All auctions in one place

  • 0—448 000 000 USD
  • 1 Jan 1990— 6 Dec 2017

Filters

Clear all
- USD
image
Pick of the day!
LADIES 18CT GOLD ROLEX DATEJUST WATCH

Low estimate: —

Want your valuables appraised by experts?

Send in an object valuation push image

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

352 hp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber 40 DCN17 carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension by coil springs and wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Exceedingly rare; the 66th of only 121 genuine Daytona Spiders A U.S.-delivery example; fitted new with air conditioning and Borrani wire wheels Offered with a correct set of books and tools One of Ferrari’s most iconic open-top sports cars Matching numbers “And now, my friend, the first rule of Italian driving. What’s behind me is not important.” Perhaps the most memorable moment from the film The Gumball Rally was that phrase, which held quite a bit of truth in 1976. When driving a Daytona Spider at that time, there was little that could keep up with Ferrari’s fastest drop-top and few cars that would look as good as the Daytona did at speed. When the film first hit the silver screen, the Daytona had been out of production for nearly three years, but there were still few automobiles that could deliver the requisite amount of performance, as well as visual and aural theater, that a Daytona Spider could. For representing the Italians in The Gumball Rally, there was truly no better car. CHASSIS NUMBER 16223: AN AMERICAN SPIDER This car, the 66th of 121 Daytona Spiders constructed by the factory, was ordered new by James Lewis Meador, of Roanoke, Virginia, through Algar Enterprises, the famous official Ferrari distributor based in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, on September 7, 1972. According to the car’s order form from Algar, Meador specified factory delivery and that it was to be outfitted with a Blaupunkt radio and air conditioning and trimmed in a unique color combination of Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) over a Bianca leather with Blu inserts and carpeting, which was a fitting and patriotic color combination for a U.S.-delivery Daytona Spider. The order form specified that the car was to be delivered on or around December 1972. However, shipping records and documentation from Algar and Ferrari, which are supplied with the car, support the fact that the car was not delivered to Meador until mid-1973 and that it was instead fitted with a Becker Mexico radio. The Daytona Spider had made its way to Florida in 1975, in the ownership of Richard Katz of Coconut Grove, Florida, who had purchased the car from Joe Marchetti. Katz owned the car for just a year before selling it to Alan R. Patterson, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At the same time, Patterson also owned a 250 LM, chassis number 6025, the one-off Pininfarina-bodied LM that was shown by Pininfarina at the 1965 Geneva Motor Show. After Patterson’s ownership, chassis number 16223 was purchased by Jean Banchet, the owner of Le Français, a highly acclaimed restaurant in Chicago, Illinois, and perhaps this Daytona Spider’s most well-known owner. Banchet retained the car until 1988, and it was eventually sold to Stuart Hayim, of Los Angeles, California. Upon receiving the car, Hayim decided to have his new Daytona restored. The body was stripped and repainted Red by Mike McCluskey. The famed Tony Nancy was commissioned to complete work on the interior, which was refinished in black leather, and the car was fully detailed by Bill Lazelere. At the same time, the engine was removed and serviced by Bruno Borri, of Modena Sports Cars. Following its $75,000 restoration (a substantial figure in 1988), chassis number 16223 was purchased by Dennis Farey in January 1992. Farey displayed the car at the 30th annual Ferrari Club of America International Concours d’Elegance at Monterey, where it won a Gold award. The car was also shown in his ownership at the Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance, and it would later be featured in articles in Forza and Millionaire magazines in 1998. Bill Kling, of Malibu, California, would be the next owner, purchasing this car, with 27,375 miles on its odometer, in July 2000. He entrusted the Daytona Spider to GT Motors of Glendale, California, for a complete mechanical overhaul, which included rebuilding the half-shafts, the drive box, and the steering box, as well as rebuilding the transmission with new synchros. The engine received new gaskets and a valve job, and the suspension was restored, with parts being replaced and refinished where necessary. After the work was completed, Kling decided to show his Daytona Spider at concours events, memorably choosing to drive, rather than trailer, the car wherever it went. It was driven from Los Angeles to Monterey in August 2001 for Concorso Italiano and was specially selected to celebrate 50 years of collaboration between Pininfarina and Ferrari. The car also garnered two Platinum awards in FCA judging at the FCA Nationals in Los Angeles in 2002 and once again in 2004. Chassis 16223 was acquired by its current custodian in 2011 and it has been properly maintained ever since. The car was last serviced by Ferrari of Central Florida in December 2014; at that time, the engine and gearbox oil and coolant were replaced and the brakes were bled, after which the car was released with a clean bill of health. At the time of cataloguing, the car’s odometer showed just over 33,500 miles, showing the frequency of which Kling drove and enjoyed his Daytona Spider over his 10+ years of ownership. The car is accompanied by a complete tool kit, a full set of manuals, and a substantial file of documentation from throughout its life. It has completed the necessary tests required for its Ferrari Classiche application. Please speak with an RM representative for further details. If ever there was a car that encapsulated the image and character of its entire marque, this Daytona Spider is it. The classic red finish, swathed over a 4.4-liter V-12 and finished with Borrani wire wheels—all of which the car wore when new—is, in and of itself, nothing short of iconic. That said, it is also unbelievably difficult to acquire. With only 121 examples built, not all Daytona Spiders are superbly presented as this example, while only a handful define so perfectly what it means to be a “Ferrari,” and fewer yet are available to the discerning enthusiast. Chassis no. 16223 Engine no. B2136 Gearbox no. 1066

