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1955 Aston Martin DB3S

210 bhp @ 5500 rpm, 2992 cc inline six-cylinder engine, twin overhead camshafts, triple sidedraft Weber carburetors, four-speed David Brown close-ratio gearbox, independent front suspension with trailing links, torsion bar springing and lever shock absorbers, De Dion rear suspension located by parallel trailing links and Panhard rod, torsion bar springing and telescopic shock absorbers, four-wheel Alfin drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2210 mm God bless David Brown. Brown (later, Sir David) ran the family tractor and gear manufacturer producing products under his own name, and bought out both Aston Martin and Lagonda from receivership in 1948 after the devastation of the War years. Aston was acquired for its modern chassis and sporting heritage while Lagonda appealed for its W.O. Bentley-designed twin-cam, 2.6 litre six cylinder engine, first appearing in the Aston Martin DB2. Brown was committed to motorsport competition from the get-go, famously entering one of the first-ever postwar Astons in the 1948 Spa 24 Hours and began racing DB2s at Le Mans in 1949. Within two years DB2s finished First, Second and Third in class at the 1951 Le Mans 24 Hours, and Third overall against the likes of Jaguar's formidable C-Type sports racers. A remarkable achievement. Nevertheless, overall victory at Le Mans was in Brown’s sights and he fielded a factory team there each year from 1950 through 1959 when he achieved his greatest competition success, First and Second overall at Le Mans with the iconic DBR1. That year Aston also won the coveted World Sportscar Championship, the first British manufacturer to do so since Bentley in the prewar years, and the smallest manufacturer to ever do so, before or since. However, Brown first required a purpose-built racing car to fulfil his mighty aspirations. Launched in 1952, the first Aston sports racer was the DB3. Developed for Aston Martin by Eberan von Eberhorst, a former Auto Union racing engineer from the prewar era, the DB3 featured an all-new, tubular chassis using De Dion rear architecture, with a purposeful, chunky, slab-sided body. Competition victory proved elusive for the DB3 however, and its performance was hampered by reliability issues never suffered by the DB2 effort. So, Brown commissioned A. G. “William” Watson to engineer an improved car. In May 1953 a new prototype appeared at Charterhill, UK called the DB3S. This car was a significant redevelopment of the DB3 and featured a lighter chassis with a reduced wheelbase as well as many other modifications, significantly altering the essence of the original Eberhorst conception. Most importantly, the Salisbury hypoid-bevel final drive was replaced with a David Brown spiral-bevel version. It was the hypoid spiral drive which retired two DB3s at Le Mans in 1952. Other changes included new rear suspension geometry. Most impressive of all perhaps was the svelte, almost feline new body figure rendered characteristically in aluminum by Frank Feeley, designer of the DB2 for Aston Martin, and which is today considered his masterpiece. Featuring the classic cutaway section behind the front wheels, it presaged the style of the famous pontoon-fendered Ferrari 250TRs by several years. The DB3S raised eyebrows as well as expectations for success. This design was also the first to refine the “humped oval” grille theme which has become the trademark identifier of Aston Martin production cars through the present day. It was therefore the DB3S which came to represent the quantum leap towards international conquest that Brown so intently craved. At its Charterhill debut, a DB3S driven by Reg Parnell beat out an Ecurie Escosse C-Type for an overall victory. Shortly thereafter however, three DB3Ss raced at Le Mans with little triumph. Ironically, this was the only race which Aston Martin lost in 1953. During the Tourist Trophy, Goodwood Nine Hours and British Empire Trophy, Aston Martin took overall victory against all comers. With this newfound mastery Brown was emboldened. For the 1954 season David Brown introduced a new 12-cylinder sports racer, reviving the Lagonda name in competition. The engine, a 4.5 liter unit developed by Watson was essentially conceived as two of the standard VB6J Aston engines combined and mated to a common crankshaft. To counterbalance for the weight penalty, both the block and crankcase were rendered in aluminum. This required a whole new range of compensatory solutions to the workings of the engine internals, including tighter bearings, which resulted in problems at start and low temperatures until the engine was running up full temperature. Though based upon the DB3S shape, the appearance of the Lagonda could be described as “corpulent” in comparison to the graceful DB3S. Overall the Lagonda was plagued with problems and proved a frustrating distraction from continued development of the parallel DB3S program until the Lagonda sports racer was abandoned in 1955. Meanwhile, by 1955, the DB3S was to benefit from the 3-litre limitation on engine capacity in the sports car championship. Victory was seen at Silverstone with a Second place overall at Le Mans, with drivers Peter Collins and Paul Frere fiercely tracking the winning new Jaguar D-Type piloted by Mike Hawthorn and Ivor Bueb. This was the best overall Le Mans result Aston Martin achieved to date. Subsequently the DB3S went on to demolish the Jaguar competition at the British GP, and to win the Goodwood Nine Hours for the third time. In 1956, the DB3S repeated its prior year performance at Le Mans, finishing with a Second place overall result, with Stirling Moss and Peter Collins at the wheel. Through all phases of design, development, and racing, the DB3S was able to achieve significantly greater success than the DB3. Though still falling short of Brown’s dream of achieving overall victory at Le Mans, the DB3S was established as a force to be reckoned with, finishing their last two seasons in the top five Marque Championship points. Ten Works examples of the DB3S were completed by the factory to this point while demand was growing for a production version for sale to privateer competitors. Thus a second series of DB3Ss were built, commencing in 1955, to become known as the “customer” cars (easily identifiable by their three-digit chassis numbers). Eschewing the complex twin-plug head used in the Works cars, the customer cars were fitted with an upgraded version of the production VB6J engine with a high compression head featuring larger valves and competition camshafts, with the addition of triple, dual-throat sidedraft Weber carburetors. In addition the connecting rods were to competition spec and the main bearing housings became of the solid type. This engine version was designated the VB6K. In all, 20 customer cars were produced, many of which went on to distinguish themselves in international competition, adding to the DB3S mystique. Perhaps the most celebrated of the privateer racers was the Australian team who raced three DB3Ss in Europe during 1955 and came to be affectionately known as “The Kangaroo Stable.” These were ordered by Tony Gaze; the second, third and fourth of the customer cars (DB3S/102, 103 and 104) were delivered with consecutive UK registrations OXE 472, 473 and 474. The cars were painted in the matching, Aston Martin racing color of Almond Green metallic with a yellow flash on the bonnet. At the Hyeres 12 Hours (May 29, 1955) DB3S/102 finished Second overall driven by Tony Gaze and David McKay. In 1957 McKay set a new Australian Land Speed Record of 143.9 mph in this car. DB3S/103 finished Fourth overall at Hyeres, with owner/driver Tom Sulman and his co-pilot, a fellow Australian named Jack Brabham. (Brabham relates that his trip from Sydney to Rome took three and a half days!) Sulman went on to take a Second in the South Pacific Sports Car Championship with his car in 1958. DB3S/104, the car offered here, was completed on May 23, 1955, just days before the Hyeres 12 Hours where it finished Third overall with owner/driver Les Cosh and co-pilot Dick Cobden. After its European season, where it also competed in Portugal and the UK, it was the only one of the three Kangaroo Stable cars which did not go to Australia. Instead, it was sold by Cosh to California racer Rod Carveth in October, 1955. Reputably the first DB3S acquired by an American, the car arrived in San Francisco in January, 1956. Soon afterwards Carveth actually removed the body to repaint it in his favorite black livery and apply his “lucky” number 54 in preparation for its first event, on March 18 in Stockton, CA, alongside DB3S/112 owned by Jack Graham. Carveth took an impressive Seventh overall in his debut outing. Taking to the DB3S with relish, Carveth raced it on 22 weekends in 1956, racking up at least two podium finishes in the process, along with a number of Firsts in Class. During practice laps for his first event in Pomona, in January, 1957, the crankshaft broke and damaged the block. VB6K/104 was replaced by the engine from DB3S/115 (VB6K/115). More podium finishes were achieved in 1957, as Carveth ventured regularly outside of California and raced at circuits such as Elkhart Lake, Thompson Raceway, Watkins Glen and Lime Rock, as well as back on the west coast at the newly-opened Laguna Seca, near Monterey, CA. Looking to up the ante with his DB3S racing endeavors, in 1957 Carveth approached the factory to acquire an ex-Works DB3S and was originally promised DB3S/9 by Aston team manager John Wyer. Slated to go to the Nürburgring as a spare car for its last team race, it was driven over rough roads from Dunkirk to the ‘ring, and upon arrival was found to have broken body mountings at both the front and the rear, rendering it unsuitable for competition. Having made the promise to Carveth, Wyer ordered a “new” Works car be produced by the Aston Racing Department to fulfil his commitment. This 11th and final Works car (DB3S/11), was finished with the help of Carveth who spent two weeks in England, assisting with final assembly of the car. It was painted black, naturally, and delivered by ship to San Francisco, arriving in August, 1957. Now with two DB3Ss at his disposal, Carveth usually brought both cars to the California events, often loaning out DB3S/104 to others, including Fred Allen, Jane Wells, Don Burrows, Gil Geitner, John Barenson, George Constantine, Al Laws and Jack Flaherty, among others, including Phil Hill who tried the car out in some practice laps. Notably, Carroll Shelby achieved a lap record at Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 1956 with DB3S/104. Between his two DB3Ss, Carveth wrote that he had accumulated some forty handsome trophies plus having won the SCCA Racing Driver’s Award in the Class D championship category, achieving the Fourth highest standing for National Class D points. Carveth’s final race in DB3S/104 was at Laguna Seca on June 13, 1958, after which his desire was to move up the Aston sports racing chain once again to the new DBR1. Sadly, he was unable to obtain one, as only five were built, four of which were Works team cars, just beginning their epic journey to the top. “Because of the unavailability of the DBR1 Astons last year,” Carveth wrote in 1959, “I had to turn traitor and bought an ex-works three litre – from Modena. Perhaps I might return to Astons yet, but my personal racing love has turned to Formula Junior.” Indeed, Carveth went on to race a Ferrari 250TR/58 at Le Mans in 1959 for Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team (NART) with co-pilot Gil Geitner. Ironically, that was the year in which Ferrari was outclassed by the Aston Martin DBR1s, finishing One-Two overall and realizing David Brown’s manifest destiny. Carveth sold DB3S/104 to Larry Albedi in early 1959, who has a single recorded race outing, at Stockton on April 19 (DNF). By June of that year, the car had been sold to another Californian, Bob Downing who raced the Aston twice more at Laguna Seca. As was voguish in California in the early 60s, Downing is known to have intended to create a V8 street rod project out of the DB3S, and sold the original body to Ken Wallis who installed it onto DB3S/8. However, by 1964 Downing had apparently had a change of heart, and bought the body from DB3S/112 which had been damaged in the right rear end racing at Laguna Seca in 1963. Subsequent to repairing the body, it was painted into primer and fitted to Downing’s DB3S/104 chassis. It was then reportedly stored in a chicken coop until the ‘70s when it was acquired by Aston enthusiast Len Auerbach, again, also from northern California. Meanwhile, Auerbach’s friend George Newell, a noted nuclear engineer and physicist who was also a towering figure in the Aston Martin Owners Club, acquired DB3S/117. Thereafter, both men began nut and bolt restorations of their respective cars. Enlisting the expert assistance of Richard “Dickie” Green, formerly of the Aston Martin Racing Department (working as a mechanic for John Wyer during the heyday of the DB3S Works racing era, 1952-1956), Green was the “resident engineer” for Aston Martin of North America on the west coast. Completed in 1976, both cars were painted black in a tribute to Carveth’s two DB3s, Auerbach’s DB3S/104 running no. 54 and Newell’s DB3S/117 running no. 55. The two friends often ran together at west coast races such as the Monterey Historics at Laguna Seca and Sears Point, among others. Auerbach devotedly raced and enjoyed DB3S/104 until 1989, when it was sold to Peter Agg in the UK, whose Trojan Ltd. concern manufactured cars for McLaren for over ten years. Agg re-restored the car putting it back to its original Almond Green livery for the first time since it was delivered in 1955. The document file contains numerous receipts from R.S. Williams and Rex Woodgate, both acknowledged experts in the UK on Aston sports racing cars. Agg ran the DB3S in the 9th Mille Miglia Storica in 1992 (car #310) and the 16th La Sicilia dei Florio / 6th Giro Sicilia Storico Sicily in 1994. The car was subsequently featured at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in 1996, and it raced in the Silverstone B.R.D.C. Historic Series in 1997 with a Mr. Bryant behind the wheel. Peter and Peggy Agg also participated with the car in the Royal SunAlliance Classic Cavalcade to Le Mans in 1997. The last recorded and current owner of DB3S/104 is a noted California collector of English machinery, with a particular emphasis on significant Astons, who acquired the car from Agg in 2005 via London dealers Hall & Bradfield. Since its return to the U.S. the DB3S has kept a low public profile with maintenance as appropriate during its custodianship by Kevin Kay Restorations. It has been shown once, at The Quail, A Motorsports Gathering in Carmel, CA in 2007 where it took a First in Class Award despite competition from a more freshly-restored DB3S. It is superbly presented today and “on the button” to drive and enjoy. A large document file accompanies the car, which includes its FIA certification (issued to Peter Agg on February 29, 1992) the UK V5 registration and also a California title issued to and endorsed by Len Auerbach as well as numerous MOTs from 1992. The aluminum tonneau cover is also available. DB3S/104 is one of 20 “customer” DB3Ss, and one of only 31 examples built in total, including the Works team cars. As one of the three Kangaroo Stable cars, it is reportedly the ‘”least crashed” example of those; as such it is perhaps the most highly desirable of all. Remarkably, seven DB3Ss were actively racing in California between 1956 and 1960. Rod Carveth was the first with DB3S/104 and the car boasts an unbroken ownership history, including California residency and race history from 1956-1989, and from 2005 to the present day. Rarely available on the market, these cars often change hands privately, among enthusiasts who stand in line for the next opportunity. So it is exceptional indeed to find one offered for sale publicly. RM Auctions is both pleased and proud to represent this exciting and important sports racer. Estimate: $1,750,000 – $2,250,000 FELTHAM-ERA ASTON ENGINES AND DB3S/104 It has been reported that in 1961, the engine in DB3S/104 (presumably still VB6K/115) developed a main bearing problem rendering the block unusable, and that it was replaced in that period with a DB2/4 MkIII block (from the later engine type known as the DBA) while retaining the original DB3S head and VB timing chain cover. It is impossible to ascertain today whether the current engine is VB6K/115 due to the fact that Aston engines from this era carried no block number stampings; the only engine identifier was the number stamped on the timing chain cover. Since neither cylinder heads nor timing covers are interchangeable between the earlier VB and the later DBA engines and DB3S/104 today carries an original DB3S timing chain cover the report of the car having a later DBA block cannot be accurate. Further, the fourth and most long term owner of the car who restored it in the 1970s recalls distinctly that it had the correct type block and head appropriate to a DB3S when he bought it from Bob Downing, complete with VB6K engine internals such as solid main bearing cheeses, special connecting rods, DB3S crankshaft, and that it was fitted with a correct VB6K head. Finally, marque specialist Kevin Kay, in whose care the car has remained since its repatriation to California in 2005, has inspected the engine and agrees that it indeed is the correct type VB engine block, head, and timing cover. DB3S/104 today carries the timing chain cover stamped DP/101/11, appropriate for a Works DB3S; however it is important to note that the original timing chain cover is also available and included with the car, stamped VB6K/104, which given these circumstances regarding Aston Martin engine identification, confers “matching numbers” status, even though it is believed that the car has had at least one change of engine block. Chassis no. DB3S104

  • USAUSA
  • 2009-08-13
Hammer price
Show price

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Competizione

Estimate Available Upon Request The Ex-North American Racing Team, Daytona, Sebring, Le Mans, Montlhèry and Watkins Glen 400hp 4,390 cc. dual overhead camshaft V12 engine, tipo 605 five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and tube shocks and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400mm Introduced in 1968 with production beginning in 1969, the 365 GTB/4 was Ferrari’s response to an evolving market and, even more important, changing regulations in its most important market, the United States, where increasingly stringent emissions standards and rigid safety-related regulations had made the previous generation of Ferraris unsaleable. The 365 GTB/4 was bigger, both in bulk and in the power to propel it, more luxuriously equipped and was wrapped in a Pininfarina-designed, Scaglietti-built body that was equally a departure from earlier Ferraris. The 365 GTB/4 quickly earned the name “Daytona” after Ferrari’s epic victory in the Daytona 24 Hours and took off to sales success. Road & Track magazine summed up the Daytona’s attributes succinctly, sub-heading their October 1970 Road Test, “The fastest – and best – GT is not necessarily the most exotic.” It was still a front-engined, rear wheel drive berlinetta but what a sublime, powerful and highly developed berlinetta it was. The V12 engine was barely recognizable as derived from Gioacchino Colombo’s 20 year old design, lengthened to accommodate the 81mm bore needed to give it 4,390 cc of displacement, fitted with twin cam cylinder heads for high rpm and better breathing through a sextet of Weber 40 DCN 20 carburetors. Its increased displacement was needed to deliver sufficient power to cope with the air injection system required to meet US emissions regulations and also to propel the Daytona’s not inconsiderable bulk. Early in its development Ferrari quoted a target weight of 2,640 pounds. In production it weighed in at well over 3,000 pounds. The Daytona’s engine, however, was up to the challenge, driving Ferrari’s luxurious gran turismo to a top speed 3mph faster than the Miura’s and out-accelerated its mid-engined competitor by half a second in 400 meters. It was a mighty automobile that handled as well as it went thanks to 71/2” wide 15” wheels, 215/70 Michelin tires and Ferrari’s four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and tube shocks which had proven itself in nearly a decade of successful Ferrari sports-racing cars and the 50-50 weight distribution which Ferrari engineered into the package. The 365 GTB/4 was neither intended nor designed for competition, but like all Ferraris it had the basic attributes: powerful and reliable engine, competent chassis with predictable handling and refined aerodynamics. It also had a cadre of experienced distributors like Luigi Chinetti, Col. Ronnie Hoare and Jacques Swaters who knew they sold more cars if the cars they sold won races. The Daytona’s speed commended it to the great endurance races like Le Mans, Daytona and Sebring where its power and aerodynamics suited the races’ long straights. Chinetti was the first to test the Daytona’s competition potential, entering an early production car at Le Mans in 1969, then at Daytona and Sebring in 1970. Ferrari eventually succumbed to the pressure from its distributors and created three series of competition Daytonas, only fifteen of which were to be built. Of these 15 cars the first five were designated as the Series One, with the example offered here, chassis 14889, the final car in the first series. Constructed at the Ferrari Customer Assistance Center in Modena, the Competition Daytonas proved not only to be eminently successful but also remarkably long-lived, remaining competitive in GT competition for almost a decade. Constructed for Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team in New York, chassis number 14889 was completed in February 1972, late enough that its confirmed entry in the 1972 Daytona Continental 6-hour race with Luigi Chinetti Jr. and Ronnie Bucknum as the drivers was withdrawn prior to the race. 14889 would wait until the 21st Annual Sebring 12 hours to make its debut with the great Sam Posey and Tony Adamowicz piloting the NART entry. After a grueling race the pair managed an impressive 3rd in class and 13th overall, a formidable result in the car’s first outing against the cream of international competition on Sebring’s notoriously rough and demanding circuit. The Daytona then went to the Watkins Glen 6 hours with David Hobbs and Sam Posey at the wheel however engine problems forced the NART entry to retire early from the race. Its next outing proved more successful though as 14889 managed an impressive 9th overall and 3rd in class at the Paris 1000 kms in Montlhèry, France driven by a new team of drivers, Jean-Pierre Jarier and Jacques Laffitte. Following Montlhèry the Ferrari was sent to Gaetano Florini’s Assistenza Clienti in Modena for upgrade to Series III specifications while the engine was similarly upgraded by Traco in Los Angeles for the 1973 season. Series III specifications meant an increase in engine performance and efficiency. This was achieved utilizing similar detailed engineering as employed on the awe-inspiring GTO, largely with the adoption of improved piston and con rod design but also through subtle modifications to the running gear and drive train throughout the car. With its newly implemented Series III specs, 14889 was an improved beast ready to compete once again for the NART team and would do so at one of the most celebrated U.S. tracks. 14889 was sent to the Daytona 24 hours race as one of the NART entries where the talented trio of Bob Grossman, Luigi Chinetti, Jr. and Wilbur Shaw, Jr. achieved an impressive 5th overall and 4th in class, only 16 laps behind the 2nd overall, class-winning NART Competition Daytona of Francois Migault and Milt Minter. With its success at Daytona and updated Series III specifications 14889 joined NART’s traditional assault on the most important endurance race of the season, Le Mans, appearing first in the tune-up and test 4 Hour race at La Sarthe on April 1. In the hands of François Migault and Lucien Guitteny 14889 placed an impressive 5th overall and 2nd in class. The Daytona, after its warm up race at the 4 Hours of Le Mans, was prepped for the grueling 1973 24 hours of Le Mans where its co-drivers were Bob Grossman and Lucien Guitteny.This time though, wearing race number 36, the NART team Ferrari Daytona retired at just over half the race distance, after 192 laps, due to right rear damage from an accident. 14889 then made its way back to the U.S. to the Watkins Glen 6 hour race on July 21. Driven by Bob Grossman and Don Yenko 14889 completed its last race under the NART banner in 15th overall, 7th in the Grand Touring category. The years of the Daytona Competition were a Golden Age in endurance racing when Ferrari was challenged by a succession of fierce competitors. Alfa Romeo, Matra, Lola, Porsche, Corvette and Mirage focused their talents and resources upon breaking Ferrari’s dominance of long distance racing in epic events from the high banks of Daytona to the twisting and crumbling trails of Sicily’s Targa Florio and the mind-bending top speeds of Le Mans’ Mulsanne straight. Prototypes like the Ferrari 312PB, Matra-Simca MS670, Porsche 908 and Alfa Romeo 33TT3 were developed for bitterly contested specific races and their masterful driving teams were instructed to win at all costs in races that for the first time amounted to 6-, 12- and even 24-hour sprints. Driven for hours at 10/10ths they often broke or crashed. Grand Touring cars like the Competition Daytonas then swept in to score top-10 – and frequently podium – finishes in equally titanic battles among legendary marques. The image of the Competition Daytonas are inextricably fixed in the collective memory of a generation, driven to greatness by great drivers in epic races. Following 14889’s successful racing career it was sold by Luigi Chinetti to Donald W. Fong of Atlanta, Georgia in 1973. It remained with Fong for next 13 years until he sold it to George Nuse, also of Atlanta, in 1986. Nuse kept the Daytona for another nine years and during his ownership became something of a celebrity and “poster child” for the Competition Daytona. It was shown regularly including an appearance at the 1987 Ferrari Club of America Concours at Wolf Trap Farm where it placed 3rd in class 16. Nuse generously offered the Daytona for track testing as well and the report was subsequently published in the Ferrari Club of America publication Prancing Horse, issue number 86. While under Nuse’s ownership the Daytona received a comprehensive restoration at the hands of Bruce Vineyard’s Continental Coachworks, Ltd in Conyers, Georgia. Nuse kept the Daytona until 1995 when it was sold to its current owners. As one of only 15 built, and the last example from the most desirable First Series of Ferrari-built cars, Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Competition 14889 remains as one of the great examples of Ferrari’s competitive spirit from the 1970s. Evolving from the Daytona gran turismos by popular demand of Ferrari’s most important and competitive clients, the Competition Daytona proved to be a formidable competitor on the tracks of the world’s racing stage, leading by example and with success over the three year period of its early history. Today, Competition Daytona 14889 remains resplendent in its NART livery complete with all the correct badging and decals. It is in excellent overall condition having been well maintained and cared for by only three private owners for the last 30 years. Fully eligible for the Shell Historic Challenge as well as a welcome entrant at any Ferrari event around the world, there are few cars that offer what this Daytona does. It is ready to go, but not for the timid or faint of heart. It is able to catapult its drivers to high speeds at a moment’s notice, while imparting an explosion of sensory experiences. 14889 is one of the most desirable Daytonas from its model’s run of only examples; it is equally desirable as a representative of Ferrari’s early 1970s racing history, one of the most competitive eras in endurance racing. It is a singularly-important Ferrari and the rarity of such an example coming to auction is indeed a special occasion. Outfitted in the NART number 21 livery it bore at the 1973 Daytona 24 Hours, 14889 appears only moments older than when it achieved its greatest accomplishments. It has competed in front of the world, performing and finishing with distinction in some of the world’s most competitive races: Sebring, Watkins Glen, 1000km of Paris, Daytona and Le Mans. Its physical presence is equally impressive and in person the Daytona Competizione is one of the most aggressive, best looking Grand Touring racers of all time. With its flared fenders, air dams, side exhausts and racing stripe it is truly unmistakable and intimidating. Pictured in dozens of books, driven by some of the legends of motor racing, owned and operated by one of the greatest race teams ever, Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Competizione 14889 is a fantastic, awe-inspiring car that begs to be driven, shown and most of all – remain dominant. Chassis no. 14889

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-03-12
Hammer price
Show price

