. The design of the front end was clearly reminiscent of the 250 GT SWB, which is arguably the greatest dual-purpose race and road car ever created. The design elegantly swept back to the rear and culminated in a Kamm tail with a subtle rear spoiler, which was similar to that on the 250 GTO and the forthcoming 275 GTB. The Lusso is instantly recognizable as a member of the 250 family of Ferraris, and its design language makes it clear that this is a Ferrari for grand touring, as it appears to be visually less muscular yet more elegant than the SWB and GTO. However, three Lussos saw competitive use in the hands of their owners and proved to be successful, testifying to the sporting nature of the engine and chassis. “Lusso” translated into English means luxury, and from one look into the cabin, there is no doubt that luxury is the perfect word to describe the ambiance. Its driver and passenger were lavished with the finest Italian materials in terms of leather, chrome trim, and a Nardi wood-rimmed steering wheel, which was a trademark Ferrari item. Arguably, the most eye-catching part of the interior was the rear luggage shelf, which was quilted in fine Italian leather and designed to support designer luggage that was just as chic as the Lusso itself. The dashboard configuration, thought to be inspired from a previous special-bodied 250 SWB, was also different from previous production Ferrari models, as it featured a large-diameter tachometer and speedometer in the center of the dashboard, which was angled toward the driver for easier readability. Additionally, that luxurious interior ambiance was heightened by the airy “greenhouse” design created for the cabin. Glass surrounds the driver on all sides, and it is only punctuated by thin rear pillars that help house the panoramic rear window. This created a sweeping curve that merged delicately into a tiny rear deck. This design feature was distinct to the Lusso and offered almost 360-degree visibility for the driver, making the car not only stylish but also easier to maneuver through traffic for the driver. In the hands of the motoring press, the car was well-acclaimed, even by Ferrari’s standards. Virtually all journalists who were granted the opportunity to test a Lusso showered the car with praise. Car and Driver declared, “Its proportions approach perfection,” Automobile Revue called it “the most beautiful car in the world,” and Ferrari Magazine called it “one of the all-time classics.” Even five years later, Road & Track proclaimed it as “Ferrari’s most beautiful car,” which is a compliment that cannot be tossed around lightly. According to Ferrari, the car offered here, chassis number 5233 GT, was originally delivered to the Roman dealer in November of 1963, finished in Azzuro (Italiver 19278M) with Nuvola interior. It is believed that it was purchased as a new car four months later by a Pakistani businessman involved in onyx mining. The gentleman was a frequent visitor to the Mediterranean area on business trips and, during one of those trips, acquired his new Ferrari in Rome. After the journey to Pakistan, the car arrived in its new home and was registered in Karachi on May 5, 1964. The Lusso has remained in the same family until now and therefore for nearly 50 years! During that time it is believed to have covered only 26,000 kilometers. The Lusso only left Pakistan for the first time in 50 years in 2014 when it was sent to a marque specialist for an inspection. As such it has been confirmed that the car’s engine, gearbox, and rear axle are all matching-numbers components to this chassis. During the family’s ownership, the body was refinished in traditional Rosso Corsa, but the interior remains intact and appears to be the car’s original trim. Overall, when one considers the well-preserved, undamaged originality of this example, there may not be a better Lusso in the world for a Platinum-level restoration, and there are fewer still that remained in the care of their original owner and his family for half a century. The car runs and drives under its own power, but a thorough reconditioning would be essential before it is exercised on the open road! Addendum Please note that the 2.5% duty is not applicable to the hammer price of this lot contrary to what is stated in the catalog. This title is in transit. Chassis no. 5233 GT Engine no. 5233 GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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1958 Lister-Jaguar 'Knobbly' Prototype