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
Show price

1984 Ferrari 288 GTO

400 bhp, 2,855 cc DOHC mid-mounted V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers, Behr intercoolers, and Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.4 in. The first 288 GTO officially delivered to Japan Bought new by Yoshiho Matsuda; remained in his collection until 2010 Under 11,000 original kilometers THE SECOND GTO By 1984, the words Grand Turismo Omologoto already carried an enormous amount of weight in the Ferrari world. For years, the 250 GTO had been considered the finest sports racer that Ferrari had ever produced. With an incredible racing record, which was only rivaled by its sensational driving dynamics, the 250 GTO had already been cemented into sports car lore as nothing short of a legend. For Ferrari to revive that legendary moniker, the new GTO would be expected to match or surpass the 250 GTO’s record in motorsport. Looking to contend in the FIA Group B rally circuit, Ferrari produced and designed the 288 GTO in order to homologate it for competition within that series, calling for a production run of 200 cars. Group B was incredibly popular following its introduction in the early ’80s, especially in Europe, and Ferrari was eager to jump into the fray, as they were certain that their car would be unmatched in competition. However, Group B was cancelled shortly thereafter, leaving a fully developed and homologated car but no series to compete in. It was clear that the public was highly anticipating Ferrari’s newest no-compromises supercar, and the 288 GTO was certainly not going to disappoint the brand’s fans or customers, even without a place to race. While it shared visual cues with the 308 and 328, there was no denying that the 288 GTO was much more special. It was visually much more aggressive, with GRP and carbon compound utilized for the majority of the bodywork, and while the doors, decklid, and bonnet were formed from lightweight aluminum, its imposing shape hinted at what lay under the hood. The race-bred, 2.8-liter V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers pumped out a monstrous 400 horsepower with 366 foot-pounds of torque. The 288 GTO could rocket to a top speed of 189 mph, making it the fastest road car ever produced at the time of its unveiling. Its acceleration was equally impressive, and the car could reach 60 mph from a standstill in 4.8 seconds and 100 mph in 10.2, which was fast enough to keep everything short of a fighter jet in its rearview mirror. Performance aside, the 288 GTO’s interior was graced with a host of modern amenities. The Kevlar-framed bucket seats were lined in leather, and buyers could request air conditioning, electric windows, and an AM/FM radio/cassette stereo as optional extras. Other than those few extras, the 288 GTO sacrificed nothing to distract the driver from the task at hand. The new GTO clearly resonated with Ferrari’s clientele, as 272 examples were built by the time production ceased, which was over 25 percent more than the amount required for homologation. The 288 GTO was the first in the lineage of modern Ferrari supercars, and it remains incredibly rare, as very few are seldom seen out and about or even offered for public sale. CHASSIS 55237: FORMERLY OF THE MATSUDA COLLECTION The example offered here, chassis 55237, was the 137th Ferrari 288 GTO produced, and it was fitted with air conditioning, power windows, red seat inserts to match the exterior paintwork, and the optional Ansa sport exhaust, according to Joe Sackey’s definitive work The Book of the 288 GTO. The new GTO was destined for a very special customer in the Ferrari world, Yoshiho Matsuda. Mr. Matsuda was one of the world’s foremost collectors of classic cars, Ferraris in particular, and he had an incredible collection, one that housed some of the marque’s most valuable and significant automobiles, including several 250 GTOs. It was only natural that Mr. Matsuda ordered himself a 288 GTO. This car was imported into Japan on April 10, 1985, as the very first example officially imported into the country by Cornes & Company, the official Ferrari importer for Japan. Immediately thereafter, the car was registered for road use by Matsuda and was used regularly by him on the streets of Japan, where it surely garnered plenty of attention. Chassis 55237 remained in his collection for an impressive 25 years. By the time it left his ownership in 2010, he had accumulated 9,500 kilometers on its odometer, which is a testament to the car’s incredible driving dynamics. Just prior to leaving his collection, the 288 GTO received a major service, which included a replacement of the timing belts, at a cost of over ¥2,000,000, which ensured that it was ready for its new owner. Following the Matsuda Collection, chassis 55237 remained in Japan until it was imported into the United States. The car has travelled less than 1,000 kilometers since 2010, and it remains in exemplary condition. It should be noted that the car includes numerous documents from Matsuda’s ownership, such as the original Japanese importation forms, registration documents, and service receipts, as well as the car’s original tool set, jack, and spare keys. The 288 GTO, now heralded as the first of Ferrari’s incredible series of supercars, was robbed of its chance to earn its fabled name through the crucible of motorsport, but it more than lived up to its predecessor’s reputation as a fabulous driving machine. As one of Ferrari’s all-time greats, the 288 GTO is a staple in many of the world’s greatest collections of Ferraris, just as this fine example was for Yoshiho Matsuda. Chassis 55237, which has been very well maintained under his tenure, has already proven itself worthy of one of the finest Ferrari collections on the planet, and it will undoubtedly continue to do so for its next caretaker. Chassis no. ZFFPA16B000055237