1997 Ferrari F50

13,800 km from new Full service recently completed, including fuel tank replacement Ferrari’s iconic 1990s supercar Ferrari Classiche certified Built to celebrate the marque’s 50th anniversary, the Ferrari F50 was powered by a 520-hp 4.7-litre normally aspirated V-12 with five valves per cylinder. It was derived directly from the Tipo 040 powerplant that Ferrari used in Alain Prost’s Ferrari 641 during the 1990 Formula 1 season. The six-speed longitudinally mounted gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine. This configuration is very similar to that used on contemporary Ferrari Formula 1 cars and gives the F50 nearly perfect balance. Perhaps the most important engineering work done for F50 was the car’s Cytec aerospace carbon fibre chassis, which tipped the scales at just 225 pounds. The F50’s rubber bladder fuel tank was housed within the chassis, behind the driver and in front of the engine, yet another Ferrari innovation inspired by the aircraft industry. The F50’s braking performance was no less impressive than the engine’s massively drilled and ventilated disc brakes were fitted along with Brembo-supplied four-piston brake callipers, enabling the car to stop to rest from 113 km/h in just 54 meters. The F50’s careful engineering enabled the car to achieve legendary performance statistics. Simply put, if one were to imagine a street-legal Formula 1 car, the F50 would likely come very close to that dream. With only 349 examples produced between 1995 and 1997, they are exceptionally rare and difficult to find today. The car offered here, chassis number 107145, retains all of its major original mechanical components, as confirmed within its Ferrari Classiche certification binder. Finished in quintessential Rosso Corsa over Nero and a European-delivery example, the car was registered in Germany as of 1999 before moving to Japan, where it was registered in the Province of Tama in 2005. By 2013, the car had returned to Europe, where it was imported to the UK and has remained ever since. With just 13,800 km showing on its odometer, all relevant service needs have been completed, including the rubber bladder fuel tank, and the car is ready to be driven and enjoyed. Accompanied by its original books and tools, the F50 is truly an incredible machine to behold and is a car that would thrill even the most seasoned and talented drivers on the open road, as it is the only Ferrari supercar to combine convertible bodywork, a manual transmission and V-12 engine all in one glorious automotive cocktail. • 13.800 km totali • Tagliando completo appena effettuato (compresa la sostituzione del serbatoio del carburante) • Iconica supercar Ferrari degli anni '90 • Certificata Ferrari Classiche Realizzata per celebrare il 50° anniversario del marchio, la Ferrari F50 monta un V-12 aspirato, 5 litri, 5 valvole per cilindro e capace di 520 CV. Questo propulsore deriva direttamente dal motore Tipo 040 che Alain Prost aveva sulla Ferrari 641 di Formula 1 nel 1990. Il cambio longitudinale a sei marce, insieme al differenziale a scorrimento limitato, è stato montato dietro il motore. Questa configurazione, molto simile a quella usata sulle F1 di oggi, dà alla F50 un bilanciamento ottimale. La soluzione ingegneristica più interessante, però, è il telaio Cytec Aerospace in fibra di carbonio, che pesa solo 102 kg. Il serbatoio del carburante in gomma è stato alloggiato all'interno del telaio stesso, dietro al conducente e davanti al motore, un'ulteriore innovazione Ferrari ispirata dall'industria aeronautica. A proposito di prestazioni, sono impressionanti anche quelle in frenata che, grazie a quattro dischi vistosamente traforati e autoventilati, con pinze a quattro pistoncini, rigorosamente Brembo, permettono alla F50 di passare da 113 km/h a 0 in soli 54 metri. Progettata per stupire, la F50 è quanto di più vicino a un'auto di Formula 1 in versione stradale ci possa essere. Con soli 349 esemplari prodotti tra il 1995 e il 1997, questa “rossa” è eccezionalmente rara e molto difficile da trovare sul mercato. La vettura proposta, con telaio numero 107145, mantiene tutti i principali componenti meccanici originali, come confermato nel certificato Ferrari Classiche. Rigorosamente Rosso Corsa, con interni Nero, è una vettura europea, visto che inizialmente è immatricolata in Germania (1999). Successivamente viene trasferita in Giappone dove, nel 2005, la registrano nella provincia di Tama. Nel 2013 torna in Europa, questa volta però nel Regno Unito, dove rimane fino ad oggi. Con appena 13.800 km sul contachilometri, sono state completate tutte le necessarie operazioni di manutenzione, compresa la sostituzione del serbatoio del carburante in gomma. L'auto, quindi, è pronta per essere guidata e goduta. Fornita di manuali e attrezzi originali, questa F50 è veramente un'auto incredibile da ammirare. Una supercar capace di emozionare anche i piloti più esperti, grazie al cocktail da vera sportiva che combina carrozzeria aperta, cambio manuale e motore V-12. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue description, this vehicle is provided with a reproduction service manual. Si fa presente che, contrario alla descrizione stampata nel catalogo, questo veicolo è presentato con una riproduzione del manuale di servizio . Chassis no. ZFFTA46B000107145 Serial no. 330/349 Engine no. 46693 Gearbox no. 444

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
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1967 Ferrari 330 GTS by Pininfarina

One of just 99 examples produced Original engine, chassis and drivetrain Wonderfully patinaed restoration Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche The replacement to the 275 GTS, the 330 GTS was designed to be an elegant, open-top, V-12 grand tourer for Ferrari’s best customers looking for the finest automotive experience money could buy. In addition to plenty of room for two plus their luggage, the 330 GTS boasted a top speed of 150 mph and a quarter-mile time of 15 seconds at just under 100 mph. Aside from the obvious addition of its convertible top, the 330 GTS was identical to the 330 GTC that had been unveiled a few months earlier at the Geneva Salon. However, the convertible was built in much more limited numbers than its closed sibling. While 598 examples of the 330 GTC were built, only 99 of the 330 GTS would leave the factory gates by the time production concluded in 1968. Today, these 99 cars are highly sought after by collectors for their fine driving characteristics as well as their gorgeous looks. Chassis number 09481 was completed in February 1967, finished in Argento Metallizzato over Nero with factory air conditioning and was delivered new to official dealer Motor S.a.S. di Carla Allegretti in Rome. In 1970 it was exported to the U.S. and has remained there since. The first American owner recorded is Walter Ancker of Stamford, Connecticut, in 1976, for whom the car was serviced that August by Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, at 38,760 miles. It was next owned in 1979 by Lawrence Reif, who would advertise it for sale several times over the next year, as would its owners through the late-1990s. By 1995 it had been refinished in its present iconic colour scheme Rosso over tan. It joined the collection of the present owner several years ago. The car retains its original engine, chassis, gearbox and body number stampings, and its finishes throughout still present in very nice overall condition, including the Borrani wire wheels. Its seats are tight, and the car is equipped with its original factory air-conditioning, as well as a Becker tape deck. It is accompanied by a full-size spare, in the trunk, as well as a top boot, partial tool set and a jack. This is a lovely 330 GTS for any fine collection. • Uno dei soli 99 esemplari prodotti • Motore, telaio e trasmissione originali • Restauro di prima qualità • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche Erede della 275 GTS, la 330 GTS è stata progettata per essere un'elegante V-12 Grand Tourer aperta, pensata per soddisfare i più esigenti clienti Ferrari sempre alla ricerca del meglio in campo automobilistico. Oltre a essere particolarmente spaziosa, per i due occupanti e il loro bagaglio, la 330 GTS vanta una velocità massima di oltre 240 km/h. A parte l'evidente aggiunta del tetto apribile, la 330 GTS era identica alla 330 GTC presentata alcuni mesi prima al Salone di Ginevra. Tuttavia, la versione aperta è stata costruita in un numero molto più limitato di pezzi. Mentre della coupé gli esemplari furono 598, le 330 GTS prodotte fino al 1968 sono solo 99. Oggi, queste auto sono molto ricercate dai collezionisti. Per le loro caratteristiche di guida eccellenti, certo, ma anche per la loro splendida linea. L'auto con telaio numero 09481, completata nel febbraio del '67, esce di fabbrica in Argento Metallizzato con interni Nero e con l'impianto dell'aria condizionata. Consegnata nuova al concessionario ufficiale Motor S.a.S. di Carla Allegretti, a Roma, nel '70 viene esportata negli Stati Uniti dov'è rimasta fino ad oggi. Il primo proprietario americano arriva nel 1976 ed è Walter Ancker di Stamford, Connecticut. Di lui la Luigi Chinetti Motors di Greenwich registra un tagliando nell'agosto dello stesso anno, a quota 38.760 miglia (62.378 km). Nel 1979 la GTS passa a Lawrence Reif, che la mette in vendita più volte nel corso dell'anno, così come faranno i successivi proprietari fino alla fine degli anni '90. Nel '95 intanto viene ridipinta nell'iconico abbinamento Rosso per la carrozzeria e marrone chiaro per gli interni. L'auto è entrata a far parte della collezione dell'attuale proprietario diversi anni fa. La 330 GTS conserva motore, telaio, cambio e numero di serie originali. Inoltre, le finiture sono ancora molto belle. Da segnalare i cerchi a raggi Borrani. Inoltre i sedili sono integri e l'auto è dotata dell'impianto di aria condizionata originale di fabbrica, così come del mangiacassette Becker. Nel baule ci sono la ruota di scorta, il copri capote, gli attrezzi (non completi) e un cric. Bellissimo esemplare di 330 GTS, davvero da collezione. Chassis no. 09481 Engine no. 9481 Gearbox no. 116/I Body no. C0151

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
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1970 Ferrari 512 S

550bhp 4,496cc double overhead camshaft light alloy V12, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel hydraulic vented disc brakes, double wishbone independent front suspension and single upper arm and lower wishbone independent rear suspension. Ferrari’s 512S represented yet another attempt by a manufacturer to thwart the homologation rules laid out by the C.S.I. (Commission Sportive International). It was a practice the C.S.I. was trying hard to avoid; manufacturers would build prototype racers, produce them in the required quantities and fit them with lights, horns, and spare tires - all the trappings of a road car. On paper, the 512S was a car for the average Joe, but in reality, it was the fastest car Ferrari had ever built, capable of moving in excess of 235mph. With the new rules in place, Enzo Ferrari knew that it would be impossible for a ‘Sports Prototype’ of only three liters to compete against a five liter ‘Sports Car.’ In 1969, with the C.S.I.’s Group 6 rule change, a reduction from a minimum of 50 to 25 production units, and a major infusion of cash from Fiat, Ferrari quickly set about creating the 25 vehicles necessary to meet the Group 6 criteria. Assembly of the first new cars began in the fall of 1969. The chassis was similar to the one used on the P4 — a semi-monocoque design. The engine was a direct development of the 612 Can Am series unit, now fitted with twin overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and Lucas fuel injection. Initially it could produce 550hp at 8,500rpm. A year after initial production began changes were made to improve reliability, lessen the weight and increase the overall horsepower — the engine could now produce 620hp at 9,000rpm. The 512S was first introduced to the public at a press conference in November 1969. Over the next three months enough chassis were completed to qualify the 512S for Group 6 Production ‘Sports Cars.’ Soon after the qualifying inspection was completed, several of the assembled cars were taken apart to be used as spares. All of the completed chassis were originally built in Berlinetta configuration. Almost immediately, the 512S began to undergo modification. The most noticeable change was the removal of the center section of the bodywork or roof panel. On April 1, an addendum was accepted by the FIA and written into the homologation papers noting the availability of a Spyder version of the 512S. The 512’s competition debut took place when five identical cars were lined up for the Daytona 24 Hour race on January 31, 1970. Three of the new 512s were official entries, two were entered by customers and all had been fitted at the rear with two substantial spoilers combined with fins and two deflectors on the front wings. Mario Andretti succeeded in qualifying in first place, but the Porsche 917s were to stay in the lead throughout the whole of the actual race. Only one 512S was to survive twice around the clock – the official 512S, driven alternately by Andretti, Merzario and Ickx. For the 512’s first outing any type of podium finish against the mighty Porsche 917s was in itself a victory. Two weeks after Daytona, Ferrari delivered chassis 1006 to Luigi Chinetti for use by his North American Race Team. Chassis 1006 and three other 512s were entered in the 1970 12 Hours of Sebring. Three of these 512s, including chassis 1006, were now in ‘Spyder’ configuration. This enabled their weight to be reduced by about 40kg and significantly improved headroom. One factory team car, driven by Vaccarella and Giunti, retained its Berlinetta configuration; however, the rear decks of all of the cars had now been revised for better cooling and aerodynamics. Another feature added to some of the cars was a new, more blunt nose. Chinetti had arranged for NART drivers Sam Posey and Ronnie Bucknum to race chassis 1006. In practice the two drove well, managing to qualify in 6th spot, ahead of the 512S Ferrari works car of Giunti, Vaccarella and Andretti (the eventual overall winners). Andretti had again achieved the best qualifying time at Sebring, and had been in the lead for most of the race, but he had to retire with a broken gearbox. He then took over Vaccarella and Giunti’s berlinetta, to finish first overall. Posey and Bucknum were able to maintain their position for the early part of the race and by the fourth hour had moved into 5th place. Sadly, their race ended when the gearbox gave out early in the fifth hour. Despite this, the two managed to cover nearly 100 laps and were officially classified 42nd overall. Chinetti next arranged for Pedro Rodriguez and the now repaired chassis 1006 to contest several Can Am races. The first of these occurred on July 21, 1970 at Donnybrook, where Rodriguez scored a 9th overall in his first Can Am race. On August 23, Rodriguez drove chassis 1006 at the Mid-Ohio Can Am race, where he scored a very respectable 7th overall. For the remainder of the 1970 season, Chinetti focused his attention on obtaining a second 512 to campaign alongside chassis 1006. The new car, chassis 1020, was immediately updated into ‘M,’ or ‘Modificato,’ configuration. This included numerous improvements such as revised suspension and new front and rear body panels. Chinetti now had two 512s at his disposal. In late December 1970, Chinetti sent his lead driver, Sam Posey, along with chassis 1006 to Argentina for the upcoming 1000 km race at Buenos Aires. Three other 512s were also on hand, one of them in the improved new ‘M’ configuration, but they could only match the practice time of Posey in chassis 1006. Chassis 1006 was actually faster than the others were on the turns and flat out. Only in braking did the new 512M show the benefits of the new modifications. All four 512s finished, one after another, occupying 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th. The new 512M was clearly the slowest of the four 512s entered, but while chassis 1006 was slightly quicker, it still only managed to score a 7th overall. After Buenos Aires, chassis 1006 joined chassis 1020 in Florida, for the 24 hours of Daytona. Four other 512s also competed in this classic endurance event. Three of the 512s were now in ‘M’ configuration. Clearly the fastest and best prepared was the 512M of Penske and Kirk F. White, chassis 1040. This car easily scored the fastest practice time, and for the first time all the 512Ms outperformed the 512S models. During the race, only chassis 1040 and the car on offer here, chassis 1006, presented any opposition to the Porsche 917s. For much of the race it appeared that chassis 1040 would take the checkered flag. An unfortunate accident late in the race forced 1040 back to third spot, while chassis 1006 soldiered on to an unforgettable and career highlight second overall. Most impressive though was the fact that 1006 gave the mighty 917 a real run for its money as the duel towards the end of the race had become the closest 1-2 finish in the history of the 24 Hours of Daytona. So close in fact the team of Tony Adamowicz and Ronnie Bucknum finished the race capturing second place on the very same lap as the Wyer/Rodriquez Gulf Oil 917K. Seven weeks after 1006’s success at Daytona, Chinetti entered the car along with chassis 1020 in the 12 Hours of Sebring. 1006 was the sole 512S amongst four ‘M’ variants. Once again, 1006 was extremely fast in practice. It was, in fact, one of the fastest of the 512s, for a while even bettering the 512M Sunoco, chassis 1040, that had nearly won at Daytona. The race was, however, relatively disappointing. While running as high as 6th overall, about eight hours into the race, the right rear tire let go. Limping back to the pits, the dry sump tank split, ending the car’s run. Officially Posey and Bucknum finished 37th overall. Chassis 1006’s final race of the 1971 season was the 24 Hours of Le Mans. No fewer than nine 512s were entered, but once again chassis 1006 was the sole example still in original ‘S’ configuration. In practice, the car proved to be the slowest of the Ferraris, but remained utterly reliable and as Le Mans was a test of endurance, Chinetti had strong hopes for a well-placed finish. Driving duties for the race were assigned to former Le Mans winner, Masten Gregory and the up-and-coming NART driver, George Eaton. The race again indicated that Porsche’s 917 was nearly unbeatable. One after another, seven of the Ferrari 512s dropped out of the race. Chassis 1006 was forced to retire in the fifteenth hour with persistent fuel-injection problems caused by dirty fuel. Ferrari had given up racing the 512s as factory team cars in 1971, instead focusing all their attention on the new 312 PB. Some of the surviving 512s continued to race into the early 1970s in the Can Am or Interserie in Europe and the U.S. Several were driven beyond their useful life and written off after one too many accidents. A fortunate few were acquired by private collectors, ex-racers and enthusiasts. These were, and remain to this day, expensive and to a degree somewhat fragile machines. As the desirability and collectability of these vehicles continued to rise, so too did interest in acquiring them. Unfortunately for the unwary collector, many of the 512s that were destroyed and written off have now reappeared. Several have been rebuilt from the remains, or parts of the original remains, of cars destroyed while racing. Chassis 1006 is one of the few 512s that have managed to escape all controversy. Well cared for, despite being actively campaigned for both the 1970 and 1971 seasons, 1006 found a succession of loving and caring owners shortly after its competitive career ended. It remains one of the single most original and untouched 512s ever completed. In fact, while 25 vehicles were originally called for, just 22 were actually completed, and a mere 16 survive to this day. While all of the 512s were upgraded and modified to some extent, there remains a total of just four 512s, including this one, still in their ‘S’ configuration. Chassis 1006 was sold at the end of the 1971 season to Harley Cluxton and shortly thereafter to Californian Steve Earle who later sold it to Chris Cord. In the mid 1970s, Cord sold the car to the well-known Ferrari connoisseur, collector, racer and enthusiast, Otis Chandler of Los Angeles, California. In 1977, Chandler sold chassis 1006 to Stone Stollenwerck, who in turn sold the car two years later to Steven Griswold of Berkeley, California. Griswold almost immediately turned the car around to Michael Vernon in the United Kingdom. Vernon had been looking for a proper 512 for some years, and upon inspecting chassis 1006 agreed to purchase the car immediately. In the early 1990s, chassis 1006 was acquired by the internationally known Rosso Bianco museum collection of Peter Kaus. Since then the Ferrari was sold to the United States where it has remained in private hands for the last five years. Though the 512S is in excellent overall condition and is ready to be competitively raced it is always recommended that a car of such significance and value be thoroughly examined and serviced prior to track use. The engine was recently rebuilt by Chris Dugan of Motion Products West and has virtually no track time on it remaining fresh for its next owner’s use. Prior to the engine rebuild chassis 1006 was intermittently raced, all the while performing competently and successfully on the track for its current enthusiast owner. The vendor reports that the 512S is also complete with a host of additional accessories including the parts necessary to convert the car to either the long or short tail configuration. Notably, we understand the 512S is capable of being road registered. For further details on this and the spare parts that accompany the car we encourage those interested parties to speak with an RM Auctions specialist. Eligible for both the Targa Florio and the Le Mans Classic, this 512S offers its next owner a world of possibilities in both show and competitive use. A true beast of historic racing, it is one of the only cars of the period that offered a serious competitive threat to the Porsche 917. Today it remains as such and we encourage close inspection of this historically important and significant Ferrari. Chassis 1006 is possibly the single best known and certainly one of the most cared for Ferrari 512s left in existence. In addition, with its second place finish at Daytona, it has one of the best racing histories of any of Ferrari’s 512s. Rarely traded, this particular 512 represents an uncommon opportunity to acquire one of the few and certainly one of the finest examples left. Chassis no. 1006

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-19
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1967 Ferrari 330 GTS by Pininfarina

345 bhp (SAE), 300 bhp (DIN) 3,967 cc V-12 engine with single overhead camshaft per cylinder bank, triple Weber dual-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension, including upper and lower A-arms and coil springs, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of only 99 built Matching-numbers example The subject of a comprehensive mechanical and cosmetic restoration The 2011 Concorso Italiano Best of Show winner From its classic Ferrari nose treatment, fitted with a characteristic shallow egg-crate oval grille, to its triple louvered vents on the rear flanks of the front fenders, and on to the seductive tapered tail, the 330 GTS epitomized mid-sixties Italian GT styling. Inside the luxuriously appointed interior were twin leather bucket seats, a wood-rimmed, aluminum steering wheel, and full instrumentation. Interior accommodations were remarkably spacious. The 330 GTS was capable of speeds approaching 150 mph, with acceleration from rest to 60 mph in about seven seconds, while the quarter-mile dash required approximately 15 seconds at just less than 100 mph. Car and Driver summed up its sparkling driving dynamics in its July 1967 issue: “Driving it doesn’t change that first visual impression of class.” They continued, “Depress clutch. Find neutral. Turn ignition key. Give the gas a tiny, nervous touch. Oh my God!” Chassis 10719 was delivered new to Luigi Chinetti Motors, of Greenwich, Connecticut, in early-1968, and it was immediately sold to Loeber Motors Inc., of 5625 North Broadway in Chicago, Illinois. It passed through a succession of owners, including Dr. Stuart L. Resch, of New York, by 1970, and then Steve Gross, of Westport, Connecticut, in 1974, who also acquired it via Chinetti Motors. Save for a repaint in the early-1970s, it was reportedly a largely original car throughout its succession of owners until the mid-2000s. In 2006, it was acquired by an astute collector from California, who added approximately 7,000 to the odometer after having Patrick Ottis Company, of Berkeley, California, sort the suspension and perform some general maintenance. When it came time for the original engine to be rebuilt, Ottis’ team was entrusted with the engine and mechanical work, while the coachwork and cosmetics were entrusted to Rudi & Company, of Victoria, British Columbia. Under the care of Koniczek and his team, the car was completely taken down to bare metal; old front-end damage was properly repaired, and any oxidation issues were addressed, a significant investment that has ensured the integrity of the car for years to come. In addition to the outstanding body and paint work, every piece of chrome was replated, the interior was reupholstered, and the gaskets and glass were replaced. Ottis’ shop was given the directive to perform the engine rebuild as thoroughly and correctly as possible. The meticulous machine work was complemented by the installation of new valves and pistons, resulting in outstanding appearance and performance. With the restorative work completed, the car was returned to Berkeley to have the engine installed and worn in. The car was subsequently sent to Brian Hoyt, of Perfect Reflections, to ensure that the car was dialed in for correctness of presentation, down to rubber seals and the smallest pieces of hardware. Stunningly presented in Blu Scuro with a Claret and black leather interior and black cloth top, 10719 is absolutely stunning. The fit and finish of the panels is excellent, with even gaps, and the only sign of wear comes in the form of light polishing marks on the paint; it should be further noted that the quality of the engine bay remains at a concours level, as does that of the underside. Nicely equipped with the standard leather seats and power windows, this 330 also comes with optional air conditioning, a Becker AM/FM radio, and Borrani wire wheels shod with Michelin XWX tires. Along with captivating presentation, 10719 comes with an original leather glove box folio, including an owner’s manual, chamois, parts book, and owner’s guarantee book. The trunk has been nicely finished in black carpeting and contains a jack bag and nicely appointed tool roll. As a testament to the craftsmen who restored 10719, when shown in 2011 at the Concorso Italiano in Monterey, it won the Ferrari Club of America Pacific Region Vintage Concours Award, as well as Best of Show honors. Simply put, the final word of the judges speaks for itself. Chassis no. 10719 Engine no. 10719

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-04-27
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1930 Cadillac V-16 Convertible Sedan by Murphy