256 bhp, 3,785 cc double-overhead cam inline six-cylinder Jaguar engine, four-speed manual synchromesh transmission, coil-spring front suspension with parallel equal length wishbones, coil-spring rear suspension with de Dion tubular axle and four trailing arms, and Girling four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90.75 in. The original Knobbly Lister-Jaguar prototype The Walt Hansgen Briggs Cunningham team 1958 SCCA World Championship car Well-known, clear history from new Offered in the U.S. for the first time in over 42 years Sold with a spare original Cunningham-prepared, 3.75-liter engine and FIA papers Built by a legend, for a legend, and driven by legends; unparalleled provenance When one thinks of legendary racing cars of the late 1950s, words like sleek, sexy, and dramatic come to mind. Cambridge manufacturer Brian Lister’s offering was all of the above, but it found its groove in rather unique contours that nonetheless gave it the popular nickname “Knobbly.” Designed by Brian Lister to meet windshield height regulations set by the FIA, while also minimizing the frontal area of a car powered by a rather large three-liter Jaguar engine, its aluminum body featured a large central bump covering the engine, which fell off in wide grooves on either side and aft, and incredibly curvaceous streamlined fenders and headrest. The result was an athletic-appearing, distinctive racing car that took the sporting world by storm when it made its debut in February 1958. The first Knobbly Lister-Jaguar, the very car shown to the motoring press at the Cambridge factory on that day, was this car, BHL EE 101; its unusual serial number resulted from the chassis having first been stamped “EE” for Ecurie Ecosse and then, to match the usual Lister pattern, overstamped with “BHL.” This was the first automobile that Lister really marketed; his original plan was to build cars and race to advertise his father’s wrought-iron company, but the Knobbly struck him as an automobile that he could actually build and sell to make money. This car achieved a lot of publicity and was heavily photographed; it was prominently featured in the February 1958 issue of Autosport, appearing both on the cover and in a feature article within. BHL EE 101 was one of two Jaguar-powered Knobblys ordered for the 12 Hours of Sebring by American sportsman par excellence, Briggs Cunningham, using a chassis that had originally been earmarked for the renowned Ecurie Ecosse racing team. Both cars were shipped to America and prepared by Cunningham’s technical director, Alfred Momo, of the Momo Corporation. Upon their arrival at Sebring for the September 12th race, they attracted much attention in their Cunningham team colors, pure white with blue stripes, and proved fierce competition to the other European exotica on the track, including Prancing Horses and the like. During those 12 hours, BHL EE 101 was co-driven by Archie Scott-Brown, Lister’s factory team ace, and American star Walt Hansgen. Running 5th in the first two laps behind the Aston Martins of Moss and Salvadori and the Ferrari TRs of Mike Hawthorn and Phil Hill, it was involved in a spectacular shunt on lap four. Olivier Gendebien was caught unawares by the Lister-Jaguar’s sudden deceleration due to a burned-out piston, and his Ferrari rode up the Knobbly’s tail, reportedly damaging Scott-Brown’s helmet and leaving a tire mark on the driver’s shoulder. The Lister-Jaguar was out of the race. The three-liter XK engine proved itself to not be up to a challenge, so both Lister-Jaguars were re-engined after Sebring. According to Alfred Momo, BHL EE 101 was fitted with an exceptionally rare, experimental department, 3.75-liter engine with a twin-plug wide-angle head, heavily tuned and blueprinted by Momo’s magicians. Having shaken off its growing pains, BHL EE 101 set to the track in the SCCA National Championship, and there was no looking back. Walt Hansgen had fallen in love with the Lister-Jaguar at Sebring, and on April 20, 1958, he won at Marlboro behind the wheel of this car; he finished 2nd at Danville, Virginia, on May 4, and then 1st over teammate Ed Crawford, in the other Cunningham Lister-Jaguar, in a second race, resulting in a 1-2 victory for the Florida team. They repeated that success at Cumberland on May 18th and again at Bridgehampton on June 1. Hansgen racked up victories at Lime Rock on June 15 and at Elkhart Lake on June 22, with Crawford finishing 2nd in the latter event for a fifth 1-2 Cunningham finish for the 1958 season. A sixth 1-2 finish was scored back at Lime Rock on July 5, this time with Hansgen and BHL EE 101 taking the 2nd place position. At this point, the Scarab-Chevrolets arrived on the scene, the first serious challenge to what had been, up to that point, the unbeatable Lister-Jaguar. Following unspectacular results at Montgomery, Alabama, on August 17 and at Thompson on September 1, both Lister-Jaguars reached success again at the Watkins Glen Grand Prix on September 20, with Crawford winning in number 61 and Walt Hansgen finishing 2nd in number 60. Hansgen scored his final win of the season at Virginia International Raceway on October 5. He had won more races there that season than the next top three finishers combined. New engines were installed for 1959, and 2.4-liter Jaguar blocks were bored-out to three liters, yet another improvement. Unfortunately, in the 12 Hours of Sebring, where, a year before, the cars had found so much glory, Hansgen’s car spent over an hour in the pits, having its fractured de Dion rear axle replaced, and then it blew a tire. It finished 12th. Hansgen’s Lister finished 2nd with a 3.8-liter mill at Marlboro on April 19th, again in SCCA competition, but it won at Danville on May 3 and at Cumberland on May 17. Hansgen co-drove with Connecticut legend John Fitch at Bridgehampton on May 31, capturing another victory, but it failed at Lime Rock on July 4th and finished 2nd, this time co-driven by Phil Forno, at Montgomery on August 9th. The Lister-Jaguar wasn’t through, yet. Hansgen scored a win at Thompson Raceway on September 7, co-driving with Ed Crawford at the Road America 500 at Elkhart Lake on September 13 and at the Watkins Glen Grand Prix on September 26. It finished 2nd, with Hansgen at the controls, at the SCCA National at Daytona on November 15. The cars ran three more times in the 1960 season, with John Fitch and Briggs Cunningham finishing 5th and 9th in the cars at Bridgehampton on May 29; one failed to finish in that year’s Road America 500, driven by Cunningham, Ed Hugus, and Phil Horno, and one ranked 6th at Watkins Glen on September 24. Cunningham kept BHL EE 101 until the mid-1960s, when it was sold out of storage to American enthusiast Herb Wetson. It was then passed in the early 1970s to Chris Drake, who drove it extensively in vintage racing before selling it to David Preece. It then passed in the early 1980s to another vintage driver, Roger Williams, and then to Andrew Baber. During its early Cunningham years, BHL EE 101’s original bonnet was replaced by the later “short bonnet” style, in keeping with the Lister factory’s latest practice; the fenders were modified by Momo, along the lines of the Ecurie Ecosse cars, to eliminate front-end lift at high speeds that had plagued the cars early on. Williams had a new bonnet built for the car during his ownership, and the bulkhead behind the driver was rebuilt for increased seating support. The original chassis frame underneath remains original, as it was found to be in good order, and it retains its original existing under-trays; the rear body panels are original, from when it was modified by the Cunningham team. The car boasts Le Mans-style Lucas headlights that were designed for rapid changes of burnt-out bulbs. The chassis was refinished, and the dashboard was restored to very near its original 1958 design. It retains its original Girling racing calipers, with quick pad-change calipers mounted at the rear, as well as nearly all of the early Cunningham/Momo modifications, such as rear jacking points on the chassis, a roll bar, the oil tank cover, and the original 42-gallon fuel tank. Under the hood is a wide-angle head, dry-sump engine, sending its power through a four-speed manual synchromesh transmission. Importantly, the car will be supplied with an extraordinarily rare, Cunningham-prepared, 3.75-liter Jaguar racing engine, as was fitted to this car by the Cunningham team in period, freshly rebuilt with a billet crankshaft, forged pistons, and other full-bore track equipment. With its “3.75” cast on the side of the block, this engine is in itself a valuable acquisition, and the new owner will have the option of reinstalling it in the car for added unbeatable authenticity on the show field. The car that appeared in period in Autosport and on the cover of racing programs has continued to be well known. It was the subject of a feature article in Hemmings Sports & Exotic Car in November 2012, and it takes up several pages in Paul Skilleter’s landmark work, Lister-Jaguar: Brian Lister and the Cars from Cambridge, which gives this car, because of its special status as the prototype Knobbly, extensive coverage. If it had only been “the original Knobbly,” this Lister-Jaguar would be special enough, since there were only 11 of these cars originally built. But this car also tore its way through history, run by Walt Hansgen through a long roster of fabulous successes that carried him to the SCCA World Championship. Racing in the late 1950s, this was the car to beat. Along the way, it was blessed by Briggs Cunningham and Alfred Momo’s intensive care and engineering, and it was driven by two other American legends, Ed Crawford and John Fitch, as well as by Briggs himself and “Maestro” Archie Scott-Brown, the most famous Lister driver of all. Few surviving racing cars of its era claim such well-known history with such fascinating characters, making this car, offered in the U.S. for the first time in 42 years, an ideal cornerstone for any collection of 1960s sporting legends. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is a race car and will, therefore, be offered on a Bill of Sale. Chassis no. BHL EE 101

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
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1953 Ferrari 375 America Coupe by Carrozzeria Vignale

300 bhp, 4,523 cc V-12 engine, triple Weber 40DCZ3 dual-choke carburetors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual gearbox, oval-section tubular steel ladder-type chassis, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and transverse leaf spring, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 110.2" - One of 12 original 375 Americas and one of the two Vignale-bodied coupes - The 1954 Geneva Salon show car - Highly documented history; high-profile owners; featured in Ferrari by Vignale - Matching-numbers engine; presented as it was at Geneva in 1954 In the early 1950s, Enzo Ferrari (almost reluctantly, some suspect) began to manufacture road-going Gran Turismo cars, often at the request of his wealthiest racing-car customers. Everything except the coachwork was built in-house, while such famed coachbuilders as Ghia, Touring, Vignale and Pinin Farina provided an array of hand-built bodywork. Following the 340 and 342 America models of 1950 to 1953, the 375 America continued to cater to Ferrari’s elite road-car buyers who desired a large-displacement, high-horsepower road car with bespoke styling and a luxurious and quiet passenger cabin. The ladder-type, tubular steel 375 America frame, with its 110.2-inch wheelbase length, was virtually identical to that of the contemporary 250 Europa. Ferrari’s then-typical underpinnings included front and rear leaf-spring suspension, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes and Borrani wire-spoke wheels. However, the big difference from the 250 Europa was under the hood, with the 375 America powered by an Aurelio Lampredi-designed 4,523 cc “long block” V-12, the largest engine offered by Ferrari at the time. Power output reached a heady 300 bhp at 6,500 rpm, courtesy of relatively high compression ratios ranging between 8.0:1 and 8.5:1, plus a trio of twin-choke Weber carburetors. A four-speed manual gearbox offered synchromesh on all forward gears, still more evidence of the 375 America’s drivability and refinement. Capable of accelerating from rest to 60 mph in under seven seconds and a top speed approaching 160 mph, the 375 America provided near racecar performance while coddling its occupants in a rich, leather-trimmed interior environment for high-speed, high-style cross-country travel. Predictably, the 375 America was considered one of the world’s ultimate grand touring automobiles in period, and owners included such industrial entrepreneurs as Howard Keck and Giovanni Agnelli, as well as Franco Cornacchia, the Ferrari dealer, Scuderia Guastala principal and racing driver with 60 starts in the 1949-1956 period. While the 375 America was not originally intended for competition, one (0317 AL) finished second overall in the 1954 Geneva Rally with the Belgian driving team of its owner, Alois De Mencik Zebinsky and Jacques Swaters of Ecurie Francorchamps fame. Today, the 375 America continues to intoxicate Ferrari enthusiasts and collectors as one of the storied marque’s first road-going models. Then, as now, exclusivity is assured with Ferrari experts placing total production at just 12 units. Completely hand-built, bespoke creations, no two 375 Americas are entirely alike, and their production was a lengthy process. Commensurate with their style, luxury and performance, pricing was stratospheric at approximately $10,000 when new. The majority of 375 Americas wore Pinin Farina bodies, with just two cloaked in distinctive and muscular coupe bodywork by Vignale, including the car offered here, 0327 AL, the first of the pair to be built. Chassis 0327 AL Originally finished in burgundy with a silver roof and tan upholstery, 0327 AL, the car offered here, is based upon the seventh of the 12 375 America chassis originally built by Ferrari. Interestingly, while it displays the same general body styling as chassis 0313 EU and 0337 AL, the head- and tail-lights of this particular car are different. Once completed, 0327 AL was fitted with temporary Bolognese license plates “BO 32117” and sent to Switzerland in preparation for its display from March 11-21, 1954 at the XXIV Annual Geneva Motor Show. In mid-1954, 0327 AL was exported to the USA, where it was sold to its first owner, Robert C. Wilke, who owned the immensely successful Leader Card Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which was also a long-running and highly successful Indianapolis 500 racing-team sponsor. By 1964, the car was known to have been refinished in metallic blue, with its original small taillights having been replaced by larger US-specification units. In 1974, the car was inherited by Robert Wilke’s son Ralph, who sold it that year to Dr. Robert E. Steiner, also a resident of Milwaukee and under whom it was Wisconsin-registered as “CG 4659.” As such, 0327 AL was later depicted on page 176 of the book Ferrari by Vignale, written by noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini and published in 1993. Subsequent ownership history continues on March 16, 1983 when a new Wisconsin title was issued for the car in the name of Rosalie Ann Steiner of Shorewood. On September 20, 1984, 0327 AL was sold to Ed Jurist's Vintage Car Store in Nyack, New York, through which it was again sold on November 23, 1984 to David L. Coffin, a resident of Sunapee, New Hampshire. During Mr. Coffin’s tenure, 0327 AL was featured in the February/March 1986 edition of Cavallino, and then in 1986, he sold 0327 AL to Thomas Barrett. Next, 0327 AL was acquired by Fritz Kroymans, the official Ferrari importer for The Netherlands. Under his tenure, 0327 AL was described and pictured in the December 1993/January 1994 edition of Cavallino magazine, this time within a piece written by Marcel Massini on the Ferraris owned by 0327 AL’s first owner, Robert Wilke. Mr. Kroymans retained 0327 AL within his noted Ferrari collection until 2010, when the current owner acquired it. In late January of this year, 0327 AL was displayed at the XX Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach, Florida, and most recently, the car was returned to its original Geneva show colors, with original paint samples of the burgundy for the body and the silver for the roof located on the car and used to correctly match the colors. In addition, the original small taillights, which were swapped for larger units under Robert Wilke’s ownership in period, were returned to the car. The dash of 0327 AL was also refinished in correctly matched burgundy paint, and the rest of the interior remains original. In addition, the undercarriage and engine bay are well detailed. Cloaked in its handsomely hand-formed Vignale bodywork, presented exactly as it first appeared at Geneva in 1954 and retaining its original, matching-numbers V-12 engine, 0327 AL is powerful, luxurious and exceedingly rare as one of only 12 examples of the 375 America originally produced. Accordingly, it epitomizes the pioneering era of Ferrari road-car development, and it is certain to remain one of the most fascinating and highly coveted classic Ferraris ever created. Please note, this car is titled as a 1954. Addendum Please note this vehicle was built in 1953, but titled as a 1954. Chassis no. 0327 AL Engine no. 0327 AL Body no. 115