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
Show price

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB by Scaglietti

280 hp, 3,286 cc V-12 engine with triple Weber dual-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs, and tubular shocks, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of approximately 58 long-nose, torque-tube, triple-carburetor, steel-bodied examples Finished in its correct Rosso Rubino over Nero Offered from long-term ownership Incredibly well maintained restoration FERRARI’S 275 GTB The 275 GTB was considered the last of the classic Ferraris, as it brought welcome updates to the brilliant but aging 250 series, yet it also managed to retain wonderful character and sense of occasion. The GTB was unveiled at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, alongside the drop-top 275 GTS, and it was clearly a worthy successor to the 250 series of cars that it replaced. It was designed and developed under the watchful eye of Enzo Ferrari himself. It featured gorgeous bodywork, which was arguably more attractive than the stunning 250 GT/L Lusso that it replaced, and incorporated a number of mechanical improvements that led to increased performance, making for Ferrari’s best grand tourer yet. The car was fitted with a 3.3-liter version of Ferrari’s Colombo V-12, and to give it a lower center of gravity, the engine’s overall height was reduced. Additionally, this was the first Ferrari to be fitted with four-wheel independent suspension and a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle gearbox, which helped to improve its handling. It goes without saying that the 275 GTB’s performance figures were astonishing. A sprint from 0 to 60 mph would take just over six seconds, and the car would go on to achieve a top speed of 160 mph, leaving it capable of dispatching most modern cars on the freeway today. The design of the 275 GTB, which was penned by Pininfarina and handcrafted by Scaglietti, is truly timeless and just as striking as the car’s performance. As is the case with many cars from Maranello, Ferrari adapted the 275 GTB over the course of its production run, and it received a handful of changes throughout its lifespan. The two most important changes were the introduction of the “long-nose” body style and the installation of a torque tube. The nose was lengthened on later cars in an effort to eliminate the undesirable high-speed lift characteristics of the earlier short-nose models. Additionally, a torque tube was added in early 1966 to improve the stability and durability of the drivetrain. By the time the 275 GTB/4 was introduced, all 275 GTBs were leaving the factory in long-nose configuration with torque tubes, making them the most desirable of the model series. CHASSIS NUMBER 08603 The car offered here, bearing chassis number 08603, is a wonderful example of a late-production 275 GTB. It was fitted with a long-nose, torque tube, and triple Weber carburetors, and it was originally finished in Rosso Rubino (106-R-12) over a Nero (VM 8500) interior that had full leather seats. According to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, chassis number 08603 was originally destined for the United States and was acquired by its first private owner, a Mr. Cochran of Los Angeles, California, after passing through Luigi Chinetti’s East Coast distributorship. By 1974, the car was in the ownership of Don Blenderman, of Enid, Oklahoma, who was an individual that was familiar with Ferraris, as he was also the owner of a 250 LM. Following his ownership, the car travelled back to the Golden State after being acquired by Michael McCafferty, of San Diego. Following McCafferty’s ownership, the car moved back east, to Houston, Texas, where it was owned by Charles H. Reid. At this time, the car was noted as being finished in Giallo Fly and fitted with Borrani wire wheels, and in the late 1970s, it received an engine, transaxle, and clutch rebuild by Bobileff Motorcars, of San Diego. After leaving the state of Texas in the mid-1980s, chassis 08603 was advertised for sale in the April 1991 issue of Ferrari Market Letter by Dr. Robert Bordin, of Minneapolis, Missouri. At that time, it was still wearing its fly yellow paint, black leather interior, and Borrani wire wheels. It was then purchased by Rodolfo Junca de la Vega II, of California, in 1992. While in Junca de la Vega’s ownership, chassis 08603 was showed at the second annual Vintage Ferrari Concours in Carmel Valley, California, where it placed Third in Class. It was shown once more by Junca de la Vega, at the Ferrari Club of America International Concours d’Elegance in Monterey, California, in August 1994, where it earned an impressive First in Class award. By that time, the car had been refinished in its current and correct red over black color combination, and later that year, it left the United States for the first time since it arrived at Chinetti’s distributorship almost 30 years earlier. This matching-numbers 275 GTB, which has only just recently returned stateside, sports the same red over black color scheme and Borrani wire wheels that it did when it left the United States, and this is a livery that will never go out of style. Its older restoration has been very nicely preserved, and the car still shows beautifully. The paintwork shines bright, the engine bay is beautifully detailed, and the interior shows nary a flaw. It is important to note that the car is also accompanied by its correct books and tools. The long-nose, torque-tube examples are considered the ultimate derivative of the 275 GTB, and they are said to be excellent drivers, ones that are ideal for either long jaunts across continental Europe or high-speed runs through California canyon roads. The long-nose 275 GTB, wearing what is undoubtedly one of the most stunning designs ever penned by Pininfarina and crafted by Scaglietti, is an icon of Italian design and craftsmanship, and it features a timeless shape that looks just as incredible stationary as it does at speed. Chassis number 08603 has been lovingly preserved for the last two decades and is in wonderful condition. It would be an excellent acquisition for any Ferrari collection. Chassis no. 08603 Engine no. 08603