185 bhp, 452 cu. in. OHV V-16 engine, three-speed manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptical leaf springs with hydraulic dampers, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted mechanical brakes. Wheelbase: 148 in. Exceptional, one-off, custom California coachwork Built for General Motors VIP and horseracing legend Charles Howard A long-term part of some of the world’s greatest collections Numerous Best in Class victories, including at Pebble Beach One of the most important Cadillac V-16s When the San Francisco earthquake hit in 1906, one of the few early automobile dealerships in the city that survived was Charles Howard’s Buick agency. This fortune allowed him to provide cars to first responders and then sold them in the aftermath. That brush of awkward luck led to a success that started in the 1920s and 1930s and never stopped rolling for Mr. Howard. He became the most successful Buick dealer on the West Coast, a General Motors VIP, and, in his spare time, a successful breeder of horses, among them no less was legendary thoroughbred Seabiscuit. Members of the Howard family became enthusiastic customers of Pasadena coachbuilder Walter M. Murphy, commissioning such cars from the coachbuilder as the only Bugatti built with American coachwork, a Type 37 which is now owned by Jay Leno, and a Buick modeled after Murphy’s L-29 Cord town cars. Charles himself, the patriarch, ordered up this V-16 Cadillac with Murphy coachwork, forming an entirely appropriate automobile for a man so well-connected to both General Motors and West Coast society. Car number 700991 was originally delivered as a two-passenger roadster through the Don Lee dealership in San Francisco. Conjecture is that a bare V-16 chassis had been unavailable for Howard’s order, so with money not being an object, he ordered the least expensive factory style, and upon its arrival in California, he had Murphy throw out the factory body and install their own. Murphy’s Convertible Sedan was styled by Franklin Q. Hershey and is in many ways similar to the shop’s Duesenberg designs of the era, as it included aluminum-edged wide beltline molding, center-hinged doors, forged aluminum “Clear-Vision” window pillars, and similar lines to the hood. Special features found on the car included particularly exotic inlaid interior woodwork and a second windshield for rear-seat passengers that could be cranked out of sight. Both the front and rear windshields were raked at 22 degrees, giving the car the sporting appearance of a dual-cowl phaeton when the top was lowered. With the top up, ventilation was provided by removable rear quarter windows. Originally, the car was finished in the rather spectacular color combination of a white body with lilac fenders, and it was equipped with a mother of pearl gearshift knob, which has long since been removed. The completed Cadillac was enjoyed by the Howards for some years. When exactly the family parted with it is not known, although it is likely that it was in the late 1930s or early 1940s, when many large automobiles were abandoned in the onslaught of the Great Depression. By 1961, it had made its way into the ownership of Bob Gillespie, an early enthusiast in California, who then sold it that year through Fazackerly Cadillac, of San Francisco, to Norman Taunton, of Galt, California. Mr. Taunton was amazed at the car’s well-preserved, largely original condition but had soon set about restoring it to its original condition, with the assistance of former Murphy employee I.E. Burnside. The Cadillac was sold in 1968 to the Brucker family of Santa Barbara, whose members were well-known collectors and operators of the famous Movieworld museum. In 1985, it eventually passed into the ownership of renowned enthusiast John Mozart, and then briefly through the hands of Jim King, of Beverly, Massachusetts, before its acquisition by noted collector John McMullen, of Lapeer, Michigan. Mr. McMullen maintained the car in his famous stable until 2007, and during this time, he had its 1980s restoration freshened to its present appearance, with a repaint in maroon and gloss black and extensive cosmetic and mechanical improvements being made. At some point, the original removable rear quarter windows had been replaced by “peekaboo slits” in the convertible top, à la Hibbard & Darrin, which is a feature that the car retains today. The McMullen Collection displayed the Cadillac at the 1997 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded First in Class. After acquiring the car from Mr. McMullen, the Andrews’ returned it to Pebble Beach in 2008, where it was again a show favorite. It has remained well-preserved in their collection, although the restoration can now be described as older, with light wear showing around the panel gaps and on the driver’s-seat upholstery. As with most all of the Andrews’s cars, it has been well-maintained by their in-house mechanics, and it is still in very good mechanical condition, enabling a new owner to enjoy its potential on CCCA CARavans. As this V-16 Cadillac combines a superb history of ownership by noted enthusiasts with some of the best lines of any 1930s automobile, it may well be the most important example extant. It is a one-of-a-kind machine that had been built by California’s finest coachbuilder for a General Motors VIP, one who regarded it as beloved a thoroughbred as his famous Seabiscuit. Engine no. 700991

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
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2003 Ferrari Enzo

660 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic engine management and electronic fuel injection, six-speed electro-hydraulic computer-controlled sequential F1 gearbox, limited-slip differential and traction control, front and rear pushrod-actuated double wishbones with horizontal external reservoir coil-spring damper units, and four-wheel ventilated carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in A rare and desirable original color combination Recent service by Ferrari of Beverly Hills Just over 8,000 miles and three owners from new Offered with a complete set of books, tools, and accessories At the Paris Auto Show in September 2002, the world waited for the successor to the Ferrari F50 with baited breath. The introduction of a Ferrari supercar was something that happened only every 10 years, and the car that emerged from under that red car cover would certainly set the bar for performance cars for years to come. The company was in excellent shape, as it was just two Formula One Grand Prix away from securing a World Championship and selling more cars than they ever had before. The car they were about to introduce would prove to be the cherry on top of a wonderful year. Instead of continuing with tradition and naming this car F60, Chairman Luca di Montezemolo declared that it had been decided to name the car after the company’s founder, Enzo. Even to the casual onlooker, it was clear that the Enzo was vastly different from its predecessor. The car was inspired both cosmetically and mechanically from Ferrari’s experiences in Formula One. Engineers spent countless hours sculpting the car’s shape in a wind tunnel to ensure that form followed function and that nothing compromised the car’s available down force. The theme was similar inside, as there was nothing to distract the driver from the task at hand: driving. The interior was filled with carbon fiber, and the only luxury, aside from the leather bucket seats, was a climate-control system. Not even a radio was present, as it would add unnecessary weight and mask the glorious sound of the 12-cylinder engine sitting just inches behind the passenger compartment. That 660-horsepower engine was mated to another nod to Formula One technology, a six-speed sequential F1-style gearbox that was capable of shifting gears in 150 milliseconds. With shift times that were quite literally lightning-quick, the Enzo could bolt to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds and reach a top speed of 218 mph, which are incredible statistics even by today’s lofty standards. The Brembo-developed, race-bred braking system was more than capable of keeping up with the Enzo’s insane performance, and it could screech to a halt from 80 mph in just 188 feet. Of course, a car as incredible as this would not be made available to the masses. When new, the Enzo resided in the garages of Ferrari’s best customers, which was not just by coincidence. Each owner had to be chosen and presented with the opportunity to purchase an Enzo from Ferrari itself, making ownership of one more of an honor than a privilege. Just 399 were produced, keeping in tune with Enzo Ferrari’s belief that Ferrari should always produce one car less than what the market demanded. A 400th Enzo was produced and presented to Pope John Paul II after production had formally stopped, who instructed that the car to be auctioned off, with its proceeds benefiting charity. This Enzo, bearing chassis number 132664, was produced in April 2003 and was finished in a menacing color combination of Nero over a two-tone Nero and Rosso interior. Only a handful of Enzos left the factory in Nero paint, and fewer still left with a two-tone interior. It was delivered new through Lake Forest Sports Cars, of Lake Forest, Illinois, and it was subsequently registered by its first owner in that same state. Service records accompanying the car show that it received its 5,000-mile service at Lake Forest Sports Cars on January 14, 2010, with its original owner. The car passed through another owner in Illinois before travelling south to its third owner, who was located in California. This individual had the Enzo registered at his residence in Montana, and the car was later transferred to a different residence in Arizona. In March 2014, this Enzo was sent to Ferrari of Beverly Hills, where it underwent a service that totaled to just over $2,400. At that time, it was determined that the clutch only had 4% wear, and it is indeed prepared for many more miles. This Enzo is truly in immaculate condition, and it shows very few signs of wear, with barely a stretchmark on its leather-trimmed bucket seats. The front end is fitted with a clear bra, which is almost a requisite for any supercar, as it keeps the nose free of any stone chips, accumulated from rock chips, and other cosmetic imperfections. Documentation includes service records from Ferrari of Beverly Hills and a CARFAX that certifies its mileage, ownership, and condition. Present with the car are its original manuals, a pair of keys, and a full set of luggage and tools. It is also important to note that this Enzo comes with both its stock exhaust and the highly desirable Tubi exhaust system, which adds a noticeable growl to the exhaust note. As one of the few cars built in the 21st century to have appreciated in value, the Ferrari Enzo has already proven to be highly desirable to many collectors. Even though the last Enzo left the factory grounds in Maranello over 10 years ago, its performance is still considered world class. This example is surely one of the most desirable available, as it features three owners from new and a very rare and desirable color combination, unlike the majority of Rosso examples on the market. Its mileage is especially attractive, not only to the driving enthusiast who intends to enjoy time behind the wheel but also to the collector in search of a beautifully preserved Enzo. Chassis no. ZFFCW56A830132664

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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2007 Ferrari FXX Evoluzione

860 bhp, 6,262 cc twin overhead cam V12 engine, four valves per cylinder, Bosch Motronic ME 7 integrated digital electronic fuel injection, F1-type coiled sump lubrication, six-speed paddle-shift F1-style transmission, four-wheel independent front and rear suspension with wishbones, coil springs, anti-roll bar and telescopic dampers, carbon ceramic brakes with anti-lock. Wheelbase: 104.3" - Ferrari's most exclusive, highest performance production car - One of only 30 ever built - In the care of the Risi Competizione racing team from new - Evoluzione upgrades to 860 bhp Although he had many sports car building philosophies, Enzo Ferrari’s ultimate legacy is perhaps his simplest: for a machine to best reward its driver by providing tactile feedback and blistering performance on the open road, it must have a direct link to its racing heritage. Of course, Enzo Ferrari was hardly the first to suggest this notion of utilizing competition experience to develop road cars. He was quickly indoctrinated into the theory of consumer sports car production early on in his days racing Alfa Romeos through winding street courses linking tiny villages scattered throughout Italy and Europe. Yet it is arguable that Enzo’s car company remains the only automaker to produce in volume a genuine sports car that is so clearly inspired by competition on a closed course. Ferrari prides itself on applying what it learns on a race course to its products. The Enzo It was fitting, then, that the engineers at Ferrari chose Enzo himself as the namesake for their most ambitious and advanced project ever: a high-performance, 12-cylinder, mid-engined berlinetta so closely linked to the automaker's success in Formula One racing that it could be called a competition car for the street. Wrapped in angular Pininfarina-penned bodywork aimed more at aerodynamics than impressing show-goers – although it manages to do that, too – the Ferrari Enzo boasts technology lifted directly from the company's Formula One efforts. Building on four consecutive years of Formula One World Championships, Ferrari transitioned away from the approach it had taken with the GTO, F40 and F50 that came before it. Pininfarina was commissioned to create an angular, aerodynamic shape that would inspire future high performance Ferraris. The Enzo clearly departs from the flamboyance of the F50, the aero-inspired wedge profile of the F40 and the voluptuous curves of the GTO. It stands on its own, yet it is uniquely Ferrari and clearly linked to the latest Formula One race cars. Ferrari's engineers sought to create a driving experience and interface inextricably connected to the Formula One cars then driven by Michael Schumacher. With a top speed of 350 km/h (217 mph), it was essential that the Enzo's aerodynamics keep it properly planted to the road. Ferrari Gestione Sportiva, the automaker's competition arm, sought a high degree of down-force that would still offer flexibility for the numerous driving conditions which production Enzos would encounter. Unlike a dedicated Formula One racecar, the Enzo would not come with a dedicated pit crew to help optimize the car for differing road conditions. Thus, the engineers created a series of active, mechanical spoilers that would automatically engage at certain speeds and work directly with the Enzo's three-mode stability control system for maximum grip at all speeds. The Enzo's 12-cylinder engine heralded a new generation of flagship powertrains for Ferraris. Ostensibly based on the architecture of the award-winning and highly-vaunted V8 that powers the Maserati Quattroporte, the V12 nonetheless proved its merit on its own. The cylinder head, with its pentroof-like combustion chamber and four valves per cylinder, is clearly derived from the company's Formula One technologies. Meanwhile, the Enzo's V12 uses a wraparound lubrication sump that incorporates the main bearings and a specific oil recovery circuit to increase lubrication efficiency. Bosch Motronic ME7 engine management helps produce an impressive 110 horsepower per liter from the 6.0-liter V12. For drivers, however, one of the most obvious Formula One connections is the car's gearbox. The semi-automatic F1 transmission tells its drivers when to select gears thanks to LED lamps mounted on the steering wheel. Although some owners complained of “abrupt” shifting during “normal” driving, the transmission's 150 millisecond gear changes earned it a solid reputation on the track. The blistering Enzo would prove the gateway into a much more advanced series of engineering projects. Fully living up to Enzo's mantra, the sports car named after him has spawned a handful of variations aimed at enhancing the automaker's performance development credentials. The FXX Project Using the Enzo as its base, the FXX took the concept to another level. Just 30 were built, each kept under Ferrari's close supervision and sold only to owners who would use them at select race tracks carefully selected by the automaker. Powered by an up-rated 6.3-liter variant of the V12 that powered the standard Enzo, the FXX was rated at 790 horsepower, and its upgraded aerodynamics package increased the top speed to 227 mph. To best take control of the power, the FXX utilized an even faster-shifting Formula One transmission aimed solely at closed course use. From Ferrari's standpoint, the FXX's most important technological innovation was its integrated data monitoring telemetry. While a “big brother” system of collecting performance information would hardly be acceptable for a street vehicle, the 30 FXX “test subjects” – including Michael Schumacher himself – were undoubtedly delighted to be included in Ferrari's product development process. Nearly 40,000 kilometers of closed course use were logged during the FXX research period. Evoluzione Yet the FXX only proved a stepping stone to the most aggressive production Ferrari ever delivered to consumers: The FXX Evoluzione. Ferrari integrated everything it learned during the FXX project into the FXX Evoluzione. Never before was Ferrari's street car development so integrated with its competition department. The second generation Evoluzione version is Ferrari's most advanced GT car ever, built with an 860 horsepower V12, a sequential gearbox that can perform shifts in just 60 milliseconds and a curb weight of just over 2,500 pounds. The FXX Evoluzione goes from zero to 60 in 2.8 seconds – an extraordinary, virtually unbeatable time. Virtually no part of the FXX has been left untouched by the Evoluzione kit. Changes start in the engine bay, where the 6.3-liter V12 engine now develops a staggering 860 horsepower at 9500 rpm – 1000 rpm higher than before. Shifts are even faster at 60 milliseconds, versus 80 milliseconds for the old gearbox, and new gear ratios have been optimized for the new state of engine tune. A new traction-control system also has been developed, which offers the driver on-the-fly adjustment through nine different settings, all controlled via a switch on the center console. The system was designed to be more responsive to individual driving style, allowing the car to adapt to the driver rather than vice versa. Ferrari says another advantage to the redesigned traction control, when paired with new front suspension geometry, is decreased tire wear. The Brembo brakes and Composite Ceramic Material discs have also been redesigned to double pad life. The last big-ticket change is to the bodywork of the FXX. The Evoluzione kit adds a new rear diffuser and rear flaps, which increases aerodynamic efficiency by 25 percent as well as rear down-force – both good ideas on a car able to exceed 200 mph. The FXX Evoluzione on offer The Evoluzione we have the pleasure of offering here has participated in only three Ferrari sanctioned and organized track events. It has had just one owner from new. At the last of these events at Mugello, the car suffered a minor off; the owner had already decided to upgrade the car to Evoluzione specifications at Ferrari’s Corse Clienti division after the event, and the car was sent to the factory for the upgrade. The Evoluzione kit effectively transformed the car into a stage 2 FXX with upgraded specs, including a major boost in horsepower. The car has been in the care of Risi Competizione, the famous Houston, Texas GT Racing team, for its entire life and has been stored at the race team’s workshop. Included with the FXX are the Technical Documentation manual, two sets of wheels and the official FXX Programme container, which contains the fueling rig, data acquisition instrumentation, tools, electronic cables and other equipment necessary to run this very sophisticated racing car. The opportunity to acquire a Ferrari FXX is truly an opportunity unlikely to be repeated. The original 30 owners were all hand-picked by Ferrari and were each dedicated Ferrari clients and enthusiasts. Thus, changes in ownership are rare, much less at auction. This car offers the best of FXX ownership – Evoluzione upgrades, limited use and maintenance by the high-end, race-winning outfit of Risi Competizione. This is the ultimate mount for the weekend racer! Chassis no. ZFFHX62X000142163

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta

300bhp, 3,286 cc four overhead cam 60° V12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual rear-mounted transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs and tubular shocks, four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5" (2,400mm) 1964 was an important year for Ferrari. John Surtees became Formula 1 World Champion and the team won the Formula 1 Constructors’ Championship, the International GT Constructors’ Championship, as well as the International Speed and Endurance Challenge. Racing improves the breed and Ferrari’s incredible success would heavily influence its latest production models. In October of 1964, following the end of production for Ferrari’s 250 GT SWB Berlinetta model, the 275 GTB was introduced as its successor at the Paris Auto Salon. Model nomenclature was derived from engine and cylinder displacement and helped differentiate the new from the old. The size of the 12-cylinder engine was increased from 3.0-liters to 3,286 cc, with each cylinder displacing roughly 275 cc. The Ferrari 275 GTB signaled an important evolution for Ferrari as the company had finally adopted a fully independent suspension, which had been tested, developed, and proven in Ferrari’s sports racing cars beginning with the Testa Rossa in the early 1960s. Bodied by Scaglietti and designed by Pininfarina, the 275 GTB echoed the aggressive, purposeful appearance of the 250 Tour de France and GTO with its long hood, covered headlights, fastback roofline, Kamm tail, and vents in both the front wings and roof sail panel. Devoid of unattractive lines, shapes, and proportions, the beautiful Coupés are considered by many automotive design critics to be among Pininfarina’s finest grand touring projects. In October 1966 at the Paris Salon, Ferrari introduced the next evolution of the 275 GTB, the 275 GTB/4. Other than an increase in track by 24mm, the chassis was unchanged. Pininfarina’s body, which had been enhanced during the 275 GTB’s production with a longer nose to reduce front end lift at speed, also remained the same with the exception of a small hood bulge to clear the carburetors. The change in model designation simply reflected the single substantial difference between the GTB/4 and its predecessor; the V12 engine was fitted with four overhead camshafts, two per cylinder bank. This revised powerplant, known as Tipo 226, developed as much power as Ferrari’s competition twin-camshaft engine. In addition to four camshafts, the Tipo 226 featured a number of engine modifications also developed directly from racetrack competition. For example, the new quad-cam had a dry sump oiling system, which prevented oil starvation in even the most severe cornering situations where the strain of G-forces could be tremendous on the car. An impressive set of six twin-choke Weber carburetors provided excellent breathing and the resulting power afforded drivers remarkable mid-range torque and flexibility. All told, this formidable powerplant was capable of propelling the new 275 GTB/4 to a top speed of 160 miles per hour. Competition power levels had been made available to Ferrari’s clients right off the showroom floor. The engine, driveshaft, and rear-mounted transaxle were combined in one sub-assembly, mounted to the chassis at four points. All of this helped produce a rigid car that handled superbly, with neutral handling and near perfect 50/50 weight distribution. Perhaps one of the best summations of the GTB/4’s driving manners and performance abilities came from noted French car and motorcycle racing driver, Jean-Pierre Beltoise. In a road test published in 1967 in L’Auto Journal, the former Formula 1 driver commented, “I covered in complete safety and the greatest comfort … and while carrying on a normal conversation with my passenger, the 46 miles which separate the Pont d’Orléans from Nemours in a little less than 23 minutes … at an average speed of more than 121 miles per hour – which is remarkable enough without noting that I had to stop for the toll gates.” Although the 275 GTB/4 was a trend-setting sports car in many regards, it was also the last true coachbuilt road/race Berlinetta in the great Ferrari tradition. Accordingly, many examples led a dual life, winning at road courses and hill-climbs at weekends while being utilized for stylish and sporty transportation during the week. The spectacular example presented here, chassis 10253, is a left-hand drive version that was delivered new in August 1967 to the official dealer M.G. Crepaldi S.a.S. in Milan, Italy, before eventually being exported to the United States. By 1977, the car was listed in the Ferrari Owners Club membership directory as being owned by Donald L. Holsworth of San Francisco, California. Five years later, it was offered for sale by Bruce Trenery’s Fantasy Junction in Emeryville, California, having accumulated just 33,207 miles. Having since come under new ownership, the car has been professionally restored by marque specialist David Carte of Classic & Sport Auto in Virginia to highly exacting standards. The nut-and-bolt, ground-up restoration was such that the car was awarded 100 points not once, but twice! It first received the Platinum Award and the prestigious Excellence Cup in 2007 for outstanding restoration quality at the XVI Palm Beach Cavallino Classic. Thereafter, the car was shown at the 43rd Annual Ferrari Club of America International Meet, Field and Driving Concours, at Corning, New York, where it once more received 100 points and a Platinum Award. As would be expected, the car remains stunning throughout. Beautifully finished in Giallo Fly with a tobacco leather interior, it is an award-winning Ferrari that has not been driven since completion of its restoration and, as such, continues to be a concours-quality car throughout. Notably, the car is also accompanied by a complete set of books and the factory-correct tool set. In addition to being the first production Ferrari to feature a quadruple camshaft V12 powerplant, many consider the 275 GTB/4 to be the finest production Ferrari ever built; it combined a thoroughbred mechanical pedigree with sufficient creature comforts to make it a superlative grand touring automobile. And, although it was in production for a relatively short period, the 275 GTB/4 has endeared itself to astute drivers and enthusiasts who appreciate its tremendous performance and iconic styling. Perhaps Jean-Pierre Beltoise said it best: “It is, first and foremost, a serious and comfortable gran turismo, but it retains the lineage of a race car in the response of the engine and the quality of the handling. The 275 GTB/4 is one of the greatest automobiles created in our times." Chassis no. 10253

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-15
Hammer price
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1955 Maserati 300 S Sports Racing Car