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-08-19
Hammer price
Show price

1955 Aston Martin DB3S

210 bhp @ 5500 rpm, 2992 cc inline six-cylinder engine, twin overhead camshafts, triple sidedraft Weber carburetors, four-speed David Brown close-ratio gearbox, independent front suspension with trailing links, torsion bar springing and lever shock absorbers, De Dion rear suspension located by parallel trailing links and Panhard rod, torsion bar springing and telescopic shock absorbers, four-wheel Alfin drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2210 mm God bless David Brown. Brown (later, Sir David) ran the family tractor and gear manufacturer producing products under his own name, and bought out both Aston Martin and Lagonda from receivership in 1948 after the devastation of the War years. Aston was acquired for its modern chassis and sporting heritage while Lagonda appealed for its W.O. Bentley-designed twin-cam, 2.6 litre six cylinder engine, first appearing in the Aston Martin DB2. Brown was committed to motorsport competition from the get-go, famously entering one of the first-ever postwar Astons in the 1948 Spa 24 Hours and began racing DB2s at Le Mans in 1949. Within two years DB2s finished First, Second and Third in class at the 1951 Le Mans 24 Hours, and Third overall against the likes of Jaguar's formidable C-Type sports racers. A remarkable achievement. Nevertheless, overall victory at Le Mans was in Brown’s sights and he fielded a factory team there each year from 1950 through 1959 when he achieved his greatest competition success, First and Second overall at Le Mans with the iconic DBR1. That year Aston also won the coveted World Sportscar Championship, the first British manufacturer to do so since Bentley in the prewar years, and the smallest manufacturer to ever do so, before or since. However, Brown first required a purpose-built racing car to fulfil his mighty aspirations. Launched in 1952, the first Aston sports racer was the DB3. Developed for Aston Martin by Eberan von Eberhorst, a former Auto Union racing engineer from the prewar era, the DB3 featured an all-new, tubular chassis using De Dion rear architecture, with a purposeful, chunky, slab-sided body. Competition victory proved elusive for the DB3 however, and its performance was hampered by reliability issues never suffered by the DB2 effort. So, Brown commissioned A. G. “William” Watson to engineer an improved car. In May 1953 a new prototype appeared at Charterhill, UK called the DB3S. This car was a significant redevelopment of the DB3 and featured a lighter chassis with a reduced wheelbase as well as many other modifications, significantly altering the essence of the original Eberhorst conception. Most importantly, the Salisbury hypoid-bevel final drive was replaced with a David Brown spiral-bevel version. It was the hypoid spiral drive which retired two DB3s at Le Mans in 1952. Other changes included new rear suspension geometry. Most impressive of all perhaps was the svelte, almost feline new body figure rendered characteristically in aluminum by Frank Feeley, designer of the DB2 for Aston Martin, and which is today considered his masterpiece. Featuring the classic cutaway section behind the front wheels, it presaged the style of the famous pontoon-fendered Ferrari 250TRs by several years. The DB3S raised eyebrows as well as expectations for success. This design was also the first to refine the “humped oval” grille theme which has become the trademark identifier of Aston Martin production cars through the present day. It was therefore the DB3S which came to represent the quantum leap towards international conquest that Brown so intently craved. At its Charterhill debut, a DB3S driven by Reg Parnell beat out an Ecurie Escosse C-Type for an overall victory. Shortly thereafter however, three DB3Ss raced at Le Mans with little triumph. Ironically, this was the only race which Aston Martin lost in 1953. During the Tourist Trophy, Goodwood Nine Hours and British Empire Trophy, Aston Martin took overall victory against all comers. With this newfound mastery Brown was emboldened. For the 1954 season David Brown introduced a new 12-cylinder sports racer, reviving the Lagonda name in competition. The engine, a 4.5 liter unit developed by Watson was essentially conceived as two of the standard VB6J Aston engines combined and mated to a common crankshaft. To counterbalance for the weight penalty, both the block and crankcase were rendered in aluminum. This required a whole new range of compensatory solutions to the workings of the engine internals, including tighter bearings, which resulted in problems at start and low temperatures until the engine was running up full temperature. Though based upon the DB3S shape, the appearance of the Lagonda could be described as “corpulent” in comparison to the graceful DB3S. Overall the Lagonda was plagued with problems and proved a frustrating distraction from continued development of the parallel DB3S program until the Lagonda sports racer was abandoned in 1955. Meanwhile, by 1955, the DB3S was to benefit from the 3-litre limitation on engine capacity in the sports car championship. Victory was seen at Silverstone with a Second place overall at Le Mans, with drivers Peter Collins and Paul Frere fiercely tracking the winning new Jaguar D-Type piloted by Mike Hawthorn and Ivor Bueb. This was the best overall Le Mans result Aston Martin achieved to date. Subsequently the DB3S went on to demolish the Jaguar competition at the British GP, and to win the Goodwood Nine Hours for the third time. In 1956, the DB3S repeated its prior year performance at Le Mans, finishing with a Second place overall result, with Stirling Moss and Peter Collins at the wheel. Through all phases of design, development, and racing, the DB3S was able to achieve significantly greater success than the DB3. Though still falling short of Brown’s dream of achieving overall victory at Le Mans, the DB3S was established as a force to be reckoned with, finishing their last two seasons in the top five Marque Championship points. Ten Works examples of the DB3S were completed by the factory to this point while demand was growing for a production version for sale to privateer competitors. Thus a second series of DB3Ss were built, commencing in 1955, to become known as the “customer” cars (easily identifiable by their three-digit chassis numbers). Eschewing the complex twin-plug head used in the Works cars, the customer cars were fitted with an upgraded version of the production VB6J engine with a high compression head featuring larger valves and competition camshafts, with the addition of triple, dual-throat sidedraft Weber carburetors. In addition the connecting rods were to competition spec and the main bearing housings became of the solid type. This engine version was designated the VB6K. In all, 20 customer cars were produced, many of which went on to distinguish themselves in international competition, adding to the DB3S mystique. Perhaps the most celebrated of the privateer racers was the Australian team who raced three DB3Ss in Europe during 1955 and came to be affectionately known as “The Kangaroo Stable.” These were ordered by Tony Gaze; the second, third and fourth of the customer cars (DB3S/102, 103 and 104) were delivered with consecutive UK registrations OXE 472, 473 and 474. The cars were painted in the matching, Aston Martin racing color of Almond Green metallic with a yellow flash on the bonnet. At the Hyeres 12 Hours (May 29, 1955) DB3S/102 finished Second overall driven by Tony Gaze and David McKay. In 1957 McKay set a new Australian Land Speed Record of 143.9 mph in this car. DB3S/103 finished Fourth overall at Hyeres, with owner/driver Tom Sulman and his co-pilot, a fellow Australian named Jack Brabham. (Brabham relates that his trip from Sydney to Rome took three and a half days!) Sulman went on to take a Second in the South Pacific Sports Car Championship with his car in 1958. DB3S/104, the car offered here, was completed on May 23, 1955, just days before the Hyeres 12 Hours where it finished Third overall with owner/driver Les Cosh and co-pilot Dick Cobden. After its European season, where it also competed in Portugal and the UK, it was the only one of the three Kangaroo Stable cars which did not go to Australia. Instead, it was sold by Cosh to California racer Rod Carveth in October, 1955. Reputably the first DB3S acquired by an American, the car arrived in San Francisco in January, 1956. Soon afterwards Carveth actually removed the body to repaint it in his favorite black livery and apply his “lucky” number 54 in preparation for its first event, on March 18 in Stockton, CA, alongside DB3S/112 owned by Jack Graham. Carveth took an impressive Seventh overall in his debut outing. Taking to the DB3S with relish, Carveth raced it on 22 weekends in 1956, racking up at least two podium finishes in the process, along with a number of Firsts in Class. During practice laps for his first event in Pomona, in January, 1957, the