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
Show price

1953 Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina

200 bhp, 2,963 cc 60-degree single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with double wishbones and double leaf springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic springs and Houdaille shocks, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102 in. The fourth of twenty-one 250 Europas constructed Interesting early history, including period Italian concours events Recently completed five-year, concours-level restoration by Ferrari specialists Featured on the cover of Cavallino issue 198 First in Class at the 2014 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este Unquestionably one of the finest 250 Europas in existence As the first Ferrari to carry the now legendary 250 series nomenclature, the 250 Europa marked the beginning of a wonderful time in Ferrari’s history. It was revealed to the public, alongside the 375 America, at the 1953 Paris Auto Salon, and it would be Ferrari’s first true grand touring automobile, showing that the company was willing to produce cars for well-heeled customers who were looking to drive their Ferraris on the road rather than on the track. In addition to being the first car of the 250 series, the Europa is unique amongst other members of its family for being the only one to carry the Aurelio Lampredi-designed V-12. This engine, which was used in previous racing Ferraris, could produce over 200 horsepower and was capable of propelling its chassis and coachbuilt bodywork at speeds in excess of 135 mph. Its coachwork was just as striking as the performance of the Europa itself, as it was designed and fabricated by Pinin Farina. The company was finally coming into its own in the early 1950s, and it was beginning to establish both a look and feel for the Ferrari bodies they were manufacturing. Pinin Farina’s design for the Europa proved to be a perfect blend of sportiness and elegance, which wonderfully represented the car’s personality. BUILT FOR A FRIEND OF THE HOUSE Chassis 0305 EU was the fourth Europa of a total of twenty-one units constructed. It arrived at Pinin Farina’s premises on September 29, 1953, according to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, and it was finished in Rosso Marrone, with a beige chiaro roof and beige sills. The interior was finished in Marrone leather and had a matching beige cloth. The exterior, which was shod with whitewall tires, featured one unusual feature, the gas tank lid was placed on the driver’s side rear three-quarter panel, whereas in other Europas it could only be accessed through the trunk. The day before Christmas Eve 1953, the bodywork was invoiced by Pinin Farina, and the chassis was sold new to its first owner, Magnolfi Latino of Florence, the son of Italian industrialist Giovanni Latino, on March 15, 1954. Magnolfi was friends with Pinin Farina himself and must have seen ownership of this Europa as an excellent opportunity to showcase his friend’s craftsmanship, as evidenced by the unusual placement of the Pinin Farina logo, just above the Ferrari emblem, on the Europa’s nose. Magnolfi showed the car at two separate Italian concours events in his first year of ownership, at the Concorso Satorie Romana in Rome and at the Primo Raduno Mondiale della Carrozzeria at Villa Ormond in San Remo. Additionally, he drove the car on the 1954 Rallye du Cinéma in San Remo. It can be argued that the appearances of this car at period concours events helped to establish Pinin Farina’s “Ferrari look” not with Enzo but with the general public, as well as with those that would be lucky enough to become a Ferrari customer in the near future. Sadly, once 0305 EU made its way across the Atlantic, its history becomes murky. Its original engine was replaced with a Chevrolet V-8, the fate of many early U.S.