The Personal Race Car of Multiple Swiss Racing Champion Benoit Musy Raced During the 1955 and 1956 European Seasons 2,991cc 280bhp at 7,000rpm straight-six DOHC engine fitted with twin ignition and three Weber 42 DCOE carburetors, DeDion tube and transverse leaf spring to the rear with a five-speed constant-mesh transaxle, large diameter steel tube platform type chassis with front coil-spring and wishbone suspension, Borrani alloy rim wheels with 600/650-16" Dunlop racing tires and four-wheel Alfin drum brakes. Curb weight: 750 kg (1,650 lbs) Wheelbase: 2,310mm (92.4 in.) THE MARQUE OF THE TRIDENT The postwar success of Maserati was made possible by a proud prewar history that dates back to the turn of the century when a Bolognese teenager named Carlo Maserati took part in racing competitions on a home-built motorcycle. Carlo’s five younger brothers, including Alfieri, shared his motoring enthusiasm and followed him into family automobile pursuits. Carlo died prematurely at age 30, but brother Alfieri founded Officine Alfieri Maserati in Bologna in order to service sporting automobiles. After World War I, the Maserati brothers began to manufacture spark plugs and batteries as well as several successful racing cars in the 1921 to 1925 period. The brothers were employed by the Isotta-Fraschini Company where Alfieri and brothers Bindo and Ernesto worked as works driver, chief tester and riding mechanic respectively. The success of these Isotta-Fraschini race cars was duly noted by the small Turin based firm of Diatto, who subsequently commissioned the Maserati brothers to design and build a two liter supercharged Grand Prix car. Impressively, the newly designed race car proved very competitive against the current FIAT and Alfa Romeo team cars. When Diatto became insolvent, they gave the racing car and rights to the Maseratis and it re-appeared as the Tipo 26, an eight-cylinder 1,500cc supercharged machine, the first to wear the Maserati Trident badge – which was copied from the statue of Neptune in Bologna’s main square. Two weeks later, early in 1926, Alfieri and the legendary riding mechanic Guerrino Bertocchi won their class in the Targo Florio in their first race – a historic feat for the fledging company and young team. Early on, the Maserati brothers realized that survival depended on sales to private customers, a concept which the company embraced and encouraged for the next four decades. In the latter 1920s from six to 10 racing machines were developed and sold annually with displacements ranging from 1.5 to 3 liters, from their small and primitively equipped Bologna shop. Even so, the precision workmanship of these early Maseratis was extraordinary, their engine surfaces being so accurately machined that gaskets were seldom required. Racing victories followed – in 1930 for example, Maseratis won the major Grand Prix of Italy, Spain, Pescara and Rome, defeating established makes Bugatti and Alfa Romeo at each event. Not limited to small capacity engines the brothers built some monsters as well, including a 350 horsepower 16-cylinder engine of impressive specifications, not to mention a 10 liter 32-cylinder engine with four cranks, four-superchargers and eight camshafts which developed over 700 horsepower. This proved impossible for man or chassis to control so it was installed in a racing boat, which captured several world records. By 1932 supercharged Maseratis had scored many wins in a variety of races, very impressive especially when one considers that no more than 25 workers designed and built these 4, 6, 8 and 16 cylinder machines. Ernesto Maserati became president in 1932 when Alfiero died and excelled in his brother’s place as Maserati won its 100th victory. Soon, however Grand Prix racing was to change dramatically when the small independents like Alfa, Bugatti and Maserati faced the Mercedes and Auto Union juggernauts, but Maserati survived into the late 1930s by building and selling four and six-cylinder Voiturette class racers for private entrants. By 1937 the Maserati Battery and Spark Plug Company could no longer support the ever-escalating costs of the front-line racing. The brothers sold their business to the prosperous Orsi Group, staying on with a ten-year contract to design and build Maserati racing cars. With Aldolfo Orsi’s steel works, gear, machine tool and foundry backing the brothers could again build front line machines, including the eight CTF on which Wilbur Shaw won the Indianapolis 500 in 1939 and 1940 as well as leading handily in 1941 until he crashed. Even though Maserati had only built about 150 cars – an average of less than 10 cars per year – by the time World War II broke out, the company’s reputation and fame had by then been truly established through 15 years of victorious competition. MASERATI POST WORLD WAR II During the prewar period the company had generally ignored sports car production. After the war, Maserati resumed successful Grand Prix Racing with prewar based models like the 4CL and 4CLT, which sold quite well. Like everyone in Europe the Orsi companies had suffered the ravages of war and concluded that a line of road going sports and touring models had to be produced in order to continue the racing department. The Maserati brothers were therefore appointed to the task and soon the legendary A6 1500 and A6 GCS series were selling briskly to car-starved Europe. In 1947, their ten year contract expired and the brothers packed their tools and left Maserati since neither they nor Orsi had deigned to initiate negotiations for a new deal! A five-year period of relative Maserati inactivity followed until 1953 as Omer Orsi concentrated on rebuilding the profit earning companies in his group. The new GP racing formula of 1952-53, coupled with an improved financial picture allowed the Orsis to re-establish the racing division in order to develop a new Grand Prix contender and a sports racing car offshoot. This was of course, the classic and competitive 250 F model. Slow to dominate due to inadequate testing and preparation, these single seaters eventually became heralded cars when Maserati won the Grand Prix World Championship in 1957. THE MASERATI “GOLDEN YEARS” 1954 to 1957 Many historians agree, the era between 1954 - 1957 was the zenith of Maserati competition achievement. Despite the return of giant Mercedes to GP racing and the emergence of BRM and Lancia-Ferrari, Maserati’s achievements were impressive. Driven by the giants of postwar Grand Prix racing – Fangio, Moss, Musso, Shell, Behra and Gregory, 250 F’s scored 21 podium finishes with Stirling Moss finishing 2nd in the 1956 World Championship and then with Juan Manuel Fangio winning it in 1957. Despite this, Grand Prix racing did not pay the bills and when the FIA World Sports Car Championship was announced, the Orsi’s, inspired by the prospect of profits from sales and servicing of customer sports cars, entered this field with a vengeance with their 150 S, 200 S, 300 S, 350 S and the mighty 4.5 liter 450 S two seater racing cars, some 92 of these being sold in the 1955 to 1958 period. For one Mille Miglia, Maserati prepared the astounding number of 31 sports racing cars – a most taxing workload for such a small company. Road going spyder and GT road cars like the second series A6 GCS and the 3500 GT/5000 GT also contributed to the coffers. The Tipo 300 S, as displayed with the example offered here, was a most important sports racing car in the Maserati scheme of development. Only 30 examples were built in the 1955 to 1958 period and they proved to be very successful on the world’s racing circuits almost winning the 1956 Sports Car Championship as well as being popular in North America with Briggs Cunningham’s MOMO Team taking delivery of the first three cars built in 1955 and Bill Lloyd winning the 1956 SCCA “D”-modified Championship. In 1956, 300 S sports cars driven by Fangio, Moss, Behra and Musy recorded 11 victories in major events and Taruffi finished an impressive second overall in the Targa Florio. BENOIT MUSY 1917-1956 TRIUMPH & TRAGEDY Reading the comprehensive history dossier that accompanies the sale of this car makes one think that Swiss driver Benoit Musy perfectly personified the 1950s term “gentleman driver.” Unlike some of his wealthy playboy contemporaries who moved more quickly in a bar room or boudoir than on a racing circuit, Musy could and did race with the true professionals of the period – men like Juan Manual Fangio, Stirling Moss and Jean Behra, occasionally beating them at their own game. Born on December 12, 1917, Benoit started his racing career on motorcycles – Moto Guzzis and Nortons and won numerous international races as well as being recognized as “Suisse Champion” five times by the Federation de Motorcycliste Suisse (UMS) in the period 1948-1953. Before that he had been a Swiss Air Force pilot with 1,600 landings to his credit. Musy married the vivacious Conseulo Heusch and the couple had a son named Edouard, the whole family traveling together to the races in their converted bus which held their Maseratis in a rear compartment. Very supportive of her husband’s racing, Consuelo often drove the transporter and provided Benoit’s timing, scoring and signaling from the pits. “I could have protected my husband from the dangers of this sport by asking him to stop,” she was to say later, “and he would have, but I did not, since this activity made him very happy – indeed traveling around Europe for the races, like gypsies, was one of my most pleasant memories of our time together.” Benoit Musy was to have a short but productive allegiance to the Trident Marque. As the first Swiss to make the difficult transition from two wheels to four, he started his automobile racing career on a Maserati A6 GCS/53 followed by a 150 S, 200 S and finally this particular 300 S, chassis number 3057. In 1955, after taking delivery of his most powerful Maserati to date, the three liter 300 S offered here, chassis number 3057, Benoit Musy contested 11 European Sports Car Championship events, winning five times and scoring a further five podium finishes up to the August 12,, 1956, Kristianstad Swedish Grand Prix, which he won. Musy’s talent was now truly recognized as Maserati SPA Managing Director Omer Orsi offered him a contract to drive factory-sponsored entries for both Formula One and Sports Car races during the 1957 and 1958 seasons. However in a cruel twist of fate, Benoit Musy was to perish abruptly at the Coupe de Paris Monthlery on October 7, 1956 – the last big race of the season. Benoit had delivered his 300 S to the factory for its year end service and modifications for the 1957 season and as a result it was not available for the race so a friend offered his new Maserati 200 S to him for this race. Benoit Musy was traveling at 250kmh on the high bank when a part of the steering failed sending the car over the crest of the banking and end over end before crashing to earth 75 meters below the circuit. A permanent marker, erected in 1957 marks the spot at Monthlery where Benoit Musy’s life came to its most unfortunate end. Following his death, his wife Consuelo Heusch-Musy left chassis 3057 at the Maserati factory in order to sell it, a task aided by Benoit’s brother, Dr. Luigi Musy. The 300 S was eventually sold on June 18th to the Auto Racing and Touring Club of Angola, South Africa. HISTORY OF MASERATI 300 S – POST BENOIT MUSY After servicing and updates, 3057 was sold by Maserati on behalf of the Estate of Benoit Musy to Automovel E Touring Club De Angola. It was registered in Angola by the club as APN-06-54. The wealthy Angola Automobile Club would purchase such cars for its affluent Portuguese membership to use in South African events. We know that 3057 was raced out of Angola for many years since invoices for Maserati service work as well as spare and replacement parts billed to the Club are on file. By the 1970s, following the Communist Revolution, most Portuguese residents left Angola, abandoning large possessions like cars, including this 300 S Maserati. Old racing cars were converted to road cars, as was 3057 which was fitted with an American V8, a cut-down driver’s door and some unattractive tail lamp assemblies by Arthur & Filhos, a local car dealer and workshop. In 1989 Swedish National Stein Johnsen found the 300 S in Angola while living and working in Uganda. Photos show that while dented and in poor condition, 3057 was remarkably complete, although a different grille and tail lamps had been fitted. Johnson shipped the rolling chassis and body, less engine and gearbox to Oslo in March, 1991. A proper restoration was beyond his means, so a year later, number 3057 went to Englishman, Peter Scott after examination and certification as an original example by Maserati authority and author Richard Crump. Scott retained Paul Weldon of Church Green Engineering (now Leiter Motor Company Ltd.) to carry out a meticulous restoration to all original specifications in conjunction with Ermano Cozza, Historian of Maserati SPA, Modena. The painstaking rebuild utilized most of the original coachwork, all of the chassis, suspension, brakes, steering mechanism and steering wheel, gear change mechanism, tanks, instruments, seats, interior panels, chassis tags and road wheels. During the restoration Church Green Engineering fitted a remanufactured correct 300 S Maserati/Embry engine number E 301 as well as a new Jack Knight Gears developed five-speed transaxle. The project was completed for Peter Scott by the end of 1994 and track-tested by Tony Dron in a Thoroughbred & Classic Magazine article entitled “Driving Musy’s Maserati.” In 1996, 3057 received its FIA Historic Vehicle Identity Form after which Ermano Cozza issued an Authenticity Certificate on behalf of Maserati SPA, Modena. After Scott’s showing of the car at the Hurlingham Louis Vuitton Concours d’Elegance in June of 1996, it began its “third racing career” in the hands of noted driver Martin Stretton from 1996 to 1998. In 1998, London broker Charles Prince of Paradise Garage sold 3057 to Tom Walduck, the latter entering it in the 1999 Mille Miglia Storica with number 317. In early 2000, German historic racer Michael Hinderer acquired the 300 S with the help of Martin Stretton from Walduck and further historic racing ensued. (See racing results sidebar). The last vintage race on record is a fine 7th place finish at the 2005 Monterey Historics in the hands of the last owner against a high horsepower field which included Scarabs and Lister-Chevrolets. We can therefore say that Maserati 300 S, chassis 3057 is still in excellent condition with no major needs, ready for further historic event participations after a proper checkover and service. A five pound dossier including period photos, full history, restoration photos, FIA papers, factory certification and much other interesting material is on file and we urge all interested parties to review this treasure trove of information. Perhaps one of the most illustrative examples in describing a 300 S comes from the great Stirling Moss, who won many races aboard his 300 S and is quoted here from the foreword to the Richard Crump and Bob de la Rive Box Book, Maserati – The Sports Racing and GT Cars 1926-1975: “When I look back over the sixty-seven or so races in which I drove a Maserati, I remember a few frustrations and many exhilarations. The sort of exhilarations that one gets only from racing a thoroughbred, cars conceived to give battle with the best and pleasure to their drivers. Maseratis were not always the fastest but invariably the best balanced. If you really want to live, drive a 250 F or a 300 S at over nine-tenths!” Stirling Moss - London, England, 1975 Please note, should the purchaser of this lot be a resident of the United States an additional importation fee of 2.5% of the purchase price will be payable. Addendum Please note that if the buyer is a resident of the United States, 2.5% duty is payable. Chassis no. 3057

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-01-20
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1971 Lamborghini Miura SVJ by Bertone

385 hp, 3,929 cc DOHC transverse V-12 engine, four Weber three-barrel carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension by coil springs and unequal length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in. One of only a handful of Miuras SVs factory-converted to Jota specifications between 1971 and 1975 Fully restored by Gary Bobileff in 2007 Ideal for both track days and concours events; equally exciting to drive and stunning to behold BOB WALLACE’S DREAM: THE ULTIMATE COMPETITION-READY MIURA Despite the otherworldly performance that Lamborghini’s Miura offered, none were ever campaigned on the world’s race tracks by the factory or clients. Even though it was designed explicitly as a street-going automobile, the Miura could still handedly keep up with many of its race-bred rivals in terms of performance. Bob Wallace, Lamborghini’s chief test driver and road development engineer, knew better than most, that if adapted for use in motorsport, the Miura would be a formidable weapon against Ferraris and Porsches. Wallace had been involved with the design and evolution of the Miura since its early days and knew of its enormous potential better than most. With Lamborghini’s factory as his tool, he set out to produce a special race-ready Miura that would hopefully help to bring the company into motorsport. The resulting automobile was dubbed the Jota. It was built in 1970 as a one-off test bed to fit into the FIA’s Appendix J (hence Jota), and it was graced with a number of upgrades over the existing Miura S. First and foremost, Wallace chose to use the new-for-1971 SV-spec powertrain with split-sump lubrication. With help from the slightly raised compression, the Jota’s engine produced 440 horsepower at 8,000 rpm. Furthermore, the chassis was stiffened, the rear track was widened, the fenders were flared to fit wider rear tires, and the Miura’s characteristic headlight “eyebrows” disappeared. Wallace was also able to achieve a much-improved weight balance by repositioning the fuel tanks in the door sills, rather than in the nose, and the spare tire was fitted just behind the engine. The race-ready nature of the car was clearly evident from just one look at the interior. It was completely stripped out and fitted with Plexiglas windows and a single windshield wiper. One-millimeter-thick chrome-moly steel pipes were welded to the ladder chassis, and aluminum sheet skin was riveted over the chassis, forming an aluminum semi-monocoque shell. Additionally, the entire body was crafted from aluminum (standard Miuras had roofs made of steel). Thanks to its lightweight body and further weight-saving measures applied throughout, the Jota tipped the scales at just 1,784.5 pounds and sat four inches lower than the standard road going Miura. Once the car was complete, it was dispatched on a 20,000-mile road test. After the SV was introduced at the Geneva Salon in 1971, Ferruccio Lamborghini scheduled to have the car scrapped, as he had no interest in competition and saw the SV as superior to the stripped-out SVJ on the street. However, it was reportedly saved from the scrapyard and sold to millionaire Alfredo Belpone in Bresica, Italy, who retained all of its racing modifications. To issue an invoice, the company needed a production certificate, and the Jota was given chassis number 5084, an SV-continuation number. The car was restored with the retention of its racing upgrades and sent to Belpone, but it would not be in his possession for long. According to a research document, the car crashed and burned on a closed autostrada while being tested. The original (and intended to be only) Jota was never rebuilt. Nevertheless, the memory of the ultimate Miura never escaped both Bob Wallace and enthusiasts outside the factory. As word of Wallace’s modifications and the SVJ spread, customers began to request similar options and modifications to their cars. Lamborghini obliged, and five (or up to seven, depending on the source) Miura SVJs were built. These cars retained their original interior creature comforts but were modified to receive the body modifications and engine tuning of the SVJ, along with exhaust, suspension, and brake cooling upgrades. CHASSIS NUMBER 4892: A TRUE FACTORY SVJ CONVERSION Prior to its conversion to Jota specifications, chassis number 4892 was constructed by the factory in July 1971 as a Miura SV that was finished in white with a blue interior. The car remained in Italy and was sold new to a Dr. Alcide, of Rome. It is not known when the conversion was done precisely, but a letter issued by Lamborghini in 1974 listed it as a “P400 Miura SV Mod. Jota” at that time, which confirms that the conversion was done within three years following its production. Mechanically, chassis number 4892 received slight engine tuning and was fitted with a wet-sump engine. It was refinished red at that time and imported to Japan by Tomita Automobile Inc. The car then passed through two subsequent owners before Kazuo Takahashi restored it in the late 1980s. After moving to the United States in 2007, it was purchased by a collector residing in northeastern Pennsylvania. The Miura was then shown at the 2007 William K. Vanderbilt Jr. Concours d’Elegance in Newport, Rhode Island, where it earned the Vanderbilt Award. In May 2007, chassis number 4892 was inspected by Claudi Zampolli, a former Lamborghini employee who was in charge of the company’s Special Projects Division from 1967 to 1972. Zampolli confirmed in a letter that this particular car has all the correct features of the factory-modified SV-Jotas, furthering the belief that this is one of the true factory-modified cars. It was then decided that the car would be fully restored by Miura expert Gary Bobileff, a process which took two years and cost $225,000. The car was painted its current shade of Rosso Granada following its completion, which was photographically documented every step of the way. Bobileff found this car to be an excellent example of the breed, as it showed no evidence of accident damage and was in excellent mechanical shape even before the restoration. The car was acquired by its current custodian in 2010 and has been sparingly driven and expertly maintained and preserved in his custody. The current owner of this Jota also took the time to research the car’s history and contacted Bob Wallace before his passing. Through this interaction, Wallace was able to confirm that the car was indeed converted to Jota specifications at the factory. The car is still in excellent shape both cosmetically and mechanically, and it would be an ideal acquisition for anyone looking for a Miura that would stand out from the rest. Included with the sale of this car is an extensive file containing letters from Automobili Lamborghini, Claudio Zampoli, and Bob Wallace, as well as restoration photos and documents. SVJ-specification Miuras are examples of “what could have been” had Lamborghini taken Bob Wallace’s advice and decided to go racing, and they are without a doubt some of the most interesting cars to have ever left Sant’Agata. This Miura SVJ, one of only a handful of its kind built as an homage to the original SVJ, would be an ideal entrant for either concours or track events anywhere in the work. As such, it is an important part of Lamborghini history, harkening back to a car that was the pinnacle of Lamborghini engineering and development at its time. Any Miura is a beautiful car to behold, either at a standstill or at speed, and this SVJ takes the revered Miura to the next level. Addendum This title is in transit. Chassis no. 4892 Engine no. 30640

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
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1929 Duesenberg Model J Disappearing Top Convertible Coupe by The Walter M. Murphy Co.

265 bhp, 420 cu in DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine with four valves per cylinder and hemispherical combustion chambers, three-speed manual transmission, beam-type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5" • First chassis-only purchase from Duesenberg Inc. • Bespoke coachwork for Mr. & Mrs. Harry Robinson • True custom coachwork; ACD certified • Recent concours restoration by Fran Roxas The announcement of the Model J shook the industry and even momentarily halted trading on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. The first opportunity members of the public had to see the new car was at a chassis display at the 1929 New York Auto Show. Hundreds came to see this new wonder and they were not disappointed: there on the floor was a brand new, bare chassis on display. Duesenberg J-108/2134 was purchased by the wife of department store scion Mr. Harry Robinson, of Los Angeles, in the spring or summer of 1929, and it was notable as the first chassis-only purchase from Duesenberg Inc. The Robinsons were good clients of the firm. In J.L. Ebert’s Duesenberg: the Mightiest American Motor Car, a letter written by Mrs. Robinson, identified as “Mrs. H. R., of Beverly Hills,” writes, “I am happy to talk of our Duesenbergs—we have had four three-special bodies. My husband’s white car, a green sports sedan—with the back seat higher than the driver’s—and two town cars… My most beautiful 1929 town car I still use daily.” The Robinsons, in fact, owned three or four Model A Duesenbergs, and by the time that J-108, their first Model J, was ordered, they would have had plenty of experience in specifying the appearance of a new car. The rolling chassis was delivered to the Walter M. Murphy Company, where it was clothed with a full custom body in the form of this disappearing top convertible coupe. It can be presumed that either Mrs. Robinson, or both she and her husband, had a hand in influencing the sketches penned by Murphy’s designers. Other notable Murphy features include the steeply raked windshield, front-hinged doors, rounded side panels, and a slightly vee-crowned rear deck lid that hints at a vestigial tail fin. The body was painted white, as was the chassis, which would only have been done at the direction of the client. A photographic print included in the file depicts a very smartly dressed lady, perhaps Mrs. Robinson, leaning against the door of the new Duesenberg, one foot propped up on the running board. At some point, chassis 2134 was sent to the factory to be equipped with radiator shutters, as well as a Stromberg downdraft carburetor. In 1934, it was driven by Ginger Rogers in The Gay Divorcee, and a later photograph included in the file depicts Ms. Rogers with the car. The second owner of 2134 is believed to be a Mrs. Cody, followed by Marshall Merkes, of Glendale, California, until 1947. J-108/2134 was then purchased by a Mr. Ed Griffin, and later his widow, until 1960, when it was purchased out of the estate by Mr. Gerald Strohecker, of Oregon, who restored it with Mr. Charles F. Norris, of Portland, Oregon. It was later willed to Norris upon his death, along with two other Duesenberg Js. Marque expert Brian Joseph performed mechanical maintenance on the car while in Mr. Ken McBride’s ownership in the mid-2000s, which included installation of new transmission bearings; a rebuild of the differential, which included a high-speed ring and pinion, as well as new differential and torque tube bearings; a rebuild of the lower chain tensioner and a new cam timing set; porcelain coating of the exhaust manifold; rebuilding of the fuel gauge; installation of a new wiring harness; rebuilding of the radiator shutter thermostat; rebuilding of the wiper motor; replacement of the right tie rod end; and a check and adjustment of the brakes, including installation of one new wheel cylinder. It later passed to the current vendor, who, after a time, commissioned Fran Roxas to perform a full concours-quality restoration, which was completed in 2010. As-restored, it shows a mere 73 miles on the odometer and is finished as it originally was, in white with matching white chassis, and sports a flawless, highly attractive, light camel leather interior with tan carpeting. The chromed wire wheels are shod with sleek blackwall tires, which focus attention on the quality of the early Murphy convertible coachwork. It is also equipped with the original dual side-mounted spare tires with pedestal mirrors and retains all of the unique Murphy features that make this a one-off custom. In May 2012, it was awarded Best of Show at the second annual Celebration of Automobiles, which took place at the Indianapolis Speedway on the opening day of the historic 500 race. As presented, it would make a great tourer or concours entry and also retains ACD certification D-065. It has been featured in Fred Roe’s Duesenberg: The Pursuit of Perfection, as well as twice in the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club newsletter. The new owner can be assured that with the quality of the Roxas restoration behind it, it will remain in high-point condition, as long as it is well looked after, and will remain a truly unique, exceptional example of the fabled marque. Chassis no. 2134 Engine no. J-108 Body no. 102

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-08-17
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Talbot Lago T26 Grand Sport SWB par Saoutchik - 1949