crankshaft broke and damaged the block. VB6K/104 was replaced by the engine from DB3S/115 (VB6K/115). More podium finishes were achieved in 1957, as Carveth ventured regularly outside of California and raced at circuits such as Elkhart Lake, Thompson Raceway, Watkins Glen and Lime Rock, as well as back on the west coast at the newly-opened Laguna Seca, near Monterey, CA. Looking to up the ante with his DB3S racing endeavors, in 1957 Carveth approached the factory to acquire an ex-Works DB3S and was originally promised DB3S/9 by Aston team manager John Wyer. Slated to go to the Nürburgring as a spare car for its last team race, it was driven over rough roads from Dunkirk to the ‘ring, and upon arrival was found to have broken body mountings at both the front and the rear, rendering it unsuitable for competition. Having made the promise to Carveth, Wyer ordered a “new” Works car be produced by the Aston Racing Department to fulfil his commitment. This 11th and final Works car (DB3S/11), was finished with the help of Carveth who spent two weeks in England, assisting with final assembly of the car. It was painted black, naturally, and delivered by ship to San Francisco, arriving in August, 1957. Now with two DB3Ss at his disposal, Carveth usually brought both cars to the California events, often loaning out DB3S/104 to others, including Fred Allen, Jane Wells, Don Burrows, Gil Geitner, John Barenson, George Constantine, Al Laws and Jack Flaherty, among others, including Phil Hill who tried the car out in some practice laps. Notably, Carroll Shelby achieved a lap record at Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 1956 with DB3S/104. Between his two DB3Ss, Carveth wrote that he had accumulated some forty handsome trophies plus having won the SCCA Racing Driver’s Award in the Class D championship category, achieving the Fourth highest standing for National Class D points. Carveth’s final race in DB3S/104 was at Laguna Seca on June 13, 1958, after which his desire was to move up the Aston sports racing chain once again to the new DBR1. Sadly, he was unable to obtain one, as only five were built, four of which were Works team cars, just beginning their epic journey to the top. “Because of the unavailability of the DBR1 Astons last year,” Carveth wrote in 1959, “I had to turn traitor and bought an ex-works three litre – from Modena. Perhaps I might return to Astons yet, but my personal racing love has turned to Formula Junior.” Indeed, Carveth went on to race a Ferrari 250TR/58 at Le Mans in 1959 for Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team (NART) with co-pilot Gil Geitner. Ironically, that was the year in which Ferrari was outclassed by the Aston Martin DBR1s, finishing One-Two overall and realizing David Brown’s manifest destiny. Carveth sold DB3S/104 to Larry Albedi in early 1959, who has a single recorded race outing, at Stockton on April 19 (DNF). By June of that year, the car had been sold to another Californian, Bob Downing who raced the Aston twice more at Laguna Seca. As was voguish in California in the early 60s, Downing is known to have intended to create a V8 street rod project out of the DB3S, and sold the original body to Ken Wallis who installed it onto DB3S/8. However, by 1964 Downing had apparently had a change of heart, and bought the body from DB3S/112 which had been damaged in the right rear end racing at Laguna Seca in 1963. Subsequent to repairing the body, it was painted into primer and fitted to Downing’s DB3S/104 chassis. It was then reportedly stored in a chicken coop until the ‘70s when it was acquired by Aston enthusiast Len Auerbach, again, also from northern California. Meanwhile, Auerbach’s friend George Newell, a noted nuclear engineer and physicist who was also a towering figure in the Aston Martin Owners Club, acquired DB3S/117. Thereafter, both men began nut and bolt restorations of their respective cars. Enlisting the expert assistance of Richard “Dickie” Green, formerly of the Aston Martin Racing Department (working as a mechanic for John Wyer during the heyday of the DB3S Works racing era, 1952-1956), Green was the “resident engineer” for Aston Martin of North America on the west coast. Completed in 1976, both cars were painted black in a tribute to Carveth’s two DB3s, Auerbach’s DB3S/104 running no. 54 and Newell’s DB3S/117 running no. 55. The two friends often ran together at west coast races such as the Monterey Historics at Laguna Seca and Sears Point, among others. Auerbach devotedly raced and enjoyed DB3S/104 until 1989, when it was sold to Peter Agg in the UK, whose Trojan Ltd. concern manufactured cars for McLaren for over ten years. Agg re-restored the car putting it back to its original Almond Green livery for the first time since it was delivered in 1955. The document file contains numerous receipts from R.S. Williams and Rex Woodgate, both acknowledged experts in the UK on Aston sports racing cars. Agg ran the DB3S in the 9th Mille Miglia Storica in 1992 (car #310) and the 16th La Sicilia dei Florio / 6th Giro Sicilia Storico Sicily in 1994. The car was subsequently featured at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in 1996, and it raced in the Silverstone B.R.D.C. Historic Series in 1997 with a Mr. Bryant behind the wheel. Peter and Peggy Agg also participated with the car in the Royal SunAlliance Classic Cavalcade to Le Mans in 1997. The last recorded and current owner of DB3S/104 is a noted California collector of English machinery, with a particular emphasis on significant Astons, who acquired the car from Agg in 2005 via London dealers Hall & Bradfield. Since its return to the U.S. the DB3S has kept a low public profile with maintenance as appropriate during its custodianship by Kevin Kay Restorations. It has been shown once, at The Quail, A Motorsports Gathering in Carmel, CA in 2007 where it took a First in Class Award despite competition from a more freshly-restored DB3S. It is superbly presented today and “on the button” to drive and enjoy. A large document file accompanies the car, which includes its FIA certification (issued to Peter Agg on February 29, 1992) the UK V5 registration and also a California title issued to and endorsed by Len Auerbach as well as numerous MOTs from 1992. The aluminum tonneau cover is also available. DB3S/104 is one of 20 “customer” DB3Ss, and one of only 31 examples built in total, including the Works team cars. As one of the three Kangaroo Stable cars, it is reportedly the ‘”least crashed” example of those; as such it is perhaps the most highly desirable of all. Remarkably, seven DB3Ss were actively racing in California between 1956 and 1960. Rod Carveth was the first with DB3S/104 and the car boasts an unbroken ownership history, including California residency and race history from 1956-1989, and from 2005 to the present day. Rarely available on the market, these cars often change hands privately, among enthusiasts who stand in line for the next opportunity. So it is exceptional indeed to find one offered for sale publicly. RM Auctions is both pleased and proud to represent this exciting and important sports racer. Estimate: $1,750,000 – $2,250,000 FELTHAM-ERA ASTON ENGINES AND DB3S/104 It has been reported that in 1961, the engine in DB3S/104 (presumably still VB6K/115) developed a main bearing problem rendering the block unusable, and that it was replaced in that period with a DB2/4 MkIII block (from the later engine type known as the DBA) while retaining the original DB3S head and VB timing chain cover. It is impossible to ascertain today whether the current engine is VB6K/115 due to the fact that Aston engines from this era carried no block number stampings; the only engine identifier was the number stamped on the timing chain cover. Since neither cylinder heads nor timing covers are interchangeable between the earlier VB and the later DBA engines and DB3S/104 today carries an original DB3S timing chain cover the report of the car having a later DBA block cannot be accurate. Further, the fourth and most long term owner of the car who restored it in the 1970s recalls distinctly that it had the correct type block and head appropriate to a DB3S when he bought it from Bob Downing, complete with VB6K engine internals such as solid main bearing cheeses, special connecting rods, DB3S crankshaft, and that it was fitted with a correct VB6K head. Finally, marque specialist Kevin Kay, in whose care the car has remained since its repatriation to California in 2005, has inspected the engine and agrees that it indeed is the correct type VB engine block, head, and timing cover. DB3S/104 today carries the timing chain cover stamped DP/101/11, appropriate for a Works DB3S; however it is important to note that the original timing chain cover is also available and included with the car, stamped VB6K/104, which given these circumstances regarding Aston Martin engine identification, confers “matching numbers” status, even though it is believed that the car has had at least one change of engine block. Chassis no. DB3S104

