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THE EX-SCUDERIA FERRARI, EX-LUIS FONTES 1934 ALFA ROMEO P3 GRAND PRIX MONOPOSTO

THE EX-SCUDERIA FERRARI, EX-LUIS FONTES 1934 ALFA ROMEO P3 GRAND PRIX MONOPOSTO Chassis No. 50001 SF No.41 Engine No. 50004 Dark red with red leather seat and cockpit trim. Engine: 8-cylinder in-line, 2.9 litre, twin overhead camshafts, twin Roots-type superchargers, 265bhp at 5,400rpm; Gearbox: three speed manual; Suspension: front, beam-axle with semi-elliptic springs and friction-type dampers, rear, live axle with twin torque tube drive to bevel-gears and quarter-elliptic reversed springs, friction-dampers assisted by telescopic shock-absorbers; Brakes: four-wheel mechanical drum. Monoposto. Alfa Corse introduced the first production single-seater racing cars to the public in 1932 with a series of six cars built for the Factory Racing Team, managed by Enzo Ferrari. The car utilized the incredible Vittorio Jano-designed straight-eight engine enlarged to 2.6 litres, which had been developed in the Monza models racing with 2.3 litre engines. The new cars were a revelation, sweeping all before them in Grand Prix events with victories in Italy, France and Germany and backed up with a string of wins in other important European races. Despite this initial success however, Europe was in the grip of recession and at the start of the 1933 season the works withdrew the monopostos, leaving Ferrari forced to run a team of older Monza models, albeit fitted with the newer 2.6 engines. As a result of this, their star driver Tazio Nuvolari defected to the rival Maserati firm, and following some success with the Bologna concern, almost certainly persuaded Alfa Corse to reconsider their actions, and the Tipo B monoposto cars were released back to Enzo Ferrari for the remainder of the season in an attempt to retrieve the situation. At the beginning of 1934 Alfa announced that they would sell the monoposto cars to private buyers, causing several drivers to sell their existing cars and place orders, which the factory then cancelled. However, they changed tack again and proposed new cars and a revised driver line-up for the 1934 season under the newly-introduced 750kg Grand Prix Formula. Seven new cars were to be built (the series 2a cars) utilizing larger bored-out blocks increasing capacity to just under 3 litres. The compression ratio was raised along with increased supercharger pressure, so that the engine was now of 2905cc and gave 255bhp at 5400rpm, compared with the old unit output of 215bhp at 5600rpm from the 2.6 litre engines. Minor modifications were made to the bodywork, giving a wider cockpit and scuttle area, to conform to the new regulations. An innovative feature on all the P3s was the unique 'double-drive' system, consisting of a differential behind the gearbox with two propellor shafts enclosed by torque tubes coming out from it to form a V. Each of these led to a bevel gear in a small light alloy housing situated under the chassis frame. Jano utilized this complex but effective design to minimize unsprung weight, thus eliminating the conventional, but heavy live rear axle design. The revamped team now comprised an impressive line up of drivers including Achille Varzi, Louis Chiron, Marcel Lehoux, Count Trossi and newcomer Guy Moll; Nuvolari remaining committed to Maserati. The team continued under the excellent guidance from Enzo Ferrari, and the cars now all bore his own prancing-horse logo painted on the bonnets, replacing the Alfa quadrifoglio motif. A most promising season ensued with Guy Moll winning from Chiron at Monaco in the opening Grand Prix. Followed by another win, this time by Varzi winning from Chiron at Bordino in Alessandria. At Tripoli there followed a 1-2-3 victory for Varzi, Moll and Chiron thus placed. The Targa Florio race was won single-handedly by Varzi driving a road-equipped P3, while Chiron and Lehoux were first & third respectively at Casablanca. In none of these events however were the Alfas matched against the newly-developing German teams of Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union. The first head-to-head came at Avus in May where Mercedes withdrew, leaving Auto-Union to provide the opposition. Guy Moll was driving an experimental streamlined version of the P3, with the engine bored out to 3.1 litres - ugly and bulbous bodywork nevertheless enabled Moll to achieve victory at an average speed of 127.57 mph over the 180 miles distance: Alfa team-mate Varzi was second and Momberger's Auto Union finished only third. In the Eifelrennen which followed Alfa Romeo tasted their first defeat of the season, with Chiron finishing third behind Von Brauchitsch's Mercedes W25 and Stuck's Auto-Union. Where there was no German opposition Alfa were still dominant such as a convincing 1-2-3 at the Penya Rhin Grand Prix at Barcelona by Varzi, Chiron and Lehoux, while Trossi was victorious at Montreux. The real test came in the French Grand Prix at Montlhry, where Chiron's P3 fought off the challenge from Stuck's Auto Union, and made fastest lap in this gruelling race, seeing off all the German cars and giving yet another triple victory for Chiron, Varzi and Moll in the Alfas. Lesser events provided further wins at Vichy (Trossi), Grand Prix de la Marne (Chiron), Coppa Ciano & Nice (Varzi), and Comminges (Comotti). The next major Grand Prix at the Nrburgring provided a German home-win with the best placed Alfa (Chiron) third; and they were out of luck again at Spa where plug-troubles caused retirements. It is interesting to note that in the Coppa Acerbo at Pescara Chiron's P3 was timed over the flying kilometre at 168.7mph. By August the long season was beginning to take its toll on the team, while the developing Germans took the ascendant, and finally defeated the Alfas on their home ground in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza, relegating Trossi/Comotti and Chiron to third & fourth places respectively after nearly 5-hours endurance. They were also outclassed in both the following Spanish and Czech Grands Prix at the close of the season. Neither Alfa Corse nor Scuderia Ferrari kept any proper records of the chassis numbers during their racing careers, so it is almost impossible to attribute sucesses to individual cars during factory ownership. It could be said that each would almost certainly have been victorious in one or more major events during 1934. However from the Scuderia Ferrari numbering system it is believed that this car SF No.41 can be identified from period photographs as the car driven by Lehoux at the Dieppe G.P. Notably a famous picture of the Lehoux car being worked on in the paddock appears on page 85 of Grand Prix Racing by George Monkhouse, clearly shows SF41 on the car. In this event he finished a creditable second place to Etancelin in his Monoposto 2.9 Litre Maserati, despite having to stop and change the plugs. Authorities such as Fusi indicate that 50001 is the first of the 2a cars, which was an all new car introduced in 1934 and not an updated and modified 2.6 model from the previous year. In 1935 radical changes were required to update the cars to keep pace with the competition, especially as handling on the Alfas was letting them down. Some of the cars were modified with independent front suspension based on the Dubonnet principle, while the rear suspension was altered on all the 1934 cars to reversed short quarter-elliptic springing and piston-type rear shock-absorbers. They received a further boost with the return of Tazio Nuvolari to the team, and he scored an early season victory at Pau with the redesigned car, winning from Dreyfus in a less modified version. Dreyfus and Brivio came in second and third in the two remaining non-independent cars at Monaco, behind Fagioli's Mercedes. With new 3.2 litre engines and a mixture of suspensions, it became more difficult to monitor all the changes and 1935 was a period of flux for the Scuderia. It did however provide the ultimate victory for the Monoposto Tipo B/P3 Alfa Romeo, where Nuvolari scored a magnificent and now legendary win against the might of both German teams in the Nrburgring Grand Prix. The car was fitted with the latest 3.8 engine, which provided the power unit for the new 8C-35 cars introduced for the latter part of the season, when some of the P3 cars were sold off to private entrants. Following its Scuderia Ferrari racing career, Chassis no. 50001 (SF41) was sold to the successful driver Luis Fontes, who was of English extraction despite his Spanish sounding name, and who was famed for his victory in the Monaco Grand Prix driving his Alfa Romeo Monza a few years previously. It appears that 50001 was not raced during 1936 and later the engine was removed and installed into a racing hydroplane in 1937. Thereafter the car remained unused and untouched throughout the war until it was purchased from Fontes in 1955 by George Weaver, an American Air Force officer serving in Europe and enjoying club racing in sportscars in England during his tour of duty. Mr. Weaver was the well known owner of the American racing circuit of Thompson in Connecticut. On his return to the USA he took this car and installed the engine from the ex-Raymond Sommer car which remained in the States following the Vanderbilt Cup race of 1937, numbered 50004. This engine has remained in the car ever since. The car then passed on to another American collector, John Willock, in the early 1960s who used the car very sparingly and later dismantled the P3 for a thorough overhaul but never completed the work. It was purchased, still apart, in the early 1980s by another noted Alfa enthusiast Peter Giddings who restored the car with the help of experts John de Boer and Phil Reilly. Upon completion its first event was the 1985 Monterey Historic Races celebrating the Alfa Romeo marque. Driven by Peter Giddings, in an exciting race he came in a creditable third place behind David Black and Rodney Felton in their highly tuned P3s. It also ran at a Palm Springs event. In the 1986 Laguna Seca event, Phil Reilly drove 50001 and finished 2nd overall. Asked recently to recollect his thoughts about this drive, Phil fondly replied. That was the most fun drive I ever had, it was truly a revelation to experience the quality of the handling and power, I was really surprised. A short while later the P3 was sold to a prominent Japanese collector, and approximately ten years later the car passed to an eminent South American enthusiast before coming into its present ownership. In 1997, 50001 was demonstrated at the Torrey Pines hillclimb. It is evident this vehicle has had very little use since being sold by the factory, and apart from the ex-works race-used replacement engine, the car remains one of the most original specification (most major components bear original stamping numbers and virtually all bodywork is reported as authentic) examples of the more desirable 1934 configuration cars. It is superbly presented and has recently been checked over by the renowned restoration expert Tony Merrick. Upon a recent test it ran and performed beautifully, and would appear to be ready for a renaissance in historic racing circles and is also eminently eligible for the Shell Ferrari Challenge series. To our knowledge, it is ten years since the last Alfa Romeo P3 was available at auction (Christie's Monaco 1989) when one of these great cars achieved $3.3 million. They are hugely important in the history of Alfa Romeo/Scuderia Ferrari racing cars and still rate as one of the most desirable of all pre-war racing cars. Chassis No. 50001 is one of only 12 P3s known to exist and most importantly it is one of the desirable second Series 2a 2.9 litre cars, with a continous and unblemished history. We are pleased and privileged to be able to offer this remarkable and historic car for sale today.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-06-19
Hammer price
Show price

1934 Packard Twelve Sport Coupe by LeBaron

Series 1106. Body Style 4070. 160 bhp, 445.5 cu. in. modified L-head V-12 engine, three-speed selective synchromesh manual transmission, vacuum-assisted clutch, shaft drive with a hypoid rear axle, front and rear leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 135 in. The last of four built; numerous one-off features The 1934 New York Auto Show car Distinguished provenance, including long-term Texas history One of the most important Classic Era Packards A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity Packard’s most beautiful automobiles of the 1930s were arguably produced as part of the Eleventh Series, and they boasted the first gentle hints of streamlining, such as a slightly angled radiator shell, more deeply skirted fenders, and vee’d headlamp lenses. The 12-cylinder models of this series were the ultimate Packards, and the ultimate of the ultimate were the versions designed by Alexis de Sakhnoffsky and built by LeBaron, of Detroit. These scarce cars featured the latest in aerodynamics, including separate sensuously rounded pontoon fenders, curved running boards nearly blended into the body, and tapered tails. They were the hottest thing to come from East Grand Boulevard in years. Two of the LeBaron styles, the Runabout Speedster and the Sport Coupe, were given their own unique, sporty chassis, which ended up being a shortened 136-inch wheelbase variant of the Twelve platform, known as the 1106. The chassis was mounted on a sturdy Standard Eight frame, and it utilized the V-12 engine. The Sport Coupe, with its fastback roofline inspired by the Mercedes-Benz Autobahn-Kurier, was the real shape of things to come, so it is no wonder that Packard tried to claim credit for it; the bodies may have been built by LeBaron, but they were attributed to the Packard Custom Body Division. Packard historians generally agree that four Sport Coupes were produced, while older references list only three survivors. Today, all four have been located, and one of them is the car offered here. THE NEW YORK SPORT COUPE: VEHICLE NUMBER 1106-4 The fourth and final car, vehicle number 1106-4, is the vehicle offered here. It is powered by engine number 901601—a number that is important to verifying its history, as will soon be seen. The engine is, in itself, the lowest engine serial number known of the Eleventh Series, and it is either the first or second V-12 engine built for that series. Vehicle number 1106-4 was photographed when new on the famous “turntable” at the Packard factory. This photograph clearly shows that when it was first built, the car had the same fixed rear quarter “teardrop” windows and steel roof as the other three Sport Coupes that preceded it, as well as conventional 1934 Eleventh Series front end styling. Following the 1934 show season, 1106-4 was returned to the Packard factory and updated with the Twelfth Series’ new front sheet metal, which included a more angular grille and head lamps, as well as a leather-covered padded roof that obscured the rear quarter windows. It was then returned to the turntable and photographed again, this time as it appears today. Copies of these photographs, which feature the car in both its Eleventh Series and Twelfth Series forms, are reproduced here courtesy of Michigan State University. The MSU copies are, importantly, both inscribed with “engine no. 901-601,” which is the engine that is still under the hood of this important Packard today, and they also identify this car in both its forms as being the 1934 New York Auto Show car. According to Edward J. Blend’s book, The Magnificent Packard Twelve of Nineteen Thirty-Four, vehicle number 1106-4 remained with Packard for five years, and it was originally delivered to a Pittsburgh industrialist, Mr. Braeburn, in 1939, which was also the year that it was first titled in Pennsylvania. It was kept at the garage of the Morrowfield, an exclusive hotel and apartment complex in Pittsburgh’s Oakland district. Mr. Blend notes that the car was sold out of Pittsburgh 10 years later. It made its way to Texas, and for many years it was part of the collection of James Tagliabue, a Houston-area funeral director with a large stable of Packards, which all had padded roofs and were painted dark green. The late Robert K. Voss, a long-time Packard enthusiast from Texas, recalled seeing the car in the Tagliabue Collection, and he confirmed that, at the time, it was still in its original and unrestored condition and finished in Packard Green, as it is today. By this time, the car is recorded by Blend as having adopted its present vehicle number, 783-4, which is a reference to its Packard style number and body number. The car was restored in the 1980s while part of the prominent Jerry J. Moore Collection in Houston, and it was exhibited by Moore at numerous concours d’elegance. Today, it has a 1983 AACA National First Prize badge and a CCCA National First Prize badge, number 1049. It was eventually sold into the ownership of renowned collector Arturo Keller, in whose stable it remained for many years. Mr. Keller traded the car to David Kane, of New Jersey, for another Packard, of which he was enamored, and it was then passed to well-known enthusiast Carmine Zeccardi, from whom it was attained by the Andrews’. This well-known and highly regarded Sport Coupe is featured in Hugo Pfau’s The Custom-Bodied Packard (page 151), Dennis Adler’s Packard (page 57), Beverly Rae Kimes’s Packard: A History of the Motor Car and the Company (page 438), and Michael Lamm and Dave Holls’s A Century of Automotive Style (page 221). It has been well-maintained and properly conserved as part of the Andrews Collection, with only the gentle patina of age found in its paint and matching leather interior. The temptation is to drive it and see what that hot drivetrain will do, but also equally tempting is the thought of a show restoration, one that will see this onetime dazzler once again entrance audiences. Simply put, the New York Sport Coupe remains very much a showstopper. Chassis no. 750795 Engine no. 901601 Vehicle no. 1106-4 / 783-4

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
Show price

1960 Aston Martin DB4GT

302 bhp, 3,670 cc twin-plug dual overhead-camshaft alloy inline six-cylinder engine with triple Weber carburetors, four-speed synchromesh alloy-cased manual transmission with overdrive, four-wheel coil-spring suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 93 in. The 1960 Turin Motor Show car One of three examples fitted with rear seats Original LHD, U.S.-delivery car Matching numbers, with well-known history Formerly owned by Ken Boyd and Alan Lampert THE ASTON MARTIN DB4GT The year 1959 was a happy one in Newport Pagnell. Aston Martin achieved outright victory at Le Mans, scoring 1st and 2nd overall, with drivers Carroll Shelby and Roy Salvadori at the front, followed by Maurice Trintignant and Paul Frere. Aston Martin also took the World Sportscar Championship title—the smallest manufacturer ever to do so, before or since. One of the first cars away at the 24-hour race that year was also an Aston Martin, painted the same light green as the victorious DBR1s. It was a prototype for a competition-oriented version of the company’s newly introduced grand tourer, the DB4. In September 1959, the production version of that car, dubbed the DB4GT, debuted at the London Motor Show. It had been developed from the production DB4 for increased performance, and it was shorter, lighter, and more powerful. The bodywork was of incredibly thin 18-gauge aluminum alloy, the wheelbase was reduced by approximately five inches, and the rear seats were deleted on all but three special-ordered cars, reducing weight by some 200 pounds. The engine was extensively modified, with higher 9:1 compression, a twin-plug dual-ignition cylinder head, and triple dual-throat Weber 45 DCOE carburetors, and it produced an outstanding 302 brake horsepower at 6,000 rpm. This was a useful increase from the claimed 240 brake horsepower of the standard DB4, and it qualified the DB4GT as the most powerful British automobile of its era. Maximum speeds during testing reached 153 mph, with a 0–60 time of 6.1 seconds. This was also one of the first cars that could go from standstill to 100 mph and then brake to a dead stop in under 20 seconds, which is a tribute, in part, to its uprated Girling braking system, as used on Aston Martin’s competition sports racers of the era. Outwardly, the DB4GT was distinguished by faired-in headlamps with Perspex covers, a popular feature that was soon adopted for the DB4 Vantage and, later, the DB5 and DB6 models. The backlight and rear quarter windows were also of Perspex on many examples, while bumper overriders were deleted, and the roll-down windows were frameless within the doors. Twin, competition-style, quick-release Monza fuel fillers were added atop each of the rear wings, leading to a high-capacity fuel tank mounted flat in the trunk. Special lightweight Borrani wire wheels, usually with 42 spokes, light alloy rims, and distinctive three-eared knock-offs completed this potent package. The interior was trimmed to full Aston Martin road car specification, with fine Connolly leather upholstery and deep pile Wilton carpet. The evocative dash binnacle on the GT cars benefited from the addition of an oil temperature gauge, in addition to the standard array. DB4GTs represented a strong challenge to the dominance of Ferrari in GT racing and enjoyed considerable victories, as it was raced from 1959 by the Works team and John Ogiar’s Essex Racing Stable. Driven by the likes of Roy Salvadori, Stirling Moss, Jim Clark, and Innes Ireland, the GT earned its stripes every weekend on the racing circuit. In December 1959, at the Bahamas Speed Week, when another driver rolled the DBR2 intended for Moss, the Works “borrowed” back a DB4GT just delivered to a Caribbean customer, and Stirling handily won the next race in an Aston plucked from the parking lot! Indeed, the GT was a dual-purpose car, equally at ease on the track and on a Grand Tour. As noted by Aston Martin historian Nick Candee, “Rivalry was intense as Aston broke Ferrari’s winning streak. The short-wheelbase DB4GT was Aston’s response to the Ferrari 250 GT ‘Tour de France.’ Ferrari retaliated late in 1960 with the great 250 GT SWB. Aston then countered with the extremely lightweight DB4GT Zagato in 1961. Ferrari then launched its ne plus ultra GTO in February 1962.” The Cobra-Ferrari wars may be more famous, but the Aston-Ferrari wars were no less fierce. Between 1959 and 1963, Aston Martin built a mere 75 DB4GTs. Of those, 45 were supplied in right-hand drive and 30 in left-hand drive. The model remains among the most beloved of all Astons, and it is unmatched for its unique combination of performance and roadability. It is, as Nick Candee described, Aston’s 250 GT TDF, with all the power and all the thrills, at a quarter of the modern-day price. CHASSIS NUMBER DB4/GT/0141/L Wading into this battle was the 41st DB4GT built, which arrived in Turin, very much Ferrari territory, for the 1960 motor show. Finished in the evocatively named Snow Shadow Grey over black leather upholstery, it was one of the 30 left-hand drive cars built and one of the three to be specially ordered with rear seats. It had tiny buckets that were suitable for children or over-night bags, but they could be folded up to make a clean package shelf behind the driver and an adult passenger, preserving the DB4GT’s sporting airs. Racing-style double gasoline tanks, which were installed in the trunk, accentuated the car’s sporting aspirations. Following the show, this DB4GT was returned to the factory, where an overdrive was fitted. It then made its way across the Atlantic, and on February 2, 1961, it was delivered to its original owner, Gurdon Bayne Wattles, a prominent socialite residing in Oyster Bay, New York. Its Aston Martin Owners Club history records, which are on file and available for inspection, record a continuous chain of ownership until nearly the present day, including Aston enthusiasts Alan Lampert and Ken Boyd; the ownership history has been further expanded and documented by Candee, with his notes also on file. The car was restored in the late 1990s, in a typically Aston shade of silver, and it presents absolutely beautifully, with excellent paint, very good panel fit, and an interior tailored in black leather to absolutely superb standards. Receipts are on file for over $50,000 of extensive work performed by renowned West Coast Aston Martin guru, Kevin Kay, including a complete rebuild of the engine. The D4BGT was recently test-driven by an RM specialist, who glowingly reported its outstanding mechanical condition, stating that it performed beautifully, handled well, steered properly, stopped straight, and boasted a full complement of functional gauges. The D4BGT is one of the most desirable of all Aston Martins, and this example provides the opportunity to acquire a car well-restored, properly sorted by experts, and in excellent condition, with unusual options and provenance that would be very hard to beat. Titled as 1961. Chassis no. DB4/GT/0141/L Engine no. 370/0141/L

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
Show price

1930 Duesenberg Model J 'Disappearing Top' Convertible Coupe by Murphy

Offered for public sale for the first time since new “Melvin’s Murphy,” with fascinating known history Original engine, chassis, and body Only 30,000 actual miles Continuously maintained, driven, and enjoyed for 83 years HE DRIVES A DUESENBERG Doran Hinchman’s family had made their fortune in the lumber industry in Logan, West Virginia. In 1930, the seat of Logan County was the center of political and business operations in the Mountain State, as it was a booming, wheeling-and-dealing power center in the heart of coal country. There was money to be made in Logan, and the Hinchmans had quite a lot of it. It was only natural that Doran would drive a Duesenberg. The order for the Model J was placed 70 miles from Logan, in the “big city” of Huntington, where Bruce Perry Motors sold Auburns, Cords, and the very occasional Duesenberg. Hinchman ordered a factory-cataloged style, the convertible coupe, with bodywork built by the Walter M. Murphy Company, of Pasadena, California. At $13,500 for the non-disappearing top model, it was the least-expensive style available, but it was among the most striking. There wasn’t a bad line to be found, just clean, simple creases and curves that were outlined with only the most minimal amount of chrome. This was especially true for the some 25 cars equipped with the “disappearing top,” a convertible top that folded neatly and then vanished under a flush-fitting metal lid on the rear deck. With the top lowered and the side windows neatly hidden under tiny shutters in the tops of the doors, the disappearing top Murphy convertible coupe had the light, fleet look of a true roadster. It was a car for the sporting enthusiast, at a price several hundred dollars higher than the standard convertible coupe style. The car made for Mr. Hinchman was built on a short-wheelbase chassis, number 2388, with engine number J-357; it was fitted with the disappearing top coachwork and painted a conservative black, with chrome wire wheels, a tan cloth top, and black leather upholstery. Apparently eager to take delivery of his new prize, at word of its completion, the lumberman traveled to Indianapolis and took delivery at the Duesenberg factory, and then he promptly drove the Model J back to his big Victorian house on Cole Street in Logan. The Model J was, for the next 16 years, a frequent sight in downtown Logan and on the local mountain roads, usually negotiating the dirt twisties at an incautious rate of speed, around 90 mph in second gear. Doran Hinchman loved his car, and even after selling it in 1946, he never stopped loving it. When early Duesenberg historian J.L. Elbert inquired to him about the car in 1948, Hinchman wrote back, on Coal and Timber Land stationery, “I shall never regret having purchased the Duesenberg, and I have never seen any other brand of car that I think can compare with the great Duesey; it was simply outstanding in a class all its own.” “MELVIN’S MURPHY” A fellow enthusiast who once sold Melvin Clemans a car referred to him as a “hillbilly lawyer.” He obviously underestimated the man, who, in reality, was a shrewd and competent attorney. However, Clemans left the bar at mid-life and relocated to a farm in the hills above Bridgeport, West Virginia, where he could reside and enjoy his hobbies. His most prominent interest was the Duesenberg. Clemans was not an enthusiast in the modern sense; he bought Model Js and kept them because, even decades after they were built, he still considered them to be faster and better than anything else. To him, they were not collector’s items; they were just cars that he appreciated for their quality and their ability to take the ruthless abandon with which he drove them. When Clemans joined the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, it was “to exchange experiences of over 30 years of actually driving Duesenbergs on the roads.” It is not surprising that he and Doran Hinchman, a man of a similar mindset, came to an agreement on Hinchman’s Murphy Convertible Coupe in 1946. By 1952, the Model J had racked up 11,000 miles. The car was Clemans’ first Duesenberg, and while others followed it, it was always obviously his favorite. He drove it regularly in the Clarksburg area, garaging it at a gas station during his law years and then moving it out to the farm. Clemans began what became an annual tradition of driving “the Murphy” to the annual ACD Club National Reunion in Auburn, Indiana. Friends recall that, in later years, Clemans would regularly bring two Duesenbergs to the meet, allowing a friend to drive the other, while he always chose the Murphy Convertible Coupe. The journey to Auburn took several hours, on highways that grew more modern as years passed. As those years of ownership turned into decades, the unpretentious Clemans became something of a legend in his own right. His most famous Duesenberg, still driven to Auburn with a case of beer as a passenger, became known forevermore as “Melvin’s Murphy.” As one enthusiast put it, “I decided to start getting to know him, because I figured that he was as close to an original owner as I would ever meet.” Over the years, Clemans called upon his friend, Harry Van Iderstine, an engineer living in nearby Kingwood, to come work on the car. Van Iderstine always admired the Murphy Convertible Coupe, especially after acquiring a Duesenberg of his own: a dismantled project that took seven years to return to life. The Murphy was something different: an almost totally original car that had never been restored, only maintained, and was still in wonderful running order. It was a pleasure to work on. In 1998, Melvin Clemans asked Van Iderstine to come work on the Murphy one more time. When the mechanic arrived, he was surprised to hear that the car would be for sale. Soon, Harry Van Iderstine had become the new owner and only the third since new. When the Murphy Convertible Coupe arrived at its third home, Van Iderstine found that it did, indeed, need some work. It was lightly detailed cosmetically and then rebuilt mechanically by its owner’s skilled hands. However, the majority of the original paint was left intact, most of the chrome was good enough to be retained, and, to this day, the car even retains its original body wood, with the Murphy body number still visibly stamped into the driver’s side door sill. Van Iderstine had no intention of making a show car. The Murphy was still to be driven and enjoyed, and as it passed only its 30,000th mile, it did so not on the show field but on the road. For years, it was regularly driven to local meets, even more so after Van Iderstine retired with it to Florida in the early 21st century. He brought the car back to Auburn one more time in 2010, for the Year of the Duesenberg. All the time, as Melvin had before him, he kept hearing one question: “Would you like to sell?” Until recently, the answer was always the same, delivered with a smile to soften the blow. 83 YEARS LATER The car has received the all-important Category One certification from the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, issued in 1983 while in Melvin Clemans’s ownership, and it is available for reissuing in the new owner’s name. It confirms the presence of the Duesenberg’s original frame, firewall, body, and engine. In its present ownership, the Duesenberg has undergone general mechanical sorting by RM Auto Restoration, and it is now fully roadworthy and ready to go to its next caretaker. This Model J Duesenberg spent its first eight decades in the ownership of a continuous chain of three loving owners; all of whom should be applauded for appreciating what it is and keeping it exactly that way. It has always been a “driver,” it was never allowed to fall from grace, and it has always been enjoyed exactly the way that Fred Duesenberg intended his automobiles to be enjoyed. It has received the very best of loving care. For 83 years, it has never been advertised for sale; instead, it has been passed from friend to friend, with a handshake and the expectation that it will become a beloved possession. Chassis no. 2388 Engine no. J-357 Body no. 946