-bound Ferraris, as replacement parts for Italian motors were often difficult to find or too expensive to source. After leaving its chassis, the engine was reported to be with Basil Shadlun in Howell, New Jersey, while the Europa itself was making its way across the lower 48, residing with an owner in Kansas and then moving to sunny California. By the 1990s, the Europa made its way back to its native Italy and passed through a pair of subsequent European owners before being purchased by an individual residing in the Netherlands, who completely dismantled the car in order to take inventory of the parts present for a future restoration. That specific restoration never began, and the car was passed to its current Belgian collector in 2006. With all parts largely accounted for, with the exception of an engine, gearbox, and rear axle, its new owner decided it was time to bring 0305 EU back to its former glory after so many years out of the limelight. Obviously, the first order of business would be to source a correct and original Lampredi V-12 to serve as the car’s new powerplant. REDISCOVERING ENGINE 0305 EU, AGAINST ALL ODDS The search for an acceptable engine began in 2007, and it was not successful until 2009, when an engine, numbered 0337 AL, was found in largely neglected condition. The engine was missing its carburetors and had clearly not been run for some time, but it was largely intact. After some deliberation, it was finally determined that this unit would be acceptable for chassis 0305 EU. Upon further inspection, an incredible discovery was made! Underneath the engine stamping on the block, another engine number was visible, and it appeared to be 0305 EU! To confirm the true identity of this engine, it was sent to Ferrari Classiche for further inspection of the engine itself and its internal numbers. Ferrari noted the internal number as 076, which, against all odds, matched the number listed in Ferrari’s own archives as indeed belonging to the chassis from which it was sourced! Ferrari restamped the correct number into the block and sent the engine back to the Belgium, where it would be reunited with its original chassis after a long absence. Once the engine and chassis were reunited, the car was entrusted to the Schouwenburg brothers at Strada e Corsa, who coordinated the restoration of the body, electrical components, and the interior and worked on the suspension, engine, and transmission in Italy. All of the requisite receipts from its exquisite restoration will remain with the car. TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO THE SHOW FIELD Following its five-year restoration, which resulted in nearly 4,000 hours of work, its owner decided that 0305 EU would embark on its second tour of Europe’s most prestigious concours events. It premiered at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in July 2013 as part of the Cartier Style et Luxe Concours, and then, in October of that year, it was shown once more in Knokke-le-Zoute, Belgium, at the Zoute Concours d’Elegance, where it earned First in Class. Perhaps the biggest piece of publicity for this fantastic Europa was when it was featured on the cover of Cavallino issue 198 in December 2013/January 2014 and was given a 10-page article written by Hugo Garritsen within. Earlier this summer, 0305 EU was invited to the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, where it definitely made a strong impression on the judges, as it took home First in Class honors. Chassis 0305 EU is undoubtedly one of the finest 250 Europas in existence, and it will now finally be able to relive its youth, as it has been reunited with its original engine. It would be welcome at any concours event around the globe, and it has already proven that it is capable of earning trophies to its name. As the 250 Europa is Ferrari and Pinin Farina’s original expression of the grand touring automobile, any Ferrari collection would be incomplete without a one. It goes without saying that the example offered here would stand proud amongst the finest examples of automobiles wearing the Cavallino Rampante in any show or collection. Addendum This title is in transit. Chassis no. 0305 EU Engine no. 0305 EU