  • USAUSA
  • 2009-08-13
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1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Competizione

Estimate Available Upon Request The Ex-North American Racing Team, Daytona, Sebring, Le Mans, Montlhèry and Watkins Glen 400hp 4,390 cc. dual overhead camshaft V12 engine, tipo 605 five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and tube shocks and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400mm Introduced in 1968 with production beginning in 1969, the 365 GTB/4 was Ferrari’s response to an evolving market and, even more important, changing regulations in its most important market, the United States, where increasingly stringent emissions standards and rigid safety-related regulations had made the previous generation of Ferraris unsaleable. The 365 GTB/4 was bigger, both in bulk and in the power to propel it, more luxuriously equipped and was wrapped in a Pininfarina-designed, Scaglietti-built body that was equally a departure from earlier Ferraris. The 365 GTB/4 quickly earned the name “Daytona” after Ferrari’s epic victory in the Daytona 24 Hours and took off to sales success. Road & Track magazine summed up the Daytona’s attributes succinctly, sub-heading their October 1970 Road Test, “The fastest – and best – GT is not necessarily the most exotic.” It was still a front-engined, rear wheel drive berlinetta but what a sublime, powerful and highly developed berlinetta it was. The V12 engine was barely recognizable as derived from Gioacchino Colombo’s 20 year old design, lengthened to accommodate the 81mm bore needed to give it 4,390 cc of displacement, fitted with twin cam cylinder heads for high rpm and better breathing through a sextet of Weber 40 DCN 20 carburetors. Its increased displacement was needed to deliver sufficient power to cope with the air injection system required to meet US emissions regulations and also to propel the Daytona’s not inconsiderable bulk. Early in its development Ferrari quoted a target weight of 2,640 pounds. In production it weighed in at well over 3,000 pounds. The Daytona’s engine, however, was up to the challenge, driving Ferrari’s luxurious gran turismo to a top speed 3mph faster than the Miura’s and out-accelerated its mid-engined competitor by half a second in 400 meters. It was a mighty automobile that handled as well as it went thanks to 71/2” wide 15” wheels, 215/70 Michelin tires and Ferrari’s four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and tube shocks which had proven itself in nearly a decade of successful Ferrari sports-racing cars and the 50-50 weight distribution which Ferrari engineered into the package. The 365 GTB/4 was neither intended nor designed for competition, but like all Ferraris it had the basic attributes: powerful and reliable engine, competent chassis with predictable handling and refined aerodynamics. It also had a cadre of experienced distributors like Luigi Chinetti, Col. Ronnie Hoare and Jacques Swaters who knew they sold more cars if the cars they sold won races. The Daytona’s speed commended it to the great endurance races like Le Mans, Daytona and Sebring where its power and aerodynamics suited the races’ long straights. Chinetti was the first to test the Daytona’s competition potential, entering an early production car at Le Mans in 1969, then at Daytona and Sebring in 1970. Ferrari eventually succumbed to the pressure from its distributors and created three series of competition Daytonas, only fifteen of which were to be built. Of these 15 cars the first five were designated as the Series One, with the example offered here, chassis 14889, the final car in the first series. Constructed at the Ferrari Customer Assistance Center in Modena, the Competition Daytonas proved not only to be eminently successful but also remarkably long-lived, remaining competitive in GT competition for almost a decade. Constructed for Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team in New York, chassis number 14889 was completed in February 1972, late enough that its confirmed entry in the 1972 Daytona Continental 6-hour race with Luigi Chinetti Jr. and Ronnie Bucknum as the drivers was withdrawn prior to the race. 14889 would wait until the 21st Annual Sebring 12 hours to make its debut with the great Sam Posey and Tony Adamowicz piloting the NART entry. After a grueling race the pair managed an impressive 3rd in class and 13th overall, a formidable result in the car’s first outing against the cream of international competition on Sebring’s notoriously rough and demanding circuit. The Daytona then went to the Watkins Glen 6 hours with David Hobbs and Sam Posey at the wheel however engine problems forced the NART entry to retire early from the race. Its next outing proved more successful though as 14889 managed an impressive 9th overall and 3rd in class at the Paris 1000 kms in Montlhèry, France driven by a new team of drivers, Jean-Pierre Jarier and Jacques Laffitte. Following Montlhèry the Ferrari was sent to Gaetano Florini’s Assistenza Clienti in Modena for upgrade to Series III specifications while the engine was similarly upgraded by Traco in Los Angeles for the 1973 season. Series III specifications meant an increase in engine performance and efficiency. This was achieved utilizing similar detailed engineering as employed on the awe-inspiring GTO, largely with the adoption of improved piston and con rod design but also through subtle modifications to the running gear and drive train throughout the car. With its newly implemented Series III specs, 14889 was an improved beast ready to compete once again for the NART team and would do so at one of the most celebrated U.S. tracks. 14889 was sent to the Daytona 24 hours race as one of the NART entries where the talented trio of Bob Grossman, Luigi Chinetti, Jr. and Wilbur Shaw, Jr. achieved an impressive 5th overall and 4th in class, only 16 laps behind the 2nd overall, class-winning NART Competition Daytona of Francois Migault and Milt Minter. With its success at Daytona and updated Series III specifications 14889 joined NART’s traditional assault on the most important endurance race of the season, Le Mans, appearing first in the tune-up and test 4 Hour race at La Sarthe on April 1. In the hands of François Migault and Lucien Guitteny 14889 placed an impressive 5th overall and 2nd in class. The Daytona, after its warm up race at the 4 Hours of Le Mans, was prepped for the grueling 1973 24 hours of Le Mans where its co-drivers were Bob Grossman and Lucien Guitteny.This time though, wearing race number 36, the NART team Ferrari Daytona retired at just over half the race distance, after 192 laps, due to right rear damage from an accident. 14889 then made its way back to the U.S. to the Watkins Glen 6 hour race on July 21. Driven by Bob Grossman and Don Yenko 14889 completed its last race under the NART banner in 15th overall, 7th in the Grand Touring category. The years of the Daytona Competition were a Golden Age in endurance racing when Ferrari was challenged by a succession of fierce competitors. Alfa Romeo, Matra, Lola, Porsche, Corvette and Mirage focused their talents and resources upon breaking Ferrari’s dominance of long distance racing in epic events from the high banks of Daytona to the twisting and crumbling trails of Sicily’s Targa Florio and the mind-bending top speeds of Le Mans’ Mulsanne straight. Prototypes like the Ferrari 312PB, Matra-Simca MS670, Porsche 908 and Alfa Romeo 33TT3 were developed for bitterly contested specific races and their masterful driving teams were instructed to win at all costs in races that for the first time amounted to 6-, 12- and even 24-hour sprints. Driven for hours at 10/10ths they often broke or crashed. Grand Touring cars like the Competition Daytonas then swept in to score top-10 – and frequently podium – finishes in equally titanic battles among legendary marques. The image of the Competition Daytonas are inextricably fixed in the collective memory of a generation, driven to greatness by great drivers in epic races. Following 14889’s successful racing career it was sold by Luigi Chinetti to Donald W. Fong of Atlanta, Georgia in 1973. It remained with Fong for next 13 years until he sold it to George Nuse, also of Atlanta, in 1986. Nuse kept the Daytona for another nine years and during his ownership became something of a celebrity and “poster child” for the Competition Daytona. It was shown regularly including an appearance at the 1987 Ferrari Club of America Concours at Wolf Trap Farm where it placed 3rd in class 16. Nuse generously offered the Daytona for track testing as well and the report was subsequently published in the Ferrari Club of America publication Prancing Horse, issue number 86. While under Nuse’s ownership the Daytona received a comprehensive restoration at the hands of Bruce Vineyard’s Continental Coachworks, Ltd in Conyers, Georgia. Nuse kept the Daytona until 1995 when it was sold to its current owners. As one of only 15 built, and the last example from the most desirable First Series of Ferrari-built cars, Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Competition 14889 remains as one of the great examples of Ferrari’s competitive spirit from the 1970s. Evolving from the Daytona gran turismos by popular demand of Ferrari’s most important and competitive clients, the Competition Daytona proved to be a formidable competitor on the tracks of the world’s racing stage, leading by example and with success over the three year period of its early history. Today, Competition Daytona 14889 remains resplendent in its NART livery complete with all the correct badging and decals. It is in excellent overall condition having been well maintained and cared for by only three private owners for the last 30 years. Fully eligible for the Shell Historic Challenge as well as a welcome entrant at any Ferrari event around the world, there are few cars that offer what this Daytona does. It is ready to go, but not for the timid or faint of heart. It is able to catapult its drivers to high speeds at a moment’s notice, while imparting an explosion of sensory experiences. 14889 is one of the most desirable Daytonas from its model’s run of only examples; it is equally desirable as a representative of Ferrari’s early 1970s racing history, one of the most competitive eras in endurance racing. It is a singularly-important Ferrari and the rarity of such an example coming to auction is indeed a special occasion. Outfitted in the NART number 21 livery it bore at the 1973 Daytona 24 Hours, 14889 appears only moments older than when it achieved its greatest accomplishments. It has competed in front of the world, performing and finishing with distinction in some of the world’s most competitive races: Sebring, Watkins Glen, 1000km of Paris, Daytona and Le Mans. Its physical presence is equally impressive and in person the Daytona Competizione is one of the most aggressive, best looking Grand Touring racers of all time. With its flared fenders, air dams, side exhausts and racing stripe it is truly unmistakable and intimidating. Pictured in dozens of books, driven by some of the legends of motor racing, owned and operated by one of the greatest race teams ever, Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Competizione 14889 is a fantastic, awe-inspiring car that begs to be driven, shown and most of all – remain dominant. Chassis no. 14889