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
Hammer price
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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB berlinetta

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB berlinetta Carte grise française Châssis n° 8407 Moteur n° 8407 - Vendue neuve en France - Version "nez long" et "torque tube" - Une des dernière Ferrari 275 GTB "dans son jus" - Numéros concordants ("Matching numbers") - Même propriétaire depuis 1972 L'extraordinaire particularité de cette voiture, c'est qu'elle est restée entre les mains du même propriétaire de 1972 à aujourd'hui. Auparavant, elle a été livrée neuve en 1966 à la Franco Britannic Autos, à Levallois et vendue à son premier propriétaire, M. Caillas, de Paris. Elle était de teinte bleue avec sellerie en cuir noir. Grace aux informations de Marcel Massini nous savons que le 13 février 1967, elle bénéficiait d'une révision au Factory Assistenza Clienti de Ferrari, à Modène (n° d'ordre 70G), le compteur affichant alors 11 189 km. En 1972, elle était cédée à son actuel propriétaire qui la connaissait pour l'avoir déjà vue dans l'Oise où elle était immatriculée depuis 1969 et où il résidait. La voiture était alors grise avec l'intérieur cuir beige. Lui-même souhaitait remplacer sa Jaguar Type E, qui a servi de soulte dans la transaction (elle était estimée à 18 750 francs) en complément d'un chèque de 26 000 francs. La voiture a été achetée chez Euro Sport, à Linas-Montlhéry, et le dossier comporte une copie du reçu du paiement. L'épouse du propriétaire se souvient même avoir ramené la Ferrari, dont l'embrayage fatigué l'avait empêchée de changer les vitesses correctement... Elle affichait à l'époque 60 000 km. Révisée, elle est alors utilisée pour de grands voyages en Europe, en direction de l'Italie, du Danemark... A partir de 1977, elle sort moins souvent car le propriétaire a fait l'acquisition d'une Maserati Bora qui lui sert pour ses grands voyages. Depuis cette époque, la belle 275 GTB roule beaucoup moins mais, dans les années 1980, son propriétaire décide de lui donner une deuxième jeunesse et fait faire un voile de peinture, tout en confiant la remise en état mécanique à Toni Auto à Maranello. Affichant un peu moins de 104 000 km, la voiture se présente aujourd'hui de teinte grise avec une sellerie beige superbe, dont l'aspect délicieusement patiné peut faire penser que la voiture est sortie d'usine avec cet intérieur. La Ferrari 275 GTB est une des berlinettes les plus désirables de la marque au cheval cabré. Elle représente en effet un progrès technique important par rapport à la 250 GT Lusso qu'elle est supposée remplacer, avec une suspension à quatre roues indépendante et une boîte accolée au pont arrière. La cylindrée du fameux V12 "Colombo" passe à 3,3 litres et la puissance à 280 ch, ce qui permet à cette belle automobile d'atteindre 250 km/h. Pour habiller ce joyau, Pininfarina a signé une ligne superbe qui répond à ses performances et mêle élégance et sportivité, avec une dose d'agressivité procurée par son long capot, son pavillon ramassé et ses ouïes latérales évoquant la GTO. L'habitacle est traité lui aussi de façon sportive, avec des sièges-baquets et un certain dépouillement intérieur. En plus de ces caractéristiques, la Ferrari 275 GTB que nous présentons est une désirable version "nez long", plus fine et élégante que les premières 275 GTB. Elle bénéficie aussi de la transmission à "tube de poussée", système qui permet de limiter les vibrations et le bruit, et d'éviter les fréquents contrôles d'alignement de l'arbre de transmission. Cette voiture est sans doute une des dernières Ferrari 275 GTB qui soit restée "dans son jus", dans les mains d'un amateur n'hésitant pas à l'utiliser et effectuant bon nombre d'intervention sur l'auto lui-même. Elle nécessitera une révision avant de reprendre la route. L'acheteur peut la laisser dans cet état enviable, mais il est aussi possible d'envisager une restauration de qualité permettant de lui rendre son beau "Blu Celeste" d'origine. Quel que soit son choix, l'acheteur aura l'incomparable plaisir d'être au volant d'une voiture qui n'a connu qu'un propriétaire attentionné depuis près de quarante ans ! French title Chassis n° 8407 Engine n° 8407 - Sold new in France - "Long nose/torque tube" version - One of the last remaining Ferrari 275 GTBs in original condition - Matching numbers - Same owner since 1972 The outstanding feature of this car is that is has been in the hands of the same owner since 1972. It was delivered new in 1966 to Franco Britannic Autos, in Levallois, and sold to its first owner, M. Caillas, from Paris, in blue livery with black leather interior. We discovered from information passed on to us by Marcel Massini that the car was serviced on 13 February 1967 by Factory Assistenza Clienti de Ferrari, in Modena (order n° 70G), when the odometer read 11 189 km. In 1972 it was acquired by the current owner, who already knew about the car, having seen it where he lived in Oise, and where the car had been registered since 1969. At that time the Ferrari was grey with beige leather interior. The current owner was looking to replace his Jaguar E-Type, which he sold in part-exchange (estimated at 18 750 francs) for this car in addition to a cheque for 26 000 francs from Euro Sport, in Linas-Montlhéry. The file includes a copy of the bill of sale. The owner's wife remembers going to fetch the car, and finding the clutch so hard to use that she was unable to change gear properly...The mileage was 60 000 km at that time. Once serviced, it was used for long journeys throughout Europe, in the direction of Italy and Denmark... When the owner bought himself a Maserati Bora in 1977 that was used for long trips, the car was taken out less often. During this period, the stunning 275 GTB was driven little but during the 1980s, its owner decided to revive the car, giving it a coat of paint, and entrusting the necessary mechanical work to Toni Auto in Maranello. Recording less than 104 000 km today, the car is presented in grey with superb beige upholstery displaying such a wonderful patina it could have left the factory with this interior. The Ferrari 275 is one of the most desirable berlinettas produced by the prancing horse marque. It represented a major technical advance on the 250 GT Lusso, the model it replaced, featuring all round independent suspension and a gear box mated to the rear axle. The engine size of the famous V12 " Colombo " increased to 3.3-litres producing 280 bhp, which allowed this stunning car to reach 250 km/h. Pininfarina produced a superb design to house this work of art that reflected its performance. The long bonnet, compact roofline and GTO-style side vents added a touch of aggression to the styling that combined sportiness with elegance. The cockpit was also given a sporty appearance, with bucket seats and pared down interior. In addition to these characteristics, the Ferrari 275 GTB on offer is the desirable " long nose " version, more elegant than the first 275 GTBs. It also benefits from the " torque tube " transmission system that limits vibration and noise and avoids the need for frequent alignment of the transmission shaft. This car must be one of the last unrestored examples of the Ferrari 275 GTB, owned by an enthusiast who has driven it without hesitation and has carried out various jobs on the car himself. It will need a service before taking to the road. The buyer may choose to leave the Ferrari in this desirable condition, but the opportunity is there to carry out a high quality restoration that would return the car to its original " Blu Celeste " livery. Whatever the buyer decides, they will have the unsurpassable pleasure of sitting behind the wheel of a car that has had just one careful owner for almost forty years ! Estimation 1 500 000 - 2 000 000 € Sold for 1,988,000 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-06
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Maserati A6G 2000 Gran Sport Berlinetta Frua - 1956

Maserati A6G 2000 Gran Sport Berlinetta Frua - 1956 Carte grise française Châssis n° 2140 Moteur n° 2140 - 4 exemplaires produits, carrosserie Frua fine et racée - Matching numbers - Histoire exceptionnelle, dans la même famille depuis 55 ans - Superbe préservation - La voiture du Salon de Paris 1956 Livrée en châssis le 9 février 1956 aux ateliers Frua par Maserati, cette voiture en repart le 6 juillet pour recevoir son moteur et ses finitions. Elle est définie dans les archives de l'usine comme "moteur numéro interne 76, 2 bobines Marelli, berlinetta Frua 2-4 places, peinture noire et sellerie ivoire, instruments Veglia." Elle est ensuite exportée en France et présentée le 2 août au service des Mines accompagnée d'une licence d'importation. Le même jour, elle est immatriculée 1007 FH 75, au nom de Jacques Fildier, rue Saint-Dominique à Paris. Architecte, il est lui-même grand amateur de voitures de sport anglaises et italiennes et compte notamment à son actif quelques Aston Martin. Il a commandé sa voiture auprès du garage Mirabeau, 71 avenue de Versailles, qui l'a récupérée auprès des Établissements Thépenier, importateur Maserati officiel et basé à Saint-Cloud. Une facture datée du 2 août 1956 adressée par Maserati à Jean Thépenier fait état d'une "vettura Frua, verniciata in colore nero, 3 carburatori Weber 36DO4 n. 836, 843, 850" pour la somme de 2 500 000 Lire. La somme paraissant relativement modeste par rapport aux habitudes, il est probable qu'il s'agisse du châssis, la facture de Frua arrivant séparément. Bien que déjà livrée et immatriculée par son nouveau propriétaire, la voiture, alors immatriculée 1007 FH 75, est exposée au Salon de Paris, sous la verrière du Grand Palais, en octobre 1956. Cette pratique n'était pas inhabituelle à cette époque où un constructeur comme Maserati produisait ses modèles de route au compte-gouttes, et où l'importateur n'achetait pas forcément avant d'avoir une commande ferme. En tout cas, un article de Giovani Lurani publié dans Auto Italiana du 30 octobre fait état d'une "Maserati GT 2 000 cm3 six-cylindres de teinte noire à finition luxe". Entre 1956 et 1959, la calandre est modifiée, peut-être à la suite d'un accrochage, avec la grille que la voiture porte encore aujourd'hui, plus fine et élégante que la calandre d'origine, un peu massive. Le 12 juillet 1957, elle est vendue à Marcel Chalas, un amateur demeurant avenue de Versailles, à Paris. On retrouve la voiture en mai 1959 sur une publicité pour "Rue de la Pink" et, le 17 décembre 1959, elle est vendue à Roger Baillon, garagiste à Paris dans le 19ème arrondissement. L'immatriculation changera plus tard, probablement lors de son immatriculation au nom de Jacques Baillon, pour 267 CMP 92, mais elle est restée dans la famille de 1959 à aujourd'hui, soit 55 ans entre les mêmes mains ! Il existe d'ailleurs dans les archives Maserati un courrier de Jacques Baillon datant de 2000, où il s'enquiert d'informations techniques sur la voiture. Rappelons que ce modèle fait partie des toutes premières Maserati de route, la première étant l'A6 1500 de 1946. La production de cette dernière démarre doucement et 61 exemplaires sortent des ateliers avant qu'une version 2000 voit le jour en 1950. La diffusion est encore plus confidentielle et le moteur simple arbre manque un peu de puissance, si bien que Maserati améliore les choses avec un moteur à deux arbres à cames en tête et double allumage, mais avec la même cylindrée, pour l'A6G/54 ("A" pour Alfieri, "6" pour 6 cylindres, "G" pour ghisa, fonte, et 54 pour 1954). La puissance passe à 150 ch et comme la voiture est légère, elle atteint 200 km/h. La réalisation des carrosseries est confiée à Frua, Allemano et Zagato. Pinin Farina ne collabore plus avec Maserati depuis 1952, étant "occupé" par Ferrari, la marque concurrente. Entre 1954 et 1957, il sortira 60 exemplaires des usines Maserati, dont quatre berlinettes Frua dans le même style que la voiture de la vente, et deux coupés plus tardifs, dotés d'un avant plus proéminent. Frua a produit également quelques versions spider, tout aussi confidentielles. Les Maserati A6G/54 et A6G/2000 sont à l'époque encore des voitures de sport radicales, directement dérivées de la compétition et réservées aux amateurs purs et durs. Mais elles vont assurer la transition entre le monde de la course et celui de la route : en 1957 sera lancée la 3500 GT, première Maserati de Grand Tourisme confortable sur laquelle se basera toute la lignée qui suivra et qui assurera le succès de la marque. En cela, l'A6G 2000 est un modèle qui représente un épisode majeur de l'histoire de Maserati. La voiture que nous présentons est donc tout à fait exceptionnelle. D'abord par le modèle qu'elle représente, rare, chargé de signification historique et présentant une technique sophistiquée, ensuite par sa carrosserie particulièrement fine et racée, et enfin par sa propre histoire et son appartenance à la même famille depuis 55 ans, tout en ayant gardé sa présentation d'origine. Elle constitue le meilleur exemplaire de ce modèle, disponible sur le marché. Cette Maserati était garée aux côtés de la Ferrari 250 California depuis que la Belle de Maranello était entrée dans la collection Baillon en 1971. Il y a quatre ans, Jacques Baillon avait mis en œuvre le remplacement de l'embrayage. Il avait enlevé le tunnel de boîte mais il n'avait pas eu le temps de finir le chantier. Cette sublime Maserati, historique, toujours équipée de son moteur d'origine, se trouve donc dans son plus pur état d'origine, jamais restaurée. Ses proportions sont parfaites, son équilibre ne peut que faire vibrer son spectateur. La magie a opéré dès notre première visite le 30 septembre dernier. Elle sera la même lorsque vous la découvrirez pour la première fois à Rétromobile. French carte grise Chassis n° 2140 Engine n° 2140 - One of just 4 produced; refined, stylish coachwork by Frua - Matching numbers - Exceptional history - in same family for 55 years - Superb condition - 1956 Paris Motor Show Maserati delivered the chassis to the Frua workshops on 9 February 1956, and it left Frua on 6 July to receive its engine and finishing. It appears in the factory archives as 'internal engine number 76, 2 Marelli ignition coils, Frua 2-4 seater berlinetta, black paintwork and ivory upholstery, Veglia instruments.' It was then delivered to France, complete with import licence, passing its "Service des Mines" homologation test on 2 August 1956. It was registered the same day in the name of Jacques Fildier of Rue St-Dominique, Paris, with number-plates 1007 FH 75. Fildier was an architect and connoisseur of British and Italian sports cars, who owned several Aston Martins. He had ordered the Maserati from Garage Mirabeau on Avenue de Versailles in Paris, who obtained it through Maserati's official French importers, Etablissements Thépenier in nearby Saint-Cloud. Maserati's invoice to Jean Thépenier, dated 2 August 1956, refers to a vettura Frua, verniciata in colore nero, 3 carburatori Weber 36DO4 n. 836, 843, 850. The relatively modest price of 2,500,000 lire probably refers to the chassis, with the bill from Frua sent separately. Although it had already been delivered to its new owner, the car was exhibited at the Paris Motor Show in the Grand Palais in October 1956. Such practice was not uncommon at a time when firms like Maserati produced their touring models one at a time, with importers only buying them after receiving definitive orders. An article by Giovani Lurani in Auto Italiana, dated 30 October 1956, talks of a '2,000cm3 six-cylinder Maserati GT, colour black with de luxe finish.' Between 1956-59 the radiator grill was modified, perhaps after a collision, and the car acquired the grill it has today - less bulky and more elegant than the original. On 12 July 1957 the car was sold to Marcel Chalas of Avenue de Versailles in Paris. After appearing in a Rue de la Pink advertisement in May 1959, the Maserati was again sold on 17 December 1959, this time to Roger Baillon, a garage-owner in the 19th arrondissement. The number-plates were later changed to 267 CMP 92, probably when the car was registered in the name of Jacques Baillon. It has remained in the Baillon family since 1959: some 55 years in the same hands! The Maserati archives contain a letter from Jacques Baillon written in 2000, requesting technical information about the car. Our model was one of the very first Maserati tourers - the first being the A6 1500 of 1946. Production was slow, with just 61 cars completed by the time the 2000 version was launched in 1950. Distribution was even more limited, and the single-camshaft engine was somewhat lacking in power. For the new A6G/54 - A for Alfieri, 6 for six cylinders, G for Ghisa (cast iron block), 54 for 1954 - Maserati improved things, with an overhead twin-camshaft engine (albeit with the same capacity) and dual spark plugs. Power was increased to 150hp and the car was light enough to reach 125mph. The coachwork was assigned to Frua, Allemano and Zagato; Pinin Farina had stopped working for Maserati in 1952, and was now 'busy' at rivals Ferrari. Between 1954-57 sixty cars emerged from the Maserati factory, including four Frua berlinettas in the same style as the car offered here, and two later coupés with a longer bonnet. Frua also produced a very limited number of Spider versions. The Maserati A6G/54 and A6G/2000 were radical sports cars for the time, inspired directly by competition and reserved for committed racing aficionados. But they would also enhance the transition between the worlds of racing and touring. The 3500 GT, launched in 1957, was Maserati's first comfortable Gran Turismo, on which all the following series that established the firm's success would be based. The A6G 2000 thus represents a key episode in Maserati's history. The car we are offering is therefore exceptional, for several reasons. First, in terms of the model - rare, historically significant and technically sophisticated; secondly, for its stylish and highly refined coachwork; and lastly for its individual history, having belonged to the same family for 55 years while retaining its original appearance. It constitutes the finest example of this model available on the market. Our Maserati has been parked next to a Ferrari 250 California ever since the latter entered the Baillon Collection in 1971. Four years ago Jacques Baillon began work on replacing the clutch; he removed the transmission tunnel, but did not have time to complete the job. This sublime, historic Maserati, still with its original engine, therefore remains in its purest, never-restored state. Its proportions are perfect; its balance is thrilling. It worked its magic on us on our first encounter on 30 September 2014. We are sure you will be equally enchanted when you discover it at Retromobile! Estimation 800 000 - 1 200 000 € Sold for 1,962,400 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-06
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1988 Porsche 959 Sport

515 bhp, 2,848 cc DOHC horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin KKK turbochargers and Bosch-Motronic Electronic Fuel Injection, six-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with double wishbones and coil-over shocks, and front and rear ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,270 mm Offered from an exceptional Swiss Porsche collection One of just 29 built Purchased new by Vasek Polak Jr. Just three owners from new Highly original; still retains its original paint Rocketing Porsche into the 21st century, the 959 showed the world just what was possible in terms of technology and performance from an automobile and what the public could expect from the automobile industry in the years to come. Adjustable suspension, an intelligent four-wheel-drive system, tyre pressure sensors, and super-lightweight hollow-spoke magnesium wheels made it nothing short of a game changer. Even with a price tag of $300,000, it is said that Porsche lost money on every single one as a result of the extraordinary costs of construction, research, and development. While the silhouette and interior might have resembled that of a 911 produced at the time, there was no doubt that this was an entirely different animal. With 450 brake horsepower on tap, the 959 could leap from 0–60 mph in less than four seconds, do the standing quarter-mile in just over 12, and reach a maximum speed approaching 200 mph. Just 284 production 959s were built. The more luxurious 959 Komfort model made up the vast majority of production, with only 29 959s built to Sport specifications. Of course, the difference between the models is instantly discernable from their nomenclature. The 959 Sport boasted a full, leather-wrapped road cage with four-point racing harnesses and cloth upholstery, instead of the leather upholstery seen in the 959 Komfort. Mechanically, it boasted a more conventional coil-over suspension and was stripped of the 959 Komfort’s air conditioning and stereo. This helped the 959 S come in at approximately 220 pounds lighter than the 959 Komfort. The 11th 959 S built, the car presented here has a fascinating story, and it can be argued that it is the finest example of its breed. It was purchased new by noted California Porsche dealer and racer Vasek Polak's son, Vasek Polak Jr. Polak picked the car up personally from Stuttgart and drove the car around Europe before returning to America. Of course, Porsche aficionados will know that 959s were never delivered new to the United States, as they were not compliant with United States Department of Transportation importation laws or emissions standards. However, Polak and one of his friends managed to find a way to import the car to the United States. Parting with the car some years later, Polak sold his 959 S to a noted collector who later sold the car in 2008 to its current custodian, a Porsche collector based in Switzerland. Since then, the 959 S has been the crown jewel of his collection. The car recently spent six months at the Porsche Museum in Stuttgart, where it was on display in a special exhibit of Porsche super cars, celebrating the launch of the 918 Spyder. Furthermore, the car has never been modified from its original format and even still retains its original paint. The pinnacle of Porsche performance and technology in the 1980s, the 959 S is nothing short of an automotive legend. With only 29 Sport models built, they remain by far and away the most desirable 959s and command a substantial premium over the ‘regular’ Komfort models. Chassis number 011 boasts a fascinating ownership history, having been delivered to one of the most influential figures in the Porsche world and its status as the first 959 to be registered in the United States. Presented in exceptionally original condition, this 959 S is a true collector-grade example, worthy of the best Porsche collections in the world. Moteur six-cylindres à plat, 2 848 cm³, 2 ACT par banc, 515 ch, deux turbocompresseurs KKK et injection électronique Bosch-Motronic, transmission manuelle six rapports, boîte-pont, suspension à quatre roues indépendantes à double triangulation et combinés ressorts-amortisseurs, freins à disque ventilés sur les quatre roues. Empattement : 2 270 mm • Issue d'une exceptionnelle collection Porsche en Suisse • Un des 29 exemplaires produits • Voiture achetée neuve par Vasek Polak Jr. • Trois propriétaires seulement En propulsant Porsche vers le 21e siècle, la 959 a simplement voulu prouver au monde entier ce qu’il était possible de rassembler sur une automobile en terme de technologie et de performances, donc ce que le public pouvait attendre de l’industrie automobile dans les années à venir. Une suspension réglable, une gestion "intelligente" de la transmission intégrale, des capteurs de pression des pneus, des jantes creuses ultra légères en magnésium, elle ne faisait rien moins que changer complètement les règles du jeu. Malgré son prix de 300 000 $, la rumeur affirme que Porsche perdait de l’argent sur chaque modèle compte tenu des coûts exorbitants nécessités par la recherche, le développement et la fabrication de cette voiture d'exception. Bien que sa silhouette et son intérieur aient pu rappeler les 911 contemporaines, il ne fait aucun doute qu’il s’agissait là d’une toute autre machine. Avec 450 ch disponibles à volonté, la 959 pouvait accélérer de 0 à 100 km/h en moins de 4 s, et sur 400 m en à peine plus de 12 s. Elle atteignait une vitesse de pointe de près de 200 mph (321 km/h). Seulement 284 exemplaires de la 959 ont été fabriqués. La 959 Komfort, plus luxueuse, a constitué l’essentiel de la production, puisque seuls 29 exemplaires ont été construits en spécifications Sport. On discerne immédiatement les différences entre les deux modèles en fonction de leur équipement. La 959 Sport propose un arceau de sécurité habillé de cuir avec harnais quatre points, et une sellerie en tissu au lieu du cuir que l’on trouve sur la 959 Komfort. Sur le plan mécanique, elle est équipée d’une suspension plus conventionnelle comportant des combinés ressorts-amortisseurs et se trouve dépourvue de la climatisation et de l’installation audio présentes sur la 959 Komfort. Ces modifications permettaient à la 959 Sport de peser environ 100 kg de moins que la 959 Komfort. La voiture présentée ici, la onzième 959 S construite, a une histoire fascinante, et l’on peut considérer qu’il s’agit du meilleur exemplaire de cette lignée. Elle a été achetée neuve par l’agent Porsche californien et ancien pilote Vasek Polak. Polak est d'ailleurs allé lui-même récupérer sa voiture à Stuttgart, puis l’a utilisée en Europe avant de la rapatrier aux Etats-Unis. Les aficionados de la marque savent bien que les 959 n'ont jamais été livrées neuves aux Etats-Unis, car elles ne répondaient pas aux normes de pollution et d’importation en vigueur. Avec l'un de ses amis, Polak a toutefois trouvé le moyen d’importer la voiture dans ce vaste pays. Se séparant de la voiture quelques années plus tard, Polak a vendu la 959 S à un collectionneur connu qui, a son tour, l'a cédée en 2008 à un collectionneur de Porsche basé en Suisse et qui la détient encore aujourd’hui. La 959 S a pris la place de joyau de sa collection. Elle a récemment passé six mois au Porsche Museum de Stuttgart où elle était présentée lors d’une exposition consacrée aux supercars de la marque, à l’occasion du lancement du Spyder 918. On notera que la voiture n’a jamais connu la moindre modification et se présente toujours avec sa peinture d’origine. Au pinacle de la performance et de la technologie Porsche dans les années 1980, la 959 Sport n'est rien moins qu’une légende automobile. Avec seulement 29 exemplaires produits, les modèles Sport sont indiscutablement les 959 les plus désirables et de ce fait leur valeur est nettement plus importante que celle des 959 Komfort, moins exclusives. Le châssis n° 011 possède une histoire assez fascinante, ayant été livré à l’un des personnages les plus influents de la "galaxie Porsche", et détenant le privilège d’avoir été la première 959 immatriculée aux États-Unis. Se présentant dans un état d’origine exceptionnel, cette 959 se montre digne de figurer dans les meilleures collections Porsche du monde. Chassis no. WP0ZZZ95ZJS905011