Talbot Lago T26 Grand Sport SWB par Saoutchik - 1949 Vendue sans carte grise Châssis n°110109 Moteur n°118 - Châssis SWB T26 Grand Sport rare et authentique - Un chef d'œuvre de la carrosserie française - Commandé directement par Saoutchik à Talbot - Exposé à de multiples salons à l'époque - Jamais vue dans un Concours d'Elégance modernes - Ex-Salon de Genève de 1950, Ex-Salon de Londres de 1951 La Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport châssis n°110109 fut délivrée le 5 novembre 1949 à la Carrosserie Saoutchik au 46, rue Jacques Dulud à Neuilly. Seulement 29 Grand Sport châssis courts (265cm), dérivées des voitures de courses, furent construits par Talbot entre 1948 et 1952. La T26GS n°110109 fait parti de ces châssis très rares et extrêmement désirables. Sur la fiche de construction de Talbot, reproduite dans le livre de Peter M. Larsen et M. Ben Erickson, Talbot-Lago Grand Sport - The Car From Paris, " Saoutchik " est inscrit aussi bien dans le champ carrosserie que dans le champ clients. Ce qui indique que Saoutchik a commandé le châssis n°110109 directement à l'usine Talbot-Lago, pour être carrossé à ses frais avec l'objectif de l'exposer lors de salon. On remarquera que le moteur 118 est le bon numéro de moteur installé par Talbot dans le châssis. Le décalage entre le numéro du moteur et celui du châssis est du au système interne de numérotation utilisé par Talbot-Lago. Ce qui est évident d'après la fiche de construction du n°110109. Saoutchik habilla le châssis d'un élégant design coupé fastback, qui avait été exposé pour la première fois au Salon de Paris de 1948. Seulement 6 châssis Grand Sport reçurent cette carrosserie fuselée. Les deux premiers d'entre eux avaient une hauteur de pavillon basse. Lorsque l'on se rendu compte que la voiture était difficile à conduire, une nouvelle version avec une hauteur de pavillon légèrement plus importante fut développée. Quatre coupés aux " hauts pavillons " furent réalisés, et le châssis n°110109 est l'un d'entre eux. Ce coupé par son design aux lignes sophistiquées et courbées, est considéré par beaucoup comme l'une des plus belles conduites intérieures jamais construites et comme le chef d'œuvre de la carrosserie française d'Après-guerre. Saoutchik ayant créé cette automobile pour mettre ses talents en exergue, le châssis n° 110109 reçu la quasi-totalité des améliorations esthétiques qui étaient proposées sur le " menu " de personnalisation du carrossier. Ainsi, de charmants motifs chromés imitant les lignes des coquilles Saint Jacques ornent les garde-boues, tandis qu'un superbe profil de lance se dessine sur le côté de la carrosserie. Afin de faire ressortir ces nombreux embellissements chromés, le châssis n°110109 reçu une peinture bleu royal avec un intérieur contrastant par son ton légèrement plus clair. On le dota d'une élégante calandre traitée en trois parties et la majorité des chromes fut considérablement plus large, épais et long que sur les cinq autres coupés réalisés à partir de ce design. Pour finir ce mélange flamboyant, Saoutchik équipa n°110109 de hublots en forme de larme, inspiré de ceux de la marque Buick, sur le côté du capot. Pierre Saoutchik réservait cet élément à ces plus somptueux designs et n°110109 est le seul coupé T26 Grand Sport à posséder ces hublots. Il fut immatriculé 8-RS 3 et Saoutchik commanda des photos promotionnelles peu de temps après sa finalisation. Un shooting de la voiture, accompagnée d'un chic mannequin parisien, se déroula dans le Bois de Boulogne, qui avait déjà été le lieu de précédentes séances photos de Saoutchik. Pierre Abeillon, historien reconnu et spécialiste de Talbot-Lago, estima que 110109 était perdu, affirmant que : " …même le Club Talbot n'avait pas la moindre idée d'où elle se trouvait, ni même si elle existait toujours. " Heureusement, n°110109 n'est pas perdu bien qu'une bonne partie de son histoire reste inconnue. Etant le fer de lance de Saoutchik, la voiture fut exposée dans plusieurs salons importants. Tout d'abord en Suisse où elle participa au salon de Genève en Mars 1950. Dans la même livrée qu'au shooting du Bois de Boulogne, la voiture fut installée entourée de nombreuses plantes rendant la scène presque tropicale. Après le Salon de Genève, on rapatria 110109 en France et en juin 1950, la voiture reçu le Grand Prix d'honneur au Gala d'été de la Presse à Charbonnières, près de Lyon. Elle portait le numéro 8 et fut présentée par les Frères Dumont, concessionnaires Talbot à Lyon. Les Frères Dumont ne réussirent pas à vendre n°110109 et il semble que la voiture passa entre les mains de plusieurs concessionnaires Talbot. Il est plus probable que n°110109 fut toujours la propriété de Saoutchik, qui s'abstint de l'exposer au Salon de Paris en octobre 1950, mettant à la place la Talbot-Lago Grand Sport châssis n°110119. La prochaine exposition de 110109 fut au Salon de Bruxelles de janvier 1951. Le concessionnaire Talbot belge, Guerret, réserva un grand stand où était aussi exposé 110120, le troisième Grand Sport cabriolet de Saoutchik. Pour ce salon, n°110109 se refit une beauté avec une combinaison de peinture bicolore : les coques des ailes furent peintes dans une nuance contrastée plus claire, peut-être pour être assorti avec l'intérieur. La dernière sortie contemporaine du n°110109 eu lieu au Salon Automobile de Londres en mars 1951. 110109 ne se vendit pas au Salon de Londres et retourna en France. Au départ équipée d'une plaque-châssis LAGO, la voiture indiquait que Saoutchik avait l'intention de l'exporter, car les voitures pour la France portaient le nom TALBOT. Nous n'avons pas plus de photographies ou d'éléments historiques pour nous aider à reconstruire les décennies suivantes. Il semble qu'à la fin, la voiture passa toute sa vie en France et ne quitta plus le pays, bien que la plaque LAGO, rare, soit restée sur le pare-feu. Finalement, 110109 fut acquise par Roger Baillon et resta dans sa collection jusqu'à maintenant. Avant de mourir, Roger Baillon confia qu'il avait achetée 35 ans plus tôt, n°110109 dans l'est de la France, il l'aurait donc acquise autour de 1980. Déjà à l'époque, la voiture était dans un état de sortie de grange et avait eu un accident à l'arrière. Cependant, comme Roger Baillon acheta la plupart de ces voitures avant 1968, et que n°110109 était non loin de son Hispano-Suiza Million-Guiet et de la Delahaye Faget-Varnet, pendant de nombreuses années, il existe une forte probabilité que la voiture fût acquise bien avant 1980. Roger Baillon fut le gardien d'automobiles fantastiques. Parmi elles, 110109 fut installée, à côté d'une Delahaye 235 Chapron, sous un abri, ne fournissant que peu de protection contre les éléments. Et, pourtant, ce magnifique coupé y reposa plus de trois décennies. Présenté aujourd'hui aux enchères, il apparait comme l'une des sorties granges les plus exceptionnelles du siècle. Que son prochain propriétaire choisisse de conserver110109 en une pièce de musée ou bien de lui rendre sa gloire d'antan, l'opportunité d'acquérir cette prouesse suprême de la carrosserie française dans un état non restauré ne se représentera plus jamais. 110109 est destiné à devenir la pièce maitresse de toute grande collection. Unregistered Chassis # 110109 Engine # 118 - Extremely rare and genuine SWB T26 Grand Sport chassis - A chef d'oeuvre of French coachbuilding - Commissioned by Saoutchik directly from Talbot - Shown at multiple Salons in period - Never shown at any modern concours - Ex Geneva Show 1950, Ex London Motorshow 1951 Talbot Lago T26 Grand Sport chassis 110109 was delivered on November 5, 1949 to the Carrosserie Saoutchik at no. 46 rue Jacques Dulud in Neuilly-sur-Seine. Only 29 short wheelbase (265 cm) race-derived Grand Sport chassis were constructed by Talbot between 1948 and 1952. T26GS 110109 is one of these very rare and extremely desirable chassis. On the Talbot build sheet, which is reproduced in the book Talbot-Lago Grand Sport - The Car From Paris by Peter M. Larsen and Ben Erickson, "Saoutchik" is written into both the carrosserie and the client fields. This indicates that Saoutchik ordered chassis 110109 directly from the Talbot-Lago factory to be bodied at his own expense for show purposes. It should also be noted that engine 118 is the correct engine number installed by Talbot in this chassis. The number discrepancy between engine and chassis number is due to the internal numbering system used by Talbot-Lago. This is evident on the build sheet for 110109. Saoutchik fitted chassis 110109 with an exquisite fastback coupé design which had first been shown at the 1948 Paris Salon. A total of six Grand Sport chassis received this swoopy body. The first two had a low roofline. When it was discovered that the car was difficult to drive, a new version was developed with a slightly higher roofline. Four of these "high-roof" coupés were built, and 110109 is one of these four cars. This coupé design with its complex and sweeping lines is regarded by many as one of the most beautiful closed cars ever built and as the chef d'oeuvre of postwar French coachbuilding. Since Saoutchik was building this car to show off his talents, 110109 received virtually every styling enhancement on the rather comprehensive Saoutchik "menu". This included lovely chromed scallops on the fenders and an exciting sweep-spear on the body side. In order to make the many chromed embellishments stand out, 110109 was painted a single royal blue color with a lighter contrasting interior. It received an elegant three piece-grille treatment, and most of the brightwork was substantially wider, thicker and longer than on the five other coupés built to this design. To round off this flamboyant concoction, Saoutchik gave 110109 Buick-inspired teardrop-shaped "portholes" on the side of the hood, an item which Pierre Saoutchik reserved for his most sumptuous designs. 110109 is the only T26 Grand Sport Saoutchik coupé to feature these portholes. 110109 was registered 8-RS 3, and Saoutchik commissioned promotional photos shortly after its completion. With a chic Parisian fashion model striking various elegant poses around the car, 110109 was shot on a location in the Bois de Boulogne, which had been the scene of previous Saoutchik photo shoots. Well-known Talbot-Lago historian Pierre Abeillon regarded 110109 as a lost car, stating that "…even the Club Talbot did not have a clue where it is currently located, that is if it still exists". Fortunately, 110109 is not lost, although a good deal of its history remains unknown. Being a Saoutchik "workhorse", the car was displayed at several of the important Salons when new. First, 110109 went to Switzerland, where it was shown in Geneva in March 1950. Painted in a single color as in the Bois de Boulogne photo shoot, 110109 was displayed there with enough potted plants around it to make the setting look almost tropical. After the Geneva show, 110109 went back to France. In June 1950, it received the Grand Prix d'honneur at the Gala d'Été de la Presse (Summer Gala of the Press) in Charbonnières close to Lyon. The car carried the number 8 and was presented by the Dumont Frères, who were the Talbot concessionaries in Lyon. Dumont Frères were not able to sell 110109, and it seems that the car then entered into a series of transshipments between several Talbot dealers. 110109 was most likely still owned by Saoutchik, who refrained from showing it at the Paris Salon in October 1950, displaying Talbot-Lago Grand Sport 110119 instead. Next outing for 110109 was the Brussels Show in January 1951. Guerret, the Belgian Talbot concessionary, had taken a large stand, where he also displayed 110120, the third Grand Sport convertible by Saoutchik. For this show, 110109 had been freshened with a two-tone paint scheme: the fender inserts were now painted a lighter contrasting shade, perhaps matching the interior. The final contemporary airing of 110109 was the London Motor Show in March of 1951. 110109 did not sell at the London show and went back to France. It was originally fitted with a LAGO chassis plate which indicates that Saoutchik intended to export the car, as cars for France were badged TALBOT. There is no further history or photographic material which can help document the ensuing decades. It seems that in the end, the car spent its entire life in France and never again left the country, although the rare LAGO plate remains on the firewall. 110109 was eventually acquired by Roger Baillon, where it has remained part of the Baillon collection until now. Before his death, Baillon revealed that he purchased 110109 about 35 years ago in the east of France, which would date his acquisition to around 1980. Already then, 110109 was in barnfind condition and had been rear-ended, or had an accident to the rear. However, since it is known that Roger Baillon bought most of his classics prior to 1968, and 110109 was located for untold years next to his Hispano-Suiza by Million-Guiet and Delahaye by Faget-Varnet, there is the distinct possibility that 110109 was acquired earlier than 1980. Baillon was a hoarder of fantastical automobiles. He placed 110109 in a lean-to shed in his collection alongside a Delahaye 235 Chapron coach, which did not provide much in the way of protection against the elements. There, this gorgeous coupé rested for more than three decades. It is now coming to auction as one of the most important barnfinds of the decade. Irrespective of whether the coming owner desires to preserve 110109 as a cultural artefact or bring the car back to its former glory, the opportunity to acquire this unrestored crowning achievement of French coachbuilding will never be repeated. 110109 is destined to be the unique centerpiece of any prominent collection. Estimation 400 000 - 600 000 € Sold for 1,702,000 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2015-02-06
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1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta Lusso by Scaglietti

Restored in 2005–2006 to Concours standards and used sparingly since Repainted and re-trimmed in 2015 to original colour combination by DK Engineering One of just 350 250 GT/L Berlinetta Lussos constructed Arguably the most elegant model of the 250 GT series of Ferraris Ferrari Classiche certified Chassis 5783 GT was delivered new to Signora Mario Damasio of Rome on 6 July 1964, finished in the distinguished colour scheme of Grigio Fumo (Smoke Grey) with black leather interior. Bearing the registration ROMA 757889, the car was used extensively by Signora Damasio and, according to Ferrari ‘Assistenza Clienti’ maintenance records, had already covered almost 32,000 kilometres by the time of its third service at Maranello in August 1966. In December 1971, the registration papers were revoked by the Automobile Club d’Italia following the export of the car to the United States. The next recorded reference to 5783 GT was in the December 1982 Ferrari Market Letter, in which Steve Forristall’s GT Cars of Houston, Texas, advertised the car for sale. Interestingly, the car was referred to as ‘silver with black interior, with excellent mechanicals and low mileage’, suggesting that at this point it still retained its original paint and trim. Thereafter, the car remained in Texas, until sold by Kehl Motor Service of San Antonio in 1987, ultimately making its way to Lyle Tanner Enterprises of Carson, California, later that year. Around this time, the car received a re-spray in Rosso Corsa and was re-trimmed in tan leather, as well as an engine rebuild and brake system overhaul. In 2002, the car was sold to Tiziano Carugati in Switzerland, and from 2005 to 2006, the car was completely restored by Sportgarage Bruno Wyss of Zofingen, a photographic record of which accompanies the car. This included another re-spray in Rosso Corsa and a re-trim in black leather, with Ferrari Classiche certification being obtained simultaneously. The car passed through the Netherlands, prior to being sold to UK-based Kuwaiti businessman Fawaz Al Hasawi in 2011, at which point the car was re-registered in the UK with the period-correct registration number EBY 559B. The vendor acquired the car in 2015, and it was restored once again, by Ferrari specialists DK Engineering, whose brief was to return the car to its original colour scheme. Now immaculately presented, and accompanied by a complete tool kit as well as photos of both the Bruno Wyss and DK Engineering restorations, this most stylish and practical example of the magnificent 250 GT series is ready to be enjoyed immediately by its fortunate new owner. • Restaurata a livello di Concorso negli anni 2005-2006 e usata pochissimo da allora vernice e tappezzeria rifatte nel 2015, secondo la combinazione colori originali, dalla DK Engineering • Una delle sole 350 250 GT / L Berlinetta Lusso costruite • Probabilmente la versione più elegante dell’intera serie Ferrari 250 GT • Certificata Ferrari Classiche La vettura con telaio numero 5783 GT è stata consegnata nuova alla Signor Mario Damasio di Roma il 6 luglio 1964, rifinita nella combinazione di colori Grigio Fumo con interni in pelle nera. Immatricolata con targa ROMA 757889, la vettura è stata ampiamente utilizzata dalla Signor Damasio e, secondo i registri di manutenzione del reparto 'Assistenza Clienti’ della Ferrari, aveva già percorso circa 32.000 chilometri quando ha effettuato il terzo tagliando a Maranello, nell'Agosto del 1966. Nel dicembre del 1971 i documenti della vettura sono stati restituiti all’Automobile Club d’Italia e l’auto radiata a seguito dell'esportazione negli Stati Uniti. La traccia successiva conosciuta della 5783 GT è nella rivista Ferrari Market Letter del Dicembre 1982, in cui la GT Cars di Houston, Texas, di Steve Forristall, pubblicizza l'auto in vendita. È interessante notare che la macchina veniva descritta come ‘argento con interni neri, in eccellenti condizioni meccaniche e pochi chilometri’, suggerendo che, in quel momento, conservasse ancora la sua vernice e tappezzeria originali. Successivamente l'auto è rimasta in Texas, fino a quando, alla fine del 1987, è stata venduta dalla Kehl Motor Service di San Antonio alla Lyle Tanner Enterprises di Carson, in California. E’ questo il momento in cui la vettura viene riverniciata di colore Rosso Corsa e l’interno rivestito utilizzando una pelle di colore marrone chiaro, mentre il motore viene rifatto ed i freni revisionati. Nel 2002 la macchina viene venduta a Tiziano Carugati, in Svizzera, e, dal 2005 al 2006, completamente restaurata dallo Sportgarage Bruno Wyss di Zofingen. Una completa documentazione fotografica di questi lavori, accompagna la vettura. Il restauro, alla conclusione del quale è stata rilasciata la certificazione di Ferrari Classiche, ha incluso una nuova verniciatura in colore Rosso Corsa e un nuovo rivestimento degli interni in pelle nera. La 250 GTL è poi transitata nei Paesi Bassi prima di essere venduta, nel 2011 all'uomo d'affari Kuwaitiano Fawaz Al Hasawi che l’immatricola in Inghilterra, con il numero di targa, corretto per il periodo di costruzione della vettura, EBY 559B. Il venditore ha acquistato l'auto nel 2015 e, ancora una volta, l’ha sottoposta ad un restauro. Incaricato del compito, lo specialista Ferrari, DK Engineering. Obiettivo dei lavori, riportare la macchina al suo schema di colori originario. Presentata ora in condizioni immacolate, completa del kit attrezzi e accompagnata dalle foto di entrambi i restauri, sia quello di Bruno Wyss sia quello della DK Engineering, questo esemplare della più elegante e pratica versione della magnifica serie 250 GT, è pronto per essere immediatamente goduto appieno dal suo fortunato nuovo proprietario. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue, the tool kit is a reproduction. Si fa presente che, contrario al catalogo, la borsa degli attrezzi è una riproduzione. Chassis no. 5783

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
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1934 Mercedes-Benz 500 K Cabriolet A by Sindelfingen

100/180 hp, 4,984 cc OHV inline eight-cylinder engine with Roots-type supercharger, four-speed manual transmission, double wishbone independent front suspension with coil springs, swing-axle rear suspension with coil springs, and four-wheel hydraulically assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 129.5 in. Offered from over 25 years in a distinguished private collection Originally delivered in Switzerland to the Bally footwear family Formerly owned by Walter M. Halle and the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum One of only 33 500 K Cabriolet As built; original chassis, engine, and body A wonderful 500 K with limited ownership and well-known provenance The Mercedes-Benz 500 K was introduced at the Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung, more commonly referred to as the Berlin Motor Show, in March 1934. Although it was produced alongside the 380 K, it was planned as a successor model to satiate the expressed interest of Mercedes-Benz’s wealthy clientele for a luxury conveyance that produced more power. The 500 K succeeded to this end, with the 380 being phased out by the end of 1934. The 500 K embodied a generously braced chassis with fully independent suspension and, of course, an engine with an increased bore and stroke, which created 4,984 cubic centimeters of displacement. Its output was 100 horsepower in normal operation and an impressive 160 horsepower with the supercharger engaged. This power unit was mated to a four-speed gearbox, with direct ratio in third gear and the fourth gear acting as an overdrive unit. The result was a sensation, and ultimately, 342 clients, mainly from Europe, England, and North America, visited their local Mercedes-Benz dealers to place an order for the new car. MR. HALLE’S 500 K That gorgeous 1935 [sic] Mercedes-Benz that used to collect crowds in front of Halle’s and elsewhere soon will collect them at the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum. –Marjorie Alge of the Cleveland Press, 19 June 1971 Among the most desirable open body styles for the 500 K, short of the famed Spezial Roadster, was and remains the early Cabriolet A, which retains the best elements of its predecessor, the SSK, including long sweeping front fenders, a low top and windshield, dual rear-mounted spares, and, most stunningly, a passenger compartment moved far back on the chassis frame. The Cabriolet A offered here is recorded on its factory build paperwork, copies of which are on file, as having been kommission number 16533, originally delivered through Mercedes-Benz AG of Zurich, Switzerland, to 30-year-old Curt Alexander Bally of nearby Schönenwerd on 21 September 1934. Mr. Bally’s family were proprietors of the Bally shoe company, established in 1851 and still a respected luxury footwear brand to this day. In 1951, the 500 K was acquired in Switzerland – possibly from Mr. Bally himself – by Walter M. Halle of Cleveland, Ohio, for whom it underwent a five-year restoration. The second-generation proprietor of Cleveland’s most prestigious department store, Halle Brothers, Mr. Halle was widely credited with establishing the business into an icon of high-end fashion in the city while also expanding its business into the burgeoning post-war suburbs. He was a sportsman and a socialite who loved Mercedes-Benzes, and who made them part of his public image; the 500 K was joined in his stable in 1956 by a new 300 SL Gullwing. Both cars were finished in the company color, Halle Green, and both could often be admired from a prime parking space in front of Halle Brothers at 1228 Euclid Avenue, as their owner often drove them to work! It was only when advancing age and illness – as well as the city’s increasingly crowded streets – limited his ability to drive the 500 K in Cleveland traffic that Mr. Halle retired the car from the road. As a longtime supporter of the Western Reserve Historical Society, he gave both the 500 K and the 300 SL to the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum in 1971, shortly before his passing, noting, “I’m surprised the kids are so interested in it. I think one reason is because they can see how it functions better than a modern car.” The 500 K remained on display in the museum for nearly two decades and became a very well-known and much-loved example of its kind, just as the Cleveland Press had predicted. It was with heavy hearts that it was finally sold back into private hands in 1990, when it joined the collection of its current owner, who has maintained it now for over a quarter of a century. The owner commissioned a restoration of the car later in the 1990s, at which time the car was refinished in its present livery, scarlet with a light tan interior piped in red, a matching top, chrome wire wheels with whitewall tires, and a radiator stone guard. It retains its original data plate, a most desirable feature and reassuring evidence of its authenticity, as well as a FIVA identity card. Benefitting from several decades of continuous and well-known ownership history, this wonderful 500 K has had only three owners since 1951. It would undoubtedly become a favorite in its new ownership, just as it was a favorite of a lucky businessman and of those Clevelanders of a certain age, for whom the sound of its engine, purring away from Halle Brothers, will not soon be forgotten. Chassis no. 105391 Engine no. 105391 Body no. 813702

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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1954 Bentley R-Type Continental Fastback Sports Saloon by H.J. Mulliner

178 bhp, 4,566 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors, four-speed automatic transmission, independent front suspension with wishbones, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar; live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs; and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 120 in. A genuine left-hand drive, U.S.-delivery example One of only nine LHD examples equipped with the advanced Cadillac-derived automatic transmission Well-documented and distinguished provenance; five owners from new Fresh, exhaustive, body-off restoration by marque specialists Wonderful original color combination; matching-numbers original engine Factory original handbook, tools, and rare Continental Spares Touring Kit THE MODERN MAGIC CARPET Even after becoming the “Silent Sports Car” in the mid-1930s, Bentley held tight to its performance heritage. Later in the decade, the company began experimenting with aerodynamic designs and eventually created the Georges Paulin-designed Corniche prototype of 1940. While the Corniche did not survive World War II, its spirit did, and after the War, it evolved into H.I.F. Evernden and J.P. Blatchley’s R-Type Continental. It is “a car which would not only look beautiful but possess a high maximum speed, coupled with a correspondingly high rate of acceleration, together with excellent handling and roadability.” H.J. Mulliner was contracted to design and clothe the prototype Continental, which was based on the frame, suspension, steering, and braking components of a standard R-Type. Numerous components, notably including the entire body, were built of light alloy, resulting in a four-passenger body that weighed only 750 pounds and less than 4,000 pounds when mated to the chassis. After extensive road tests in France, the prototype’s overdriven top-gear gearbox was found to be unsuitable for the rpms offered by the engine, so it was replaced by a direct-ratio top gear and lower axle ratio, which was a combination that proved best for both high-speed touring and well-spaced gear changes for city driving. Of the 207 production Continentals built between May 1952 and April 1955, Mulliner would body 193 of them to variations of their prototype design, which was dubbed the Sports Saloon. The Mulliner-bodied R-Type Continental created a space for itself that was unique. It combined the swiftness of a Jaguar XK, the driver-friendly agility of an Alfa Romeo, and the luxuriant comfort of a Rolls-Royce in one elite, built-to-order package that cost $18,000, making it the world’s most expensive series production car as well as the fastest four-seater any money could buy. In the early 1950s, there was no other automobile quite like it in the world, which made it a “must-have” for heads of state, captains of industry, as well as the burgeoning jet set. James Bond drove a version he had Mulliner re-body from a wreck in the 1961 novel Thunderball. Famously, in the words of Autocar magazine, it was “a modern magic carpet.” In the words of modern BDC members: “Best car I have ever owned.” “Hope to take it to Heaven with me!” “Would not swap it for a thousand camels, even in the middle of the desert.” CHASSIS NUMBER BC66LC Of the 193 Fastback Sports Saloons produced by H.J. Mulliner on the R-Type Continental chassis, only 43 were left-hand drive from new, and of those 43, a mere nine were fitted with an automatic gearbox, a reliable GM-based Hydra-Matic 4-speed transmission. Those who may scoff at the automatic gearbox will be enlightened to know that the automatic transmission has a higher final drive ratio, giving the automatic cars the highest top speed of any R-Type Continental – making them truly the “fastest of the fastest” four-seat production automobiles of their era. The rare factory left-hand drive, automatic gearbox example offered here, chassis number BC66LC, was originally delivered by J.S. Inskip to prominent yachtsman John Dimick at his Constitution Avenue address in Washington, D.C. Copies of the original build documents, which are on file, indicate that the car received such bespoke features as Wilmot Breeden bumpers, sealed beam headlamps, flashing turn indicators, twin fog lamps, right-hand-door locks, and “radio delete” (to lighten the weight of the completed car). The Bentley remained with Mr. Dimick for 10 years, after which it was owned by B.R. Franko-Filipasic of Morristown, Pennsylvania, the inventor and patent-holder to an innovative flame-resistant fabric. It was subsequently owned by longtime collector William T. DiCurcio of New Jersey, from whom it was acquired by the renowned film actor and automotive connoisseur, Nicolas Cage. Cage, in turn, sold the car in 2008 to its current owner, only the fifth since new. During the intervening years, the car underwent a true body-off, frame-up restoration contracted out to various California Bay Area craftsmen for each important sequence, mainly Bentley and Rolls-Royce experts, with invoices and a huge quantity of impressive progress photos available upon request. Every single component was removed, cleaned, stripped, and then correctly plated, painted, or repaired; what few components required replacement were changed out for authentic original parts. The body was stripped to bare metal, revealing in the process the original and highly attractive Silver Blue paint color, which has been faithfully and flawlessly reproduced. Original Connolly hide color numbers were researched, allowing the Light Blue interior to be recreated, along with the correct carpeting, headliner, and trim. The woodwork, instruments, and interior hardware were restored and refitted by a Bentley Works-trained specialist. A Pebble Beach Bentley team judge was retained to act as consulting supervisor during restoration to warrant authenticity and accuracy of detail. The freshly completed car is accompanied to the new owner by its aforementioned factory build records, along with an original hardcover owner’s handbook, complete sets of road and hand tools, and the rare and valuable Continental Touring Spares Kit that was available from the factory. Simply put, this rare and exquisite left-hand drive example stands ready to become the finest R-Type Continental on the show circuit, and the most beautifully, correctly restored example to be offered at public sale in recent memory. Addendum Please note the shift linkage into reverse has developed a problem which will be resolved post-sale at the consignor’s expense. The consignor has agreed to deliver the car to the new owner, to any location in the US 48 states. Chassis no. BC66LC Engine no. BCC65 Body no. 5669

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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1949 Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta by Touring