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-03-12
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1997 Ferrari F50

13,800 km from new Full service recently completed, including fuel tank replacement Ferrari’s iconic 1990s supercar Ferrari Classiche certified Built to celebrate the marque’s 50th anniversary, the Ferrari F50 was powered by a 520-hp 4.7-litre normally aspirated V-12 with five valves per cylinder. It was derived directly from the Tipo 040 powerplant that Ferrari used in Alain Prost’s Ferrari 641 during the 1990 Formula 1 season. The six-speed longitudinally mounted gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine. This configuration is very similar to that used on contemporary Ferrari Formula 1 cars and gives the F50 nearly perfect balance. Perhaps the most important engineering work done for F50 was the car’s Cytec aerospace carbon fibre chassis, which tipped the scales at just 225 pounds. The F50’s rubber bladder fuel tank was housed within the chassis, behind the driver and in front of the engine, yet another Ferrari innovation inspired by the aircraft industry. The F50’s braking performance was no less impressive than the engine’s massively drilled and ventilated disc brakes were fitted along with Brembo-supplied four-piston brake callipers, enabling the car to stop to rest from 113 km/h in just 54 meters. The F50’s careful engineering enabled the car to achieve legendary performance statistics. Simply put, if one were to imagine a street-legal Formula 1 car, the F50 would likely come very close to that dream. With only 349 examples produced between 1995 and 1997, they are exceptionally rare and difficult to find today. The car offered here, chassis number 107145, retains all of its major original mechanical components, as confirmed within its Ferrari Classiche certification binder. Finished in quintessential Rosso Corsa over Nero and a European-delivery example, the car was registered in Germany as of 1999 before moving to Japan, where it was registered in the Province of Tama in 2005. By 2013, the car had returned to Europe, where it was imported to the UK and has remained ever since. With just 13,800 km showing on its odometer, all relevant service needs have been completed, including the rubber bladder fuel tank, and the car is ready to be driven and enjoyed. Accompanied by its original books and tools, the F50 is truly an incredible machine to behold and is a car that would thrill even the most seasoned and talented drivers on the open road, as it is the only Ferrari supercar to combine convertible bodywork, a manual transmission and V-12 engine all in one glorious automotive cocktail. • 13.800 km totali • Tagliando completo appena effettuato (compresa la sostituzione del serbatoio del carburante) • Iconica supercar Ferrari degli anni '90 • Certificata Ferrari Classiche Realizzata per celebrare il 50° anniversario del marchio, la Ferrari F50 monta un V-12 aspirato, 5 litri, 5 valvole per cilindro e capace di 520 CV. Questo propulsore deriva direttamente dal motore Tipo 040 che Alain Prost aveva sulla Ferrari 641 di Formula 1 nel 1990. Il cambio longitudinale a sei marce, insieme al differenziale a scorrimento limitato, è stato montato dietro il motore. Questa configurazione, molto simile a quella usata sulle F1 di oggi, dà alla F50 un bilanciamento ottimale. La soluzione ingegneristica più interessante, però, è il telaio Cytec Aerospace in fibra di carbonio, che pesa solo 102 kg. Il serbatoio del carburante in gomma è stato alloggiato all'interno del telaio stesso, dietro al conducente e davanti al motore, un'ulteriore innovazione Ferrari ispirata dall'industria aeronautica. A proposito di prestazioni, sono impressionanti anche quelle in frenata che, grazie a quattro dischi vistosamente traforati e autoventilati, con pinze a quattro pistoncini, rigorosamente Brembo, permettono alla F50 di passare da 113 km/h a 0 in soli 54 metri. Progettata per stupire, la F50 è quanto di più vicino a un'auto di Formula 1 in versione stradale ci possa essere. Con soli 349 esemplari prodotti tra il 1995 e il 1997, questa “rossa” è eccezionalmente rara e molto difficile da trovare sul mercato. La vettura proposta, con telaio numero 107145, mantiene tutti i principali componenti meccanici originali, come confermato nel certificato Ferrari Classiche. Rigorosamente Rosso Corsa, con interni Nero, è una vettura europea, visto che inizialmente è immatricolata in Germania (1999). Successivamente viene trasferita in Giappone dove, nel 2005, la registrano nella provincia di Tama. Nel 2013 torna in Europa, questa volta però nel Regno Unito, dove rimane fino ad oggi. Con appena 13.800 km sul contachilometri, sono state completate tutte le necessarie operazioni di manutenzione, compresa la sostituzione del serbatoio del carburante in gomma. L'auto, quindi, è pronta per essere guidata e goduta. Fornita di manuali e attrezzi originali, questa F50 è veramente un'auto incredibile da ammirare. Una supercar capace di emozionare anche i piloti più esperti, grazie al cocktail da vera sportiva che combina carrozzeria aperta, cambio manuale e motore V-12. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue description, this vehicle is provided with a reproduction service manual. Si fa presente che, contrario alla descrizione stampata nel catalogo, questo veicolo è presentato con una riproduzione del manuale di servizio . Chassis no. ZFFTA46B000107145 Serial no. 330/349 Engine no. 46693 Gearbox no. 444