  • FRAFrance
  • 2017-02-08
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1955 Ferrari 750 Monza Spider by Scaglietti

260 bhp, 2,999 cc DOHC inline four-cylinder engine with two Weber 45 DCO/A3 carburettors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front suspension with transverse leaf springs, De Dion rear axle with parallel trailing arms and semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel drum brakes, and a tubular steel frame. Wheelbase: 2,250 mm Finished 5th overall at the 1955 12 Hours of Sebring Multiple 1st place finishes; campaigned by both Phil Hill and Carroll Shelby Documented history by Marcel Massini Early example of the three-litre, four-cylinder customer sports/racing cars Recently restored to authentic Monza livery In early 1954, Ferrari began offering racing customers the 500 Mondial Spider, which was essentially a sports/racing version of their World Championship two-litre, four-cylinder grand prix car. During this period, Maranello was increasing experimentation with different displacements of Aurelio Lampredi’s four-cylinder engine design, trying 2-litre, 2.5-litre, and 2.9-litre variations. At the Grand Prix Supercortemaggiore at Monza on 27 June 1954, where a three-litre formula was imposed, Ferrari entered two racing spiders with the 2.9-litre engine, one with traditional open Pinin Farina coachwork (0444M) and the other wearing streamlined Scaglietti spider coachwork (0440M) in the style of a 166MM that the coachbuilder had re-bodied for Dino Ferrari (0050M). Finishing 1st and 2nd overall, these two cars proved the potential of a three-litre, four-cylinder motor, and Ferrari quickly engineered a true 2,999-cubic centimetre version of the engine, as the race-entered, F1-derived 735 actually only displaced 2,941 cubic centimetres. Starting with chassis number 0440M, the 2nd place finisher at Monza, 31 examples of the 750 Monza Scaglietti Spider were produced, and the model remains one of the most esteemed of Maranello’s 1950s sports racers. Chassis 0498M, approximately the eighth car built, was one of the earliest Monzas sold to the United States, and it was acquired new by Chinetti Motors in early 1955. The Scaglietti-built Spider, finished in white paint with a blue nose band, entered the fourth edition of the 12 Hours of Sebring on 13 March 1955, where it was driven by Piero Taruffi and well-known Ecurie Bleu scion Harry Schell to a 5th overall finish. This Monza was sold a short time later to George Tilp, of Short Hills, New Jersey, and then it began its association with one of the most important Ferrari drivers of all time, the legendary Phil Hill. At this point, Mr Hill was still primarily competing in European sports racers on the early SCCA circuit, and he was only a few short years away from his important triumphs at Le Mans and in Formula One. On 4 July 1955, Mr Hill took 1st place at Beverly, Massachusetts, and almost four weeks later, he placed 2nd at Seafair. Hill drove the car to another chequered flag on 11 September, at the Road America 500 at Elkhart Lake, and he roared to a 2nd place finish at Hagerstown, Maryland, on 9 October. This car’s relationship with Mr Hill concluded with another 2nd place finish at the Governor’s Trophy race during the Nassau Speed Week on 9 December. Sometime in the late summer of 1956, the Monza was acquired by Jack Hinkle, of Wichita, Kansas, and was driven by Paul O’Shea to two 3rd place finishes at Montgomery, Alabama, on 19 August and 19 September. Mr Hinkle himself then took 2nd place at Coffeyville on 7 October. In early 1957, 0498M, finished in light yellow, was purchased by A.D. Logan and entered in the third annual Frostbite Races in Fort Worth, Texas, where it was photographed and later depicted in Willem Oosthoek’s 2011 book, Sports Car Racing in the South. Logan soon installed engine number 0578M, a 3.5-litre, four-cylinder motor from one of the four 857 Sport examples that he had sourced from Luigi Chinetti. That stronger powerplant would prove to be quite competitive. Under his ownership, the car was campaigned at the first Gran Carrera Lafitte in Galveston Island, Texas, where it placed 1st overall in both the prelim and feature races, with Ray Jones behind the wheel. In one of its final outings under Logan’s ownership, 0498M was campaigned at the Mansfield Labor Day Sports car races in Mansfield, Louisiana, from 31 August to 1 September 1957, with one of Logan’s other cars, a 500 TRC. The 750 Monza was entered in Race 7, and a John S. Smith was listed as the driver. However, to sports car racing aficionados, it was easy to see who was actually in the driver’s seat. Carroll Shelby had raced with Logan and Jones previously, and he knew both men well. Since Jones and Shelby were much faster than Logan, Logan was perfectly happy to give up his seat if Shelby didn’t have a car to race in. As a result of Shelby becoming a professional driver, he was no longer able to compete in SCCA events; therefore, he took up the pseudonym of John S. Smith to get around this rule, which was often disregarded in the South. With Shelby at the helm, the Monza quickly tore away from the rest of the field at the outset of the race and came close to lapping the entire field. Having annihilated the competition, Shelby pulled into the pits with two laps remaining, allegedly with engine trouble, allowing Jones to win in Logan’s 500 TRC. At that time, this car was already offered for sale by Logan, and was it was purchased later that month by Edwin D. Martin, of Columbus, Georgia. His first outing in his new purchase was at the Recional Sports Car Races at Ford Pierce, Florida, from 28–29 September 28-29, where Martin placed 4th overall. Chassis 0498M remained competitive throughout 1957, finishing 1st overall at Galveston, taking place from 9–10 October, and with several top-five finishes following the remainder of 1958. The Monza continued to campaign the sports car tracks of the American South during the next few years, whilst it was in the ownership of Chuck Nervine, of Fairhope, Alabama, in 1960. The following year, Nervine installed a Chevy V-8. However, by that time, it was clear that the Monza was finally past its racing prime. So, in 1963, it was sold to a Tulane University student who soon married and moved to his wife’s hometown in Texas. The car, officially owned by Jim Hinson, sat outside a barn on his mother-in-law’s farm in Azie, Texas, for the next 30 years. The Ferrari was discovered as a barnyard find in 1994, by Rick Grape of nearby Fort Worth, and it was subsequently purchased and sold to collector Terrence Healy, of Brisbane, Australia, in November 1998. Mr Healy commenced a full restoration, which continued when the car was sold in 2004 to the consignor, who retained Geoff Smith, of Bellbrae, Victoria, to oversee the renewal of the car to the best mechanical and cosmetic presentation. Since the original body had suffered significant corrosion from three decades of exposure to the elements, the consignor decided to commission the fabrication of new coachwork in the Scaglietti spider style. Measurements were taken from the original coachwork, as it still retained its original shape. A correct three-litre, four-cylinder Lampredi motor, engine number 006 (from a 625 monoposto grand prix car), was acquired from Tom Wheatcroft, the rescuer and owner of British circuit Donington Park. Chassis 0498M, now finished in Rosso Corsa, is nicely presented and ready to return to the track. It claims very strong race provenance, having been piloted by the great Phil Hill and Carroll Shelby, and it is eligible to continue racing in to events like the Mille Miglia and the Le Mans Classic. This Ferrari is also accompanied by the remnants of its original Scaglietti coachwork, which displays fascinating and rare slanted front wing vents and rear wing brake cooling ducts. This 750 Monza is one of just 31 examples constructed, and one of far fewer with such notable racing history, and it should attract the fancy of any enthusiast of 1950s Ferraris and early SCCA competition. Without equivocation, it is a sensational example of one of Ferrari’s most important four-cylinder racing cars. Moteur quatre-cylindres en ligne, 2 999 cm3, 260 ch, deux ACT, deux carburateurs Weber 45 DCO/A3, boîte manuelle cinq rapports transaxle, roues avant indépendantes avec ressorts à lames transversaux, pont arrière De Dion avec bras tirés parallèles et ressorts semi-elliptiques, freins à tambours sur les quatre roues, structure tubulaire en acier. Empattement: 2 250 mm. Cinquième aux 12 Heures de Sebring 1955 Nombreuses victoires ; pilotée par Phil Hill et Carroll Shelby Exemplaire documenté par Marcel Massini Un des premiers exemplaires de cette quatre-cylindres 3 litres compétition/client Récemment restaurée dans son authentique configuration Monza Au début de l'année 1954, Ferrari a commencé à proposer aux pilotes faisant partie de ses clients le Spider 500 Mondial, qui était en fait une version sport de la monoplace quatre-cylindres 2 litres de Grand Prix. A cette époque, Maranello expérimentait le quatre-cylindres d'Aurelio Lampredi en différentes cylindrées, avec des variantes en 2 litres, 2,5 litres et 2,9 litres. Lors du Grand Prix Supercortemaggiore de Monza, le 27 juin 1954, le règlement imposait une formule 3 litres. Ferrari s'est donc engagée avec deux spiders de compétition dotés du moteur 2,9 litres, l'un avec une carrosserie ouverte traditionnelle de Pinin Farina (0444M), et l'autre avec un habillage de spider profilé signé Scaglietti, dans le style d'une 166 MM que le carrossier avait modifiée pour Dino Ferrari (0050M). Terminant première et deuxième au classement général, ces deux voitures ont alors montré tout le potentiel d'un moteur quatre-cylindres 3 litres. Si bien que Ferrari ne tardait guère à produire une vraie version 2 999 cm3 de ce quatre-cylindres car le moteur 735 dérivé de celui de Formule 1 ne présentait que 2 941 cm3. En commençant avec le châssis numéro 0440M, celui qui avait terminé deuxième à Monza, 31 exemplaires du Spider 750 Monza Scaglietti voyaient ensuite le jour, ce modèle étant aujourd'hui l'un des plus estimés parmi les machines de catégorie sport produites à Maranello dans les années 1950. Acheté neuf par Chinetti Motors au début de l'année 1955, le châssis 0498M, environ le huitième produit, correspondait à l'une des premières Monza vendue aux États-Unis. Ce spider produit par Scaglietti, peint en blanc avec une bande bleue de calandre, était engagé le 13 mars 1955 à la quatrième édition des 12 Heures de Sebring. Entre les mains de Piero Taruffi et Harry Schell, le pilote bien connu de l'Écurie Bleue, cette voiture terminait cinquième au classement général. Peu de temps après, cette Monza était vendue à George Tilp, de Short Hills (New Jersey), et entamait alors une association avec l'un des pilotes Ferrari les plus célèbres de tous les temps, le légendaire Phil Hill. A cette époque, Phil Hill participait encore sur des voitures européennes au championnat SCCA, quelques années avant ses succès fameux aux 24 Heures du Mans et en Formule 1. Ainsi, le 4 juillet 1955, il remportait la victoire à Beverly (Massachusetts) et, presque quatre semaines plus tard, il terminait deuxième à Seafair. Il signait à nouveau une victoire le 11 septembre aux 500 Miles de Road America, à Elkhart Lake, et décrochait une autre deuxième place à Hagerstown (Maryland), le 9 octobre. L'association de cette voiture avec Phil Hill s'achevait le 9 décembre avec une deuxième place au classement général de la course du Governor’s Trophy, au cours de la Nassau Speed Week. A la fin de l'été 1956, la Monza était achetée par Jack Hinkle, de Wichita (Kansas) et, confiée à Paul O’Shea, elle remportait deux troisièmes places à Montgomery (Alabama), le 19 août et le 19 septembre. M. Hinkle lui-même signait ensuite une deuxième place le 7 octobre à Coffeyville. Au début de l'année 1957, 0498M, alors de couleur jaune clair, passait entre les mains de A.D. Logan qui l'engageait aux troisièmes Frostbite Races annuelles, à Fort Worth (Texas). Là, elle était prise en photo et décrite par la suite dans le livre publié en 2011 par Willem Oosthoek, Sports Car Racing in the South. Logan installait sans tarder le moteur n°0578M, un quatre-cylindres 3,5 litres provenant d'une des quatre 857 Sport qu'il avait trouvées chez Luigi Chinetti. Ce moteur plus puissant allait se révéler très compétitif. Alors qu'elle appartenait encore à Logan, la voiture était engagée à la première Gran Carrera Lafitte, à Galveston Island, au Texas, où elle remportait la victoire lors des préliminaires et de la course, entre les mains de Ray Jones. Pour une de ses dernières sorties alors qu'elle était encore en possession de Logan, 0498M participait aux courses de voitures de sport de Mansfield Labor Day à Mansfield, en Louisiane, les 31 août et 1er septembre 1957, avec une autre des voitures de Logan, une 500 TRC. La 750 Monza était engagée dans la Course 7, le pilote inscrit étant un certain John S. Smith. Cependant, pour les passionnés de sport automobile, il était facile d'identifier celui qui était réellement au volant. Carroll Shelby avait déjà couru auparavant avec Logan et Jones, et il connaissait bien les deux hommes. Jones et Shelby étant beaucoup plus rapides que Logan, Logan n'a vu aucun inconvénient à céder son baquet à Shelby, qui ne disposait pas de voiture avec laquelle participer. Mais, Shelby étant pilote professionnel, il ne pouvait plus prendre part aux courses SCCA ; c'est la raison pour laquelle il s'est inscrit sous le pseudonyme John S. Smith, de façon à contourner cette règle, ce qui se produisait souvent dans le sud. Avec Shelby au volant, la Monza s'installait rapidement en tête, réussissant à prendre quasiment un tour d'avance sur ses rivaux alors que l'arrivée approchait. Ayant écrasé ses concurrents et alors qu'il restait deux tours à couvrir, Shelby rejoignait les stands soi-disant à cause d'un problème moteur, ce qui permettait à Jones de remporter la victoire au volant de la 500 TRC de Logan. A cette époque, cette voiture était déjà proposée à la vente par Logan, et c'est Edwin D. Martin, de Columbus, en Géorgie, qui en faisait l'acquisition le même mois. Les premières épreuves auxquelles il prenait part au volant de sa nouvelle voiture furent les Regional Sports Car Races, à Ford Pierce, en Floride, les 28 et 29 septembre, où il terminait quatrième au classement général. Le châssis 0498M restait compétitif tout au long de la saison 1957, remportant la victoire à Galveston, les 9 et 10 octobre, et terminant à de nombreuses reprises dans les cinq premiers jusqu'à la fin de 1958. La Monza continuait à courir sur les circuits du sud des États-Unis pendant encore quelques années. En 1960, elle appartenait à Chuck Nervine, de Fairhope, Alabama. L'année suivante, Nervine installait un V8 Chevrolet mais à cette époque, il apparaissait clairement que la Monza commençait à être vraiment dépassée. Si bien qu'en 1963 elle était vendue à un étudiant de l'université de Tulane qui, après s'être marié, déménageait dans la ville natale de son épouse, au Texas. Appartenant officiellement à Jim Hinson, la voiture restait alors entreposée à côté d'une grange de la propriété de sa belle-mère, à Azie, au Texas, pendant les 30 années suivantes. Découverte en 1994 comme « sortie de grange » par Rick Grape, de Fort Worth, cette Ferrari était finalement achetée en novembre 1998 par le collectionneur Terrence Healy, de Brisbane, en Australie. Il commençait une restauration complète, qui s'est poursuivie après la vente de la voiture en 2004 au propriétaire actuel. Celui-ci demandait alors à Geoff Smith, de Bellbrae (Victoria) de superviser la remise en état de la voiture pour la meilleure présentation mécanique et esthétique possible. La caisse ayant souffert d'une importante corrosion à la suite de 30 ans d'exposition aux éléments, le propriétaire décidait de commander la fabrication d'une nouvelle carrosserie dans le style spider Scaglietti. Les mesures de la carrosserie d'origine étaient prises, pour que la forme originale puisse être reprise. Un moteur quatre-cylindres Lampredi 3 litres correct, n°006 (provenant d'une monoplace 625 de Grand Prix) était acheté auprès de Tom Wheatcroft, sauveur du circuit anglais de Donington Park. Cette voiture, châssis 0498M, maintenant peinte en Rosso Corsa, offre une belle présentation et elle est prête à reprendre la piste. Elle affiche un brillant palmarès sportif, ayant été pilotée par le grand Phil Hill et par Carroll Shelby. Pour continuer à courir, elle est éligible à des courses historiques comme les Mille Miglia et Le Mans Classic. Elle est aussi accompagnée par les restes de sa carrosserie Scaglietti d'origine, qui montre d'étonnantes et rares prises d'air inclinées sur les ailes avant, et des conduits de refroidissement des freins arrière. Cette 750 Monza fait partie des 31 exemplaires produits, et c'est l'une des rares à offrir un palmarès en course de cette qualité. Elle devrait attirer l'attention de tout passionné de Ferrari des années 1950 et de compétition SCCA. Sans aucune équivoque, c'est un exemple extraordinaire de l'une des plus importantes Ferrari de course à moteur quatre-cylindres. Addendum Please note that this car is not currently registered in Australia as stated in the catalogue; it will be offered on a Bill of Sale. Contrary to the catalogue description, the engine fitted to this car is not an original and correct 750 Monza type and it cannot be confirmed that it comes from a Ferrari 625 monoposto Grand Prix car. Chassis no. 0498M

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-05
Hammer price
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1936 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A