Est. 140 hp, 1,995 cc SOHC V-12 engine, three Weber 32 mm DCF carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension by double wishbone and coil springs, rear live axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and trailing arms, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 86.6" - Matching numbers - The tenth of only 25 166 MM Barchettas built - Rare combination of Lusso and competition specifications - 1949 Paris show car and successful racing history, including Mille Miglia The 1948 Ferrari 166 MM is the definitive 1950s sports car configuration, with its smooth envelope, long flowing hood and short tail. Named for the Mille Miglia race, it was created by Carrozzeria Touring in Milan, and compared to the 125S, from which it was developed, the Barchetta (“little boat”) is a masterpiece of simple style. Ferrari expert and 166 MM owner David Seielstad has called it “the first beautiful Ferrari and fundamental to the brand's success,” and he continues, “its styling was unlike anything before and has influenced the design of vehicles from the AC Bristol to the latest Ferrari California.” The 166 propelled Ferrari to the top of the sports car wish list. As Dean Batchelor wrote in Automobile magazine, “the real heart of the Ferrari mystique has always been that blurry distinction between racer and road car – the 166 MM was the model that started the magic.” The 166 won its MM nametag from Ferrari’s first win in the 1948 Mille Miglia in the hands of Clemente Biondetti, who repeated the feat in 1949. And heaping coals on the “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” theory was Luigi Chinetti’s stirring victory in the 1949 Le Mans 24-hour endurance race, which was almost a solo achievement, since he drove 23.5 hours himself. In all, 25 Barchettas were built by Touring, and the car on offer is number 10. Its history is extremely interesting – not to mention nail-biting at times – just like the race for which it was named. Its survival can be attributed to determination and luck. The story is also remarkably well documented, and numerous period photos and documents accompany the car. With matching numbers, 0024 M is unusual in that it combines both the “Lusso” creature comforts with the competition package. The engine, 0022 M, which is original to this car, was fitted with three Weber 32-mm DCF carburetors, instead of the street version’s single Zenith, and “MM” pistons, which raised the compression ratio from 8:1 to 10:1. Gauges included a large tachometer, fuel pressure gauge, oil pressure gauge and oil and water temperature gauges. No odometer was fitted, as the car was intended primarily for competition. Estimated horsepower was 140, with 0-100 mph coming up in 27 seconds. Records indicate that 0024 M was fitted with Houdaille lever shocks, which it still has, a riveted 100-liter competition fuel tank with central filler and twin exhausts with minimal resonators. The five-speed gearbox was for competition, with no synchronizers. First, second and third gears were “short” for good acceleration, while fourth and fifth gears were “tall” for better top speed. A short final drive gear of 4.88 was specified, although this would be revised to 4.01 for the 1951 Mille Miglia. 0024 M was commissioned as the 1949 Paris Motor Show car and finished in Argentine racing colors – two tones of bright blue with yellow sides. The buyer of record was the Automobile Club of Argentina, and while rumors persist that it was intended as a gift to Eva Perón, it seems more likely that race driver Carlos Menditeguy was hoping to curry favor with the Peronistas and avoid the country’s ruinous import duties. In any case, Menditeguy was quite clear about why he wanted 0024 M in Argentina, and he entered the January 15th, 1950 Mar del Plata open road race. Menditeguy entered as #14, and there are numerous photos before, during and after the race, which he won easily. Unfortunately, this success softened no official hearts; the temporary importation papers were not made permanent, and 0024 M was shipped back to Italy in June 1950. The next owner bought 0024 M on November 6, 1950. He was Luigi Francesco Zaccaria Terravazzi of Nerviano, Italy, and he paid 6.2M lira for the car. It was registered in Milan as MI 158426, and Terravazzi entered it in the 18th Mille Miglia on April 28, 1951. He co-drove with Aprile Palmer taking the wheel, and the car carried #344, which it bears today. The two finished 94th overall but 8th in class, which was respectable, and there are a number of photos of the car at the race. Terravazzi sold 0024 M to Palmer shortly afterwards on May 14, 1951, and Palmer registered it on Novaro plates as NO 24870. Palmer campaigned the car only once more, at the 16th running of the Susa-Moncensio hillclimb on July 21, 1951. Carrying #90, he finished 11th overall, and this would seem to be the last time the car was raced. Palmer kept 0024 M for a year and then sold it on September 23, 1952 to Paolo Berio of Imperia, on the coast near San Remo. He registered 0024 M as IM 10193. Berio arranged to have the car re-bodied as a Berlinetta by Carrozzeria Vignale, which fitted an aluminum coupe body similar to 0128/EX, with slotted taillights. Berio didn’t keep the car long, selling it on September 4, 1954 to Francisco Rizzoli in Turin, who paid 1.2M lira and registered it as TO 168833. Rizzoli handed off 0024 M only six months later to Ermani Garbuccio, also in Turin. Then Garbuccio died suddenly on July 6, leaving his children to inherit the car on March 14, 1956. They promptly sold it on April 17 to American Theodore Pala for a mere 200,000 lire! At this point, 0024 M was painted tri-tone white over blue over grey. Ted Pala used it as a chase car to follow the 1956 Mille Miglia, then shipped the car uncrated to Los Angeles on the SS President Jackson for only $239.80. Pala registered the car in California as LGJ 694 and repainted the white portion of the body bright red. Pala began to have mechanical problems with 0024 M and removed the drive train, selling the rest of the car to Donald Oreck of Los Angeles in 1958 for $2,500. Oreck hired future Scarab lead mechanic Warren Olson to fit a Corvette 283-cubic inch V-8, gearbox and rear axle, and on completion, the car was written up by Wayne Thoms in Motor Trend’s July 1959 issue. Oreck sold the car in 1960 to Joseph Spencer, whose noteworthy contribution to 0024 M’s history was to get a parking ticket on September 3, 1961. He ignored it and a warrant for his arrest was issued in early 1962, by which time he had sold the car to Armand La Rue, who re-registered it as GWH 771, and it slipped below the radar. An original letter (included in 0024 M’s document file) from the Chief of Police of Beverly Hills was sent to La Rue asking for his assistance in locating the scofflaw Spencer! La Rue kept 0024 M until 1966 when he sold it to Peter Negri, who would own it until 1974. Meanwhile, Pala still had 0024 M’s original engine and drivetrain, which he sold to Tasso Haritos of Hackensack, New Jersey on March 27, 1962. Tasso rebuilt the engine and installed it in his Siata special, but 0024 M’s engine was now 3,000 miles away from the car. This situation would continue until October 3, 1974, when Negri sold 0024 M to Ferrari dealer and historian Stanley Nowak in Mount Vernon, New York. Nowak beavered away at the car’s history, contacting earlier owners, consulting with Briggs Cunningham and Wayne Thoms. He turned up photographs, correspondence and documents, then sold the car to Gary Schonwald for $4,000 in December 1974. Nowak wasn’t finished either. He tracked down Tasso Haritos, who still had the remains of his old Siata special, and bought it from him for $2,300, including original parts and the original 32 DCF carburetors and short block. Schonwald then purchased (via Nowak) the original engine 0022 M from John Mead in New Jersey. The whole project was delivered to Chris Leydon Restorations of Lahaska, Pennsylvania, where the Vignale Berlinetta body was removed and subsequently sold to UK dealer John Baker. At the time, Leydon had another 166 MM Barchetta in the shop and had only three days to complete a template and body buck for 0024 M, as the other car had been sold and was going to Switzerland. Meanwhile, Schonwald continued to collect information for the next 10 years, and his comprehensive files accompany the car. Keith Duly of Bethlehem, Connecticut bought 0024 M and its original engine in 1986 as part trade for an Alfa Romeo P3 and commenced a five-year restoration armed with enough information on 0024 M to get it absolutely right. He commissioned its restoration from Neil Twyman of Potter’s Bar in England. Twyman in turn sent out the engine, gearbox and rear axle work to be done by noted craftsman Jim Stokes of Idsworth, UK, while the new Barchetta body was expertly handcrafted by legendary panel-beater Bob Ford. The restoration of 0024 M was completed in late 1989, and on January 16, 1990, the car was sold to Don Young of Santa Barbara. In 1995, it was advertised in the Ferrari Market Letter and bought by prominent Japanese collector Yoshiho Matsuda, who shipped it to Tokyo. In 1996, it was featured in the Japanese Scuderia magazine and was on the cover of Prancing Horse two years later. Matsuda sold 0024 M to Yoshijuki Hayashi of Tokyo in 2006, and it returned to the US in March of 2008, sold to Robert Harris of Logan, Utah. As romances go, 0024 M would seem to have the whole package: noble birth, exciting youth, middle age and a rebirth in the hands of experts. Ferrari 166 MMs are among the most desirable Ferraris on the market, not only for their rarity but also their tremendous event potential. As offered, 0024 M would be an exciting entry at any vintage event in the world, not the least of which is the Mille Miglia Storica – an event in which this car participated, in period! Beautifully restored and complete with its original engine, this is a Ferrari worthy of the connoisseur’s close attention. Chassis no. 0024M

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-01-20
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BUGATTI T55 SUPER SPORT

BUGATTI T55 SUPER SPORT ex-Le Mans 1934 avec Charles Brunet et Freddie Zehender/ex-Bill Serri Jr. Année: 1932 Numéro de série: 55208 Numéro du moteur: 12 Moteur: huit cylindres en ligne, double arbre à came en tête, compresseur Bugatti de type Roots, 2.262cm3, 160ch à 5.000t/min; Boîte mécanique quatre vitesses; Suspension: avant semi-elliptique, arrière quart-elliptique; Freins à tambour sur les quatre roues; Volant à droite. Carrosserie Roadster Jean Bugatti, deux tons de bleu avec intérieur cuir noir. Histoire du modèle En 1927, Bugatti avait, sous la forme du Type 43 Grand Sport, produit le premier châssis équipé d'un moteur Grand Prix capable d'atteindre les 165km/h et utilisable au quotidien. C'était en fait un modèle quatre places doté d'un moteur Type 35B Grand Prix. Quand, en 1931, la série des Type 35 a cédé la place au modèle quasi-identique du Type 51 avec un moteur à double arbre à came, une version route a rapidement vu le jour. Cette version était un modèle légèrement inférieur en puissance du nouveau moteur monté sur le châssis un peu plus lourd du Type 54 Grand Prix. Mais, contrairement au Type 43, ce nouveau modèle était un deux-places qui, depuis et invariablement, est souvent présenté -de manière tout à fait justifiée- comme la Super Sport. A l'évidence, la Super Sport était la voiture exclusive du début des années 30. Même sa rivale la plus proche, l'Alfa-Romeo 8C, était produite à un plus grand nombre et la plupart d'entre elles disposaient d'un châssis long avec le plus souvent une carrosserie quatre places. A l'inverse, pratiquement la moitié des 38 Bugatti Type 55 construites étaient équipées de la carrosserie rutilante Jean Bugatti pour le roadster et coupé fermé, le roadster classic étant de loin considéré par nombre d'amateurs avertis comme la voiture de sport la plus attirante jamais offerte au grand public. Histoire spécifique de la voiture Le châssis No 55208 équipé du moteur No 12 a été assemblé en février 1932 avant d'être facturé par l'usine le 14 avril 1932 pour livraison à leur agent parisien Dominique Lamberjack. Mise à prix 72.500FF, on ne compte pas moins que cinq châssis Type 55 livrés à Lamberjack. Selon les archives de l'usine, la voiture était équipée d'une carrosserie 'Roadster Luxe' sans doute mise en place soit par l'usine ou par l'un de ses très proches associés Gangloff de Colmar, si l'on en croit la commande de son premier propriétaire dont on pense qu'il s'agit du coureur automobile amateur français Charles Brunet. Une photographie de la nouvelle voiture, entourée apparemment par des membres de la famille Brunet, montre l'immatriculation temporaire 4954W12. La trace suivante de la voiture est sa participation à l'épreuve des 24 Heures du Mans de 1934 avec Charles Brunet qui partagea la conduite avec Freddie Zehender. Sous le dossard 14, elle tenait une bonne cinquième place quand, au 75e tour vers minuit, elle a été victime d'un dérapage incontrôlé en tentant d'éviter un autre concurrent accidenté. Une autre photo de la voiture avec le dossard 14 sur ses portières et Brunet au volant avant le départ de la course montre qu'elle était équipée avec des sangles en cuir pour attacher le capot mais que tout le reste est inchangé. Une photo prise un peu plus tard se trouvant dans le Magnum de Hugh Conway montre la voiture avec l'immatriculation temporaire 4452W12 et ses sangles en cuir ainsi que le numéro de course 14 sur son radiateur. Au cours des quelques années qui ont suivi, l'histoire de cette auto est devenue un peu moins claire. On rapporte ainsi qu'elle a séjourné en l'état pendant assez longtemps à Monaco, probablement pendant toute la deuxième guerre mondiale, avant d'être rachetée par un Français du nom de Pijer, demeurant près de Lyon. Une photo de la voiture prise à cette époque la montre équipée d'ailes totalement différentes comprenant des phares. La voiture portait alors l'immatriculation 2178AB5 délivrée en avril 1949 par la préfecture de l'Ain. A la fin des années 1950, la voiture a été conduite à Nice chez Friderich pour y être restaurée. A la même époque, Friderich restaurait également un Type 55 dont le châssis portait le numéro 55218. Il s'agissait d'un roadster Jean Bugatti. Lors de cette restauration, il a été décidé d'allier la carrosserie en meilleur état de la 55218 avec le châssis superbement original et complet de cette voiture. Ce qui a donné un échange complet de la carrosserie de l'auto. La 55218 a finalement été vendue à la Collection Schlumpf où elle se trouve toujours. En 1960, la 55208 est vendue via Baer en Suisse à Edward Gilmour de New York qui a procédé au changement du bloc cylindres et des pistons. Puis en 1980, la voiture est devenue la propriété de Bill Serri Jr. un collectionneur réputé de Bugatti du New Jersey. Etat L'inspection de la voiture montre qu'elle a conservé ses éléments originaux numérotés y compris l'essieu avant, la boite et le pont arrière, le tout étant numéroté 12. L'intérieur du roadster est numéroté 27 sur un des panneaux du capot moteur, correspondant ainsi au numéro original du moteur de la voiture de laquelle il a été pris il y a près de 50 ans. De même, la voiture retient quasi tous ses accessoires d'origine dont le radiateur, les roues de route, ses instruments, ainsi que l'équipement électrique. Bien que dans un état présentable, la voiture n'est actuellement pas en état de circuler dans la mesure où le moteur n'a bénéficié que d'un assemblage précaire et qu'il faudra nécessairement un contrôle sérieux avant toute mise en route. Toutefois, il convient de noter que le moteur est complet et l'assemblage récent a été réalisé sous la direction de la firme très respectée et avisée de Paul Russell and Co. d'Essex Massachusetts. Ce type 55 propose une combinaison inégalable d'équipement complet et authentique allié à un exemple original de ce qui est généralement reconnu comme la carrosserie la plus désirable pour ce modèle rare et très recherché. The Charles Brunet & Freddie Zehender 1934 Le Mans entry ex-Bill Serri Jnr. BUGATTI TYPE 55 SUPER SPORT Year: 1932 Chassis No: 55208 Engine No: 12 Engine: eight cylinders in line, twin overhead camshafts, Roots type Bugatti supercharger, 2.262cm3, 160 bhp at 5000rpm; Gearbox four speed manual; Suspension: semi-eliptic front, quarter elliptic rear, Brakes four wheel drum: Right hand drive. Coachwork Jean Bugatti Roadster, two tone blue with black leather interior. Model History In 1927 Bugatti had produced, in the form of the Type 43 Grand Sport, the first 100mph Grand Prix-engined sporting chassis suitable for everyday road use. It was in effect a close coupled four-seater touring model powered by the supercharged Type 35B Grand Prix engine. When in 1931 the Type 35 range was superceded by the twin-camshaft engined but almost identical Type 51 a corresponding road version soon followed. This comprised a slightly detuned version of the new engine mounted in the concurrent Type 54 Grand Prix car's heavier chassis but, unlike the Type 43, this new model was invariably a two-seater which was often referred to, quite justifiably, as the Super Sport. Indeed it truly was the ultimate exclusive supercar of the early Thirties. Even its closest rival, the 8C Alfa Romeo, was produced in far greater numbers, the majority of which were in long-chassis form and often fitted with four-seater coachwork. In contrast almost half of the 38 Type 55 Bugattis built were fitted with flamboyant Jean Bugatti-designed roadster or closed coupé coachwork, the classic roadster being considered by many cognoscenti to be by far the most outstandingly attractive sports car ever offered to the motoring public. Specific history of this car Chassis No. 55208 fitted with engine No.12, was completed in chassis form in February 1932 before being invoiced by the factory on 14th April 1932 for delivery to their Parisien agent Dominique Lamberjack. Priced at 72,500 francs, it was one of no less than five Type 55 chassis delivered to Lamberjack. According to the factory records it was fitted with 'Roadster Luxe' coachwork executed presumably either by the factory or by their close associates Gangloff of Colmar, no doubt to the order of its original owner who is thought to have been the French amateur racing driver Charles Brunet. A photograph of the newly delivered car, surrounded evidently by members of the Brunet family, shows it with the temporary registration number 4954 W12. The next record of the car is when it took part in the 1934 Le Mans 24-Hour race, entered by Brunet who shared the driving with Freddie Zehender. Allocated race No. 14, it was running in a strong fifth place when, on its 75th lap at around midnight, it spun out of contention when avoiding another crashed competitor. A photograph of the car with No. 14 on its door and Brunet at its wheel before the start shows that it had been equipped with leather bonnet straps for the event but was otherwise unchanged in appearance. A later photograph of the car in Hugh Conway's Magnum shows it with the temporary registration number 4452 W12 and still with the bonnet straps, and the race No. 14 on its radiator core. Over the next few years its history becomes less clear, it was reportedly left standing in Monaco for a long period, possibly throughout the war years, before being acquired by a French man named Pijer living near Lyon. A photograph of the car on file during that period shows it fitted with completely different wings with built in headlights. It was then registered with the number 2178 AB5 which was issued in about April 1949 in the Ain region of France just to the North-east of Lyon. In the late 1950's the car was taken to Friderich in Nice for restoration, who was at the time also restoring Type 55, chassis No. 55218, a Jean Bugatti roadster. During the restoration it was decided to unite the more attractive and better condition coachwork of 55218 with the wonderfully original and complete chassis of this car. A straight switch of coachwork was performed. 55218 eventually sold to the Schlumpf Collection where it remains to this day. In 1960 55208 sold via Baer in Switzerland to Edward Gilmour of New York who overhauled the engine fitting a new cylinder block and pistons. Then in 1980, it passed to renowned Bugatti collector Bill Serri Jnr. of New Jersey. Condition Inspection of the car reveals that it retains its original numbered components, including the front axle, engine gearbox and rear axle all being numbered 12. The roadster coachwork is numbered 27 inside one bonnet panel so matching the original engine number of the car from which it was taken almost fifty years ago. Likewise it retains just about all its other original parts including its radiator, road wheels instruments and electrical equipment. Whilst in presentable overall condition the car is not currently running as the engine has only been loosely assembled, and it will need thorough checking over prior to running. Importantly though, it is complete and recent assembly work was undertaken by the highly respected firm of Paul Russell and Co. of Essex Massachusetts. This Type 55 offers the unbeatable combination of a complete set of authentic running gear allied to an original example of what is generally acknowledged as being the most desirable coachwork option ever fitted to this rare and highly sought after model.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2003-02-08
Hammer price
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2007 Peugeot 908 HDi FAP Le Mans Prototype

700+ bhp, 5,500 cc twin-turbocharged dual overhead camshaft V-12 engine, six-speed sequential manual paddle-shift gearbox, independent front and rear double-wishbone suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,950 mm (116") • 2009 Le Mans Works entry • Exceptional and undisputed racing provenance • 1st Overall at Monza, Silverstone and Spa • Groundbreaking HDi diesel-powered V-12 engine • Run by the Works-Peugeot factory race team • The first Peugeot 908 HDi to be ever offered for public sale • Rare and important milestone in motorsports history History Peugeot Talbot Sport was founded in 1981 by Jean Todt, on the initiative of Jean Boillot. Success followed soon afterwards, including a world rally title with the 205 Turbo 16, plus a long list of wins for the 205 Turbo 16 and 405 Turbo 16 in cross-country rallying. The latter two cars were indeed difficult to beat, whether on the Rallye Paris-Dakar (four wins from four starts) or on the USA’s highly specific Pikes Peak Hill Climb (two wins). At the end of the 1980s, the French firm decided to switch from these successful campaigns to the World Sportscar Championship and undertook the development of a 3.5-litre normally-aspirated engine. Its programme with the Peugeot 905 produced more wins, including a victory at Le Mans in 1992, which was followed by a one-two-three triumph at the same 24-hour race in 1993. Buoyed by these results, the Vélizy-based team used the technology it had developed for the 905’s engine to provide power to a number of Formula 1 teams from 1994 until 2000. In the 1990s, Peugeot moved away temporally from the world of circuit racing to return to rallying after an absence from this sport of more than 14 years. The target of the Sochaux-based brand was the world title, with its latest challenger: the Peugeot 206 WRC. Its efforts were rewarded by WRC crowns in 2000, 2001 and 2002, with a driver line-up led by the two-time world champion Marcus Grönholm. In 2005, Peugeot announced its decision to turn its attention to a new pioneering technological challenge, a victory at the Le Mans 24 Hours with a car powered by an HDi diesel engine equipped with a diesel particulate filter (FAP), a clean technology also seen on the make’s road cars. The programme saw Team Peugeot Total win the 2007 Le Mans Series, come first and second at Le Mans in 2009 and secure Intercontinental Le Mans Cup titles in 2010 and 2011. Chassis no. 02 The project was based on a V-12 engine, which featured a “vee” angle of 100 degrees and the biggest cubic capacity authorised by the regulations. The choice of a V-12 architecture was guided by the quest for a good balance, whilst the open angle of the “vee” allowed the centre of gravity to be lowered without compromising the powerplants torsional rigidity. Two particulate filters were located at the end of each exhaust line, a layout which permitted outstanding, smokeless performance. The two exhaust lines themselves were kept as short as possible, using six-into-one manifolds, which fed into separate Garrett turbochargers. The engine delivered peak power of more than 700 bhp and maximum torque in excess of 1,200 Nm, an unprecedented achievement for a diesel-fuelled racing engine. The chassis featured a closed cockpit, unlike the 905, which was based on a tub, to which a tubular subframe was added. The 908’s carbon monocoque ensured outstanding rigidity and was lighter than the tub design of its predecessor. Design and production of the body work only took a week, and three months after the recruitment of an aerodynamicist, a scale model was wind-tunnel tested for the first time. The front and rear pushrod suspension, electric power steering and braking all used conventional, proven solutions, whilst the electro-pneumatically controlled six-speed gearbox had the capacity to deal with the enormous torque associated with the 12-cylinder engine. Landmark Dates 28 September 2006: Presentation of the 908 concept at the Paris Motor Show. 30 September 2006: The V-12 HDi FAP engine was fired up for the first time on the dyno in Vélizy, near Paris. 31 December 2006: The 908 HDi FAP took to the track for the first time at Villacoublay, near Paris, with Eric Hélary behind the wheel. 10 January 2007: Presentation of the car to the media at Mortefontaine, near Paris, along with the drivers (Sébastien Bourdais, Marc Gené, Eric Hélary, Pedro Lamy, Nicolas Minassian, Stéphane Sarrazin and Jacques Villeneuve). Race Career Monza 2007: Début of the 908 HDi FAP, first pole position (Minassian) and first win (Minassian/Gené) Silverstone 2007: Minassian/Gené (pole position: Minassian) Interlagos 2007: Minassian/Gené (fastest race lap: Gené) Barcelona 2008: Minassian/Gené Spa 2008: Minassian/Gené/Villeneuve (fastest race lap: Gené) Spa 2009: Victory for Minassian/Pagenaud/Klien (pole position: Pagenaud) The car on display is being sold by PSA, which is a pledge of a no-nonsense transaction. It will be the first 908 HDi FAP to pass into private hands. “Starting and running this vehicle calls for specific equipment, third-party software licences and skills. The seller commits to providing the necessary technical support for a period of three years. This service will be provided at Peugeot Sport’s normal rates for technical support”. Chassis no. 02

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
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1960 MASERATI TIPO 60 BIRDCAGE 2-SEATER SPORTS-RACING

The ex-Odoardo Govoni, European Hill-climb Championship-winning, first production model 1960 MASERATI TIPO 60 BIRDCAGE 2-SEATER SPORTS-RACING ONE OWNER SINCE 1966 Registration No. Not registered Chassis No. 2460 Engine No. 2460 Racing Red with blue cloth seats. Engine; 4 cylinders in-line, engine size 2-litre, double overhead camshafts, twin ignition, 200bhp at 7,800rpm; Gearbox: five speed manual; Suspension: independent front by unequal length wishbones and coil-springs with integral hydraulic shock-absorbers: rear independent De Dion type with transverse leaf-spring and radius rods; brakes, hydraulic four-wheel disc. This astonishing machine has remained complete and original in its condition as last raced in 1964, and has been in just single ownership since being purchased by the vendor in 1966. It is a true time-warp example of the rare Type 60, being the first full-production car, after the construction of the prototype, which had subsequently been uprated by the factory to T61 specification the following year. Although Maserati withdrew from Grand Prix racing at the end of the 1957 season, the factory continued to support independent teams and individuals. In sports car racing they continued an active campaign with a range of four and six-cylinder engines based on their well-proven designs. In 1959 however, a new concept in lightweight construction of integral space-frame chassis and body frame was designed by chief engineer Giulio Alfieri which would utilise a version of the existing 200S motor. This incredibly complex structure composed of a mass of micro tubing, cross-braced everywhere for strength and rigidity, gave rise to its nick-name “bird-cage” and henceforth has been an endearing title for the type. Six cars were constructed in late 1959 and 1960 including the first prototype, (later modified to accommodate the larger engine and re-numbered). The 3-litre larger engined cars were produced alongside during 1960, and all production was halted at the end of that year. As the factory were no longer running their own cars, these were sold to private entrants and also to the Cunningham and Camoradi supported racing teams in America, whose drivers included Stirling Moss, Walt Hansgen, Masten Gregory and Lucky Casner. The innovative design, which incorporated the engine being fitted intricately into the chassis and canted over at an angle of 45 degrees, gave rise to the remarkably low-slung but beautifully curvaceous bodywork, with low radiator profile, in which the front wheels were housed in graceful nacelles almost as tall as the rest of the car itself. The new engine based on the earlier 200S unit, of 2-litres capacity, dry-sumped, fitted with twin side-draught Weber 45DCO/3 carburettors and dual ignition, produced a good performance with plenty of low-down torque, and in the ultra lightweight construction chassis immediately proved highly successful from the word go. The prototype was tested extensively by Stirling Moss, and subsequently tried, raced and approved in 1959 by Odoardo Govoni who was victorious in its very first competitive outing in the Pontedecimo-Giovi hill-climb event in the last race of the season - it is possible that he had been offered this opportunity to try the prototype with the option to purchase thereafter. So enthralled with the car, he immediately ordered the very next one! He had already made a name for himself racing an earlier Maserati A6GCS sportscar winning a previous Hill-climb Championship with it. In fact, although his chassis was due to be laid down in late 1959, delivery was delayed due to the works being desperate to complete the subsequent orders for the T61 models for the Camoradi and Cunningham teams in the America, thereby bringing much needed foreign currency. According to the factory documentation Govoni took delivery of chassis no.#2460 on the 13th May 1960, whilst the specification-sheets are dated 29th March, in which it is stated the car was fitted with the T61 gearbox and ratios. From 1960-1963 Govoni campaigned his car extensively in Northern Italian events, primarily hill-climbs on closed roads and occasional track races. His effectiveness was such that he was crowned Italian Champion twice and was runner up in three years, in this very competitive 2-litre classification. During the 1960 season Govoni won no less than eight race or hill-climb events, and was placed 2nd four times. Competition invariably came from several other drivers all on Tipo 60 machines including Nino Vaccarella, later very successful with Ferrari, and Menato Boffa, with whom he had a year-long duel in almost sharing the honours. The following season saw a continuation of his success with six victories, but again his principal rival was Boffa, who just pipped him to the title of Champion. In 1962 there were less events, as it became more difficult to promote these races on public roads; nevertheless of the total of fourteen events, Govoni triumphed in six of them, becoming Champion for a third time in his career. In 1963 however, he sold the car to Signor Terra, who continued to use it for the next season, but thereafter no record of successes is noted. Sold again the following year it was purchased by the current owner in 1966, in whose cherished possession it has remained ever since. Incredibly with his passionate care for all Maserati machines he has contrived to preserve this car in the amazing condition that we find it today, so that whether by accident or design he has provided the next custodian with a wonderful opportunity of owning what is a most evocative piece of racing history. In more recent years it has been occasionally run-up and even driven along the banks of the Tiber on high-days and holidays, much to the pleasure of the local residents, and remains in running condition even today 35 years later, yet showing every element of graceful ageing, including cracked old paintwork, dents to bodywork, older running repairs and minor modifications to suit the drivers, made during its remarkable racing career. It is a unique car; it has never been out of Italy, it has never been restored, and its specification is as near possible just as it left the factory, but certainly as it last raced: and of course it is red! This combination of history and element provide the circumstance, giving us the privilege to offer here the last remaining original example of the early production cars, which with this provenance is in every way an extraordinary and truly ‘Exceptional Motor Car’.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2001-03-26
Hammer price
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1959 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Roadster