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
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1967 Ferrari 330 GTS by Pininfarina

One of just 99 examples produced Original engine, chassis and drivetrain Wonderfully patinaed restoration Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche The replacement to the 275 GTS, the 330 GTS was designed to be an elegant, open-top, V-12 grand tourer for Ferrari’s best customers looking for the finest automotive experience money could buy. In addition to plenty of room for two plus their luggage, the 330 GTS boasted a top speed of 150 mph and a quarter-mile time of 15 seconds at just under 100 mph. Aside from the obvious addition of its convertible top, the 330 GTS was identical to the 330 GTC that had been unveiled a few months earlier at the Geneva Salon. However, the convertible was built in much more limited numbers than its closed sibling. While 598 examples of the 330 GTC were built, only 99 of the 330 GTS would leave the factory gates by the time production concluded in 1968. Today, these 99 cars are highly sought after by collectors for their fine driving characteristics as well as their gorgeous looks. Chassis number 09481 was completed in February 1967, finished in Argento Metallizzato over Nero with factory air conditioning and was delivered new to official dealer Motor S.a.S. di Carla Allegretti in Rome. In 1970 it was exported to the U.S. and has remained there since. The first American owner recorded is Walter Ancker of Stamford, Connecticut, in 1976, for whom the car was serviced that August by Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, at 38,760 miles. It was next owned in 1979 by Lawrence Reif, who would advertise it for sale several times over the next year, as would its owners through the late-1990s. By 1995 it had been refinished in its present iconic colour scheme Rosso over tan. It joined the collection of the present owner several years ago. The car retains its original engine, chassis, gearbox and body number stampings, and its finishes throughout still present in very nice overall condition, including the Borrani wire wheels. Its seats are tight, and the car is equipped with its original factory air-conditioning, as well as a Becker tape deck. It is accompanied by a full-size spare, in the trunk, as well as a top boot, partial tool set and a jack. This is a lovely 330 GTS for any fine collection. • Uno dei soli 99 esemplari prodotti • Motore, telaio e trasmissione originali • Restauro di prima qualità • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche Erede della 275 GTS, la 330 GTS è stata progettata per essere un'elegante V-12 Grand Tourer aperta, pensata per soddisfare i più esigenti clienti Ferrari sempre alla ricerca del meglio in campo automobilistico. Oltre a essere particolarmente spaziosa, per i due occupanti e il loro bagaglio, la 330 GTS vanta una velocità massima di oltre 240 km/h. A parte l'evidente aggiunta del tetto apribile, la 330 GTS era identica alla 330 GTC presentata alcuni mesi prima al Salone di Ginevra. Tuttavia, la versione aperta è stata costruita in un numero molto più limitato di pezzi. Mentre della coupé gli esemplari furono 598, le 330 GTS prodotte fino al 1968 sono solo 99. Oggi, queste auto sono molto ricercate dai collezionisti. Per le loro caratteristiche di guida eccellenti, certo, ma anche per la loro splendida linea. L'auto con telaio numero 09481, completata nel febbraio del '67, esce di fabbrica in Argento Metallizzato con interni Nero e con l'impianto dell'aria condizionata. Consegnata nuova al concessionario ufficiale Motor S.a.S. di Carla Allegretti, a Roma, nel '70 viene esportata negli Stati Uniti dov'è rimasta fino ad oggi. Il primo proprietario americano arriva nel 1976 ed è Walter Ancker di Stamford, Connecticut. Di lui la Luigi Chinetti Motors di Greenwich registra un tagliando nell'agosto dello stesso anno, a quota 38.760 miglia (62.378 km). Nel 1979 la GTS passa a Lawrence Reif, che la mette in vendita più volte nel corso dell'anno, così come faranno i successivi proprietari fino alla fine degli anni '90. Nel '95 intanto viene ridipinta nell'iconico abbinamento Rosso per la carrozzeria e marrone chiaro per gli interni. L'auto è entrata a far parte della collezione dell'attuale proprietario diversi anni fa. La 330 GTS conserva motore, telaio, cambio e numero di serie originali. Inoltre, le finiture sono ancora molto belle. Da segnalare i cerchi a raggi Borrani. Inoltre i sedili sono integri e l'auto è dotata dell'impianto di aria condizionata originale di fabbrica, così come del mangiacassette Becker. Nel baule ci sono la ruota di scorta, il copri capote, gli attrezzi (non completi) e un cric. Bellissimo esemplare di 330 GTS, davvero da collezione. Chassis no. 09481 Engine no. 9481 Gearbox no. 116/I Body no. C0151

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
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1970 Ferrari 512 S