Two owners from new 1936 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A Chassis no. 130946 Engine no. 130946 Together with its predecessor the 500 K, the magnificent Mercedes-Benz 540 K was arguably the most noteworthy production model offered by the Stuttgart firm during the 1930s. A development of the 500 K, whose independently suspended chassis it shared, the 540 K was powered by a 5.4-litre supercharged straight-eight engine. The 540 K was one of the first models developed under Mercedes' new chief engineer, ex-racing driver Max Sailer, successor to Hans Nibel, who had died in November 1934 aged only 54. It featured the company's famous Roots-type supercharger system in which pressing the accelerator pedal to the end of its travel would simultaneously engage the compressor and close off the alternative atmospheric intake to the carburettor. This system had been thoroughly proven on the preceding series of Dr Porsche-conceived S-Type cars, and in effect the 540K was the last supercharged production Mercedes until relatively recent times. Launched at the Paris Salon in October 1936, the 540 K had an engine that developed 115bhp un-supercharged or 180bhp with the compressor engaged. The gearbox was a four-speeder, but with a direct top gear rather than the overdrive ratio used on the earlier 500K. With the supercharger engaged, the 540 K's blown straight-eight gave it a top speed approaching 110mph (177km/h) matched by servo-assisted hydraulic braking. Its performance potential was such that Mercedes-Benz in the UK retained racing driver Goffredo 'Freddy' Zehender as technical adviser and demonstration driver, since the super¬charged Mercedes was one of the few genuine 100mph road cars available in the 1930s. Late in 1938, a revised 540 K made its appearance, with oval-section chassis tubes instead of channel frame members, while the adoption of sodium-cooled valves followed the company's highly success¬ful racing practice. Although the 500 K/540 K chassis attracted the attention of many of the better quality bespoke coachbuilders of the day, the company's own Sindelfingen coachwork left little room for improvement. The cabriolet came in a variety of styles. This example has the desirable Cabriolet A option with two-door, left-hand drive coachwork and is outstandingly handsome. The work of the gifted Hermann Ahrens, design chief at Mercedes-Benz's in-house Sindelfingen coachworks, the Cabriolet A offered two-seater accommodation allied to breathtaking performance. The manufacturing record of the 540 K revealed its exclusive nature: 97 being produced in 1936, 145 in 1937, 95 in 1938 and 69 in 1939 before the war ended series production (though three more were built up to July 1942). In recent years, the rarity, style and performance of these big supercharged Mercedes have made them one of the most sought-after of all classic cars on the few occasions they have come on the open market. This ultra-rare 540 K Cabriolet A, chassis number '130946', has been confirmed by Mercedes-Benz to be one of a mere ten cars that left the factory built to its particular 'interim' specification: equipped with the more powerful 5.4-litre engine but carrying the 500 K-style body with two rear-mounted spare wheels (see fax from Daimler Chrysler AG on file). This sporting body style is similar to that of the exclusive 540 K Special Roadster and thus is one of the most sought after of all factory coachwork. '130946' was ordered on 3rd June 1936 (internal order number '226106') and its bodywork completed at Sindelfingen's factory on 13th July that same year. The car was collected by its first owner on 12th October 1936 from the Mercedes-Benz showroom in Paris. Proprietor of the well-known Parisian night-club Bar Americain 'La Roulotte', he is depicted in an archive photograph posing with his Mercedes-Benz outside the premises, which hosted artists of world renown including Edith Piaf and Django Reinhardt. The car remained in his possession for over 70 years and only passed to the current (second) owner in 2007; it is understood that it has never left French soil since being delivered new to Paris. It retains all of its original major components: chassis, engine and bodywork. In 1993 a meticulous restoration to the highest standards was carried out at the original owner's request by renowned restorer Dominique Tessier of Chambray-Lès-Tours, France. The bodywork was removed and restored where necessary; the convertible top and interior upholstery renewed; and the instruments rebuilt. All chromed parts were re-plated and no cosmetic details left untouched. The restoration's mechanical aspects received equally thorough attention, the engine, gearbox, axles, brakes, suspension and starter motor all being fully rebuilt. After the restoration's completion the Mercedes was driven by Dominique Tessier regularly over relatively short distances, accompanied on occasions by the elderly owner. The car has seen relatively little use since its acquisition by current owner in 2007 and is still in excellent condition. Works carried out include installing electric power assisted steering in 2010 for €5,945 (an easily reversible upgrade) and services in December 2012 and again in May 2014 (invoices on file). The supercharged models built by Mercedes-Benz were among the ultimate cars that money could buy in the late 1930s. Their beautiful proportions exude both power and grace. This example is undoubtedly among the finest of restored 540 Ks that Bonhams has had the pleasure of offering, with only two French owners from new and having resided with its first for 70 years. Appreciation of such fine machinery can only be done in person and we thoroughly recommend that prospective buyers take the opportunity to view this car. '130946' comes with archive photographs, an original service invoice dated 25th August 1946, and a full photographic record of the restoration together with the relevant invoices. This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, not to be missed. Zwei Vorbesitzer 1936 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A Fahrgestell-Nr. 130946 Motor-Nr. 130946 Zusammen mit seinem Vorgänger, dem Typ 500 K, ist der großartige Mercedes-Benz 540 K das begehrenswerteste Fahrzeugmodell des Stuttgarters Herstellers aus den 1930er Jahren. Der 500 K teilt sich mit seinem Nachfolger, dem Typ 540 K, das zu dieser Zeit hervorragende Fahrgestell mit an Doppel-Querlenkern geführten Vorderräder und der mit einer Ausgleichsfeder versehenen Pendelachse für die Hinterräder. Für den Typ 540 K steht der auf 5,4 Liter Hubraum vergrößerte Reihen 8-Zylinder Kompressor-Motor zur Verfügung. Dieses Modell war eins der ersten Modelle unter dem neuen Chefentwickler und Ex- Rennfahrer Max Sailer. Er wurde Nachfolger von Hans Nibel, der im Alter von 54 Jahren im November 1934 verstorben war. Durch sein markantes, Aufheulen" beim Betätigen des Kompressors, welcher zugeschaltet wird, nachdem man das Gaspedal gänzlich durchgetreten hat, erlangte der 540 K seine markenspezifische Berühmtheit. Die zusätzliche Leistungssteigerung durch den Roots-Kompressor, der bereits sehr erfolgreich im Mercedes-Benz Typ-S zum Einsatz kam, eine Entwicklung von Dr. Porsche, verhalf dem 540 K zu seinem besonderen Status. Er war das letzte durch einen Kompressor unterstützte Fahrzeug von Mercedes-Benz bis in die Neuzeit hinein. Vorgestellt wurde der 540 K auf dem Pariser Autosalon, Oktober 1936. Sein Motor liefert 115 kompressorlose PS, mit Kompressor 180 PS. Ein manuelles 4-Gang Schaltgetriebe, dessen 4. Getriebegang einem Direktgang gleicht und die Overdrive-Variante des 500 K übertrifft, sorgt für den nötigen Vorwärtsdrang. Der mit dem Kompressor ausgestattete Reihen 8-Zylinder-Motor ermöglicht das Fahrzeug auf eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit von nahezu 180 km/h zu beschleunigen. Die Bremsen, mit hydraulischer Unterstützung, bringen das Fahrzeug im Notfall zum Stillstand. Auf dem Automobilmarkt in Großbritannien zählte dieses Fahrzeug als ein echtes 100 mph (160 km/h) Modell. Als technischer Berater und Demo-Fahrer führte der Rennfahrer Goffredo ,,Freddy" Zehender, der auf Wunsch von Mercedes-Benz UK engagiert war, das Fahrzeug bereitwillig der Kundschaft vor. In den späten 1938er Jahren wurde das Modell 540 K überarbeitet und erhielt einen Fahrgestell-Rahmen mit ovalem Stahl-Profil anstatt des vorhergehenden U-Profilrahmens. Die bisherigen Ventile wurden durch Natrium gekühlte Ventile ersetzt, welche sich im Renneinsatz bestens bewährt hatten. Wie zu dieser Zeit üblich, ermöglichten die weltbesten Karosseriebauer eine große Vielfalt besonderer Karosserieaufbauten auf das Chassis des Typ 500 K /540 K. Die werkseigenen Karosserien aus dem Sindelfingener Karosseriewerk hatten bereits einen hohen Standard. Dieses 2-türige, 2-sitzige und links gesteuerte Sindelfinger Werks-Cabriolet A besticht durch sein außergewöhnliches Erscheinungsbild. Hierbei kommt insbesondere das Karosseriedesign des begnadeten Hermann Ahrens, Chef-Designer im Karosseriewerk Sindelfingen, zum Ausdruck. Werkseigene Produktionszahlen belegen den exklusiven Status dieses Fahrzeugs: 97 Exemplare - 1936, 145 Exemplare – 1937, 69 im Jahr 1938 und 1939, bis zum Beginn des 2. Weltkriegs – zu diesem Zeitpunkt wird die Produktion eingestellt, nochmals 69 Exemplare. Entsprechend der Unterlagen von Mercedes-Benz wurden drei weitere Fahrzeuge nach Juli 1942 gefertigt. In den vergangenen Jahren ist immer wieder der Seltenheitswert dieses Mercedes-Benz Kompressor Modells dadurch bestätigt worden, dass er sehr, sehr selten am Markt überhaupt angeboten wurde. Dieses äußerst seltene 540 K Cabriolet A, Fahrgestell nummer "130946" ist von Mercedes-Benz als eines von zehn Fahrzeugen bestätigt, das in dieser speziellen Karosserieversion im 500 K Stil, aber mit dem leistungsstärkeren 5,4 Liter-Motor ausgeliefert wurde. Ebenso die zwei zusätzlich am Heck angebrachten Reserveräder (siehe Fax der Daimler Chrysler AG, im dazugehörigen Ordner). Sein sportliches Karosseriedesign ähnelt dem des exklusiven 540 K Spezial Roadster und gehört damit eindeutig zu den seltenen Werkskarosserien. Bestellt wurde das Chassis mit der Nummer "130946" am 03. Juni 1936 (interne Bestell-Nummer "226106") welches mit der Karosserie in Sindelfingen am 13. Juli 1936 bereits fertig gestellt wurde. Das Fahrzeug wurde am12. Oktober 1936 im Ausstellungsraum von Mercedes-Benz in Paris dem Erstbesitzer übergeben. Er war Betreiber und Eigentümer des berühmten Nachtclubs und der Bar ,,Americain La Roulette". Auf einem zeitgenössischen Schwarz-Weiß Foto posiert er neben seinem Fahrzeug vor dem Nachtclub. In diesem Etablissement traten weltbekannte Künstler wie Edith Piaf und Django Reinhardt auf. Das Fahrzeug blieb in über 70 Jahren (2007) immer einem Eigentümer zugeschrieben. Dies ist so zu verstehen, dass der Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A seit der Erstauslieferung in Paris, das Land Frankreich nicht verlassen hat. Im Jahr 1993 wurde auf Wunsch des Eigners eine äußerst penible Restaurierung, unter Berücksichtigung höchster Standards, bei dem bekannten und anerkannten Restaurator Dominique Tessier in Chambray-Les-Tours (Frankreich) vorgenommen. Die Karosserie wurde vom Chassis abgehoben und nur mit den notwendigsten Ausbesserungen versehen. Das Cabriolet-Verdeck und der Innenraum-Polsterstoff wurden erneuert, sowie alle Anzeigeinstrumente überarbeitet. Alle Chromteile wurden neu verchromt und dabei blieb kein Teil unberührt. Im gleichen Maße erhielten alle Mechanikteile dieselbe Aufmerksamkeit: Motor, Getriebe, Achs- und Aufhängungsteile, Bremsen und der Anlasser. Nach der abgeschlossenen Restaurierung fuhr Dominique Tessier den Mercedes-Benz kürzere Strecken, in Begleitung des älteren Besitzers, regelmäßig zu verschiedenen Anlässen. Das Fahrzeug wurde vom derzeitigen Besitzer seit 2007 nur geringfügig genutzt und befindet sich in einem exzellenten Zustand. Für 5.945 € wurde im Jahr 2010 eine elektrische Lenkhilfe eingebaut, welche in einfachster Weise wieder zurückgerüstet werden kann. Service-Belege von Dezember 2012 und Mai 2014 liegen vor. Die Mercedes-Benz Kompressor Modelle waren das ultimativ Beste das man sich für Geld in den 1930er Jahren kaufen konnte. Deren wunderschöne Proportionen vermitteln Leistung und eine außergewöhnliche Anmutung. Bonhams hat das Vergnügen, dieses Automobil als zweifelsfrei Besten restaurierten Mercedes-Benz 540 K anzubieten. Mit nur zwei französischen Vorbesitzern in den letzten 70 Jahren. Wir empfehlen Interessenten eine Besichtigung, um sich vom außergewöhnlichen Zustand des Fahrzeugs ein eigenes Bild machen zu können. Chassis-Nummer "130946" wird mit einer Vielzahl von Fotografien, einer Original Service-Rechnung vom 25. August 1946, sowie einer Foto-CD mit Fotos der Restaurierung und vielen wichtigen Rechnungen angeboten. Das ist die Chance Ihres Lebens, eine einmalige Gelegenheit, die Sie sich nicht entgehen lassen sollten.

  • DEUGermany
  • 2014-07-12
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Ferrari Classiche Certified1985 FERRARI 288GTO

1985 FERRARI 288GTO VIN. ZFFPA16B000054243 Engine no. F114B00100 2,855cc DOHC Twin Turbocharged V8 Engine 394bhp at 7,000rpm Electronic Fuel Injection 5-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *Ferrari Classiche Certified *Believed to have covered only 7,432 kilometers from new *Freshly serviced by main Ferrari dealer *Offered with tool roll and jack *One of only 272 built, fraction in USA THE 288 GTO The original, immortal 250GTO had been developed for the FIA GT Championship, duly taking the manufacturer's title for Ferrari in 1962, 1963 and 1964; clearly, any revival of the 'GTO' name could only be permitted for a very special car indeed. Enter the 288GTO. Like its illustrious forebear, the 288GTO (the initials stand for Gran Turismo Omologato) was conceived as a limited edition model, just 200 units being planned to meet the then-existing Group B homologation requirements for international sports car racing. Styled by Pininfarina's Leonardo Fioravanti, creator of the awe inspiring Ferrari 365GTB/4 'Daytona', the 288GTO was based on the 308GTB (another Fioravanti creation) and made its public debut at the Geneva Salon in February 1984. Fioravanti later recalled Enzo Ferrari's original design brief. 'There was no specific instruction, just to produce a car based on the 308GTB that could be used for racing.' Although superficially similar to the contemporary 308GTB Quattrovalvole, the 288GTO was radically different beneath the skin, mounting its V8 engine longitudinally rather than transversely, a change that necessitated a new chassis with a wheelbase extended from 234cm to 245.1cm. This new frame was constructed of steel tubes in the traditional manner while incorporating the latest in Formula 1-derived composite technology in the form of a Kevlar and Nomex bulkhead between the driver and engine. The alteration in engine layout had been made to accommodate twin IHI turbo-chargers and their associated Behr inter-coolers and plumbing; the adoption of forced induction requiring that the quad-cam, 32-valve V8 be downsized from 2,927cc to 2,855cc to comply with the regulations. Ferrari's considerable experience gained from turbo-charging its Formula 1 engines was deployed in adapting the 308 unit, the latter in highly modified 288GTO form producing 400bhp at 7,000 rpm and a mighty 366lb/ft of torque at just 3,800 revs. Top speed was a staggering 189mph. Its three rear-wing cooling slots deliberately recalling the earlier GTO, the 288 body likewise benefited from the adoption of F1 technology, being constructed of glass fiber and a mixture of the lightweight composite materials Kevlar and carbon fiber. Aerodynamically refined in the wind tunnel, the 288GTO sported flared wheelarches, larger front and rear spoilers, taller door mirrors and four additional driving lights in the front grille, these subtly altered looks combining elegance with muscularity in equal measure. Given its race-bred, state-of-the-art technology and drop-dead gorgeous looks, it is not surprising that the 288GTO appealed to Formula 1 drivers of the day, with Ferrari's Michele Alboretto and René Arnoux, and even McLaren's Nikki Lauda, numbered among its owners. In the event, the 288GTO never contested the races for which it had been conceived, as the FIA axed Group B, citing lack of manufacturer interest as the reason. Testament to its relevance in reviewing the 2016 Ferrari 488GTB, Road & Track chose to compare it with a 288GTO, producing many memorable quotes, from author Chris Chilton: 'The 288GTO's blistered fenders and quad headlamps are pure lust', 'If there's one thing that really dates the 288, it's the steering because it's finger-tingling spectacular. Short on kickback but big on the richly textural feedback that reminds you how sanitized most modern systems are' 'While the GTO wasn't Maranello's first boosted mid-engine road car, it's the first one you should care about.' and 'There are no disappointments with the GTO; you make no excuses for its age. You drive it, abuse it like a new car. And then you get out wondering how it must have felt in 1985 to experience something so brutally rapid as its 189-mph top speed.' With total production amounting to only 272 cars, every one of which was sold prior to the start of production in July 1984, these cars have been covetable ever since the production ceased in 1986. Priced at $85,000 new, within the next three years asking prices for the few that had made their way to North America were pushing seven figure sums. The modest number built particularly compared to all subsequent Ferrari flagship supercars has ensured that today it is a this worthy successor to the 250GTO and remains one of the most desirable and sought-after Ferraris of recent times. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This immaculate, Ferrari Certified example was delivered new in Continental Europe to the French market. Accordingly it was imported to France through Charles Pozzi SA in Paris and then sold through official dealer Daverat Automobiles of Bayonne, on the Atlantic coast to its locally based first owner Thierry Deserces of Pau. The 95th car of the series to have been built, its original specification ex-factory is documented to have been the Rosso Corsa livery it wears today, with Pelle Nera/Stoffa Rossa - black leather seats with red inserts. It benefited from the optional extra of air-conditioning, but was otherwise spartanly equipped with manual windows and no radio/stereo, the acknowledged 'lighter weight' configuration. Adhering to national laws its headlamps had yellow diffusers. Mr. Deserces enjoyed the 288 for a number of years, certainly well into 1987 and is recorded as having given it some light track use in France at the 100 GT race in Dijon-Prenais in April 1985, the Ferrari Benelux meeting at Zandvoort in June, and was seen at the Ferrari Owner's Club International meeting in July 1986. Around a year later he showed it in his home town at the Club Ferrari France meeting in May 1987. Shortly after this the car migrated to the America in the heady days of the 1989 boom. According to its CarFax document, the Ferrari was imported to the US on July 5th, 1989, and by the end of November the US Dept. of Transportation in Charlotte, North Carolina declared it to 'meet US highway safety specifications' and they released the car from their bond. As for many Ferraris in this era it subsequently sold into Japanese ownership. In the mid-1990s the car came onto the radar of serial 288 GTO owner Wesley Hatakeyama of Atascadero, California. Hatakeyama, a knowledgeable enthusiast and Ferrari Club concours judge and a native of Japan was able to use his connections to retrieve a handful of ex-US Federalized cars that had migrated there. This car he sourced through 0123 Art Sport in Osaka, Japan, bringing it back to North America where it has remained for the last 18 years. Speaking with Hatakeyama this July he fondly recalled ownership of the car, and in his hands it was displayed at Quail Lodge in 1999, in the days when the Concorso Italiano was based here, securing him a 'Platinum Award'. It later passed through noted 288GTO expert Brandon Lawrence in 2000 to Robert Owen of Austin, Texas, where it was titled on September 1st that year. 4 years later almost to the day it was sold to a Toronto based collector in 2004, remaining there for nearly a decade before arriving in its present private ownership. Within the last 2 years the car has received a full major engine service with replacement of cam-belts with the works carried out by Ken and Darin McCay's Boston Sportscar and latterly an overhaul of the brakes by a respected main Ferrari dealer in Pennsylvania. Since then only a few miles have been accrued. It was also inspected for Ferrari Classiche Certification and received its red book in April this year. Well charted over the course of its 3 decades, there is considerable information supporting its current odometer reading of just over 7,400 kilometers. Its odometer fascia has been converted to appear to read miles, as was the case for many of the cars that were Federalized, but as verified by a recent road test, the instrument continues to count kilometers. On inspection today, the car is immaculate throughout and clearly a highly original and unspoilt example, facts that have been acknowledged by those who have owned or assisted in the car's sale over the years. Its only known attention have been very light work on the interior with a few replacement leather inserts and the leading edges, as well as sympathetic detailing of the paintwork to improve the aesthetics of this now 30 year old classic. The last few years have seen the 288GTO rightfully assume its status as a truly collectible icon, by merit of its modest production, iconic design and blistering performance. Amazingly, it is thought that only 15%, or three dozen of these cars exist in the U.S. today, making the chance to acquire one and one of this quality exceedingly rare. When contemplating its purchase, one might consider the sentiments in the quoted magazine article, Chris Chilton concludes his piece 'despite having driven most of the landmark supercars... I can't think of many past masters I've wanted in my garage more than this GTO.'

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-15
Hammer price
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THE EX-ECURIE FRANCORCHAMPS SPA 500 KILOMETER RACE WINNING 1964 FERRARI 250 LE MANS BERLINETTA

THE EX-ECURIE FRANCORCHAMPS SPA 500 KILOMETER RACE WINNING 1964 FERRARI 250 LE MANS BERLINETTA Chassis No. 6023 Engine No. 6023 Rosso Corsa with black leather interior Engine: 12 cylinders, 3286cc, 360bhp at 7,500rpm; Gearbox: five speed manual; Suspension: independent front and rear with coil springs and double wishbones all round; Brakes: Dunlop discs front and inboard rear. Right hand drive. The ultimate development of the famous line of '250' designated Ferrari Sports-Racing cars was embodied in the Le Mans Berlinetta, introduced at the Paris Motor Salon in October 1963. It was clear to Enzo Ferrari that for him to be able to maintain superiority over his rivals in the GT Classes of long-distance events and road-racing, a new model was required; that it should be homologated by the FIA; and with further success at Le Mans the principal goals. Breaking with tradition, the new 250 LM represented a significant step forward from the standards of the 250 GTO, and moved much closer to following the logical development of the 250P sports-racing models. For FIA acceptance, a minimum 100 production units would have to be manufactured, and indeed following the precedent set by having hoodwinked the FIA into accepting the GTO as a development of the SWB models, this was not going to work the second time around. Nevertheless it was introduced as a 250 variant in Gran Turismo guise; mid-engined, a first for a GT from Maranello, the prototype initially utilising a further development of the 3 litre engine. This was immediately enlarged to 3.3 litres for the production models, but still retained the '250' nomenclature rather than '275', further disguising Ferrari's intentions. The V-12 engine with dry-sump lubrication was still installed lengthwise behind the driver, with transmission via a 5-speed crash box into the multi-tubular chassis, in which the side-tubes carried water and oil to the forward-mounted radiators. The incredibly low and seductively styled bodywork was designed by Pininfarina, whilst the mechanical arrangement with suitable axle ratio and gearing allowed a maximum speed of up to 300km/h. The road-holding was superb, utilising a wheel-base identical to the GTO at 94ins, and with a track of 67ins; height was just amazing at only 43 inches! In early 1964, with the production gaining momentum, Ferrari applied for FIA homologation which was turned down. This infuriated Il Commendatore, who immediately suspended Ferrari works entries to international events, but this action by the FIA threatened to reduce the car's eligibility for classes for prototypes only, for which it was not intended. However this did not prevent other teams from achieving success, with a fine victory in the Reims 12-hours event of July 1964 for the Maranello Concessionnaires entry, driven by Graham Hill & Jo Bonnier; and capped by its greatest achievement the following year at Le Mans, where the cars took first and second places, with Masten Gregory driving a NART-entered car with Jochen Rindt and the Ecurie Francorchamps car behind. Their records showed two cars entered with one of them finishing second, having led, only to succumb to a puncture, robbing them of victory. This car 6023, driven by Langlois & Elde, was forced to retire with clutch trouble during the early hours of the morning. It was supplied new in August 1964, the 17th off the production line, and the second of three cars all supplied directly to Ecurie Francorchamps, the Belgian importer for Ferrari, and delivered originally in red racing livery. This team was one of the three principal entrants of Ferraris in sports-racing events and was the first to race the 'LM' models, of which ultimately only 32 examples were built. In September, 6023 was entered for its first event, the Paris 1000km at Montlhry, for their No. 1 driver Willy Mairesse with Jean Blaton (Beurlys), but possibly due to hasty preparation it did not finish. However fortunes were quickly restored with Mairesse gaining victory and fastest lap in the 300km Angola GP, and the other team 250 LM placed 2nd driven by Lucien Bianchi, thus rounding off a pleasing season. The car was repainted in Belgian national yellow to commence the 1965 season, where at Zolder, Willy Mairesse won a hard-fought race in the Coupe de Belgique. April saw testing sessions for the Le Mans race where Langlois was 13th fastest in 6023, while later in the month it was entered for Mairesse in the 1000km Inter Europa Cup at Monza, but failed to finish due to steering problems. National pride was at stake on the 16th of May at Spa-Francorchamps for the 500 kilometre race. Mairesse was at the wheel and fought a race-long battle against the Cobra coupes of Whitmore and Bondurant after seeing-off the other Ferrari competition from Mike Parkes in a 330P and finally taking the chequered-flag, winning from the British entry of another 250 LM driven by David Piper. This was a superb achievement by the Francorchamps team in their major home event, and a great victory for the marque type as well. Indeed in a recent article devoted to the 250 LM, David Piper is quoted for his impressions of the car: For me it's twice the car a GTO is and still very under-rated. It is more sophisticated, much quicker- and the gearbox and steering are fabulous. On really fast circuits such as Daytona, Sebring, Le Mans and Reims, it was very quick in a straight line and would out-perform many more-powerful cars.(Classic & Sportscar; June 1999). The busy season continued the very next week with the longer-distance 1000km race at the very demanding Nordschleife Nrburgring track, where although he qualified well in practice, Mairesse had to retire from 6th place with suspension damage after some 23 laps completed. But the car was back in action only another week later when Beurlys took first place in the Herbeumont hillclimb event. A short respite followed allowing time to prepare the car for Le Mans in mid-June, where it was entered for Langlois & Dernier (Elde), together with the second EF team entry of the car number 6313 for Dumay & Gosselin. 6023 was forced to retire with an inoperative clutch, whilst the second team-car actually led for many laps from early morning until midday, when a puncture surely robbed them of what would have been a great victory - having to settle for 2nd to the NART entered LM driven by Rindt & Gregory. A month later 6023 achieved a creditable 3rd place in the 12 Hour race at Reims, victory at least going to Ferrari, with P2's first and second, and Mairesse & Beurlys completing a hat-trick, beating off yet another challenge from the Ford-engined Cobras. Beurlys won two further hillclimb events at Andenne and Bomeree during July, completing a quite remarkably successful and hectic season. Life at the top is very short for racing cars, as continuous developments fuelled by strong competition make today's front-runners tomorrow's also-rans. However, the team continued to enter major events in 1966 at Monza and Spa 1000km and Le Mans, where regrettably, mechanical faults caused retirements in all those races. However some successes still came their way with 4th place in the Coupes de l'Avenir at Zolder, and 7th in the Paris 1000 km at Montlhry; but a retirement in the Kyalami 9 hrs race, where Jacky Ickx made a debut for the team. In all these racing miles it never had a major accident, and all bodywork panels are believed original. At the end of 1966 the car was displayed at the Brussels Motor Show, whereafter it was sold to a Mr. Luscombe-White of London, passing in turn to Mr. Patrick McNally in Lausanne, and then sold to another Swiss owner, then to David Piper, who at the same time owned the sister team-car 6313, at which point the engines were transposed, 6023 was repainted red, and re-sold to an American owner Dr. Hamilton Kelly via Tom Meade. Several other notable collectors/dealers handled it until purchased by Kimble McCloud, a keen enthusiast, who used it as a road car from 1976 until the mid 1980s, whereafter it was purchased by Richard Freshman, who raced it in an historic event at Elkhart Lake in 1987. Fortuitously Mr. Freshman was acquainted with the new American owner of 6313, and to mutual advantage they agreed to swap engines again, so that both Ecurie Francorchamps cars were back to their factory-spec origins. Two further ownership changes have seen the car in private collections in Europe with little usage since restoration in 1987. However the current vendor had commissioned a no-expense spared complete cosmetic and detail refurbishment, including retrimming the interior in black leather to his personal preference over the factory specification trim, and a supreme-quality repaint so that the car is now resplendent in Ferrari works livery and presented in immaculate condition. A recent mechanical check-over by a leading restorer in England enables us to proudly offer for sale this rare, superbly original and historic Ferrari of impeccable pedigree and provenance. This 250 LM is ready for a Concours lawn or the front row of a period racing grid.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-08-29
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1938 Talbot-Lago T23 Teardrop Coupe