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
Show price

1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Coupe Aerodinamico by Pininfarina

340 bhp, 3,967 cc single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine with triple Solex carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, coil-spring independent front suspension with live rear axle, four-wheel telescopic Koni shock absorbers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95 in. The 1961 Paris Motor Show Car One of only 17 SWB Pininfarina 400SA Aerodinamico Coupes ever built Complete with books, tools, build sheet copies, and extensive documentation Very likely the finest restored 400SA in existence; Platinum Awards at Cavallino and FCA meets and 99 points at Pebble Beach Ex-Count Somsky, Greg Garrison, and Skeets Dunn The high performance luxury gran turismo was a new automotive idiom in the prosperous years following World War II. The genre had its roots with great pre-war touring cars like Rolls-Royce’s Phantom II Continental and Mercedes-Benz’s supercharged 500K and 540K Sports Coupes. Post-war luxury gran turismos included the Bentley Continental R-Type and, later, the Mercedes-Benz 300SCs. Moving into the 1960s, these fast, luxurious cars continued to be the car of choice for the rich and famous. Most combined powerful engines with a highly competent chassis and were clothed in unique or limited production coachwork from inspired designers, equipped to the highest standards, and trimmed in the finest materials. Ferrari had offered such cars to its very best clients for years. Crafted in tiny quantities, they were superbly fitted and offered sparkling performance. One of the best known of these was the Superamerica and Superfast series—superb cars with price tags that exceeded even Rolls-Royce. The Aurelio Lampredi-designed V-12 engine, which was originally developed for the four-liter GP cars, supplied power for the first-series examples. The 410 Superamerica appeared at the Brussels Motor Show in January 1956 with a 4,962-cubic centimeter “long block” engine that delivered 340 horsepower. Pininfarina’s coachwork was masterful, minimizing the car’s apparent size and conveying the car’s performance potential. The second-series 400 Superamerica was introduced at the Brussells Motor Show in 1960, when chassis 1611SA, a two-place cabriolet was first exhibited. Later, at the Turin Show in November, the Superfast II debuted, providing the inspiration for the Coupe Aerodinamico. Introduced in 1962 as the Superfast III, the new car would be built between September 1962 and January 1964. A total of 17 examples were built. Unlike the earlier 410 Superamericas, these cars were fitted with the latest version of Ferrari’s legendary Colombo-designed V-12. The lovely design, penned by Pininfarina, featured a tapered nose and tail, creating an elegant, streamlined look. It was this design that earned the model its name: Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico. It is considered to be one of Pininfarina’s great designs—an artful expression of Ferrari performance with stylistic elegance. Once again, their dizzying price tags ensured that the client base would be restricted to heads of state and captains of industry. These cars represented the pinnacle of Ferrari production to be sure: fantastic 1960s styling, extremely low production numbers, and world-class performance. One must also consider that, given the era, these cars were even rarer than other concurrent Ferrari models, the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB later on, and the 250 GT SWB included. Chassis 2841SA was one of these seventeen 400 SA Aerodinamico SWB Coupes produced. It was completed in September 1961 and finished in Grigio Fumo, or Smoke Grey, with the interior finished in Pelle Rosso, or red Connolly, leather. The history of 2841SA is well-known, having been first seen in public in October 1961 at the Paris Motor Show. Later, in November of that year, the car was delivered to its first owner, Count Fritz Herbert Somsky, of Geneva, Switzerland. It remained with him for some time, but, by the 1970s, the car had been imported into the U.S., where it was owned by Barry Le Fave, of Santa Ana, California, who sold it to W. B. LeFace. Fellow California resident Walter Harris then purchased the car; it was advertised by him in 1980, stating that the car had “all original, numbers