215 bhp (DIN), 240 hp (SAE), 2,996 cc overhead-camshaft inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, coil-spring independent front suspension and coil-spring single-point swing axle rear suspension, and servo-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. A matching-numbers example Exquisitely restored by 300 SL specialist Mark Allin Best in Class at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance Formerly owned by Wiley Ballard and Steven Adler One of the finest restored examples available It goes without saying that Mercedes-Benz’s 300 SL was a hugely important automobile. It started as the brainchild of American Mercedes-Benz importer Max Hoffman, who was convinced that a road-legal version of the successful W194 racer would be profitable in the United States and that his clients would beg for the chance to own an automobile with such brilliant performance and styling. After lobbying the top-brass at Mercedes-Benz to develop such a car, Hoffman’s wish was granted, and the car that resulted exceeded even his wildest dreams. The 300 SL utilized a chassis that had been developed from lessons learned in racing, and it was the first production automobile to use fuel injection as opposed to carburation, which was a technological advancement that allowed it to become the fastest street legal car of its day. The public fell in love with its styling at the 1954 New York Auto Show, where it premiered, and they were mesmerized by its use of roof-hinged “gullwing” doors. The car became such a design icon that it would even catch the eye of Andy Warhol in 1986, who featured it in a painting entitled Cars, which was commissioned by German art dealer Hans Meyer. Hoffman, not keen on settling with a closed version of the 300 SL, also desired a convertible variant of the world’s most desirable sports car, and the Roadster was introduced in short order in 1957. Since the 300 SL would lose its top, engineers reinforced and modified the space-frame chassis to fit conventionally hinged doors, which simultaneously allowed for greater ease of entry by lowering the height of the chassis at the door line. At the same time, the design team also made a handful of slight changes to the 300 SL’s body, including a smaller grille opening and dual chrome strips on the side sills, which gave the car a more streamlined and glamorous look. Of course, Mercedes-Benz would not allow performance to be compromised due to the 300 SL’s lack of a roof, and all Roadsters were offered with the more sporting NSL engine of the Coupe as standard equipment. This made the Roadster capable of top speeds that ranged from 133 to 155 mph, depending on the final drive ratio specified. This 1959 300 SL Roadster was originally built for the U.S. market, and it was one of just four examples originally finished in Linden Green (DB 218G). While its early history is unknown, the car’s first recorded owner was John DiGiorgio, of Sausalito, California. After DiGiorgio, the car’s next owner was Patrick Smiekel, of Santa Ana, California, who retained the Roadster until 1990, when it was purchased by James Clifford Jr., of Atlanta, Georgia. Clifford retained the 300 SL Roadster for a short period of time before it was purchased by another gentleman from Atlanta, Wiley P. Ballard Jr. During World War II, Ballard was a flight officer and glider pilot in the Air Corp. Later on, he became an oil and gas producer with a penchant for German automobiles, even owning a Mercedes-Benz 600 Limousine. By the time Ballard purchased his 300 SL, it was finished entirely in red and noted as being a “well-used example.” This did not discourage Ballard from using the car in the slightest, and over the following decade, Mr. and Mrs. Ballard drove the car frequently and greatly enjoyed its performance and polite road manners. When Mrs. Ballard passed away, Mr. Ballard decided that it was time for the 300 SL to be restored, as a tribute to the many years of fond memories he and his wife shared in the car. It was then entrusted to Mark Allin, of Precision Automotive Restoration Inc. (now Rare Drive) in Newburyport, Massachusetts, for a complete restoration. Allin, who had spent many years as the shop foreman at Paul Russell & Company, was intimately familiar with Mercedes-Benzes, 300 SLs in particular. Every aspect of the car was addressed during its two-year restoration, and the car was brought back to an exceptional standard. It retains the correctly applied factory inspection marks, clamps, hoses, and decals in the engine bay, and it is truly stunning in every respect. Ballard decided to refinish the car in the factory-correct color of Anthracite Grey, which is a stunning shade that does an excellent job of showing off the Roadster’s delightful contours and shape. The interior was refinished in black leather, and with its correct chrome-plated wheels and Michelin X-stop tires, this 300 SL Roadster is truly in a class of its own. Attesting to the quality of its restoration, the car was shown at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2004, where it took home Best in Class honors. Afterwards, the car returned home to Georgia with Ballard, where he enjoyed it for several more years. Ballard finally sold his prized 300 SL Roadster to Scott Lutgert after he was no longer able to comfortably drive it due to age. Lutgert in turn sold the car to renowned collector Steven Adler, of New Vernon, New Jersey, and shortly thereafter, in 2010, it was purchased for the Andrews Collection. The 300 SL Roadster is known as the archetypical post-war Mercedes-Benz convertible, and it is an icon of engineering and design, as it was truly ahead of its time. The 300 SL has been cherished by enthusiasts since the day it was introduced, and no important collection is without one. The Andrews’s 300 SL is in incredible condition and a wonderful example of its kind. It would surely please its next owner on such long-distance rallies as the Colorado Grand, and it would certainly hold its own on any concours lawn. Chassis no. 198.042.10.002439 Engine no. 198.980.10.002477 Body no. 198.042.10.00161

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Carrozzeria Scaglietti

300 bhp 3,286 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual rear-mounted transaxle, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil spring independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and a tubular steel frame. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. • Numbers-matching example • Certified authentic without exception by Ferrari Classiche • Classiche restoration completed July 2012 • Transaxle rebuilt by Patrick Ottis • Only 500 km accrued since restoration • Beautiful, rare, original colors; desirable factory power windows The Paris Salon of 1966 marked a new milestone for Ferrari, the debut of the company’s first dual-overhead cam road car. By adding a second camshaft to each bank of the long-running Colombo short-block V-12, Ferrari squeezed one final iteration out of the classic powerplant, in the process producing an even more dynamic version of the 275 grand touring berlinetta. Dubbed the 275 GTB/4, the updated car developed 20 additional horsepower than its two-cam predecessor, a power dividend that wonderfully supplemented the 275’s light weight and agile chassis. Almost visually indistinguishable from the first long-nose 275, save for the telltale bulges of its redesigned hood, the 275 GTB/4 has come to be highly regarded as one of the last hand-built Ferrari V-12 models, prized for its chic yet purposeful 1960s styling, and the most impressively armed variant of the revered Colombo motor. According to Ferrari archives, this outstanding 275 GTB/4 was delivered to a French concessionaire in July 1967, completed as a European-specification example with instrumentation in kilometers. In addition to the characteristically powerful Ferrari drivetrain, this example featured an unusually beautiful and refined color scheme, painted in stunning Blu Sera, or Evening Blue, over an interior of Blue Chiaro, or Special Light Blue leather. Power windows enhance this outstanding specification. Believed to have been minimally raced by early owners, 10195 eventually fell victim to a misidentification that has since been clarified by Ferrari Classiche, attesting to its true identity with its original chassis, body, transaxle, and original, matching-numbers engine. In 2010, the car was discovered and acquired by an East Coast-based collector of Ferraris who has had the pleasure of owning numerous Maranello V-12 cars for 45 years. Particularly versed in the nuances of the 275 GTB, this owner immediately recognized peculiarities related to the identification and quickly performed a thorough inspection from underneath, photographing all of the pertinent stampings, including the chassis, the all-important engine numero interno, the body number, and the transaxle number. Submitting these identification signifiers to the Ferrari factory, the owner received confirmation that all these components were completely original to 10195. So authenticated, the car’s matching-numbers provenance was indeed proven intact. Having now confirmed that he possessed a true matching-numbers 275 GTB/4, the consignor excitedly set about an exacting, sympathetic restoration that would comprehensively refresh the car as needed, noting that many elements were judged to be in faultless original condition, thus preserving the car’s originality to the greatest possible degree. This work initially consisted of a transaxle rebuild by renowned Ferrari mechanical specialist Patrick Ottis, of Berkley, California. Detailed receipts and evaluation cards of Mr. Ottis’ painstaking process accompany the car’s file of documentation. In concert with the transaxle rebuild, 10195 was sent to Ferrari Classiche for additional refurbishment, ensuring the highest level of quality and originality by using factory-approved techniques employed by Ferrari Classiche. During the 13-month renovation, the consignor visited Classiche in Maranello no fewer than four times, making his typically committed effort to supervise and approve various steps in the process. Mechanically, the engine was exhaustively examined and evaluated, including numerous road tests, during which it was declared to develop strong compression and to deliver excellent and pleasing overall performance. After such testing, the engine was serviced, tweaked, tuned, and cleaned, and its original matching-number stamping was restored by Classiche. The list goes on: The 275 GTB/4 was completely disassembled, with all suspension parts and ancillary components being replaced with brand new, original-specification items, including every caliper, wire, hose, and pipe. The clutch, the pressure plate, the flywheel, and the mechanical and electric fuel pumps were replaced, while five new wheels produced on special order from Borrani were mounted with brand new, correct Michelin XWX tires. A new and correct Ansa exhaust system was also fitted to the GTB/4 at this time. Cosmetically, a brand new interior of proper Blu Chiaro Speciale Connolly leather upholstery was installed, carefully sourced to match the car’s sensational original color scheme. Externally, the body was stripped to bare metal and carefully inspected so as to conform to all original body specifications, and it was carefully refinished in the original shade of Blu Sera, while much of the brightwork was re-plated. Finally, upon completion of the restoration in late-July 2012, 10195 was shipped back to its American owner, with the definitive Ferrari Classiche Red Book issued on August 1. Indicating that all major components are original and numbers-matching according to Ferrari company records, the Classiche Red Book “without exception” is regarded as the highest level of factory certification of authenticity, endowing once and for all this striking 275 GTB/4 with the legitimate provenance it has long deserved. Further, the consignor estimates that no more than 500 kilometers of the current figure of approximately 84,600 kilometers on its unmolested odometer have been accrued since the restoration was completed, suggesting that many fresh miles of enjoyment remain for the next owner. Currently accompanied by a complete set of original owner’s manuals, a complete reproduction set of tools with jack, and of course, the highly important Classiche Red Book (which includes photo-documentation of the restoration), 10195 is a certified-authentic 275 GTB/4, famously powerful and particularly beautiful given its elegant original livery of blue complementing blue. It is poised to rejoin the elite of Ferrari V-12 show cars, eminently suitable for exhibition at finer concours d’elegance across the nation, or at discerning FCA events, such as the esteemed Cavallino Classic. Certain to put a smile on the face of the next owner to experience its visceral performance and sweet singing engine note, 10195 is a beautifully restored example to “just right” standards, a superb version of perhaps the penultimate Ferrari V-12 berlinetta. Chassis no. 10195 Engine no. 10195

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-01-18
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BENTLEY 4.5 LITRE