Coachwork by Figoni et Falaschi 115bhp (rated), 3,996cc six-cylinder engine with hemispherical combustion chambers and twin Winfield carburetors, Wilson four-speed pre-selector transmission, transverse leaf spring independent front suspension, leaf spring and live axle rear suspension, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,950mm Talbot-Lago Bugatti, Delahaye, Delage, Hispano Suiza and Talbot-Lago – these marques comprise the greatest names in French automotive history and have become some of the most prized of all European classic collector cars. The Talbot-Lago offered here presents a truly rare opportunity to own one of most exotic and significant European sports cars ever produced. The story begins at the very dawn of the automobile, in 1893, when three of the early French automobile pioneers – Darracq, Serpollet, and Clement – banded together, ultimately forming Société Darracq et Cie in Suresnes, a suburb of Paris. By the turn of the century, Darracq automobiles were being sold in many countries, and before long, an English company (financed by Earl of Shrewsbury and Talbot) was formed to represent the firm in Great Britain, and S. A. Darracq (1905) Ltd. was created. Meanwhile, the Sunbeam Motor Company, Ltd. of Wolverhampton, England was embarking on a racing program. When engineer Louis Coatalen joined Sunbeam in 1909 the British firm became a dominating force in racing. By the end of the second decade it was becoming more important for automobile manufacturers to consolidate in order to reduce costs, streamline production, and share resources. Finally, in 1922, the English Darracq company acquired Sunbeam, and the resulting firm was renamed Sunbeam Talbot Darracq Motors Ltd., and it now controlled the French Darracq company – which had been renamed Automobiles Talbot S.A. Following the formation of STD, Sunbeam’s Louis Coatalen remained the director and immediately set about building a new Sunbeam racing design. By 1921 STD was competing with 3-litre straight eight-powered racing cars in that year’s Indianapolis 500. Two cars were entered as Sunbeams and one as a Talbot-Darracq, but all three were identical except for the radiator badges. Notably, one of the Sunbeams finished 5th. Even more success followed. Later in the French Grand Prix at Le Mans three Talbot-Darracqs, two Sunbeams and two Talbots would be entered –again all identical except badging. Never one to miss an opportunity, Coatalen embarked on a land speed record campaign that resulted in five world land speed records from 1925-27. One of the most memorable achievements occurred at the 1930 running of the 24 Hours of LeMans, where two Talbots placed third and forth behind the fabulously powerful Speed Six Bentleys – but finishing ahead of the competition from Mercedes-Benz and Alfa Romeo. Though some may have been surprised by this result, Georges Roesch - who was the mastermind behind Talbot’s engineering at the time - was not. Beginning in the mid- twenties, Roesch was determined to build one of the fastest, quietest and most dependable sports cars ever created. He focused on reducing noise, vibration and excess weight, while squeezing every ounce of performance out of a high revving and high compression engine that was often smaller than the competition. When 5,000 rpm was considered the ceiling for an engine of the twenties, Roesch developed an engine that reached 6,000 rpm and an unbelievable compression ratio of 8.5 to 1. In 1928, Talbot featured the first pressurized cooling system ever offered in an automobile, which was soon followed up by the 90 Series engine that achieved a compression ratio of 10 to 1. After various racing successes in 1930, Roesch developed the 105 Series with a 3-liter, six-cylinder engine that produced an amazing 140 horsepower at 4,500 rpm in race form. This was superior even to the Type 35 Bugatti, which was rated at just 135 horsepower. Even with the racing successes – and product improvements – produced by Roesch and Coatalen, Talbot was only marginally successful in the sales arena. By 1933, their French sales branch in Suresnes was ready to fold and the factory located there was in even worse shape. In fact, Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq was on its last legs when a young Italian engineer named Major Anthony Lago stepped into the picture for the first time. Anthony Lago was one of many Italian trained engineers who sought out the French automobile industry because the work being done there was at the leading edge of automotive design and engineering at the time. The innovations pioneered by the French had led to domination of international Grand Prix racing, and it was this climate of development that in turn attracted bright young minds from other countries. Lago started his automobile career selling Isotta-Fraschinis in London after serving in the Italian Army – where he rose to the rank of major during World War I. The Isotta-Fraschini was the finest Italian car ever produced up to that time, and featured world-class craftsmanship, engineering and style. The attention to every detail that was evident in the Isotta made a lasting impression on Lago. Major Lago then went on to work in a series of automotive engineering apprenticeships throughout London, including a stint at Sunbeam. He later worked at Wilson, assisting in the final development of the pre-selector gearbox. Later, it was this experience that lead him to acquire the foreign distribution rights to the Wilson gearbox and subsequently use it in his own cars. (By 1931-32 such prestigious firms as Alvis, Crossley, Daimler, Invicta, Lanchester, MG, Standard, Armstrong-Siddeley, Isotta-Fraschini and Talbot were using Wilson gearboxes as an alternative to manual boxes.) By 1932, Anthony Lago’s fascination with racing led to his position on the Armstrong-Siddeley works team and competing in the 1932 Alpine Trials. Later that year, he joined the struggling Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq firm, now on the brink of financial collapse in both England and France, rising to the position of assistant director. Lago was sent to the Suresnes factory in France to assist in a last gasp re-organization. Strange as it may seem, the British side of the company apparently had little involvement with its French sibling. When Lago moved to Suresnes, the company was set to liquidate the French factory. Lago argued against this and was made the new director-general and given the opportunity to try to save the company. The following year Rootes bought the English side of Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq. Lago, who had acquired considerable financial support, assumed control of the French Talbot concern. After assuming control of the company, Lago hired an engineer named Walter Brecchia, and together they created the first Talbot-Lago based on a Talbot-Darracq three liter Type K78. Although these were pleasant enough cars, they were hardly exciting – certainly not what was needed to take checkered flags, nor were they suitable platforms for elegant custom coachwork. Brecchia’s next engine proved to be a brilliant design. Based on the seven main bearing six cylinder K78 block, displacement was increased to four liters, and a new cylinder head was fitted that dramatically improved both breathing and volumetric efficiency. It was a hemispherical head design, with valve gear actuated by a low set camshaft with crossed pushrods acting through both long and short rocker arms. This new six-cylinder engine was able to develop 140 hp at 4,200 rpm, breathing through twin Solex carburetors. A consummate salesman, Lago somehow persuaded French racing great René Dreyfus to manage his new Talbot-Lago race team. Dreyfus delivered in June of 1936 at the French Grand Prix at Montlhéry when Lago asked him to “stay ahead of the Bugattis for as long as you can.” All three Talbot-Lagos finished in the top ten, running toe-to-toe with the Bugattis before mechanical problems slowed them near the end. The next year – after a productive year of product improvement –Talbot-Lagos placed first, second, third and fifth at the 1937 French Grand Prix – and Lago’s dream of producing one of the world’s greatest sports cars was now a reality. The victories would continue, with a win at Tourist Trophy races at Donnington Park, and a first place in the 1938 Monte Carlo Rally. They were competitive around the world, including at such renowned venues as the Mille Miglia, where they acquitted themselves well against the best that Ferrari and Alfa Romeo could field. In International Grand Prix racing in the late 1930s the Talbot-Lago racing cars were unable to successfully compete against the omnipotent German Mercedes-Benz and Auto-Union teams. Nonetheless they developed uncanny reliability, and often did surprisingly well, proving the old racing adage “to finish first, first you must finish”. Anthony Lago never let racing distract him from his passion to build the finest French cars of all. That meant luxury cars, the best of which were clothed by the great design houses of Paris. His reliable new engine would provide the basis for a powerful new chassis, and the glory of Talbot-Lago’s racing record would provide the perfect image to attract wealthy and powerful new clients to his order book. Racing aside, it was the road cars that paid the bills – and in certain cases – built the marque’s reputation for incomparable style. The most prominent of these was the T23 “Baby” that, oddly enough, carried the most elaborate coachwork. A thoroughly modern design, it was built in several wheelbases, and fitted with either a three liter engine or the much healthier four liter engine. Clearly, the most sporting variant would be the short wheelbase chassis with the four liter engine, and that is exactly the chassis chosen by S/N 93064’s patron. With a wheelbase of 2.95 meters, it is identical in size to S/N 90034 – the example sold by RM in 2005. For road use, the four liter engine was available with a twin Zenith-Stromberg carburetor installation rather than the standard single carburetor setup. Today, S/N 930034 is fitted with a hemispherical combustion chamber cylinder head, normally fitted to the T150C SS models. Some historians believe it was so equipped from new, although no build records exist to confirm this. The T23 chassis offered exceptional roadholding, a result of the car’s independent front suspension with its advanced geometry, along with light weight and excellent brakes. Racing success certainly enhanced the appeal; it was this demand, combined with Lago’s collaboration with Joseph Figoni and Ovidio Falaschi and their Figoni et Falaschi coachbuilding firm that would lead to the creation of what many believe are the most beautiful cars ever built. Figoni et Falaschi: Masters of Elegance There is little doubt that the era of exuberant French coachwork precipitated a tidal change in automotive design. Gone were the largely functional forms of the twenties and early thirties, replaced by the fanciful curves and sensuous lines that ushered in the era of the automobile as art. Although others were versed in the style to one degree or another, it was the Parisian firm of Figoni et Falaschi that is widely regarded as the innovator of the new look. Christened Giuseppe Figoni in Piacenza, Italy in 1894, Joseph Figoni was born in Italy but moved to France as a young child with his parents. After graduating from vocational school in 1908, Figoni apprenticed to a local carriage builder where he developed his understanding of the principles of body construction and began to develop his appreciation for the lines, forms, and proportions of good design. Figoni served in the French armed forces during the war, leaving in 1921 to start his own body shop. He developed his coachbuilding skills accommodating the needs of his clientele, and repairs began to be supplanted by updates and modifications. By the mid twenties, he was building complete bodies. Figoni’s early work was quite conservative, probably a reflection of the wishes of his affluent clientele. Nonetheless, his early designs show a sophisticated sense of line and proportion. Far from extravagant, these early cars were like a well-tailored suit: impeccable craftsmanship combined with just enough flair in the cut to stand out from the ordinary. By the turn of the decade, Figoni had begun to earn commissions for racing cars, and it was these unlikely orders that began to shift his image and reputation in a more sporting direction. Alfa Romeos, Lancias, Bugattis, and other sporting marques began to figure more prominently in his shops. Even as his design talent flourished, Joseph Figoni’s methods remained primitive. For many years, he would build a framework outline of the body directly on the chassis, using strips of steel welded together. While not as sophisticated as an engineering drawing, his method had the decided advantage of allowing him to directly translate a concept into a three dimensional reality. Adjustments were easily made until he (and the client) was satisfied, at which point the steel framework would be used directly by the panel fabricators to clothe the chassis. By the mid thirties, as the shop grew and became more sophisticated, he began to make scale models of a new design in clay, turning the result over to draftsmen to create the drawings that would be used to build the body. The principle was the same – the form would be realized and refined in three dimensions before being translated into drawings – the reverse of the more normal practice of the time. In 1935, several events would take place that would prove pivotal both for Figoni and for French design. In May of 1935 Joseph Figoni took in a partner. Ovidio Falaschi, a successful Italian businessman, was to provide working capital and business expertise. By all accounts, the partnership was a success, with both men making substantial contributions. The second seminal event was that Figoni was introduced to the work of the famed French artist Geo Ham. Accounts vary as to the extent of the role that Ham played in the creation of the new design ethos, but earlier work by Ham makes it clear that his design ideas were at least a source of inspiration for Figoni. The third event was the development of the Delahaye 135 in 1935/6. The 135 introduced a new lower radiator and independent suspension, which not only improved the car’s handling dramatically, but also lowered the chassis. It was these innovations that created the canvas on which Figoni would design the 1936 Paris show car. It is difficult today to appreciate the magnitude of the innovation. Here was a rakishly low car that had no vertical lines; the body was all outrageous curves, with four skirted fenders hiding the wheels. It was outrageous, stunning, and utterly unlike anything ever seen. Priced at a lofty 150,000 francs, it was snapped up immediately by Aly Khan, an international playboy and the son of the Aga Khan III. While Ham may have influenced the design of that first Delahaye 135, most historians believe that the remarkable series of designs that would follow were the work of Joseph Figoni. It was during this period that Figoni began to turn his attention to the Talbot-Lago. In fact, in 1937 Lago and Figoni signed an agreement to work together exclusively, and for a time they did. It was a collaboration that would result in the greatest cars of the era. The 16 Teardrop Coupes: “Goutte d’Eau” Prominent among them was a series of coupes, the first one commissioned at the request of a French businessman, M. Jeancart, resulting in what many believe was Figoni’s most important and successful design -– the so-called Teardrop or “goutte d’eau” coupes. It is believed that just sixteen of these Figoni coupés were built with two slightly different body styles. The first car, in what is now known as the ‘Jeancart’ design series was a beautiful aerodynamic coupé with a long streamlined rear. Five of these cars were built, three on the short T150C-SS chassis, one on the Lago Speciale chassis – and this one, the only example built on the four liter T23 chassis. Table #1 to the right illustrates the ‘Jeancart’ series, and their current status. Since the Jeancart bodies are all slightly different, each one can be easily recognized based on a variety of subtle differences. 93064 does include many of the interesting details featured on some of these including not only the split windscreen but the large integrated sunroof, a distinctive layout of bonnet louvers accented with chrome trim, and the elegant chrome fairings enhancing the bodywork’s natural curvature. The other Teardrops were built in the ‘New York’ style, named after the car shown at the New York Auto Salon in 1937. Except for one car on a T23 chassis, these were all T150-C short chassis cars. Table #2 illustrates the ‘New York’ series, and their current status. Whether in the ‘Jeancart’ or ‘New York’ style, all these handbuilt cars show minor differences, probably accounted for by the first owner’s personal desires. Two cars in the ‘New York’ series had fully skirted front fenders, and headlamp treatment varied. Some with recessed headlamps were transformed to the bullet design early in their life. Others, like 93064, were built with freestanding lights, but updated early on with recessed lights. Perfectly proportioned, these Teardrop Coupes are arguably the pinnacle of the French streamlined design movement and it is all too easy to forget today that these works of art are now nearly seventy years old. Exquisite coachwork, fitted to a powerful chassis, and all of it designed for the enjoyment of true grand touring. Most of the Teardrops were designed to accommodate two people however a few cars, like 93064, could accommodate three. They were the most advanced French automotive creations of their time, combining race bred technical competence with a brand new design inspired by aerodynamic efficiency directly linked with advances in aviation. One of the great appeals of a Figoni et Falaschi design – then as much as now – was competition in the concours d’ elegance of the day. A largely European phenomenon, wealthy clients would commission both automobiles and dress for the purpose of competing, with honors awarded to the most elegant fashions, rewarding both coachbuilder and couturier. Figoni’s talent extended beyond coachwork, as he sought new colors, leathers, and fabrics that would enhance his designs and reward his clients. Chinetti was always a fan of the Teardrop coupes. So much so, that during an interview in Automobile Classique, Chinetti went as far as to rate the Talbot-Lago T150-C models on par with the 2.9 Alfa Romeos he had known so intimately. Notably, Chinetti was the only official sales agent for the Talbot-Lago Figoni Teardrop Coupes throughout all of Europe. At an astounding price of 165,000 French Francs, the owners of these cars demonstrated their financial capability as well as their taste, as the acquisition of a Teardrop represented one of the most expensive automotive purchases one could make in 1938. Although there were some good designs that followed the Teardrops, in many ways they represented the end of an era as well. With chassis costs on the rise, the coachbuilding world was in decline before the war. After the war, carmakers turned to monocoque designs and production bodies to improve efficiency and lower costs. Meanwhile, particularly in France, tax authorities put the final nail in the coffin by implementing oppressive taxes on luxury cars. As French carmakers struggled, levies on foreign chassis were raised even more, eliminating that avenue of survival for the coachbuilder’s trade. By 1950, Falaschi had left the firm, returning to Italy to open a hotel. Figoni carried on for several years more, but ultimately transformed the business – now run by his son, Claude – into a new car dealership and repair shop. Joseph Figoni died in 1978, at the age of 84. Today, his son Claude remains involved in the history of his family firm, assisting historians and collectors to keep the record straight – and the passion alive. Chassis 93064: One of a Kind In the flourishing artistic environment of prewar Paris, if you were a wealthy, youthful, fashionable Parisian resident at the end of the 1930s, you surely resided in one of the magnificent townhouses of the city center. Your residence was decorated with the most exquisite of custom designed furniture by Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann, one drank from custom made René Lalique glasses and the walls were adorned by works by the pre-eminent artists of the time including Pablo Picasso and Francis Picabia. Undoubtedly, such a modern thinking sportsman would have had the most fashionable French car of the period in front of his door, and there would have been nothing more appropriate than a Teardrop Coupe. The Teardrops were all unique, each reflecting the tastes and wishes of its patron. Chassis no. 93064 may well be the most unique of all. It is the only example built on the four liter T23 chassis. Its wheelbase, at 2.95m, is some 30 cm, or 11.8 inches greater than the T150C-SS cars, but identical to the single Lago Speciale example, chassis 90034, which was sold by RM in August of 2005. Although the T23 was hardly a long wheelbase chassis by the standards of coachbuilt automobiles, the effect of the added length on the Figoni tear drop coachwork is quite breathtaking. The execution of its design was so well done that the added length is not immediately obvious. The difference is mostly aft of the firewall, giving a longer body and tail. Additionally, it has a physical presence unlike many of its counterparts as its slightly wider track gives it a very balanced and sporting stance. The Jeancart style seems to fit the longer wheelbase with such ease and proportion that it opens the door to the question of whether it was always destined to be on a longer chassis. The added length in the body makes it appear even lower while giving a more pleasing shape to the window area as well. At the same time, the longer tail balances the long hood, a dramatic effect that is enhanced by the subtle notchback that is the identifying characteristic of the ‘Jeancart’ version of the Teardrop coupe. In the world of important French cars, provenance is second only to design, and 93064 stands as one of the best of the Teardrops, having a continuous history from new, and no history of fire, accident, or deterioration. Chassis no. 93064 was given Figoni production number 685, a number that can be found on the car in numerous places as many parts of the car were stamped with this number during construction. Unfortunately, the identity of the first owner has been lost in the mists of time. Records do indicate that it was ordered as it is today – finished in metallic blue with a red leather interior, on a “Baby 4L” chassis, and carrying Style 9221 Model Jeancart coachwork, built by Figoni et Falaschi as job #FF685. S/N 93064 was delivered on February 21, 1938 to a French resident, and registered with plate no. 199ADY75. Fortunately, the car’s exceptional beauty made it prominent on the concours circuits of the day, and we have photography from period magazines showing the car in the company of a striking woman (who may have been the original owner) at its first showing in June 1938 at the Concours d’Elegance de l’Auto. In these photographs, the car appears much as it does today, although with a few minor differences: slightly different bumpers, external headlights, and chrome wire wheels. The wartime history of the car is not recorded, although by the late 1940s, it was in southern California, probably brought back by a returning serviceman. It was at this time that Denver, CO native David Radinsky bought the lovely teardrop. Radinskly later sold the car to machinist Paul Major. For many years, Major was seen driving the car in the Denver area (it was now black with a brown interior). At this point, the headlights had been recessed into the fenders, and the taillights were now flush with the fenders. Sometime in the mid 1950s, the trafficators had ceased to work and Major added turn signals in the tops of the headlight housings, with a similar arrangement added to the taillights. Bumpers from a prewar Cadillac were also fitted. It was about this time that S/N 93064 was featured – and photographed - in an article in Rocky Mountain Autolife, written by Ronald C. Hill, a friend of Major’s. According to Hill, Major offered the car at auction at Arthur Rippey’s Veteran Car Museum in September 1966, although it appears it did not sell. It was offered again at the same place in November 1967, this time selling to to a buyer in Atlanta, GA, believed to have been a Mr. Millbank. In the early 1970s, Millbank shipped it to French coachbuilder Henri Chapron in Paris for restoration. According to noted French car author Richard Adatto, Jean-Paul Caron, his photographer, wrote that in 1972 he stopped by to visit Chapron at his shop. In between the Rolls Royces, De Tomaso Panteras and Ferraris, he spotted various pieces of a car that made his heart beat fast. “It was a Talbot-Lago, bodied by Figoni & Falaschi in 1938 and under restoration for its American owner, Mr. Millbank.” Once the restoration was completed, Mr. Chapron invited Mr. Caron back to the shop for a look at the results before the car was launched again in public in Paris in 1974. They took the car around the Bois de Boulogne and the Arc de Triomphe, “which was quite a feat considering the difficulty of a steering wheel with a one and a half turn lock to lock and a gear box with pre-selected gears. On a highway it must be a dream to drive, however, and can move at a steady 180 km/hr.” During the restoration, the car was returned to its original colors. At the same time, several small touches were added. The headlights were modified slightly, the rear turn signals were removed, and the bumpers were changed to appropriate original type single blade style. At some point in the late 1980s, S/N 93064 was purchased by a Japanese collector. It remained in Japan until brought back to the America by the vendor, a noted Washington collector. When the new owner first received the Talbot he immediately set out to get the Talbot in excellent running order and restored the engine and mechanicals. While a frame off restoration was not necessary he had the car cosmetically freshened both inside and out with new paint and interior. Today, the Talbot remains as it was for so many years, a picture perfect representation of a well cared for automobile. The current gentleman owner fell in love with car at first sight. An avid motoring enthusiast and collector of important cars, his intention was to maintain it in concours condition. His passion, however, was to drive it. He is among the lucky few who speak from experience when they report that the Talbot chassis, combined with the Teardrop’s lightweight coachwork, results in an exquisite driving experience. The steering is both quick and light, proving that properly designed chassis have no need of power steering. The engine has been adapted to Winfield carburetion for improved throttle response and a much broader power band. (The original manifold remains untouched, and could easily be returned to the original Zenith-Stromberg carburetion setup should a future owner prefer it). Even with the stock carburetors, the four liter Talbot engine was a delight, revving freely and producing its peak output at a dizzying (for the time) 4,200 rpm. In this configuration, with the hemispherical heads and high performance specifications, the Teardrop’s performance enhancements were clearly inspired by the T150C competition models. The Wilson preselector gearbox is another period delight. While it may seem mysterious to those who have not used it, those who have praise it with the fervor of the newly converted. Smoother than a conventional manual gearbox, it also offers positive coupling, quick shifting, and exceptional torque handling. Highly reliable, the Wilson box handled power transmission for generations of London busses. The author had the opportunity to speak with the vendor at length about his decision to offer S/N 93064 to a new owner. An experienced collector, his reluctance to sell came not from the undeniable beauty of the car, but rather from the delightful memories he has of the car as an entry in several of the increasingly popular driving events available to collectors today. Although he owns many show cars, he said he was never tempted to go that route with 93064 – though he acknowledges that the car’s next caretaker may intend to do just that. In fact, his intention is to pursue another acquisition to replace his cherished Teardrop – though he steadfastly refuses to hint at what it might be. Following the Talbot’s second running on the Colorado Grand the owner noted inconsistencies in the suspension and the Teardrop was sent to noted mechanic and restorer Mr. Jim Stranberg for examination. Wear was found in the front suspension, and consequently the decision was made to undertake a comprehensive rebuild of the steering and front suspension. While there, an extensive service was undertaken as well, and as expected the Talbot now runs and drives without fault. On a recent road test the Talbot proved to be in excellent operating order, starting easily from cold, and settling almost immediately into a comfortable idle. Moving off, the clutch action is silky smooth, and the car accelerated easily through the gears. There is no question that the 1938 Talbot-Lago T23 Teardrop Coupe is a master work of Art Deco design. Its proportions and sweeping stance are a wonderful representation of the pinnacle of prewar French creativity and imagination. Crafted at the very height of Art Deco design in 1938, it was, like all significant works of art, virtually unmatched in its beauty, without peer or parallel. Just two years later, the composition of the world would change dramatically; Paris would no longer be the destination of the intellectual or continental. It would prove to be the end of an inspiring era. At the height of its prewar grandeur, Paris and its impressive artisans and craftsmen would leave the world a handful of legacies of its place at the center of the creative world. One such example is this Talbot-Lago Teardrop Coupe and today, we are grateful for its celebrated representation of art and engineering, motion and emotion. The Opportunity Its appearance at Amelia Island marks the first time this Talbot has been offered to the public since 1967, Unique among the 16 Teardrop Coupes, chassis 93064 represents the pinnacle of automotive design. This very special T23 combines speed, luxury, and undeniable beauty. Its history is continuous and uncontested since 1938, its provenance is impeccable and its mechanical and cosmetic condition is excellent. It is both well known and well respected among the marque specialists. Without argument, this is one of the most stunning cars in the world. Chassis no. 93064 Engine no. 23294 Figoni no. 685 Estimate: Available Upon Request References Adatto, Richard. From Passion to Perfection, The Story of French Streamlined Styling 1930 – 1939. Editions SPE Barthélémy, 2003, Paris, France. Borgeson, Griffith. Figoni et Falaschi: The Coachbuilder as Sculptor. Automobile Quarterly, Vol. XX, Number 1, 1982, Kutztown, PA, USA. Spitz, Alain. Talbot – Des Talbot-Darracq Aux Talb Chassis no. 93064

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-03-11
Hammer price
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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Design by Pininfarina Coachwork by Scaglietti