match, highly tuned engine, rebuilt brakes and rear end.” Presumably, as a result of that advertisement, Harris sold the car to the late Greg Garrison, a renowned Ferrari collector and the producer of the Dean Martin Show in Hollywood. In May of 1999, after almost 20 years of ownership, 2841SA was sold by Garrison to C. A. “Skeets” Dunn, of Rancho Santa Fé, California. In May 2001, the car was shown at the Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance by Mr. Dunn, and it placed First in Class and won the Meguiar’s Award for best paint. Despite its obviously lovely condition, Dunn eventually elected to undertake a complete restoration of the car, beginning in August 2003. The mechanicals were performed by specialist Bill Pound, with the body and paint done by Symbolic Restoration, in Sorrento Valley, California. The car went through an exhaustive and comprehensive Ferrari restoration, where it was disassembled down to every nut and bolt. The body was stripped to bare metal, and every panel and piece of chrome was carefully fitted before repainting or replating. Finally, the body was meticulously refinished in Blu Sera, while the interior was carefully retrimmed in natural saddle leather. The entire restoration, costing in excess of $400,000, is documented by an accompanying file of restoration receipts and several dozen photographs. Most importantly, the car is also accompanied by copies of its original Ferrari build sheets. Upon completion of the restoration in mid-2006, Skeets Dunn elected to show 2841SA at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elégance, where it scored 99 points in the class for Ferrari GT cars, a remarkable result for a first-time showing, particularly when one considers that the judges included none other than Paul Russell, David Seilstad, and Parker Hall. Later, in January 2007, the car was shown once again at the XVI Palm Beach Cavallino Classic Concours d'Elegance at The Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida, where it won a coveted Platinum Award. It has since been shown many times, accumulating a string of Platinum and First in Class awards. As a testament to the preservation of this extraordinary car, 2841SA was awarded a Platinum Award, scoring 99.5 points at the 2013 Ferrari Club of America Concours in Pasadena. A recent inspection by marque specialists has confirmed what a superior motor car it truly is. “Today, the car looks as amazing as it looked on the Pebble Beach lawn in 2006. The quality of the paint is pristine, showing no sign of aging. All the body panels fit precisely and effortlessly. The chrome doesn't have any sign of wear and tear. The undercarriage is spotless, and it shows the care and the lengthy work that made this car one of the best Superamericas ever restored. No corners were ever cut on the restoration, which can be admired by looking at the undercarriage. The interior still remains in excellent condition, and it gives the car the extra touch of originality and elegance that makes it so amazing all the way around. However, one can only appreciate the full extent of this restoration's execution when one closes the door and turns the ignition key. The even sound of the engine, the effortless clutch, the responsive throttle, and the precise gearing make the driving experience beyond divine.” Adding to the car’s extraordinary presentation, it comes complete with books, tools, a jack, and an extensive history file. Please note, however, that while the inspection is complete, the binder remains in transit at the time of printing. With just 17 built, it is certainly true that any 400 SA Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico is extremely rare. This example is all the more unique for its well-known ownership history and its high-point, professional restoration, making it arguably one of the best available examples of the 400 Superamerica and, very likely, the finest restored example on the planet. Furthermore, when one considers its supreme rarity, particularly in relation to its brethren in the Ferrari stable, be it a 275 GTB, 250 GT SWB, or perhaps even a GTO, it becomes readily apparent that the opportunity to acquire such a car will not come again soon, and perhaps never again. It is a motor car of supreme scarcity, exclusivity, power, and elegance, the likes of which the motoring community may never see again. Titled as 1962. Chassis no. 2841SA Engine no. 2841SA