550bhp 4,496cc double overhead camshaft light alloy V12, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel hydraulic vented disc brakes, double wishbone independent front suspension and single upper arm and lower wishbone independent rear suspension. Ferrari’s 512S represented yet another attempt by a manufacturer to thwart the homologation rules laid out by the C.S.I. (Commission Sportive International). It was a practice the C.S.I. was trying hard to avoid; manufacturers would build prototype racers, produce them in the required quantities and fit them with lights, horns, and spare tires - all the trappings of a road car. On paper, the 512S was a car for the average Joe, but in reality, it was the fastest car Ferrari had ever built, capable of moving in excess of 235mph. With the new rules in place, Enzo Ferrari knew that it would be impossible for a ‘Sports Prototype’ of only three liters to compete against a five liter ‘Sports Car.’ In 1969, with the C.S.I.’s Group 6 rule change, a reduction from a minimum of 50 to 25 production units, and a major infusion of cash from Fiat, Ferrari quickly set about creating the 25 vehicles necessary to meet the Group 6 criteria. Assembly of the first new cars began in the fall of 1969. The chassis was similar to the one used on the P4 — a semi-monocoque design. The engine was a direct development of the 612 Can Am series unit, now fitted with twin overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and Lucas fuel injection. Initially it could produce 550hp at 8,500rpm. A year after initial production began changes were made to improve reliability, lessen the weight and increase the overall horsepower — the engine could now produce 620hp at 9,000rpm. The 512S was first introduced to the public at a press conference in November 1969. Over the next three months enough chassis were completed to qualify the 512S for Group 6 Production ‘Sports Cars.’ Soon after the qualifying inspection was completed, several of the assembled cars were taken apart to be used as spares. All of the completed chassis were originally built in Berlinetta configuration. Almost immediately, the 512S began to undergo modification. The most noticeable change was the removal of the center section of the bodywork or roof panel. On April 1, an addendum was accepted by the FIA and written into the homologation papers noting the availability of a Spyder version of the 512S. The 512’s competition debut took place when five identical cars were lined up for the Daytona 24 Hour race on January 31, 1970. Three of the new 512s were official entries, two were entered by customers and all had been fitted at the rear with two substantial spoilers combined with fins and two deflectors on the front wings. Mario Andretti succeeded in qualifying in first place, but the Porsche 917s were to stay in the lead throughout the whole of the actual race. Only one 512S was to survive twice around the clock – the official 512S, driven alternately by Andretti, Merzario and Ickx. For the 512’s first outing any type of podium finish against the mighty Porsche 917s was in itself a victory. Two weeks after Daytona, Ferrari delivered chassis 1006 to Luigi Chinetti for use by his North American Race Team. Chassis 1006 and three other 512s were entered in the 1970 12 Hours of Sebring. Three of these 512s, including chassis 1006, were now in ‘Spyder’ configuration. This enabled their weight to be reduced by about 40kg and significantly improved headroom. One factory team car, driven by Vaccarella and Giunti, retained its Berlinetta configuration; however, the rear decks of all of the cars had now been revised for better cooling and aerodynamics. Another feature added to some of the cars was a new, more blunt nose. Chinetti had arranged for NART drivers Sam Posey and Ronnie Bucknum to race chassis 1006. In practice the two drove well, managing to qualify in 6th spot, ahead of the 512S Ferrari works car of Giunti, Vaccarella and Andretti (the eventual overall winners). Andretti had again achieved the best qualifying time at Sebring, and had been in the lead for most of the race, but he had to retire with a broken gearbox. He then took over Vaccarella and Giunti’s berlinetta, to finish first overall. Posey and Bucknum were able to maintain their position for the early part of the race and by the fourth hour had moved into 5th place. Sadly, their race ended when the gearbox gave out early in the fifth hour. Despite this, the two managed to cover nearly 100 laps and were officially classified 42nd overall. Chinetti next arranged for Pedro Rodriguez and the now repaired chassis 1006 to contest several Can Am races. The first of these occurred on July 21, 1970 at Donnybrook, where Rodriguez scored a 9th overall in his first Can Am race. On August 23, Rodriguez drove chassis 1006 at the Mid-Ohio Can Am race, where he scored a very respectable 7th overall. For the remainder of the 1970 season, Chinetti focused his attention on obtaining a second 512 to campaign alongside chassis 1006. The new car, chassis 1020, was immediately updated into ‘M,’ or ‘Modificato,’ configuration. This included numerous improvements such as revised suspension and new front and rear body panels. Chinetti now had two 512s at his disposal. In late December 1970, Chinetti sent his lead driver, Sam Posey, along with chassis 1006 to Argentina for the upcoming 1000 km race at Buenos Aires. Three other 512s were also on hand, one of them in the improved new ‘M’ configuration, but they could only match the practice time of Posey in chassis 1006. Chassis 1006 was actually faster than the others were on the turns and flat out. Only in braking did the new 512M show the benefits of the new modifications. All four 512s finished, one after another, occupying 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th. The new 512M was clearly the slowest of the four 512s entered, but while chassis 1006 was slightly quicker, it still only managed to score a 7th overall. After Buenos Aires, chassis 1006 joined chassis 1020 in Florida, for the 24 hours of Daytona. Four other 512s also competed in this classic endurance event. Three of the 512s were now in ‘M’ configuration. Clearly the fastest and best prepared was the 512M of Penske and Kirk F. White, chassis 1040. This car easily scored the fastest practice time, and for the first time all the 512Ms outperformed the 512S models. During the race, only chassis 1040 and the car on offer here, chassis 1006, presented any opposition to the Porsche 917s. For much of the race it appeared that chassis 1040 would take the checkered flag. An unfortunate accident late in the race forced 1040 back to third spot, while chassis 1006 soldiered on to an unforgettable and career highlight second overall. Most impressive though was the fact that 1006 gave the mighty 917 a real run for its money as the duel towards the end of the race had become the closest 1-2 finish in the history of the 24 Hours of Daytona. So close in fact the team of Tony Adamowicz and Ronnie Bucknum finished the race capturing second place on the very same lap as the Wyer/Rodriquez Gulf Oil 917K. Seven weeks after 1006’s success at Daytona, Chinetti entered the car along with chassis 1020 in the 12 Hours of Sebring. 1006 was the sole 512S amongst four ‘M’ variants. Once again, 1006 was extremely fast in practice. It was, in fact, one of the fastest of the 512s, for a while even bettering the 512M Sunoco, chassis 1040, that had nearly won at Daytona. The race was, however, relatively disappointing. While running as high as 6th overall, about eight hours into the race, the right rear tire let go. Limping back to the pits, the dry sump tank split, ending the car’s run. Officially Posey and Bucknum finished 37th overall. Chassis 1006’s final race of the 1971 season was the 24 Hours of Le Mans. No fewer than nine 512s were entered, but once again chassis 1006 was the sole example still in original ‘S’ configuration. In practice, the car proved to be the slowest of the Ferraris, but remained utterly reliable and as Le Mans was a test of endurance, Chinetti had strong hopes for a well-placed finish. Driving duties for the race were assigned to former Le Mans winner, Masten Gregory and the up-and-coming NART driver, George Eaton. The race again indicated that Porsche’s 917 was nearly unbeatable. One after another, seven of the Ferrari 512s dropped out of the race. Chassis 1006 was forced to retire in the fifteenth hour with persistent fuel-injection problems caused by dirty fuel. Ferrari had given up racing the 512s as factory team cars in 1971, instead focusing all their attention on the new 312 PB. Some of the surviving 512s continued to race into the early 1970s in the Can Am or Interserie in Europe and the U.S. Several were driven beyond their useful life and written off after one too many accidents. A fortunate few were acquired by private collectors, ex-racers and enthusiasts. These were, and remain to this day, expensive and to a degree somewhat fragile machines. As the desirability and collectability of these vehicles continued to rise, so too did interest in acquiring them. Unfortunately for the unwary collector, many of the 512s that were destroyed and written off have now reappeared. Several have been rebuilt from the remains, or parts of the original remains, of cars destroyed while racing. Chassis 1006 is one of the few 512s that have managed to escape all controversy. Well cared for, despite being actively campaigned for both the 1970 and 1971 seasons, 1006 found a succession of loving and caring owners shortly after its competitive career ended. It remains one of the single most original and untouched 512s ever completed. In fact, while 25 vehicles were originally called for, just 22 were actually completed, and a mere 16 survive to this day. While all of the 512s were upgraded and modified to some extent, there remains a total of just four 512s, including this one, still in their ‘S’ configuration. Chassis 1006 was sold at the end of the 1971 season to Harley Cluxton and shortly thereafter to Californian Steve Earle who later sold it to Chris Cord. In the mid 1970s, Cord sold the car to the well-known Ferrari connoisseur, collector, racer and enthusiast, Otis Chandler of Los Angeles, California. In 1977, Chandler sold chassis 1006 to Stone Stollenwerck, who in turn sold the car two years later to Steven Griswold of Berkeley, California. Griswold almost immediately turned the car around to Michael Vernon in the United Kingdom. Vernon had been looking for a proper 512 for some years, and upon inspecting chassis 1006 agreed to purchase the car immediately. In the early 1990s, chassis 1006 was acquired by the internationally known Rosso Bianco museum collection of Peter Kaus. Since then the Ferrari was sold to the United States where it has remained in private hands for the last five years. Though the 512S is in excellent overall condition and is ready to be competitively raced it is always recommended that a car of such significance and value be thoroughly examined and serviced prior to track use. The engine was recently rebuilt by Chris Dugan of Motion Products West and has virtually no track time on it remaining fresh for its next owner’s use. Prior to the engine rebuild chassis 1006 was intermittently raced, all the while performing competently and successfully on the track for its current enthusiast owner. The vendor reports that the 512S is also complete with a host of additional accessories including the parts necessary to convert the car to either the long or short tail configuration. Notably, we understand the 512S is capable of being road registered. For further details on this and the spare parts that accompany the car we encourage those interested parties to speak with an RM Auctions specialist. Eligible for both the Targa Florio and the Le Mans Classic, this 512S offers its next owner a world of possibilities in both show and competitive use. A true beast of historic racing, it is one of the only cars of the period that offered a serious competitive threat to the Porsche 917. Today it remains as such and we encourage close inspection of this historically important and significant Ferrari. Chassis 1006 is possibly the single best known and certainly one of the most cared for Ferrari 512s left in existence. In addition, with its second place finish at Daytona, it has one of the best racing histories of any of Ferrari’s 512s. Rarely traded, this particular 512 represents an uncommon opportunity to acquire one of the few and certainly one of the finest examples left. Chassis no. 1006

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-19
Hammer price
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