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Design by Pininfarina Coachwork by Scaglietti Chassis no. 10507 Engine no. 1886 3,286cc DOHC V-12 Engine Six Weber Carburetors 300bhp at 8,000rpm 5-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *Three owners from new *Full service records *Assembly sequence: no. 232 *Just over 500 miles on engine rebuild THE FERRARI 275 To the Ferraristi, those who revere the stable of the prancing horse above all other marques, so admired is the GTB/4 that mere mention of "four-cam Ferrari" invariably evokes outbursts of acclaim for the car's exquisite symmetry of visual and mechanical potency. To those fortunate enough to have driven a GTB/4, the sensation of being pulled toward a limitless horizon by the V-12's refined muscle will forever be engraved into their memories. Noted automotive journalist David E. Davis once said, "I firmly believe that everyone who is worth anything at all should own a 12-cylinder car before they die." It was likely he had a Ferrari V-12 in mind. Even a young Enzo Ferrari came to appreciate the V-12's alluring combination of power and smoothness. While recalling his first sight of a V-12, in a Packard in 1919, he remarked, "From that moment I married the V-12, and I never divorced it." More aggressive in appearance, the GTB's long hood, plexiglass-covered headlamps, laid-back cockpit, integrated rear spoiler and side vents were a vivid tribute to the all-conquering GTO race car. Its higher belt- and fender lines and rounded contours gave the 275 a commanding yet aerodynamic presence that conveyed its ability to slice powerfully through the atmosphere. Beneath the gorgeous body, penned by Batista Farina himself, was a tubular steel frame and mechanicals that reflected thirty years of racecar development. The first road Ferraris to have fully independent suspension, a rear-mounted transaxle for near 50-50 weight distribution, and the use of lightweight cast alloy wheels to reduce unsprung weight, its chassis and gearbox innovations were a direct adaptation of the developments that brought so much success to Enzo Ferrari with his sports/racing cars. The 5-speed rear-mounted transaxle had been utilized on the single-seat F1 and then on the sports/racing cars in the 1950s, and the 7x14-inch cast light alloy wheels recreated the design used on the 156 Formula One car of 1963. The 275 GTB/4 made its public debut at the 1966 Paris Auto Salon; thereafter, according to Ferrari, only 331 examples were built during the short production run that ceased in March of 1968 (it brought to an end by U.S. emissions standards that effectively eliminated Ferrari's most lucrative market). Model serial numbers range from no. 09007 to no. 11069; all were numbered in the odd chassis number road-car sequence; each chassis was identified with reference no. 596; and the car was offered in both left- and right-hand drive. Most GTB/4s were constructed of steel with aluminum doors, bonnet, and boot lid; a few were built entirely of aluminum. When new, a 275 GTB/4 cost between $16,000 and $17,000. Its overall shape was almost identical to preceding 275s, including the long nose, designed to reduce front-end lift, which was first introduced to the GTB in 1965, though with a flat bonnet instead of the first GTB's slightly raised profile. Thus the only easily seen visual difference from the 275 GTB (which was produced through 1966) was a slim and shallow central blister to accommodate a larger air filter housing. A second pair of vents, echoing those on the fenders, was cut into the sail panels to evacuate cabin air. European-spec models had different rear light lenses (an orange upper section for the turn signal and central circular reflector) from those bound to the U.S. (full red with a central horizontal rectangular reflector). Behind the angled windscreen was an interior that emulated other Ferrari-badged grand tourers of the era. Simple but elegant, the cabin's design featured a wraparound dashboard connected with the door panels, which featured aluminum inserts at the bottom. Four gauges fronted both the instrument panel and the center stack area, and the driver faced a classic three-spoke wood-rimmed steering wheel. The conservatively bolstered seats, without headrests, were designed more for grand touring than fighting extreme sideloads. Of course, Ferrari offered buyers options for customization, so the 275 GTB/4's interior could be altered by choice, with colors and trims ranging from basic black to lighter shades or even to red, blue or yellow. Under the hood, however, was to be found the reason for the /4 in the GTB's nameplate: the first version of the Colombo short-block V-12 to utilize double overhead camshafts. Derived from the 3.3- and 4.0-liter engines of the 275 and 330 P2 prototypes of the 1965 racing season, this new Tipo 226 engine had the same dimensions of the earlier 275's Tipo 213 but incorporated some significant differences: a reduced valve angle for more compact heads; valves directly actuated without the intermediary rocker arms; six twin-choke Weber 40 DCN carburetors (for remarkable mid-range torque and flexibility); and a dry sump oiling system as used on the earlier competition 275 GTB/C, crucial for a high-revving engine in order to reduce windage losses and increase cooling capacity. Oil capacity itself was raised from 11 quarts to 17 quarts. Twin-coil ignition sparked a single spark plug per cylinder. What did all these refinements deliver? Listen to Dick Irish, an American gentleman racing driver from Kansas City who campaigned a 375 Ferrari in SCCA events against Bill Spear, Carroll Shelby and Jim Kimberly. Dick had finally saved enough money to afford a four-cam and arranged in October 1967 to stay in Maranello to personally oversee production of his 275 GTB/4. He recounted the many interesting experiences in the Ferrari Club magazine Prancing Horse. His final factory thrill was riding with the test drivers: "Would you believe we traversed Modena and the surrounding country side at never under five grand in any gear. He left the factory with his "new" Ferrari showing 119 miles of road testing. When leaving Italy after 5,000 miles he told his factory friends, "It is all I had hoped for except it is much more civilized than I had imagined." In the first year he drove it 42,000 miles on two continents. As he said, the car is a true Gran Turismo in every way. With a 400-mile range, he went 398 on one tank; long distances can be covered quickly. He did have problems with "loose" undercoating. It was too brittle for three-digit driving on roads sanded to combat ice and snow. In 1970 he drove from Tulsa to Canada and Niagara Falls and back via Detroit and Chicago — with his yellow Labrador wedged behind the seats. By June 1971 the four-cam had 82,462 miles on several sets of tires. Several minor problems had arisen, but a clutch pressure plate at 79,000 miles was about the only major repair. As he contemplated his four-year odyssey, he said, "The voluptuous, almost animalist lines Scaglietti gave the 275 GTB/4 made me realize that Ferraris are the ultimate in Grand Touring." THE MOTORCAR OFFERED Ferrari 275 GTB/4 with chassis 10507 was manufactured in 1967, beginning with a June 20 delivery of the chassis to Carrozzeria Scaglietti in Modena. Assembly of its type 226 engine no. 1886 was completed on October 5 and dyno-tested the following day while awaiting the October 12 delivery of the completed chassis/body. Late in 1967 the GTB/4, in its original metallic maroon paint, was delivered to William F. Harrah's Modern Classic Cars, the official U.S. West Coast importer, in Reno, Nevada. In 1985, second owner David C. Anderson showed it at the 15th Annual Ferrari Club of America National Meeting in 1977 at Watkins Glen, where the car earned third place in class. In July 1991 Anderson advertised the car for sale indicating it was 250 miles into an engine rebuilt, and in 1992 it was sold to Theodore J. Day of Nevada with 42,000 miles on the odometer. With a current odometer reading of 42,360 miles at the time of cataloging, which is believed to be original and correct, this magnificent and highly original Ferrari 275 GTB/4 was a noteworthy part of T.J. Day's exemplary collection of classic automobiles and presents very well indeed, its shark-like front fender gills and covered headlights echoing those of Ferrari's competition models. The car shows excellent panel fit and original Rosso Cordoba (106-R-7) exterior color, original full-leather beige seats (VM 3218) and dark brown carpets, and it rolls on the original optional Borrani wire wheels. Stored in a climate-controlled facility, it was very lightly used after an engine rebuild commissioned by the previous owner. Full purchase and service records and a complete tool set are included with today's sale. These four-cams are eligible for many international driving events such as the Tour de France, the Copperstate 1000, and the factory-sponsored tours. As a factory spokesman said about the 2004 275 Italian tour organized to celebrate the 40th anniversary of one of its most iconic models: "The idea of holding a rally for the Ferrari 275 stemmed from this model's successful past, on both road and track, especially in hill climbs and endurance races. In fact, it represents the essence of Ferrari at that time: a car designed for road use, but built with totally sporting pretensions." From the Collection of T.J. Day

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1965 Ferrari 275 GTB by Scaglietti

280 bhp, 3,286 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber 40 DCZ6 carburettors, five-speed manual transaxle, fully independent coil-spring suspension with upper and lower wishbones, Koni tubular shock absorbers, and four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Ferrari Classiche certified Retains its original engine and gearbox Presented in its original colours of Verde Pino over Beige A pair of new Ferraris broke cover at the 1964 Paris Salon: the 275 GTB and 275 GTS. Although both cars boasted identical welded steel tubular flame chassis with fully independent suspension, five-speed manual transaxles, and 3.3-litre Colombo V-12s, the similarities ended there. Both cars looked drastically different, with the GTB’s bodywork being crafted by Scaglietti, and the GTS coachwork built by Pininfarina. The engine in the 275 GTB was rated at 280 brake horsepower, while the 275 GTS’ engine had an output of 260 brake horsepower. While the 275 GTS was meant to be an open-top grand tourer, the 275 GTB was slightly sportier in nature. Although still an ideal grand tourer, customers could equip their cars with a handful of performance options, including three or six Weber carburettors or steel or aluminium bodywork. Campagnolo alloy wheels were standard, but Borrani wire wheels remained as a popular optional extra. Just one year after the initial debut of the 275 GTB, a second-series example was premiered with a slightly longer nose, a modification intended to help aid aerodynamic downforce at high speed. Despite the technical improvements, many enthusiasts prefer the first-series car’s proportions and purity of design, and early short-nose examples remain highly sought after by collectors, with only approximately 250 examples built. Originally delivered to the official Ferrari dealer Rugico of Madrid, Spain, in 1965, chassis number 07341 was born as a short-nose 275 GTB, finished in the lovely and seldom-seen colour combination of Verde Pino (106-G-30) over a Beige (VM 3218) Connolly leather interior. By 1966, the car had been sold to a resident of Switzerland and was registered on Swiss license plates 'GE 57243', according to Ferrari historian Marcel Massini. It returned back to the factory on 6 May 1966, where it was serviced and its odometer was recorded as showing 10,755 kilometres from new. While the majority of the car’s early history remains unknown, it was acquired by Joaquim Folch of Barcelona, Spain, in August of 1989. By this time, the 275 GTB had been refinished in red with a yellow stripe and was pictured in the book Collector’s Garage wearing this livery. The car remained in his ownership until at least 2006, when it was certified by Ferrari Classiche; shortly thereafter, the yellow stripe was removed and the car was repainted red throughout. After leaving Folch’s ownership, the car was sold to the United Kingdom, where it was returned to its original colour combination. The car is accompanied by a file that includes its certification binder from Ferrari Classiche, as well as a handful of service invoices from DK Engineering and Joe Macari. One of Ferrari’s most beloved designs, the 275 GTB was perhaps the quintessential high-performance, grand touring car of the 1960s. Today, a well-maintained 275 GTB remains a staple of any world-class Ferrari collection. This particular example, presented in its original colours, with its original drivetrain, and boasting Classiche certification to its name, would be a splendid addition to any collection. Moteur V12, 3 286 cm3, 280 ch, 1 ACT par banc, trois carburateurs Weber 40 DCZ6, transmission manuelle cinq rapports transaxle, suspension avant et arrière indépendante avec doubles triangles, ressorts hélicoïdaux et amortisseurs Koni, freins à disques Dunlop sur les quatre roues. Empattement 2 400 mm. • Certifiée Ferrari Classiche • Moteur et boîte de vitesses d'origine • Présentée dans ses teintes d'origine, Verde Pino et intérieur Beige Deux nouvelles Ferrari ont fait sensation au Salon de Paris 1964 : la 275 GTB et la 275 GTS. Même si les deux voitures présentaient le même châssis tubulaire en acier avec suspension complètement indépendante, la même boîte-pont cinq rapports et le V12 Colombo 3,3 litres, les similitudes s'arrêtaient là. Les deux modèles affichaient en effet une forme très différentes, la carrosserie de la GTB étant réalisée par Scaglietti, et celle de la GTS par Pininfarina. Le moteur de la 275 GTB développait 280 ch, alors que celui de la 275 GTS se contentait de 260. Alors que la destination de la 275 GTS était d'être une grande routière découvrable, la 275 GTB offrait une personnalité plus sportive. Bien que tout aussi idéale comme grande routière, elle était souvent équipée par ses acheteurs d'options sportives, comme trois ou six carburateurs Weber, ou une carrosserie acier ou aluminium. Les jantes Campagnolo en alliage étaient montées en série, mais les Borrani à rayons étaient une option appréciée. Un ans seulement après le lancement de la 275 GTB, une version de deuxième série était présentée avec un avant légèrement plus long, modification effectuée pour contribuer à diminuer le délestage à vitesse élevée. Malgré les améliorations techniques, de nombreux amateurs préféraient les proportions et la pureté des versions de premières série, si bien que les premiers exemplaires de 275 GTB "short-nose" restent très recherchés des amateurs, avec une production qui s'est limitée à 250 exemplaires environ. Livrée neuve en 1965 au distributeur Ferrari officiel Rugico de Madrid, la voiture portant le n° de châssis 07341 est une 275 GTB "short-nose", qui présentait la teinte rare et séduisante "Verde Pino" (106-G-30), avec une sellerie en cuir Connolly Beige (VM 3218). En 1966, la voiture avait été vendue à un résident en Suisse, qui l'immatriculait sous le numéro suisse GE 57243, selon l'historien Ferrari Marcel Massini. La voiture était envoyée à l'usine le 6 mai 1966 pour une révision, et son compteur kilométrique affichait à l'époque 10 755 km. Alors que l'histoire de la voiture reste en grande partie inconnue dans ses premières années, elle a été achetée en août 1989 par Joaquim Folch, de Barcelone. A cette époque, la 275 GTB avait été repeinte en rouge, avec une bande jaune, et elle apparaît en photo avec cette livrée dans l'ouvrage Collector’s Garage. Elle restait entre les mêmes mains au moins jusqu'en 2006, quand elle était certifiée par Ferrari Classiche ; peu après, la bande jaune était enlevée et la peinture rouge entièrement refaite. La voiture était ensuite vendue en Grande-Bretagne, où elle revenait à sa combinaison de teintes d'origine. Elle est aujourd'hui accompagnée d'un dossier qui inclut le classeur de certification de Ferrari Classiche, ainsi qu'une série de factures d'entretien de DK Engineering et Joe Macari. La 275 GTB est une des Ferrari les plus appréciées. Elle représente peut-être la quintessence de la voiture de grand tourisme à hautes performances des années 1960. Aujourd'hui, une 275 GTB en bon état constitue une pièce de base pour toute collection Ferrari importante. Le présent exemplaire, dans ses teintes d'origine, sa mécanique d'origine et sa certification Ferrari Classiche, constituera un ajout splendide à toute collection. Chassis no. 07341 Engine no. 07341 Gearbox no. 258

  • FRAFrance
  • 2017-02-08
Hammer price
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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

300 bhp, 3,286 cc DOHC Colombo V-12 engine with six Weber carburettors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil-spring independent suspension, and front and rear disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm Matching-numbers example Offered from long-term ownership Ferrari Classiche certified Replacing the venerable 250 series of grand touring cars would be a daunting task for everyone at Ferrari in 1963. With the 250 GT/L being the swansong of the series, Ferrari needed to create a car that would replace the chassis that catapulted Ferrari into the garages of A-list automotive enthusiasts all over the world. More specifically, Ferrari wanted their new car to carry on the tradition of the Lusso, straddling the line between their more luxurious creations and their race cars, resulting in the fantastic 275 GTB. After introducing the long-nose body style, a change doctored in to the original design to reduce front end lift at high speeds, among other minor improvements, the racing seasons of 1964 and 1965 brought Ferrari’s most drastic improvement yet. Ferrari had yet another trick up their sleeve, in the form of a revised Tipo 226 engine, which resulted in the birth of the Ferrari 275 GTB/4. This was a landmark model for Ferrari for a variety of reasons. It was a Ferrari that was as usable as it was beautiful; a true jack of all trades. Whilst most were designated as street cars from Ferrari and not earmarked for factory-backed racing, the 275 GTB/4 could easily drive under its own power to a track event and handily win its class. After finishing the race and picking up the requisite trophy, the victorious car could transport its owner home under its own power, all well swaddling that owner in the finest Italian leather and interior fitments, such as wood trim and standard power windows. Aesthetically, the 275 GTB/4 shared much with its older sibling. Many automotive publications rated this as one of the top Ferrari designs of all time, and it’s easy to see why. With is sleek bodywork styled by Pininfarina and formed by Enzo’s favourite craftsmen at Scaglietti, the sight of the new design at the 1966 Paris Motor Show was truly something to behold. The long nose, low roofline, and small yet commodious boot made for a glorious silhouette that would become known as a truly great post-war automotive design. With a grand total of 330 examples produced by the end of 1968, this Ferrari was coveted by enthusiasts from its introduction and came to be recognised as one of the most desirable grand touring Ferraris ever built. The only change to the body of the GTB/4 was a full-length bulge down the bonnet in order to allow a significant performance enhancement to the “four-cam” engine, which included six downdraft Weber 40 DCN carburettors. To the untrained eye at speed on the autostrada, it looked no different from its predecessor, but anyone sitting behind the gorgeous Nardi steering wheel could tell the difference in performance almost immediately. Developed on race tracks all over Europe in Ferrari’s 330 P2 prototype racers just a year prior to the GTB/4’s introduction, this iteration of the Colombo V-12 was the first engine with dual overhead camshafts to be fitted to a production Ferrari. Dry-sump lubrication in the new engine was also another race-bred improvement that was developed in the 330 P2. As a result, performance was incredible: top speed was 166 mph and horsepower was a respectable 300. Additionally, Ferrari had installed a torque tube to connect the engine and transmission, giving the car improved handling as well as masking some of the noise the engine created, allowing for a more comfortable cabin atmosphere. Chassis 10643 was produced in 1967 and left the factory destined for its home market of Italy. It was originally finished in one of Ferrari’s rarer shades of red, Rosso Chiaro, over a Nero leather interior and was fitted with Campagnolo alloy 10-hole wheels. This 275 GTB/4 was then sold new to a Mr Vassallo, of Rome, Italy, and imported to the United States after his ownership. By 1972, the car on sale today was registered to Richard Caradori, of Langdon, Missouri, who enjoyed ownership of the car for 16 years. After being listed for sale by Ferrari, of Walnut Creek, California, in August of 1989, by the Ferrari Market Letter, 10643 made its second trans-Atlantic crossing to a new home in Germany, and it was purchased by its current owner in April 1998. Residing with a very important European collection, this 275 GTB/4 has always been very well pampered and is showing less than 34,000 kilometres on the odometer, which are believed to be original. The original Rosso Chiaro paint looks fantastic, and the interior shows few signs of wear. On 12 October, 2006, Ferrari’s Classiche department presented chassis 10643 with a certificate of authenticity, certifying the mechanical and cosmetic authenticity of this particular 275 GTB/4. The Classiche binder is complete with pictures that show that the chassis and engine numbers are indeed matching, and it is included in the sale. Not only does the Classiche certification work as a fantastic way of compiling provenance and assuring mechanical correctness for an individual motor car, but it also helps place the car amongst other Ferraris in terms of originality. The 275 GTB/4 is truly one of the great Enzo-era Ferraris. Combining breath-taking good looks from the designers at Pininfarina, a beautifully executed body crafted by Scaglietti, and being graced with one of the finest Colombo engines ever built, it has compiled some of the best work from the best companies united under the badge of the Prancing Horse. With under 34,000 kilometres on its odometer, this is an example of a car that needs nothing and is ready to impress on the concours lawn and perform in classic driving events. This is a great opportunity to acquire a genuine and unmolested Ferrari that comes from long-term ownership and has seen very few caretakers in its life. Please not that this lot is subject to VAT on the full purchase price (both on the hammer price and the commission). It is eligible for import into the UK at a reduced rate of 5% VAT plus customs charges. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is eligible for import into the UK at a reduced rate of 5% VAT. Chassis no. 10643 Engine no. 10643

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-09-08
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1965 Ferrari 275 GTB by Scaglietti

280 bhp, 3,286 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber 40DCZ6 carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, fully independent coil-spring suspension with upper and lower wishbones, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Beautiful presentation in gorgeous colors Ferrari Classiche certified THE 275 GTB By 1963, it had become increasingly apparent to Ferrari’s engineering team that the long-running and highly successful 250 GT series of road cars had reached the end of its development potential. Despite the fact that Ferrari was slowly drifting toward a more luxurious base-V-12 car, the company still wanted to maintain its fine tradition of dual-purpose sports/racing cars, which had cemented its considerable sporting reputation. Renowned British racer Michael Parkes, at the time a Maranello Works driver, participated in considerable testing and proved to develop a replacement model for the 250 GT platform, one that ultimately drew considerably upon the 250 GTO, with its long front hood and short rear deck. The resulting 275 GTB, or Gran Turismo Berlinetta, debuted to great acclaim at the 1964 Paris Motor Show, appearing in tandem with a companion open-top spider version. While the elegant 275 GTS spider was constructed by Pininfarina with a design brief stressing comfort and luxury, the berlinetta retained the more sporting characteristics of prior Ferrari sports/racers, and it was built by Scaglietti. Technically, the 275 featured the final development of the classic single-overhead-camshaft Colombo short-block design, which was now enlarged to displace 3,286 cubic centimeters. Optimal weight balance was achieved by mounting the gearbox directly to the rear axle, a rear transaxle design that would become a standard practice in many ensuing Ferrari road cars. The 275 is also notable as the first Ferrari for the street to feature an independent suspension on all four wheels, an innovation that eventually took hold across automobile manufacturing. A year after the 275 GTB’s debut, a second series was unveiled that featured a longer nose, a modification intended to aid aerodynamic downforce at high speeds. Despite the technical improvements, many enthusiasts prefer the first-series car’s proportions and purity of design, and early short-nose examples remain highly sought after by collectors, with only approximately 250 examples built. CHASSIS NUMBER 07053 The car offered here, chassis number 07053, was completed by the factory in April of 1965, finished in Bleu Scuro (18942 M) over Nero (VM 8500). Later that month, it was sold to Luigi Chinetti Motors, the official East Coast U.S. importer, as part of a package of three cars. Shortly thereafter, Chinetti Motors had sold the 275 GTB to its first lucky owner, Peter Knoll of New York City, who kept it in Europe for over a year, driving it on New York plates PK 64. It was serviced and maintained at the factory Assistenza Clienti in Modena that May, having been driven 2,201 miles. In early 1966, the car was re-registered on Florida plates 6D 13400, with service at the Assistenza Clienti continuing until later that spring, as the car eventually accumulated 15,438 miles in fast touring. It subsequently moved to the West Coast and was purchased by an individual residing in California. By 1970, the 275 GTB was owned by Bruce A. Jacobson, a Ferrari Club of America member who placed an ad in the June 1974 FCA Newsletter seeking information on his car’s history while beginning a restoration. Unfortunately, little work had been completed in that effort by the time of Jacobson’s untimely passing in 1976. The car passed to his widow, Sondra, who registered it on California plates as 66 GTB and sold it in January 1977 to retired U.S. pilot Jack Lierman. Mr. Lierman would retain the car until 2012. The Ferrari was subsequently given the restoration that Mr. Jacobson had begun, and it was finished in Azzurro over Nero, a combination that remains very attractive today. It is also equipped with the ANSA exhaust system bought for the car in the 1970s, as well as correct Borrani wire wheels. Under the hood remains clean, presentable, and well detailed, and the interior is in beautiful condition, with tight upholstery, clean gauge faces, a beautiful wood-rimmed steering wheel, and a general high level of fit, finish, and detail throughout. Underneath, the car shows some signs of driving enjoyment but little actual wear. The car was submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification, which has been awarded, with the “Red Book” expected to be received by the time of sale. It records 48,704 miles on the odometer at the time of cataloguing, a number which, given the relatively scant use of the car over the years, may well be original. A highly attractive and interestingly optioned 275 GTB, this Classiche-certified example would be a beautiful addition to any collection of the finest modern sporting cars. Addendum Please note that this car is Ferrari Classiche Certified with a correct replacement engine and gearbox. Chassis no. 07053 Engine no. 7053 Gearbox no. 188

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-01-28
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1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L 'Lusso' Berlinetta by Scaglietti

250 bhp, 2,953 cc DOHC V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. A lifelong “driver’s Ferrari” Single ownership for 46 years Meticulously maintained since new An exceptionally well-known Southern California example One of the finest Lussos in existence Matching-numbers engine THE LAST GREAT 250 GT The final iteration of Ferrari’s vaunted 250 GT was dubbed the 250 GT/L, with the “L” denoting Lusso (for luxury), and it was positioned as a pure luxury grand tourer, with distinctively elegant coachwork that was designed by Pininfarina and built by Scaglietti. The Lusso’s body, which was crafted from steel with an aluminum hood and doors, was a study in sports car perfection, and it remains one of the most celebrated automotive designs of all time. Gently curved fenders gave way to a sleek fastback Kamm tail, which was complemented by a generously glassed canopy and delicate, minimal brightwork. Mechanically, the GT/L rode on the 2,400-millimeter wheelbase chassis of its immediate predecessors, and it was powered by the same 2,953-cubic centimeter short-block V-12 that was designed by famed Ferrari engineer Gioacchino Colombo. This would be the last Ferrari V-12 road car to feature the 250-cubic-centimeter-sized cylinder, as displacement would increase to 275 cubic centimeters for the next development of road cars. Despite featuring essentially the same powerplant as its direct 250 GT forebears, the Lusso offered significant chassis upgrades, and more significantly, it included quite a bit of know-how gained from the SWB and GTO competition cars. These improvements principally consisted of the use of concentric springs around the telescopic shock absorbers and a Watts linkage to laterally stabilize the rear axle; both of these features were developed on the legendary race-winning GTO. The interior of the Lusso was as luxurious as the name implied, as it had leather-upholstered door panels and bucket seats and a completely unique dashboard arrangement that had never been offered on any other Ferrari. The console featured a large-dial tachometer and speedometer located in the central position and angled towards the driver, and five smaller gauges could be found in the traditional instrument panel location. The 250 GT/L concluded production in late 1964 and was built in a modest quantity of just 350 examples. It is the ultimate, luxurious version of the seminal 250 GT, and it has grown to become one of the most prized vintage Ferraris ever constructed. The Lusso represents a zenith for the platform, and it now routinely enjoys the focus of the world’s most discriminating Ferrari judges and collectors. LUSSO NUMBER 5179: A DRIVER’S FERRARI According to Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, chassis number 5179 was originally delivered to legendary Los Angeles dealership Otto Zipper Motors in 1964. It was driven for two years by its original owner, Peter Jennings, who then traded it back to Zipper for a new 275 GTB. While the Lusso was parked on Zipper’s showroom floor, it caught the passing eye of Larry Bloomer, who lived nearby. Mr. Bloomer spent nearly six months driving to the dealership on a daily basis and admiring the car, but he never “bit” on the purchase of it. When it suddenly disappeared one day, he stopped in and was told that the car was being detailed, as someone was coming in the next day to have a look at it. The next day, Mr. Bloomer arrived at Zipper Motors first thing in the morning and purchased the long-admired Lusso. To say that Mr. Bloomer got enjoyment out of his purchase would be an incredible understatement. He spent the next 46 years behind the wheel, serving two times as a president of the Ferrari Owners Club, taking tours all over the western United States, hill climbing in Virginia City, carrying the family on ski trips to Mammoth Mountain, and completing the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance in 2011. He did all of this after several years of using the Lusso as, simply, his commuter car, to get to and from work. The Lusso was extremely well cared for and survived its 46 years on the road well. Three years ago, in an effort to make the car present even more beautifully, Precision Auto Body, a well-regarded Los Angeles facility, stripped the body to bare metal and refinished it in its present metallic maroon while in Mr. Bloomer’s care. They also refinished the Borrani wire wheels and installed new Michelin tires. The interior was maintained as necessary over the years. While the center console and carpets were replaced many years ago, the door panels, dashboard leather, seats, and rear package shelf all remain original. The engine underwent a major rebuild about 3,000 miles ago, and it is now nicely broken-in. While the clutch and other normal wear items were replaced as required over the years, the transmission and differential have never been rebuilt, because they never required it. Remarkably, the chassis still wears its original “pebble” undercoat applied by the factory, and remains in good condition. The car is supplied with original belly pans and the original parts that have been replaced over the years, as well as with a 2003 Hemmings Vintage Ferrari calendar and Checkered Flag 200 Finish Line magazine, which feature the Lusso. This Lusso is being offered today by only its third owners from new, and it remains in wonderful, well-sorted mechanical order. It is being accompanied by not only its original Bill of Sale but also a large file of documentation that relates to its engine rebuild and paint. An RM specialist recently road-tested the car and reports, “There is something to be said about a car that has never been apart and lovingly cared for by one owner most of its life. No matter how thoroughly a car is restored, it never drives like an original car. Everything about it reminds me of that favorite baseball glove that is worked in just right and has the perfect amount of play. Don’t get me wrong, this car cosmetically looks like it could go to a show field and, indeed, has placed successfully in many, but it has those subtle, original touches that make it just right and give it the perfect element of class. It is not a trailer queen that looks the part then as soon as you step on the pedal it feels as though it is going to fall apart. This car feels like you could easily jump in and drive it 5,000 miles without a problem. This example definitely has it together; there are no squeaks or rattles, the handling is tight and the steering precise. It is an extremely well-balanced car, and the V-12 especially comes to life after 3,500 rpm. The brakes feel robust, and the transmission is fluid through all the gears. In my opinion, it has the perfect balance between cosmetic appeal and mechanical capability.” This prized Lusso is a genuine “driver’s Ferrari” that has been owned and treasured since new by men who appreciated it for its originality, its authenticity, its beauty, and its speed. Chassis no. 5179 GT Engine no. 5179 GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1952 Ferrari 342 America Cabriolet by Vignale