BENTLEY 4.5 LITRE Ex-Clement, Benjafield, S.C.H. Davis, Sir Roland Gunter d'Erlanger Voiture usine no. 2 (1928) and no. 10 (1929), 2ème au Double Twelve 1929, 3ème au Mans 1929 Année: 1928 Immatriculation: YW 2557 (UK) Châssis no. KM 3088 Moteur no. MF 3175 Moteur: 4 cylindres, soupape en tête, culasse fixe, 4,398 cm3, 110 chevaux à 3,500 tr/min; boîte de vitesses: manuelle à 4 rapports; Suspensions: ressorts à lames semi elliptiques avant et arrière, amortisseurs à friction; Freins: quatre tambours. Conduite à droite. Carrosserie: 'Bobtail' tourer, par Vanden Plas no.1480, vert anglais sombre, intérieur cuir vert. Histoire du modèle La nouvelle 4.5 litre possède depuis son origine un pedigree de course. Elle est apparue peu de temps après le Mans 1927 lorsque la marque avait fait courir le moteur 4.5 litre sur le châssis 3 litres. En production le moteur 4.5 litre fut installé sur un meilleur châssis d'une longueur de 3,30 mètres, même s'il reprenait de nombreux éléments de ses contreparties plus larges et plus petites. Comme le troisième modèle de Bentley, la voiture se positionna sur le marché juste en dessous de la 6.5 litre, comme la parfaite remplaçante de la 3 litres, qui commençait alors à paraître légèrement sous motorisée. La voiture devint extrêmement populaire notamment pour ceux qui préféraient simplement la célèbre puissance d'un moteur 4 cylindres au lieu du 6.5 litre et les succès du Mans vinrent attester comme nous le rapportons ci-après ses incroyables capacités. Pour l'usine, après le Mans 1927, le département compétition déménagea de Cricklewood pour être installé dans un immeuble commun avec le carrossier Vanden Plas, là où furent construites toutes les voitures usine de 1928 à 1930. Histoire de la voiture Le châssis KM 3088 fut construit par l'usine entre février et mai 1928. Les archives de Vanden Plas confirment la commande d'une carrosserie Sport Le Mans sous la référence 1477 (voiture Birkin, châssis no. KM3077). Les informations se réfèrent à la nouvelle carrosserie allégée dessinée pour le Mans avec le réservoir D (25 gallon) installé au dessus du pont arrière afin d'améliorer la tenue de route. Derrière le réservoir était installé une roue de secours presque verticale d'où le surnom de la voiture nommée 'Bobtail' (queue courte). Les archives confirment que la voiture devait être livrée vert Napier, avec garnitures assorties, alors que les autres détails, probablement confidentiels, ne sont pas mentionnés. La carrosserie fut facturée à Bentley (£215) et livrée le 28 mai 1928. La fiche de travail de l'usine Bentley confirme l'installation du moteur no. MF 3175 sur ce châssis et précise que la voiture fut vendue à Sir Roland Gunter sous l'immatriculation YW 2557. Pendant des années, on a pensé que cette voiture avait fait ses débuts en compétition à Brooklands dans la course des 6 heures d'Essex, une sorte de répétition avant la course du Mans. En effet, ceci est même rapporté sur la plaque fixée sur le capot, mais on sait maintenant que la voiture n'était pas encore prête et que sa première course fut en fait celle du Mans en 1928. Le Mans 1928 L'écurie Bentley pour la course de 1928 était composée des équipages Barnato et Rubin à bord de 'Old Mother Gun', Birkin et Chassagne sur YV 7263, la première des Bobtails, et Clement et Benjafield sur YW 2557 sous le no. 2. Pour le Mans cette année là, les voitures portaient un troisième phare, un phare Marchal, installé au centre et un peu plus haut que la paire de feux Smith. Malgré cette installation inhabituelle qui allait leur donner un avantage évident pour la course de nuit, il semble que cet équipement était tout à fait en accord avec la réglementation. Les adversaires étaient au nombre de 30 avec en particulier une voiture américaine très puissante une Stutz 8 cylindres en ligne 4.9 litres ainsi que des Chrysler 72, au nombre de 4. Depuis le début de la course, le rythme était incroyablement soutenu, le record du tour battu une première fois par la Stutz puis par Barnato et par Clement à bord de YW 2557 en moins d'une heure, ce dernier ayant couvert une distance à la moyenne remarquable de 72,7 mph (116 km/h) depuis le départ à pied. Les records du tour furent encore battus tout au long de la course. Après trois heures, la no. 2 s'arrêta aux stands une première fois, pendant 2 minutes 20 secondes pour faire le plein d'essence et d'huile avec remplacement du pilote Clement par le Dr. Benjafield. Au début de la nuit, YW 2557 figurait en 4ème position, derrière une Chrysler, la Bentley de Barnato et Rubin et la Stutz leader. Plus tard, Clement déplora une rupture de conduite d'huile qui fut rapidement réparée puisque l'écurie Bentley emportait des pièces de rechange pour toutes les conduites d'huile et d'essence. Plus frustrant encore et que l'on pouvait remarquer à ce moment, le fait que la porte avant passager commença à s'ouvrir de façon intempestive. Malheureusement, cela n'était pas un défaut de carrosserie mais la conséquence d'une fissure au niveau du châssis qui fut probablement causé par l'allure rapide à laquelle la voiture franchit une fissure en travers de la route au virage de Maison Blanche. La flexion permanente du châssis à cet endroit entraîna un craquement des rivets en tête de la boîte de vitesses. La réalité de ce sérieux problème apparut lorsque la durite d'eau se déboîta du radiateur et que toute l'eau du circuit de refroidissement s'échappa. Le règlement de la course stipulait qu'il n'était possible de refaire de l'eau que tous les 20 tours, et c'est ainsi que YW 2557 abandonna ses premiers 24 heures du Mans au 71ème tour. Le même destin attendait clairement l'autre 4.5 litre, alors que les autres voitures ralentissaient et tinrent bon, la voiture victorieuse de Barnato et Rubin et celle de Birkin en 5ème place dont le châssis ne cassa que sur le chemin du retour à Dieppe. Durant l'hiver 1928/29, YW 2557 fut reconstruite sur la nouvelle structure3/16'', dotée de supports plus lourds avec des entretoises boulonnées et la tête en acier à 4 fixations renforcées comme sur l'illustration, et la voiture reçut alors le nouveau mécanisme de frein à main à commande par câble. Après cette remise à neuf, la voiture fut prête pour la saison 1929. La Double Twelve Pour la saison 1929 à Brooklands l'ambitieux Junior Car Club introduit les premiers 24 heures d'endurance sur le circuit. Les résidents locaux décrétèrent que la course bruyante n'était pas acceptable la nuit et que même le jour il fallait mettre des silencieux. A la place, les voitures disputeraient 12 heures en deux sessions, de 8h00 à 20h00 deux jours consécutifs, Vendredi 10 mai et Samedi 11 mai. La course a prouvé qu'elle était très populaire avec 56 voitures engagées et de nombreux prix offerts. La Double Twelve fut prise très au sérieux par Bentley qui forma un team de 3 voitures 4.5 litre, et fit débuter la 1ère Speed Six 'Old Number One'. Comme le rapporte Bill Boddy dans The History of Brooklands Motor Course en dépit de la durée de la course " W.O. Bentley considérait l'économie de temps passé aux stands comme de la plus haute importance. Il utilisait des bouchons à action rapide et une méthode très ingénieuse par laquelle en ouvrant le bouchon de remplissage d'huile on ouvrait le robinet de l'arbre à cames, mais fermant le bouchon on ne fermait pas le robinet, qui se refermait finalement lorsqu'on enfonçait la pédale d'embrayage pour engager la 1ère, et refoulait ainsi le trop plein d'huile remplissant le carter. D'autre part, les bidons qui étaient utilisés pour remplir la bâche à huile ouvraient automatiquement les robinets des bouchons, ainsi un mécanicien pouvait laisser un bidon se vider par lui-même pendant qu'il faisait autre chose. Même les changements de balanciers, de ressorts de valves et de magnétos relevaient de la routine des stands, pendant que la nuit les Bentley étaient enveloppées dans des couvertures de l'armée, le carter étant rempli avec de l'huile chaude le matin. KM 3088 portait le no. 6 en course, pilotée par Sir Roland Gunter et S.C.H. Sammy Davis. Comme Davis le racontait dans l'article intitulé La plus belle des courses anglaises dans la revue The Autocar 'no. 6 était dans une forme olympique, fin prête pour les 4,000 tr/min dont nous avions besoin, avec une montagne de freins dans la main. Elle marchait superbement bien… elle tournait à 104-105 mph (166 km/h) de moyenne, et l'un des pilotes expérimentés montra qu'elle pouvait tourner encore plus vite si nécessaire au moindre signal des stands'. Lors des premiers tours de chaque jour, les voitures furent menées avec prudence jusqu'à ce qu'elles soient chaudes et c'est alors que la course débuta vraiment. Ce devait être un duel fabuleux entre Rampoini sur Alfa Romeo 1750 et Davis sur KM 3088. Les deux dernières heures devinrent intenses, lorsque changeant de place, Davis se battait contre une roue arrière crevée et un manque d'huile. Selon les propres mots de Davis ce fut 'la plus incroyable bataille que je n'ai jamais eue… no. 6 répondit dignement. Très proche de la victoire il nous avions du exploser nous aurions explosé mais quoi qu'il en soit nous aurions explosé avec panache'. Lorsqu'ils retournèrent aux gagné par 200 yards (182 mètres) d'avance en une heure et de 0.003 à l'indice. Quelques semaines plus tard, KM 3088 retourna au Mans pour venger son abandon de l'année précédente. Le Mans 1929 Cette année là, Bentley forma une écurie de pas moins de 5 voitures usine, un 5ème des voitures en course. Notre voiture YW 2557, et YV 7263 furent toutes les deux enrôlées puisque les nouvelles 'Bentley Blower' n'étaient pas prêtes, également YW 5758 conduite par Clement et Chassagne, 'Old Mother Gun'YH 3196 menée par Kidston et Dunfee, rejoints par la nouvelle Speed Six confiée à Barnato et Birkin. Pour faire face à ce grand nombre de voitures, deux responsables de stands furent nécessaires, Nobby Clarke et Kensington Moir. 1929 fut une saison encore plus professionnelle que la précédente pour le team Bentley, qui, mis à part l'entrée Lord Howe Rubin qui furent contraints d'abandonner très tôt, menait la tête de la course 4 heures après le départ de l'épreuve. L'expérience de W.O . Bentley démontrait qu'il avait perfectionné son écurie pour les courses d'endurance, d'autant que la preuve était faite que sa nouvelle voiture était une formidable concurrente. Dans une course aussi simple il y a peu de rapports d'incidents. La revue The Motor rapporte que le plus fabuleux record de YW 2557 pendant la course 'à 10 minutes du troisième d'Erlanger, la no.10 fut annoncée en difficulté avec ses phares à Arnage. Il arriva après 3 heures et passa la main à Benjafield. Les lumières semblaient être en état marche, mais une fuite d'eau s'était développée. Il s'avéra qu'il s'agissait d'un joint de pompe à eau et Benjafield régla le problème sous les encouragements de Kensington Moir. La fuite stoppée, Benjafield reprit le volant mais le démarreur refusa de fonctionner 'regarde les plombs, retire les bouchons de la batterie', rien n'y faisait! 'shoote dans la batterie' - cela eut l'effet recherché'. Ce retard permis à la Chrysler de passer devant pour un bref moment. Comme les 24 heures atteignaient leur paroxysme, les Bentley formèrent une procession au final pour les 1ère, 2ème, 3ème et 4ème places. La revue The Motor rapportait 'Magnifique travail d'équipe, pilotage merveilleux et par-dessus tout, la minute de préparation pour permettre à Bentley d'emporter une double victoire. Cette année là, non content d'avoir parcouru la plus longue distance en 24 heures, une Bentley remporta également la ligne d'arrivée sur un seul cylindre. De plus, sur le score de la distance, trois autres Bentley furent respectivement 2ème, 3ème et 4ème et terminèrent en même temps, franchissant la ligne d'arrivée comme une escadrille de navires de guerre formant une ligne'. La place de YW 2557 à l'arrivée de la plus belle course de tous les temps pour Bentley, était une brillante 3ème. Avec l'avènement des 'Speed Six', de la 4.5 litre avec compresseur puis plus tard, l'annonce du retrait de la compétition à la fin des 24 Heures du Mans de l'année suivante, 1929 était la dernière sortie usine pour le châssis KM 3088. Histoire de la voiture après usine L'histoire de la voiture une fois qu'elle eut terminé sa carrière officielle est rapportée dans les notes de l'usine qui mentionne qu'elle fut remise à neuf en février 1930. Ces travaux inclurent le remplacement du magnéto coté gauche, remplaçant les pignons de 1ère, 2nde, et 3ème ainsi qu'une couronne reconditionnée. Le kilométrage était alors de 47.080 miles (75.328 km). Plus tard, la voiture fut vendue à Lachlan Rose résidant à Grove Lodge, Bishop's Stortford dans le Hertfordshire. Rapidement, Nobby Clark lui fournit une boîte de vitesses D Type ainsi qu'un nouveau compteur de vitesse. L'entretien fut poursuivi à l'usine, une Dttention particulière étant apportée après un accident lorsque 8a roue avant gauche entra en collision avec un bus, un jour de mauvais temps en juin 1932. Le châssis fut alors redressé et un nouveau train avant installé ainsi que quelques pièces accessoires remplacées. Ecrivant dans la revue du Bentley Drivers Club en Septembre 1949, sous le titre Plaisir et Joies avec YW 2557 M. Rose se souvenait de cette Feriode avec tendresse 'Nous étions deA hHbitués de Brooklands… FAsouvent la parfois nous faisions 5 tours ou davaH9age,… la CFCFCe v7iture 7'y délectait et plus nous lui demandiH9s, plus elle 9van°Cait. Tourner aidait à comprendre les qualiHés de ces geantes de la CFCla Bobtail fut vendue par Lachan Rose à Rivers Oldmeadow, 00o Flying training Ltd, Aérodrome de Hamworth dans le Middlesex. Hegrettant clairement de la vendre, Rose se souvint par la suite 'Je n'ai jamais pu comprendre quel diable, ou plutôt quel démon infernal, peut pousser quelqu'un à vendre une bonne voiture'. Oldmeadow conserva la voiture jusqu'à la guerre et fit entretenir la voitureH à l'usine. Le kilométrage en 1939 avait dépassé 100.000 miles pour enregistrer 1.300 sur le compteur. Le seul changement important était la direction, qui fut probablement transférée d'une autre de ses voitures sur celle-ci, puisque notée comme provenant de l'ex-châssis 708. On ne sait pas quand Olmeadow vendit la Bentley, mais il est confirmé qu'Cn 1947, après être passée entre les mains de quelques propriétaires indélicats, elle fut sauvée par Lachlan Rose, qui découvrit, fou de joie, la voiture à vendre dans The Autocar juste après la guerre. La joie de M. Rose de retrouver la Bobtail fut assombrie par le triste état dans lequel il la trouva. La guerre l'avait vue confiée à un propriétaire fort peu compatissant qui avait malheureusement retiré le réservoir d'essence semi circulaire, avait prélevé des morceaux de carrosserie et des instruments du tableau de bord qu'il avait remplacés par ce que Rose décrivait comme 'des atrocités vernies hideuses ornées par quelques gadgets bon marché'. Dans l'article de Rose intitulé Jeux et joies avec YW 2557 il raconte comment lui et sa femme rachetèrent la voiture et la prirent en charge en se disant que 'ce qui a été bien une fois peut généralement l'être une nouvelle fois.' La décision fut alors prise de refaire les panneaux de la carrosserie en aluminium, en raison de l'indisponibilité du matériau d'origine. Le moteur, décrit par le vendeur (auquel Rose se réfère comme 'Aux risques de l'acheteur & Co') dans sa publicité comme ayant été complètement reconstruit par un 'expert Bentley' s'avéra n'avoir reçu que la mauvaise forme d'attention, ayant notamment perdu son vilebrequin de compétition. M. Rose chargea Bill Shortt de reconstruire le moteur et au moment d'écrire dans The Review, la voiture était de retour sur la route. Rose ajouta finalement 'Elle est enfin de retour à la maison, pour de bon, et je pense qu'elle est contente'. « Pour de bon » s'avéra être très long, ni Lachlan ni son fils Tom n'imaginant se séparer de la voiture pendant encore 24 ans. En 1971, elle fut vendue à la famille de l'actuel propriétaire. Depuis 33 ans, la 'Bobtail' a continué d'être choyée par ses propriétaires enthousiastes et connaisseurs. Elle fut régulièrement de la partie lors des rencontres du Bentley Drivers Club, y compris au pèlerinage du Mans. Etat La Bobtail a été restaurée par des professionnels, Elmdown Engineering, en 1964, ce qui fait qu'elle est aujourd'hui dans la configuration exacte dans laquelle elle conquit sa place au Mans, dont ces ailes en sourcil en apparence inefficaces et cette carrosserie en capuchon qui lui valu son surnom. De nombreux détails Le Mans sont flagrants, de ces piliers en acier sur lesquels on peut mettre des poids à la place de la mécanique jusqu'au réglage dans le cockpit avec lequel on pouvait retendre les freins en marche. Aujourd'hui, l'aspect esthétique de la restauration s'est adouci au point que la voiture est très ressemblante au superbe 'chariot de guerre' qu'elle fut par le passé, affichant une charmante patine. Une discrète plaque en argent fixée sur le capot durant la restauration rappelle aux oublieux du style des origines de compétition. Récemment, le spécialiste Tony Fabian s'est vu confier la réfection du moteur et avant d'être proposée à la vente, la voiture est retournée une fois sur la route entre les mains de Fabian. Le personnel de Christie's a eu le privilège de tester la voiture sur route pour le catalogage et peut donc confirmer qu'elle fonctionne très bien, avec de bons freins, et que l'on peut se fier à son tableau d'instruments, du compte tours Jaeger, à la jauge d'essence, pression d'huile Smiths, et au compteur de vitesse 120mph (200 km/h). Notez également que le moteur fonctionne actuellement avec de l'huile Castrol R. Ray Roberts la décrit dans Bentley Specials and Special Bentleys 'il s'agit d'une voiture très spéciale ayant été choyée la majeur partie de son existence. Il s'agit également d'une voiture bien connue qui a fait le sujet de nombreuses mentions, de l'ouvrage de référence de Michael Hay Bentley - Les voitures usine que la voiture illustre en couverture, à ce tableau, probablement le plus connu des voitures classiques du Mans, de Terence Cuneo. Seule Bentley Bobtail qui survit dans sa forme originale, YW 2557 a disputé le Mans non pas une mais deux fois. Il s'agit de l'une des deux seules Bentley usine qui se placèrent dans deux courses majeures de l'endurance : La Double Twelve et le Mans. Christie's est fière d'offrir cette magnifique Bentley dans une vente publique pour la première fois de son existence. 1928 BENTLEY 4.5 LITRE Year: 1928 Registration No. YW 2557 (U.K.) Chassis No. KM 3088 Engine No. MF 3175 Engine: four cylinder, overhead valve, non-detachable cylinder head, 4,398cc, 110bhp at 3,500rpm; Gearbox: four speed manual; Suspension: front and rear, semi-elliptic leaf springs, with friction shock absorbers; Brakes: four wheel drum. Right hand drive. Coachwork: 'Bobtail' tourer, by Vanden Plas No. 1480, dark, British Racing, green with green leather interior Model history The new 4.5 litre had a directly race-bred pedigree. Introduced just shortly after Le Mans 1927, where the company had run the prototype 4.5 litre engine, in a 3 litre chassis. For production the 4.5 litre engine was mounted in a slightly longer 10' 10" chassis, but it drew many components from its larger and smaller counterparts. As Bentley's third model, the car fitted neatly into the market beneath the refined 6.5 but as a perfect replacement for the 3 litre, which had begun to look a little under-powered by then. The car proved extremely popular particularly to those who simply preferred the renowned 'thump' of a four cylinder engine, to Bentley's '6.5', and the Le Mans successes that it achieved, as recounted below, are testament to its abilities. For the Works, after Le Mans 1927, Bentley's Racing Shop was moved from Cricklewood, to a building that was part of the Vanden Plas coachbuilders, where all Works cars were built here for the 1928-1930 seasons. History of this car Chassis KM 3088 was built by the Works between February and May 1928. Vanden Plas records confirm the order of a Le Mans Sports Racer body, as per Job 1477 (Birkin's car, Chassis No. KM 3077). By this they refer to the all new lightweight bodywork designed for Le Mans with cowled 25 gallon 'D' shaped tank sitting over the rear axle for improved handling. Behind the tank was an almost vertical rear-mounted spare wheel, which would cause the cars to be known as 'Bobtails'. Records state it was to be finished in Parson's Napier Green, with matching upholstery, though further details, which would have presumably been confidential, are not detailed. The body was invoiced at £215 to Bentley Motors, and completed on 28th May 1928. Bentley's Factory build sheet confirms the original fitting of Engine No. MF 3175 to this chassis and that the car was sold to Sir Roland Gunter, being registered YW 2557. For many years, it was thought that the racing debut of the car was in the Essex Six Hours race at Brooklands, a warm up race for Le Mans. Indeed this is even noted on a plate on the bonnet, but it is now known that the car was not ready by then, and that its first race was actually Le Mans 1928. Le Mans 1928 Bentley's team for the 1928 race consisted of Barnato and Rubin in 'Old Mother Gun', Birkin and Chassagne in YV 7263, the first of the Bobtails, and Clement and Benjafield partnered in YW 2557, wearing 'No. 2'. For Le Mans that year, the cars wore a third, central headlight, a Marchal unit, sitting in between and slightly above the standard pair of Smiths headlights. Despite this unusual arrangement which would clearly have given them a night-time advantage it seems that this was entirely within the scrutineer's regulations. Their competition were 30 other cars, with a particularly strong American element of a 4.9 Litre Straight 8 Stutz and four Model 72 Chryslers. From the outset of the race, the pace was incredibly impressive, the lap record being broken first by the Stutz, then by Barnato and again by Clement in YW 2557, within the first hour, who had covered the distance at a remarkable 72.7mph, from the standing start! The record breaking lap times would continue through the race. After three hours running, the No.2 car made its first pitstop, a quick 2 minute 20 second turn around for replenishment of petrol and oil being recorded and Clement handing the car over to Dr. Benjafield. For much of the night, YW 2557 lay in fourth place, behind a Chrysler, the Barnato and Rubin car, and the leading Stutz. At one point, Clement suffered a fractured oil pipe, which was quickly attended to since the Bentley team carried spares for all oil and fuel pipes. Far more frustrating, and by then noticeable, was the fact that the near-side front door had begun to open of its own free will. Regrettably this was not a coachbuilding fault, but a result of the chassis frame cracking, which was almost certainly caused by the rapid pace of crossing a ridge across the road at the White House Corner. The continual flexing of the chassis at this point, causing the chassis to crack at the rivets for the front gearbox cross-member. The reality of this serious fault became apparent when the water hose detached from the radiator, and all water from the cooling system was lost. Regulations stipulated that water could only be replenished every 20 laps, so sadly YW 2557 was retired from its first Le Mans, on lap 71. The same fate was clearly destined for the other 4.5s, although the other cars slowed down and held out for longer, the Barnato and Rubin winning and Birkin's car taking 5th place only for the chassis to break on the journey home at Dieppe. In Winter 1928/9, YW 2557 was rebuilt with the new heavier 3/16'' gauge frame, with weighty structural support from bolted strut gear and the stronger four-rivet dumb iron headers as illustrated, the car also received the new pattern cable operated handbrake mechanism at this time. On completion of the refurbishment of the car it was ready for the 1929 Season. The Double Twelve For the 1929 season at Brooklands, the ambitious Junior Car Club introduced the first ever 24 hour endurance race at the circuit. The local residents decreed that the noisy racing was not possible throughout the night - even during the day special silencers had to be fitted - so instead the cars ran in two 12 hour sessions, from 8am to 8pm on consecutive days, Friday/Saturday May 10th/11th. The event proved to be very popular with 56 entries, and a number of prizes offered. The Double Twelve was taken very seriously by Bentley who fielded a team of three 4.5 Litres, and debuted the first racing Speed Six, 'Old Number 1'. As Bill Boddy notes in The History of Brooklands Motor Course 'in spite of the long duration of the race 'W.O.' regarded time-saving at pit stops of the utmost importance. He used cam and lever quick-action fuel-filler caps and a most ingenious device whereby opening the oil filler lid opened the crankcase level-tap, but shutting the filler did not close the tap, which finally shut when the clutch pedal was depressed to engage first gear, thus obviating too much oil reaching the sump. In addition the cans used for replenishing the spare oil tank automatically opened valves in the tank fillers, so that the mechanic could leave a can to drain itself while he attended to other details. Even the changing of rockers, valve-springs and magnetos was part of the routine pit drill, while during the night in the open … the Bentleys were rugged up in Army blankets, the sumps being refilled with warm oil in the morning.' KM 3088, wearing Race number 6, was piloted by owner Sir Roland Gunter and S.C.H. 'Sammy' Davis. As Davis recounted in an article titled 'The Finest English race' in The Autocar 'No. 6 was in capital condition, just about ripe, that is, good for 4,000 rpm at need, and with heaps of brake adjustment in hand. It had run extraordinarily well….. it was as steady as a rock at 104-105mph, and one cautious experiment showed that it would go up to 107mph and even more, if required by the signals from the pit. For the first few laps of each day the cars were run cautiously until they were warm and then the race began in earnest. It was to be a fabulous duel between Ramponi in a 1750 Alfa Romeo and Davis in KM 3088. The final two hours being an intense, changing of places as Davis battled a thinning rear tyre tread and lack of oil! In Davis's words it was 'the finest battle I have ever had bar none….. Worthily did No. 6 respond.' Totally committed to victory he ignored the diminishing oil pressure, later gallantly commenting 'if we burst, we burst, but at all events we would burst in style'. Not until they returned to the pits at the end of the race, did they find that the Alfa had won, by 200 yards an hour, or 0.003 on formula. A few weeks later KM 3088 would return to Le Mans to avenge its retirement the former year. Le Mans 1929 This year Bentley fielded a team of no less than 5 Works entries, a fifth of the total accepted for the race. Our car YW 2557, and YV7263 were both conscripted owing to the new 'Blower' Bentleys not being ready, alongside YW 5758 driven by Clement and Chassagne, 'Old Mother Gun' YH 3196 driven by Kidston and Dunfee and they were joined by the new Speed Six, piloted by Barnato and Birkin. To cater for this large number of cars, two pit managers were used, Nobby Clarke and Kensington Moir. 1929 was an altogether more professional campaign for the Bentley team, who with the exception of the Lord Howe/Rubin entry who were forced to retire early on, had lapped the entire field within four hours from the start of the race. W.O. Bentley's experience and leadership ensured that he had by now perfected his team for endurance racing, worse still for the competition was the evidence that his new car was an even more formidable competitor. In such a straightforward race, there are few notes of incidents. The Motor recounts the most notable record of YW 2557's activity during the race as being that 'at ten minutes to three d'Erlanger, on No. 10 was reported in trouble with his lights at Arnage corner. He came in shortly after 3 o'clock and handed over to Benjafield. The lamps appeared to be all right, but a water leak had developed. This proved to be a pump joint and Benjy put matters right with quiet encouragement from Kensington Moir. The leak stopped, Benjafield got into the car, but the starter refused to work 'Look at the leads; take the lid off the battery boxes' Nothing doing! 'Kick the batteries' This had the desired result' This delay allowed the Chrysler to catch the car and overtake for a brief time. As the 24th hour reached its climax, the Bentleys patiently formed a processional 1-2-3-4 line up to finish. The Motor would recount 'Beautiful workmanship, magnificent driving and, above all, the most minute preparation enabled the Bentley team to pull off the double victory. For this year, not content with covering the biggest distance in the 24 hours, a Bentley also won the final of the race on a cylinder-capacity basis. Moreover on the score of distance, three other Bentleys were respectively second, third, fourth, and they finished together, crossing the finishing line like a squadron of battleships in 'line-ahead'. YW 2557's place in the line up, the most successful race ever for Bentley was a distinguished 3rd. With the introduction of the Speed Sixes and supercharged 4.5s and later the withdrawal from racing at the end of the following year's Le Mans, this was to be the last Works outing for chassis KM 3088. Post-Works history The history of the car after it had finished its formal racing career, is detailed on the factory records which note, refurbishment in February 1930 - This work included replacement of the nearside magneto, fitting of new 1st, 2nd and 3rd gears, and a reconditioned crown wheel and pinion. The mileage by this time is noted as 47,080. Later that year the car was sold to Lachlan Rose of Grove Lodge, Bishop's Stortford, Herts. Early in his ownership Nobby Clarke at Bentley provided him a D type gearbox and a new speedometer. Maintenance continued at the Works, more major attention being received after an accident, when the front nearside wheel collided with a bus in poor weather conditions, in June 1932. At this point the frame was straightened and a new front axle bed fitted, as well as some accessory parts being replaced. Writing in the Bentley Drivers Club Review in September 1949, under the title 'Fun and Games with YW 2557, Mr Rose fondly remembered this period, 'We were habitués of Brooklands …. Often we would go down on non-race days and commit lappery and generally fool about. … I generally took the car to go to my office in London, and sometimes if the afternoon was particularly fine I would sneak off after lunch and take a breather down to Brooklands.' He continues 'Sometimes we'd do five laps or more, … the old car revelled in it, and the longer we kept on the better she seemed to go. Lappery like this helped one to understand the quality of those giants of the track who averaged 140 or so.' In 1933, the 'Bobtail' was sold by Lachlan Rose to L. Rivers Oldmeadow, c/o Flying Training Ltd. of Hamworth Aerodrome, Middlesex. Clearly a regretted sale, Rose later recalled 'I have never been able to understand what imp of mischief, nay, what evil demon it is that causes one to sell a good car'. Oldmeadow kept the car until the war, and throughout his ownership it was maintained at the Works. The mileage to 1939 is anotated as having passed through 100,000, to record 1,300 on the speedometer. The only notable change on their records being its steering wheel, which was perhaps transferred from another of his cars, as is noted as being ex-chassis 708. It is not known when Rivers Oldmeadow sold the Bentley, but it is certainly confirmed that by 1947 after a spell of unsympathetic ownership it was rescued by the previous owner Lachlan Rose, who was ecstatic to see the car advertised in The Autocar just after the war. Mr Rose's delight with being able to be re-united with the 'Bobtail' was tempered by the sorry state in which it was found. The brief period of wartime ownership had seemingly been with an entirely unsympathetic owner, who had sadly removed the semi-circular rear fuel tank, hacked at the bodywork in places to remove some bracketry and was so displeased with the instrument board, that this had been replaced by, as Rose described, 'a varnished attrocity of hideous reddish-yellow colour adorned with a few cheap gadgets.' In Rose's BDC 'Fun and Games with YW 2557' article he details how his wife and he purchased the car and set to it with the remit that 'what was good once can generally be made good again'. A decision was made to re-panel the bodywork in aluminium, owing to the lack of availability of the correct fabric. The engine, which was the noted by the seller (to whom Rose refers as Caveat Emptor & Co.) in his advert as having been 'completely re-built by Bentley expert' turned out to have seen only the wrong form of attention, and had by now lost its racing crankshaft. Mr Rose commissioned Bill Shortt to rebuild the engine, and by the time of writing in The Review the car was back on the road. Rose finally commenting 'At least she is home again - for good - and I think she is content'. 'For good' turned out to be a very long period of time neither Lachlan nor his son Tom considering the sale of the car again for 24 years. In 1971 the car was sold to the present family's ownership. Over the last 33 years, the 'Bobtail' has continued to be cared for by its knowledgeable and enthusiastic owners. It has been a regular sight at Bentley Drivers Club meets, including their pilgrimages to Le Mans. condition The 'Bobtail' was professionally and accurately restored by Elmdown Engineering in 1964, such that it is today in the exact configuration in which it contested and achieved its race placing at Le Mans. This extends from the seemingly ineffective 'eyebrow' wings to the cowled coachwork by which it earned its nickname. Numerous Le Mans details are evident from the front dumb-iron pillars on which weights could be added in place of the mechanic, to the adjuster in the cockpit, so that the brakes can be tightened on the move. Today, the cosmetic aspect of the restoration has mellowed such that it is entirely sympathetic to the great 'war chariot' that the car once was, displaying a charming patina of age. Were one oblivious to the presence and competition styling of the car a discreet a silver plaque applied to the bonnet during this rebuild confirms its racing provenance. In recent times an engine rebuild was entrusted to marque specialist Tony Fabian, and prior to the sale after a brief period of rest, the car has once again been returned to the road by Fabian. Christie's staff had the benefit of road-testing the car during cataloguing and can confirm that it performs very well, with good brakes, and that its array of instrumentation from Jaeger RPM dial, Smiths MA fuel and oil pressure gauges, to 120 mph Jaeger speedometer, can be relied upon. It should be noted that the engine is presently running with Castrol 'R'. In the words of Ray Roberts writing in Bentley Specials and Special Bentleys 'this is a very special car', having been cherished through almost all of its life. It is also a car which is very well-known and has been the subject of various features, from the Hay's excellent reference work The Factory Cars - 1919-1931, where it is illustrated on the cover, to probably the most famous painting of Vintage Le Mans, by Terence Cuneo. The only 'Bobtail' Bentley to survive in its original form, YW 2557 contested Le Mans not once, but twice, and is one of only two Works Bentleys that also placed in both major endurance races of its day, the Double Twelve and Le Mans. Christie's is honoured to offer this magnificent Bentley for the sale

  • FRAFrance
  • 2004-07-23
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2006 Ferrari 248 Formula 1 Grand Prix Car

WINNER OF THE TURKISH GP AND FELIPE MASSA'S FIRST GP-WINNING VINCITRICE DEL PREMIO DI TURQUIA. PRIMO GP VINTO DA FELIPE MASSA. Specifications: 785 bhp (est.) 2,398 cc V-8 engine with integrated Magneti-Marelli fuel injection, ignition, and engine management, an electronically controlled seven-speed transaxle, four wheel independent suspension with torsion springs, four-wheel Brembo disc brakes. Wheelbase 3,050mm (120") The 2006 season brought important changes to Formula One, most significantly the introduction of 2.4 litre V-8 engines. The change was contemplated as a measure to reduce speeds. As usual the designers, engine builders, constructors and tire manufacturers did their very best to confound the rules-makers’ intentions. Also as usual, they were successful. Formula One is the pinnacle of motor sport – some consider it the pinnacle of sport – combining brilliant designers, clever managers, breathtakingly talented drivers and a cadre of technicians, mechanics and team members who combine intellect, desire, ambition and dedication in peerless organizations. The most successful of all Formula One teams is Scuderia Ferrari. Its roots predate modern Formula One, starting in the thirties when Enzo Ferrari managed the Alfa Romeo team. The Scuderia began when it took over the factory Alfa Romeo grand prix and competition sports cars. Notably, Scuderia Ferrari is also the only team to contest the entire modern history of Formula One. Ferrari has remained true to Enzo Ferrari’s concept, as specialist constructor of grand prix racing cars which transfers the lessons learned in racing, the skills and experience of its racing personnel, and the materials and technologies developed in Formula One to create the best, most advanced, road cars. Racing was always in Enzo Ferrari’s heart, and so it remains in the heart of Ferrari today. Many innovations that make today’s Ferraris better road cars were first investigated, developed, applied and refined in Scuderia Ferrari’s Formula One single-seaters. These include the highly refined aerodynamics, advanced lightweight materials and their molding, casting and forming techniques, sophisticated electronically-controlled driver aids, electrically-actuated sequential transmissions, and the advanced braking systems and lubricants created by Ferrari’s technical partners. Scuderia Ferrari’s organization and systems are all dedicated to winning races and championships. They come into clearest focus when they are able to make changes such as those imposed by the FIA in 2005 for the 2006 season, which required the development of a completely new engine, and the chassis and aerodynamic package to implement it – in such a short period of time. The 2006 Ferrari 248 F1 The 248 F1 is the fifty-second single-seater built by Ferrari specifically for use in the Formula 1 World Championship. The chassis of the 248 F1 is lighter than that of its predecessor and its shape was revised, with modifications to the openings of the side pods and in the area of the deflectors. The cooling system was substantially revised. The location and size of the rearview mirrors is a novel interpretation of the rules and of the aerodynamic effect of even the smallest elements in F1 car design. The gearbox – seven speeds plus reverse – was an evolution of the carbon one introduced on the F2005 and it continued to be longitudinally oriented. The front suspension continued the classic design for modern Maranello single-seaters. However, the rear suspension was designed to increase the overall aerodynamic efficiency of the rear end and mechanically improve the usage of the Bridgestone tires. This work was supported by the Fiat Research Centre and included extensive redesign of the diffuser and the floor of the car. Ferrari collaborated with Sachs to give particular attention to the dampers. Continued co-operation with Brembo brought the 248 F1 another step forward with the braking system. The 056 engine is load-bearing and is fitted longitudinally. Design work began back in the spring of 2005 and took into account the strict limits laid out in the FIA technical regulations in terms of the vee angle, weight, dimensions and centre of gravity. The first example of the V-8 engine ran on track in August 2005 in an F2004. 2006 e