The first of six examples produced; among the rarest road-going Ferraris The only 342 America bodied by Vignale Exceptional open coachwork with special design features Equipped with its original numbers-matching engine Rarely seen in public since the 1970s Among the earliest “ultra-Ferraris” to wear the now-famous America nameplate, the 342 America was intended as an especially luxurious and powerful custom road car for the factory’s best clients. Built with an extended 2,650-mm wheelbase to accommodate the enlarged 200-hp Lampredi V-12, it saw a total production run of only six examples, for such clients as King Leopold of Belgium and Enzo Ferrari himself. It is unusual among road-going Ferraris in that each car was delivered with an even chassis number, carrying the suffix “AL” for “America Lungo,” and all had left-hand drive. Records indicate that 0232 AL was the very first 342 America built, and the first of three completed with cabriolet coachwork, in this case by Vignale, with the unique feature of slotted taillights recessed into the fenders. It was test-driven by the factory on 27 October 1952, and delivered to its first owner on 14 January 1953. Odofranco “Otto” Wild of Muri, Switzerland, was an early good customer of Ferrari, as well as an avid purchaser of other unusual coachbuilt European cars in this period. It is interesting to note that the car’s radiator bears a tag from a Zurich supplier, indicating that it may have been installed during this original ownership. The car was subsequently exported to the United States in the late 1950s or early 1960s, and acquired by T. Dan Smith of Los Angeles. In 1971, Smith sold the 342 America to longtime enthusiast Norman Snart of Hayward, California, for which it was registered in California as ‘NMB 316.’ By this time the car had been refinished in metallic silver and its bumpers had been removed. While Mr. Snart would own the car for the next two decades, it was very infrequently shown or displayed. One of the rarest exceptions was the FCA Pacific Region Ferrari Concours d’Elegance at Quail Lodge in 1992. He finally parted with the Ferrari in 2004, selling the car to Paul Forbes. The car was purchased later in 2007 by its current owners, and was restored in California in the current color scheme of metallic green and white, with a complementary white and green leather interior. At this time the dashboard was engine-turned and a front bumper with overriders fitted. Registering only 210 miles since its restoration, it has continued to remain largely hidden away, aside from infrequent exhibitions at various West Coast shows and museums. It has been featured in Marcel Massini’s book, Ferrari by Vignale, as well as in Cavallino no. 117 (p. 10), as part of recollections by Mr. Snart. Accompanying it are a correct spare wheel and tire, as well as a rear-view mirror. The opportunity to acquire a 342 America is necessarily extraordinarily rare, as only six examples were produced; to buy one with open coachwork is virtually impossible. Thus, the opportunity here is as rare as the car itself, and may be the only time for a dedicated tifosi to acquire a 342 America in his lifetime. Addendum Please note that engine is not currently running and will require further service work prior to operation. Chassis no. 0232 AL Engine no. 0232 AL Gearbox no. 3L

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1936 Lancia Astura Cabriolet Series III "Tipo Bocca" by Pinin Farina

82 bhp, 2,972 cc narrow-angle V-8 engine with Zenith 30 DVI twin-choke carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, front suspension with self-lubricating sliding pillars, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 122 in. Pinin Farina’s 1936 Milano Motor Show car; winner of the R.A.C.I. President’s Cup Displayed at the inaugural Concorso d’Eleganza, San Remo, May 1937 Believed to be the first of three or fewer PF cabriolets built on the short-wheelbase Corto chassis Unique coachwork designed by Mario Revelli di Beaumont for Pinin Farina Immaculate concours restoration TORRE ASTURA The Astura is the pinnacle of pre-war Lancias, placing it at the summit of pre-war Italian automotive engineering and design. Its combination of luxury and engineering refinement made it an ideal platform for coachbuilders, particularly in its more sporting Corto, or short-wheelbase version. Introduced in November 1931 as a replacement for Lancia’s flagship Dilambda, the new model represented a generational shift. Where the older model featured a 3,960-cubic centimeter engine moving 2,010 kilograms, the new car would retain the same length but would be lighter and more efficient – its new, reduced displacement engine nonetheless giving it a better power-to-weight ratio than the earlier car. Reflecting a new Italian nationalism, Lancia broke their precedent of assigning their cars the letters of the Greek alphabet and instead named the new model Astura, after an ancient island castle south of Rome. Although Lancia had pioneered monocoque construction in their 1922 Lambda, the Astura was destined for carrozzerie and was given a cross-braced box-section platform to allow wider design latitude. The model was initially offered in a single 125-inch wheelbase as the Tipo 230, but for the 3rd Series, two versions were offered. Nine hundred and eight were built as Lungo, with a wheelbase of 131 inches as the Tipo 233L, while 328 were constructed to Corto specification on a wheelbase of 122 inches as Tipo 233C. Notwithstanding its more conventional construction, like its predecessors the chassis had excellent torsional stiffness, which contributed to its feeling of solidity and refinement. The front suspension retained Lancia’s sliding-pillar independent suspension, while the live rear axle was controlled by friction dampers that could be adjusted to suit with dashboard-mounted controls. A Bijur central lubrication system was provided. The 3rd Series also received a Dewandre brake servo and a 78-liter fuel tank. An option for late cars was a hydraulic braking system, built by Marelli under license from Lockheed. As with the Dilambda that preceded it, the Astura was given a narrow-angle V-8 engine. Initially at 19-degrees with a displacement of 2,604 cubic centimeters and producing 73 brake horsepower at 4,000 rpm, by the introduction of the 3rd Series in 1933, it had grown to 2,972 cubic centimeters at an angle of 17-degrees 30-minutes, in which form it produced 82 brake horsepower at 4,000 rpm. The narrow-angle architecture made for a compact unit – narrower than a conventional V-8 and shorter than an inline – with a single cylinder head. The head itself was unusual in having a cast iron lower section and an aluminum upper section. In between is the camshaft driven by a triplex chain with tensioner. The engine also featured an Autokleen oil filter, a unit that rotated a cleaning cylinder every time the engine was started. Although the engine was inherently quite smooth, it was set into the chassis on four rubber isolators. Fitted with a factory berlina body, the 3rd Series Astura weighed 1,500 kilograms, while the bare coachbuilders’ platform came in at 960 kilograms. To ensure that the car delivered the performance its well-heeled buyers expected, Lancia recommended that coachbuilders limit bodywork weight to no more than 460 kilograms. Although not primarily a competition car, the 3rd Series Asturas did achieve some success in that realm. In 1934, a Castagna-bodied Astura was driven to 10th place in the Mille Miglia by Mario Nardilli and Carlo Pintacuda. Later that year the same pair won the Giro d’Italia, a six-day, 3,534-mile circuit around Italy, finishing the grueling event in 65 hours, 57 minutes, and 6 seconds at an average of 53.58 mph – a testament to the reliability and roadhandling of the model. Further reinforcing the car’s capability, another Astura driven by Giuseppe Farina and E. Oneto finished third. CHASSIS NUMBER 33-5313: LA BELLA MACHINA The present car, Tipo 233C chassis number 33-5313, is one of 328 Corto versions produced on the short-wheelbase 122-inch platform. Fitted with engine number 91-1171, it was delivered as a bare chassis to Pinin Farina in the summer of 1936 and clothed in a body designed by Mario Revelli di Beaumont, who took full advantage of the narrow-angle V-8 to create a rakish yet restrained cabriolet design, dubbed the Tipo Bocca. It was commissioned a Lancia dealer in Biella who ultimately ordered a total of six Bocca cabriolets in both corto and lungo chassis. The aerodynamic profile features a sloping, rounded grille, whose horizontal bars are interrupted by a dramatic “waterfall” of chrome strakes running from the slim, elegant bumper to the base of a vee’d windshield. The peaked front fenders are separated from the body by rounded fairings that feature individually integrated headlights and driving lights, while the rear fender spats also contribute to the clean, smooth lines. The open car’s streamlined horizontal emphasis is reinforced by a chrome strake running the entire length of the body as well as horizontal engine compartment vents, features that are accentuated when the halves of the split windshield are folded flat. Gently curving body sides feature an early use of curved side windows. Highlighting the car’s restrained elegance was its subtle, pale grey paint with blue upholstery and power-actuated convertible top, the latter a great novelty for 1936. The newly completed cabriolet was displayed on the Pinin Farina stand at the 1936 Salone del l’Automobile, Milano, where it received the President’s Cup from the Registro Ancetre Club Italia. Following the show, chassis number 33-5313 was acquired by Ghiara & C., Lancia’s main agent in Genoa. Ghiara sold the car to Cav. Piero Sanguineti, a local industrialist, for about 75,000 Lire (the equivalent of about $4,200 at the time). In May 1937, Sanguineti showed the car in the inaugural Concorso d’Eleganza per Automobili, San Remo, where it received a class award. The car was subsequently purchased by Emil Uebel, Lancia’s German distributor, who apparently kept it in his main facility in Berlin-Charlottenburg. Wartime records no longer exist, offering no explanation of whether Uebel sold the car or retained it for himself, or how and where the car survived the conflict. But survive, it certainly did, and in early 1947 it was acquired by American collector Barney Pollard, as part of a package deal with two steam locomotives. Pollard shipped number 33-5313 to the United States and kept the car until 1980, when it was sold to Armand Giglio, former President of the American Lancia Club. Giglio held the car a further two decades, selling it in 2004 to an owner in Connecticut. Other than an older repaint, the car was in largely original condition, but with some deterioration of the body’s wood framing. The new owner undertook restoration of the wood framing, as well as some body preparation work. In this state the car was sold in late 2011 to Orin Smith, who commissioned Vantage Motorworks of Miami to complete the restoration to international concours standards. The finished car easily achieved Best in Class at the Classic Sports Sunday at Mar-a-Lago, and People’s Choice here at Amelia Island, both in 2013. The Lancia subsequently journeyed back to Italy, where it was judged Most Sympathetic Restoration at the 2014 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, in the company of a thrilled Mr. and Mrs. Smith. More recently the car was exhibited at the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, as part of their “Rolling Sculpture” exhibit of advanced streamlined design. Notably, a sister car to this lovely Astura, in long-wheelbase form was awarded Best of Show at the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, cementing its importance to design and elegance for the era. This Lancia Astura ‘Corto’ cabriolet perfectly epitomizes Pinin Farina’s design of the pre-war period – restrained elegance with simple but precise details. As such, it represents an opportunity to acquire one of the most important and beautiful examples of Italian engineering and coachbuilding – a show car par excellence, now as then. Addendum Please note that the Elegance at Hershey has kindly extended an invitation for this car to attend their event on June 9-11, 2017. Please refer to an RM Sotheby's representative for additional information. Chassis no. 33-5313 Engine no. 91-1171

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
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1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

400 bhp, 2,855 cc DOHC mid-mounted V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers, Behr intercoolers, and Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,450 mm Spiritual successor to the 250 GTO One of only 272 examples; matching numbers throughout Delivered with power windows and air conditioning Compliant with U.S.A. EPA legislation Recent major service by Ferrari specialists THE GTO REINVENTED The Ferrari 250 GTO, considered by many to be the finest sports racer Ferrari had ever produced, is the stuff of legend. The car was aided by an incredible racing record and sensational driving dynamics, but it earned its reputation the hard way, through victories in the toughest races the world had to offer. For Ferrari to even consider reviving the legendary moniker, any new GTO would have to match or surpass the 250 GTO’s record in motorsport. The new GTO, commonly referred to as the 288 GTO, was born from the FIA Group B race and rally homologation regulations that had been introduced for 1984, meaning that, like many of the greatest racing cars in the past, it was built for the public largely so that racing versions could take to the track. Rules required a minimum of 200 road going examples to be built, but so great was the response from Ferrari’s most loyal and well-heeled customers that around 272 examples were built. Despite the fact that Group B was ultimately cancelled and Ferrari’s fully developed and homologated car had no series to compete in, it was clear from the outset that this was a very special car and that the 288 GTO was certainly not going to disappoint the brand’s fans or customers, even without a place to race. The car was styled by Pininfarina's Leonardo Fioravanti, the creator of the stunning 365 GTB/4 “Daytona”, and he later recalled Enzo Ferrari’s original design brief: “There was no specific instruction, just to produce a car based on the 308 GTB that could be used for racing”. Although clearly following design cues from the 308, the 288 GTO was much more aggressive-looking, and in a fitting tribute to the 250 GTO, the rear wings had three cooling slots behind the wheels. Perhaps surprisingly, the road going 288 GTO was no spartan racer inside, as it boasted leather-upholstered Kevlar-framed bucket seats, optional air conditioning, electric windows, an AM/FM radio-cassette player, and a dashboard filled with a 10,000-rpm tachometer, a turbo boost gauge, oil temperature and pressure gauges, and a water temperature gauge. The fact that the 288 GTO could reach a huge top speed of 189 mph was simply another reason for its almost guaranteed success, as it made the 288 GTO the fastest road car ever produced at the time of its unveiling,. CHASSIS NUMBER 52475 According to the research of noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, the factory issued the certificate of origin for this 288 GTO, chassis number 52475, on 30 January 1985, and it was first registered on 6 February by Crepaldi Autos, of Milan. This early European-specification example has spent the majority of its early life in Italy. It wears body number 6 and is one of the earliest 288 GTOs manufactured during the limited production run. Additionally, it was delivered new with desirable power windows and air conditioning. As one would expect of perhaps the most special Ferrari produced for many years, and one under keen and enthusiastic ownership, this outstanding 288 GTO was a regular participant in many Ferrari gatherings. These included the Ferrari Parade of Crepaldi at Monza in September 1986 and an appearance in Autoluce’s 1987 calendar. In 1987, under the ownership of Mr Fausto Pieroni, of Modena, 52475 took part in the 25th Anniversary GTO celebration at Mas du Clos in France, and it again took part in the Crepaldi parade in Monza. That same year, having travelled just 6,000 kilometres, 52475 attended the 40 Years of Ferrari gathering at Imola. Throughout its early life in Italy, this stunning GTO was regularly maintained by Motor Service S.r.l., and 10 years later, it attended Ferrari’s 50th anniversary meeting in Modena. After passing through several new owners, 52475 was purchased by a Southern California-based collector of rare and modern road cars that were specifically engineered for racing. Upon arrival in the United States, the car was modified to meet U.S.A. EPA legislation. Later, this owner was able to fulfil his passion and build a collection that included such vehicles as Lamborghinis, a Porsche 959, an F50, and two F40s (including the F40 GT raced by the Monte Shell team). Adding a 288 GTO to his stable was perhaps the icing on the cake. As a Ferrari race team owner, it comes as no surprise that this owner had his own personal staff of mechanics, who have serviced this 288 GTO throughout his long-term ownership. Indeed, 52475 was garaged throughout his ownership and only saw the light of day to participate in regular charity events, where it was always transported to rather than arriving under its own power. By this owner’s estimate, 52475 covered only around 300 miles during his ownership of more than a decade. This GTO, now showing just 31,000 miles on its odometer, has recently benefitted from a major service by a renowned Ferrari specialist in the UK, with the work including upgrading the cam belts and installing new tyres, . This incredible limited-production Ferrari is also offered with its original books and tools. The 288 GTO was the first in a series of limited-edition Ferrari supercars, which eventually culminated into the recent LaFerrari. Whilst many supercars lose their appeal over time, the analogue 288 GTO stands almost alone in having its reputation enhanced, and its appeal is now greater than ever. 400 cv, 2.855 cc doppio albero a camme in testa, motore V-8 con due turbine IHI, intercooler Behr, iniezione elettronica Weber-Marelli, cambio manuale a 5 rapporti, sospensioni indipendenti e 4 freni a disco ventilati. Passo: 2.450 mm • La succeditrice spirituale della 250 GTO • Solo 272 esemplari prodotti; completamente matching numbers • Dotata di alzacristalli elettrici ed aria condizionata • Conforme alla normativa U.S.A. EPA • Recentemente revisionata da specialisti del Marchio Ferrari LA GTO RINATA La 250 GTO è considerata da molti come la Ferrari da corsa meglio riuscita e gode di una fama leggendaria. Caratterizzata da un'incredibile presenza nelle gare di inizio anni 60 ed essendo dotata di una sensazionale dinamica di guida, si è giustamente guadagnata la sua reputazione con vittorie nelle gare più difficili e massacranti del mondo. Affinché la Ferrari facesse un nuovo modello degno della sigla GTO, avrebbe dovuto fare una macchina capace di eguagliare o superare il record della 250 GTO nelle competizioni. La nuova GTO, comunemente indicata come 288 GTO, nacque dai regolamenti FIA del 1984 per le omologazioni del Gruppo B per auto da rally e da pista. Ciò indicava che come per le grandi macchine da corsa del passato era costruita in serie per il pubblico in modo che le versioni preparate da gara potessero essere ammesse alle competizioni internazionali. I regolamenti imponevano come minimo una produzione di 200 esemplari, ma questa macchina riscosse un tale successo fra i clienti più affezionati e facoltosi della Ferrari che alla fine vennero costruiti ben 272 esemplari. Sebbene il Gruppo B fu poi soppresso e la macchina sviluppata ed omologata dalla Ferrari non avrebbe avuto alcuna categoria in cui competere, la 288 GTO rimaneva un'auto straordinaria che non avrebbe mai deluso nessun ammiratore o cliente della Ferrari, anche se non sarebbe mai scesa in pista. Lo stile della macchina fu realizzato da Leonardo Fioravanti della Pininfarina, lo stesso disegnatore dell'incredibile 365 GTB/4 Daytona. Egli ricordò così le direttive originali di Enzo Ferrari su come avrebbe dovuto essere la macchina: "non c'erano istruzioni specifiche, si trattava solo di costruire un'auto basata sulla 308 GTB che potesse essere usata per le gare". Sebbene si fossero seguiti gli stilemi della 308, la 288 GTO era caratterizzata da un aspetto più aggressivo. Come omaggio alla 250 GTO furono messe 3 alette di sfogo del calore motore dietro le ruote posteriori. Può sorprendere che la 288 non aveva un interno spartano tipico delle auto da corsa purosangue, ma era aveva sedili a guscio, in pelle, con intelaiatura in kevlar ed erano offerti optional anche aria condizionata, alzacristalli elettrici e radio AM/FM con mangiacassette. Il cruscotto era completo di un tachimetro con fondoscala a 10.000 giri, indicatori di temperatura e pressione di acqua ed olio. Al momento della sua presentazione, la 288 GTO era l'auto di serie più veloce in assoluto, capace di raggiungere la ragguardevole velocità massima di 304 km/h. Ciò ne garantì il successo commerciale immediato. IL NUMERO DI TELAIO 52475 Secondo le ricerche svolte dal noto storico Ferrari Marcel Massini, la Fabbrica ha rilasciato per questa 288 GTO telaio numero 53475 un certificato di originalità in data 30 Gennaio 1985 e fu immatricolata per la prima volta il 6 febbraio dello stesso anno dalla Crepaldi Auto di Milano. Questo esemplare consegnato con specifiche europee ha passato la maggior parte della sua vita in Italia. Il numero di identificazione è il 6 e questo la posiziona fra le prime 288 GTO prodotte. La macchina è stata consegnata da nuova già fornita con aria condizionata e alzacristalli elettrici. Essendo una delle Ferrari più importanti e speciali prodotte negli ultimi anni , questa 288 GTO è stata posseduta per anni da un vero appassionato che la iscrisse regolarmente ai raduni ed eventi Ferrari. Fra questi eventi la macchina ha partecipato alla parata Ferrari della Crepaldi a Monza nel settembre 1986 e vanta una presenza nel calendario Autoluce del 1987. Sempre nello stesso anno il telaio numero 52475 partecipò insieme al Proprietario, il Sig. Fausto Pieroni di Modena, al 25esimo anniversario della GTO presso Mas du Clos in Francia e ancora una volta alla parata Ferrari di Crepaldi. Sempre nell '87, dopo una percorrenza di soli 6.000 km, la 52475 partecipò al grande raduno ad Imola per i 40 anni della Ferrari. Nel corso della sua permanenza in Italia, questa meravigliosa GTO fu regolarmente manutentata dalla Motor Service S.r.l. e partecipò 10 anni più tardi al raduno dei 50 anni della Ferrari a Modena. Dopo essere stata venduta e passata per più proprietari, la 52475 fu acquistata da un collezionista americano della California del Sud specializzato in auto rare e moderne, tutte strettamente derivate dal mondo delle corse. Una volta giunta negli Stati Uniti, la macchina fu modificata per essere conforme alle normative dell' EPA americana. Questo proprietario realizzò il suo sogno di mettere insieme una collezione di auto di prestigio comprendente delle Lamborghini, una Porsche 959, una F50 e due F40 (inclusa la versione GT portata in gara dal team Monte Shell). L'aggiunta della 288 GTO alla suo garage costituì forse la ciliegina sulla torta. Essendo il proprietario di un team corse Ferrari non deve sorprendere se la macchina sia stata mantenuta da uno staff privato di meccanici, che hanno provveduto a tenere in ottima forma questa GTO nel corso della sua permanenza a lungo termine nelle mani dello stesso proprietario. Nonostante ciò, il telaio numero 52475 fu tenuto fermo in garage per la maggior parte del tempo e fu usata solo per partecipare regolarmente ad eventi di beneficienza, dove è sempre stata trasportata e non è mai stata usata su strada. Stando alle stime del proprietario, questo esemplare ha percorso solo 300 miglia nei 10 anni in cui l'ha posseduta. Questa GTO segna solo 31.000 miglia sull'odometro ed è stata recentemente sottoposta ad una completa revisione da un noto specialista Ferrari nel Regno Unito, il quale ha installato nuove cinghie di distribuzione e montato gomme nuove. Questa magnifica Ferrari in produzione limitata è fornita anche dei suoi libretti originali e kit degli attrezzi. La 288 GTO è stata la prima delle serie speciali limitate Ferrari, culminate con la recente LaFerrari. Sebbene molte supercar perdano il loro appeal nel tempo, l'analogica 288 GTO è un caso a sé stante, in quanto ha incrementato negli anni la propria bellezza e il proprio valore, giunto ad un picco massimo negli anni recenti. Chassis no. ZFFPA16B000052475 Engine no. 90 Body no. 6 Gearbox no. 85

  • CANCanada
  • 2015-05-23
Hammer price
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Matching numbers Highly original and preserved One owner for the past 28 years 1964 PORSCHE 904 GTS

1964 PORSCHE 904 GTS Chassis no. 904-098 Engine no. 99090 1,966cc DOHC Flat 4-Cylinder Engine Dual Weber Carburetors 180bhp at 7,200rpm 5-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *Highly original and minimally used example of a Porsche racing legend *Raced sparingly yet successfully during 1964 and 1965 and then tugged away and preserved *Current 27-year period of ownership and just two low-mileage caretakers totaling 48 years *Retaining original matching-numbers 4-cam Carrera engine *Documented with factory Kardex and listed in several marquee books THE PORSCHE 904 GTS 'The final sports racing expression of the Porsche four-cylinder line came in 1964 with the arrival of the 904 GTS Coupe. It not only took the first two places in that year's Targa Florio event but was also second in the 1965 Monte Carlo Rally and scored a host of class wins, in addition to numerous other competition successes.' – Jonathan Wood, Porsche: The Legend. Having axed its expensive Formula 1 program at the end of 1962, a commitment that placed a heavy burden on the German manufacturer's limited technical resources, Porsche turned once more to sports car racing as a means of improving and marketing its road car range. The Type 356-based Abarth-Carreras had flown the Porsche flag in international GT racing during the early 1960s, but an entirely new design was now deemed necessary to meet the strengthening opposition. A minimum of 100 road-usable cars had to be made to meet the FIA's homologation requirements, a stipulation that made a complex spaceframe design like the Type 718 RSK a non-starter, so Porsche's Technical Director, Dr. Hans Tomala started with a clean sheet. Colin Chapman's revolutionary Lotus Elite, with its fiberglass body/chassis, had demonstrated the potential of composite materials for structural use in cars, and this technology was embraced in the design of Porsche's new mid-engined GT racer, the Type 904. Tomala though, opted for a chassis comprising a pair of steel, cross-braced, box sections, to which the fiberglass bodyshell was bonded. The engine and suspension were bolted directly to the steel structure, thereby reducing the transmission of noise and vibration to the passenger compartment, problems that had afflicted the all-composite Elite. Designed by Ferry Porsche's eldest son, 'Butzi', the body was manufactured by the Heinkel aircraft company and is widely recognized as one of Porsche's most elegant, while the Zuffenhausen firm's recent Formula 1 experience was reflected in the 904's state-of-the-art suspension, which featured double wishbones all round. Although developed at the same time as Porsche's new Type 901 six-cylinder road car, which would enter production in 1964 as the 911, the 904 used the 356 Carrera 2's tried and tested Type 587 2.0-liter four-cam, four-cylinder engine. The new six would not be ready in time in any case, but with an eye on future developments, the 904's engine bay was made big enough to accommodate it, as well as the 2-liter version of the F1 flat eight. In road trim, the 587/2 produced 155bhp, with 180 horsepower available when fitted with the full racing exhaust system. The five-speed transaxle incorporated internals developed for the 911's transmission, but used a different casing that reflected the 904's mid-engined layout. The 904 made its competition debut in the USA in February 1964 when an example entered in the prototype class at Daytona failed to finish. At Sebring in March, the 904 scored its first international success, the Cunningham/Underwood car winning its class and finishing 9th overall behind a multitude of Ferraris. While the small-capacity Porsches had always struggled to match the pace of the larger-engined opposition on fast tracks, at the punishing Sicilian Targa Florio, which was run along the lines of a tarmac rally, the nimble 2-liter cars were at much less of a disadvantage. Indeed, the German manufacturer had won the Sicilian classic on three occasions since the race first formed part of the World Sportscar Championship in 1958, and the 904 underlined its pedigree by scoring a debut win in the hands of Colin Davis and Antonio Pucci. In May, Ben Pon and Gunther Koch took 3rd place at the Nürburgring 1,000kms in a production 904, while at Le Mans all five 904s entered finished, the highest in 7th place overall. The 904's attraction as a competitive customer car was further underlined at the Reims 12 Hours where eight finished in the top 20, the highest in 5th place. Its exceptional versatility was demonstrated at the start of the 1965 season when the Böhringer/Wütherich 904 finished 2nd overall in the Monte Carlo Rally. There would be no classic endurance racing victories for the Porsche 904 in '65 however, although the car secured numerous podium finishes and continued to dominate its class. Lightweight, spyder-bodied versions were developed for the European Hill-Climb Championship, but even here the compromises enforced by the regulations prevailing at the time of the 904's design told against it. It had been intended to build a second series of 100 904s powered by the 911's six-cylinder engine for 1965, but a change in the homologation requirements made Porsche realize that such a car would not be competitive and the plan was abandoned. The 904's successor would be an all-new 2-litre sports car – the Carrera 6. Of the 120 model 904s produced, 104 were completed with the four-cylinder engine while ten were fitted with the 911's six and a further half-dozen used the F1-type flat eight. The 904's star may have burned only briefly, but it was both bright and glorious. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This remarkably original 904 GTS benefits from several long-term owners, as well as very minimal use over the last 48 years. According to a copy on file of the factory Kardex built sheet, 904-098 was equipped new with engine no. 99090, a Type 587/3 Carrera motor. Shod with Dunlop tires, the 904 GTS was dispatched on June 5, 1964, finished in hellelfenbein (light ivory) paint and upholstered with a blue cloth interior. According to marque authority Jerry Pantis, it is the only 904 to leave the factory painted ivory. Distributed to the famed Brumos Porsche of Jacksonville, Florida, this 904-098 was initially acquired by local resident J.L. Brundage before quickly passing to Ted Tidwell, also of Jacksonville. Mr. Tidwell embarked on a brief but successful racing campaign, placing second in the E-modified class at the SCCA event at Bainbridge, Georgia, in September 1964. Around the same time, the car came in first at the Chimney Rock Hillclimb, where it reportedly set a new record. At the season's conclusion, Tidwell had finished 6th in points in the E Modified class. In April 1965, 904-098 finished 9th overall and second in the 2-liter GT Class at the Pensacola USRRC event, while at Savannah Effingham later that year the car finished first in the A Production class. These strong results combined to propel Tidwell to a 4th-place finish in season points. Tidwell reportedly switched to another 904 around this time, and in November 1965 he offered 904-098 for sale. The rare 904 GTS soon passed to two different dealership principals who exhibited it as a display piece on their respective showroom floors. The first of these was Rip Ridley of Ithaca, New York, who sold the original engine to a buyer in Ohio. The second dealer, Skip Callahan of GT Motorcars in Norwalk, Connecticut, installed a Type 547/4 Carrera motor originally used in a 550 Spyder, and it is believed that he also applied the current paint finish in dark blue with a single white racing stripe and numbering circles. In November 1968, the relatively unused 904 GTS was acquired by Bruce Herrington of Virginia (later of El Toro, California), who noted that the odometer displayed only 1,900 miles when he conducted a pre-purchase test drive. Because the car had been exclusively raced and exhibited it was never registered for road use, and Herrington finally convinced the Virginia DMV to issue a registration in April 1969. Two months later he married a woman with four children, and having little time to seriously drive (and fearing for the Porsche's outcome!), he domiciled the racing machine for nearly twenty years. Of course the 904 begged for use on occasion, so Herrington would enjoy it for brief drives through rural Virginia, and once took it to a PCA event at the Marlboro Raceway where he happily remembers the car cornering like a go-kart. In 1989 the rare GTS was offered for sale for the first time in over two decades, and it was then acquired by broker Werner Schoch (a Swiss national living in Southern California) in conjunction with 904 expert Heinz Heinrichs. At the time, the consignor, a Porsche collector from Denmark, had determined to locate an original unrestored 904, and to this end he had reached out to marque collector Jim Barrington of San Francisco. Two weeks later, he received notice from Barrington that 904-098 was available, and a vacation to Hawaii was re-routed to Southern California, where a purchase was arranged. Since being imported to Denmark, the Porsche has been dutifully maintained. Most importantly, in 1992 the owner acquired and re-installed the original 4-cam motor, engine no. 99090, which had come into the possession of period racing driver Warren Eads (ex-Type 718 RSK Spider, chassis no. 718-033) and was rebuilt by his mechanic, the respected Carrera expert and onetime driver Al Cadrobi. Since then, this 904 GTS was only occasionally enjoyed for gentle cruises in the Danish countryside. Though the reset odometer currently displays 2,249 miles, it is estimated that the car has accumulated approximately 7,750 actual miles. 904-098 remains in highly original and un-molested condition throughout, and has been spared from crashes or neglect. The cars original interior remains in situ, and the original fiberglass body and chassis construction intact. Very few sports racing cars of any kind, can boast such qualities. Now inviting consideration by serious Porsche connoisseurs whom are missing the legendary 904 in their collection, this pristine low-mileage sports racing icon would crown most collections, and is sure to be welcomed at PCA corrals, major concours d'elegance, and vintage racing events.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
Hammer price
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1932 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3 Monoposto

265hp 2,992cc dual overhead camshaft inline eight-cylinder engine, twin Roots superchargers; live axle front suspension with semi-elliptical leaf springs, live axle rear suspension, twin torque tube drive to bevel gears with semi-elliptical leaf springs and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,650mm Vittorio Jano joined Alfa Romeo in 1923 from FIAT where he had worked on the Type 405 Grand Prix engine. His first charge from Nicola Romeo was to design a competitive grand prix car. Designated the P2, it had an eight-cylinder engine of 1,987cc, dual overhead camshafts and a small Roots supercharger running at 1.33 times crankshaft speed. The small blower gave, according to Lawrence Pomeroy’s The Grand Prix Car, 0.7 atmospheres boost, and the engine produced 156hp at 5500 rpm. In its first racing appearance Giuseppe Campari’s P2 outran Europe’s best including Bugatti, Fiat, Delage, Miller and Sunbeam at the 503 mile 1924 European GP at Lyon and conclusively established Alfa Romeo’s sporting reputation. The P2 was a consistent grand prix winner through 1929. Its 1925 World Championship is the reason why every subsequent Alfa’s badge is surrounded by the laurel wreath of victory. When the bar was raised for the 1931 season, Jano created two very different automobiles. One, the Tipo A, was powered by a pair of 6C 1750 engines mounted side-by-side and driving the rear wheels through a pair of transmissions, driveshafts and differentials into a single solid rear axle. The Tipo A was powerful, but its complication brought unreliability and its career was short. The other was an eight-cylinder based on the bore and stroke of his six-cylinder 1750. Intended for both sports and grand prix competition, Jano used two pairs of fourcylinder aluminum blocks with steel cylinder liners and detachable aluminum double overhead camshaft cylinder heads. The camshafts were driven by a helical gear train between the pair of blocks to minimize inertial loadings and torsional cam timing variations. With the 6C 1750’s 65x88mm bore and stroke the eight displaced 2,336cc. It breathed through a single Roots supercharger and dual throat Memini carburetor and produced 178hp at 5,400rpm. Designated 8C 2300, it earned the nickname it bears to this day, “Monza”, when 1924 Lyon winner, the stocky baritone Campari, teamed with the diminutive and mercurial Figlio del Diavolo, Tazio Nuvolari, to win the 10 hour 1931 Italian GP at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza. While the 8C 2300 was eminently successful in the 1931 season, a new 750kg formula for 1932 convinced Alfa Romeo a new car was necessary. THE ALFA ROMEO TIPO B “P3” Putting the complicated Tipo A behind him, Jano returned to proven principles for the 1932 Tipo B, designing his first purposebuilt grand prix car around the demonstrated effectiveness of the Monza but with attention to detail and execution that made it Alfa’s greatest single seat grand prix car. The Tipo B retained the Monza’s layout but cast the cylinders and heads integrally in the fixed head, testa fissa, configuration that had proven successful with the 6C racers. The centrally located camshaft drive gear train used straight cut gears for more precise timing. Also driven from the center of the crankshaft were two small Roots superchargers, each with its own Weber carburetor and supplying four cylinders. Jano recognized that smaller superchargers put less stress on the engine, had less rotational inertia and were more thermally efficient. Crankcase and sump were cast in magnesium, one of Jano’s objectives being to reduce the engine’s weight. Initially displacing 2,654cc, it produced 180hp at 5600rpm with 0.75 atmospheres boost. The Tipo B’s chassis was equally based on proven principles but conceived and executed with attention to road-holding and lightness. The chassis layout was conventional, with solid axles front and rear sprung by semi-elliptic leaf springs, however, great attention was paid to keeping all masses low and unsprung weight to a minimum. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the rear axle drive system. Drawing on the Tipo A’s split drive arrangement, Jano placed the differential at the back of the Tipo B’s transmission with two short driveshafts running at angles to simple bevel gears just inside each rear wheel driving stub axles. The axle tube itself was very light and the centrally located driver could sit low, between the two driveshafts. Ferrari’s factory-entered Tipo Bs dominated grand prix racing in 1932. At the time Alfa consistently referred to these monopostos as Tipo B, but never objected to the public’s and journalists’ use of “P3”, a designation that could only remind competitors of the Alfa P2’s grand prix domination. It was the best kind of advertising hyperbole – that backed up with performance – and it is as the P3 that the Alfa Romeo Tipo B is best known through its long and successful history. ALFA ROMEO TIPO B “P3” GRAND PRIX HISTORY 1932 The P3 quite literally obliterated its competition in the 1932 season, winning seemingly at will and frequently backed up by Monzas in GP configuration. Its first appearance came at the Italian GP at Monza on June 5. While in earlier years grands prix had been 10 hour races, along with other revised regulations the three Championship races, the Italian, French and German GPs, were held over a length of “only” five hours, a sprint race by the standards of the day. New and daunting cars were built for the 1932 formula by the major constructors. Maserati unleashed a 4,904cc twin-engined monster, the V5, powered by a pair of eightcylinder 26M engines which it entrusted to the great Luigi Fagioli. Bugatti countered with two supercharged 4,972cc Type 54s driven by Louis Chiron and Achille Varzi. The Alfa Romeos were entered by Scuderia Ferrari, the private team supported by wealthy Italian sportsmen and managed by Enzo Ferrari that had been established in 1929 to campaign Alfa Romeos in grand prix and sports car competition. Two P3s were built by Alfa Romeo at Portello and prepared by Scuderia Ferrari for the Italian GP at Monza where they were driven by Tazio Nuvolari and Giuseppe Campari, backed up by four Monzas for Borzacchini, Caracciola, Ghersi and Siena. An epic battle ensued, one of the most stirring in an era of great races. First Nuvolari in the P3 and Chiron in the Bugatti swapped the lead. Shortly, however, they were surpassed by Fagioli in the twin-engined Maserati. After Chiron’s retirement Nuvolari and Fagioli engaged in a see-saw battle, the lightweight 2.9 liter P3 against the monster Maserati, until the day was carried by the incomparable Nuvolari in Jano’s lithe monoposto Alfa, repeating the P2’s accomplishment of achieving victory in its first competitive appearance. Three Alfa Romeo P3s driven by Nuvolari, Caracciola and Borzacchini appeared at the French GP, the oldest and most prestigious race of the season, this year held at Rheims. They were opposed only by Bugatti which presented two Type 54’s for Varzi and Divo and a 2.3 liter Type 51 for Chiron. Ten privately-entered Alfas and Bugattis filled out the sixteen car field. At the end of the day the P3s swept the board with Nuvolari first, followed by Borzacchini and Caracciola. The third race of the 1932 Championship series, the German GP at the daunting Nürburgring likewise saw the P3s sweep the podium with Caracciola taking his home GP under team orders, leading Nuvolari and Borzacchini. The P3 captured a succession of other victories; during the whole 1932 season it was defeated only once when Nuvolari’s magneto was swamped in a rain-drenched Czechoslovakian GP at Brno on September 4 and repeated pit stops dropped the Flying Mantuan and his P3 to third at the finish. 1933 Only six P3s were built by Alfa Romeo for the 1932 season and after the devastation they wreaked on the competition, Alfa, now in financial difficulty and nationalized as part of the Istituto Ricostruzione Industriale, officially withdrew from racing. The P3s were stored in Portello and Scuderia Ferrari competed with 8C Monzas increased in displacement to 2,632cc. They, however, were not competitive with the dedicated grand prix machines from Bugatti and Maserati and Enzo Ferrari finally pried the P3s out of the factory’s hands. Their first appearance was at the Coppa Acerbo on August 13. Luigi Fagioli in the P3 faced off against Nuvolari, now driving his own three liter Maserati, and once again the P3 was victorious. Fagioli also snatched victory in the Italian GP at Monza on September 10th but in the Monza GP Campari in the Alfa P3 was killed in an accident on the first lap of the second heat. The P3s took further victories, including Chiron’s wins in Czechoslovakia and Spain and Motor Sport’s unofficial tally of manufacturers’ points at the season’s end saw Alfa Romeo the decisive leader. 1934 Following the 1933 season Alfa Romeo announced it would build a limited series of enhanced P3s with 2,905cc displacement making 255bhp at 5,400rpm. Initially slated for delivery to clients, Enzo Ferrari succeeded in convincing Alfa Romeo to restrict availability of the 1934 P3s only to Italian clients, effectively locking up the new P3s for Scuderia Ferrari. In addition to more power the 1934 P3s also had improved chassis with hydraulic brakes, hydraulic shock absorbers at the rear along with friction dampers and a wider cockpit to meet regulations, but at the cost of an increase in weight although still well under the 750kg maximum allowed by the GP rules. Eventually some nine of these 1934 Alfa Romeo P3s were built while the earlier P3s were updated to meet the 1934 regulations. Ferrari entered five 2.9 liter P3s for the Monaco GP driven by Varzi, Chiron, Guy Moll, Lehoux and Count Trossi, Scuderia Ferrari’s President. Ranged against them were three of the new Type 59 Bugattis for Dreyfus, Wimille and Nuvolari and a selection of Maseratis. Intruding on the scene, but not an official entrant, was Caracciola who took demonstration laps in the newest Mercedes-Benz GP car, a hint of things to come in the increasingly nationalistic grand prix competition. Count Trossi, whose position as the President of Scuderia Ferrari was not an honorary one, set the fastest practice time which gave him the pole position in the first grand prix in which the starting grid was set by time rather than by a drawing. Rene Dreyfus took the lead in his Type 59 Bugatti at the start but was quickly passed by Louis Chiron who drove with verve, building his lead lap after lap. He was eventually pursued by Phillipe Étancelin driving his year-old Maserati 8CM until a mid-race accident sidelined the charging Maserati. Nuvolari, also in a Bugatti Type 59, and Piero Taruffi in one of the Scuderia Ferrari Alfa P3s tussled mid-race until they encountered mechanical problems. Through it all the young Guy Moll, in his first race for Scuderia Ferrari, drove consistently and eventually rose through the pack to lie second behind the great Chiron. Guy Moll was nearly two months shy of his 24th birthday when he took his first start as a member of Scuderia Ferrari. An Algerian, like fellow Scuderia Ferrari driver Marcel Lehoux, he had first risen to prominence two years before, driving Lehoux’s Bugatti to 3rd place in the Czechoslovakian Grand Prix. Moll acquired a 2.6 liter Alfa Romeo Monza in 1933 and showed a blend of consistency and quickness, which marked him as an up-and-coming driver. He was one of the private entrants who sent a deposit to Alfa Romeo for a customer P3 but unlike most of the disappointed privateers, when Alfa decided to restrict the P3s to Scuderia Ferrari Moll, along with his countryman and patron Lehoux were added to the team. Showing fine balance between speed and reliability, Moll pursued the veteran Chiron, who had built his lead to nearly two minutes, almost a full lap, through the streets of Monaco. Then, on the penultimate lap of the 100 circuit race, Chiron miscalculated at the station hairpin and entangled his P3 in the sandbag barrier. It took him nearly three minutes to extricate the Alfa while Moll swept by and took the victory by just over a minute. Dreyfus’s Bugatti interrupted a P3 train, finishing 3rd ahead of Lehoux, both a lap in arrears to Moll and Chiron. The P3 swept the podium spots a total of four times in 1934 at Tripoli (Varzi, Moll, Chiron), Penya Rhin (Varzi, Chiron, Lehoux), the French GP (Chiron, Varzi and Count Trossi (with relief from Guy Moll)) and the GP de la Marne at Rheims (Chiron, Moll and Varzi/Marinoni). At Bordino the P3s were 1-2 (Varzi, Chiron) with Tadini 3rd in a 2.6 liter Monza. One of the more remarkable P3 wins came when Achille Varzi won the Targa Florio. Guy Moll continued to run fast and carefully planned races, taking an important victory on the German teams’ home turf at the Avus-Rennen on the day before his 24th birthday in a special streamlined 3.2 liter Alfa Romeo P3. In the Coppa Ciano on July 22 Varzi and Moll battled throughout the 241 km event. The veteran Varzi eventually took the victory, but Moll’s talent and race-craft were now thoroughly evident. At the Coppa Acerbo held on the 16 mile Pescara circuit on August 15 the German teams appeared in force with three of the eight-cylinder supercharged W25’s putting 350hp in the hands of Caracciola, Fagioli and champion motorcycle rider Ernst Jacob Henne and two 16- cylinder 295hp Auto Union Type A’s in the hands of Hans Stuck and Wilhelm Sebastian up against the 255hp Alfas. Their performance decisively showed where the rest of the season was headed, particularly the Mercedes team which were both fast and quick. The race started on a wet track exploited by Caracciola who set a blistering pace. Stuck, Varzi and Fagioli (Auto Union, Alfa P3 and Mercedes respectively) battled for second until Caracciola was caught by a rain shower and crashed. Fagioli now led but had to pit for tires. The new leader? Guy Moll. A fuel stop dropped Moll to third behind Varzi (who had taken over Pietro Ghersi’s Alfa P3) and Fagioli which became second when Varzi pitted for new tires. Running hard with only two laps of the 20-lap contest remaining, Moll came up to lap Henne in the Mercedes W25 on the Montesilvano straight. The Alfa twitched, some say blown off its course by the sirocco wind off the Adriatic Sea, spun off course, bounced through a ditch, hit a bridge and finally was arrested nearly a quarter mile away by the wall of a barn. Guy Moll, only twenty-four and the rising star of Scuderia Ferrari, died shortly thereafter A brilliant career was cut short, but not before accomplishing a feat – winning his first grand prix with a factory team – that few others have achieved. In Guy Moll’s case it came, further, at the age of only 23, in an era when experienced drivers enjoyed a distinct advantage. Guy Moll’s 1934 Monaco Grand Prix victory was an accomplishment that remained unmatched for well over a half-century – winning his first grand prix at the age of 23 years, 314 days. ALFA ROMEO TIPO B (P3) S/N 5006 The few surviving records from Scuderia Ferrari in the thirties do not identify which cars were driven in the many races that the Scuderia contested, (frequently more than one on a given weekend). The team was in business both to satisfy its patrons’ desire to compete and to appear as often as possible in its quest for starting and prize money. Ferrari used at least seven P3s in the 1934 season, with races and hillclimbs coming on successive weekends throughout Europe and North Africa. What is settled, however, is that the car offered here, chassis 5006, stamped with the Scuderia Ferrari identification SF33, was one of the first P3s built in 1932. It would have been actively employed by Scuderia Ferrari throughout the 1932-1934 seasons, and has been consistently described since just after World War II as the “1934 Monaco Winner”, a conclusion supported by period photos of Guy Moll at Monaco driving a P3 with features that are shared by 5006/SF33 With the advent of the fully independent suspension Alfa Romeo 8C-35 in 1935, 5006/SF33 was sold to Raphael Bethenod de Las Casas who raced under the pseudonym Georges Raph. He employed 5006/SF33 for the balance of the thirties throughout Europe, retiring it as the clouds of World War II darkened the skies of the continent. Following the war it was acquired by Anthony Powys-Lybbe in England who raced it with some success, winning the Wakefield Trophy at Curragh outside Dublin in both 1949 and 1953 and taking the Frank O’Boyle Trophy at Dundrod in Ulster in 1950. John Vesey acquired it sometime later, contesting VSCC events in 1955, then it was purchased by W.H. “Bill” Summers, one of the preeminent early British collections who, with Peter Waller, raced it into the sixties It is believed that it was during Summers’ ownership that 5006/SF33’s engine failed during a race weekend in Rouen in France. At some point thereafter, another original P3 engine was fitted, this one the rear engine from the Bimotore, a twin engine experimental grand prix car that – while brutally fast – was too heavy and too hard on tires to find success on the racetrack. (The Bimotore had been dismantled, although it has since been restored by the Donnington collection, in whose care it remains today.) The next owner of 5006/SF33 was Neil Corner, whose collection of avidly raced and demonstrated historic GP machines is legendary. The originality, continuous history and exemplary condition of 5006/SF33 appealed to Corner, not to mention the performance of its engine and chassis, and he regularly used it in historic race events as well as lending it for display in the famed Donington Collection. After nearly two decades in Corner’s collection 5006/SF33 was sold to a Japanese collector in the early 1980s where it remained, carefully displayed and maintained without regard to cost, until 2000. It is no trailer queen, but rather a potent, historic example of the finest grand prix car of the early thirties, an age which most commentators – both today and more importantly in contemporary accounts – describe as “The Golden Age” of grand prix competition. Serving Scuderia Ferrari through three years of intense competition, it was driven by the finest drivers of the preeminent team in a legendary period. Its history is solid and its acceptance as Guy Moll’s 1934 Monaco Grand Prix winner through a continuous ownership history from Georges Raph through Neil Corner carries great weight. An authority no less particular than Denis Jenkinson in his 1987 Directory of Historic Racing Cars gave 5006/SF33 his highest accolade, describing it as “Genuine.” Powered by one of the most glorious high performance engines ever built, with a lightweight, balanced and competent chassis and elemental lightweight coachwork, Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3 5006/SF33 is the ultimate in thirties racing cars. It is eligible for the most enjoyable and important historic events where its participation will be welcomed by the most discriminating organizers Chassis no. 5006

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  • 2005-08-19
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