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1961 Porsche 718 RS 61 Spyder

178 bhp, 1,600 cc flat four-cylinder engine with dual Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with torsion bar, coil springs, and tubular shock absorbers, and front and rear disc brakes. Wheelbase: 86.6 in. Formerly owned and raced by Bob Donner and Don Wester Finished 7th overall and 2nd in class at the 1961 12 Hours of Sebring Numerous podium finishes at SCCA and USRRC events One of just fourteen RS 61s ever constructed Brilliantly restored and ready for track action To many manufacturers, motorsport victories are essential to commercial success. The adage of “race on Sunday, sell on Monday,” was never more true for Porsche during the late 1950s and early 1960s. The mid-engined Porsche Spyders were still attempting to establish a foothold in the United States, and it took to the track in the hands of factory-supported racers and privateers alike, dicing with the likes of Ferrari, Aston Martin, Jaguar, and Maserati for the vaunted spot at the top of the podium. Victory was the goal for many a weekend, and victory on the weekend would only grow the allure of the brand to spectators, leading to further sales and overall awareness of the Porsche brand. Victory was what Porsche needed to gain a foothold in the United States. Unlike other builders of highly tuned racing cars, Porsche’s engineers relied on constructing a lightweight chassis and powertrain with a streamlined alloy body in order to provide fantastic handling, braking, fuel efficiency, and tire wear, as well as more lightning-quick acceleration. This formula proved to be very effective, and the 550 quickly notched up overall wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Mille Miglia, and the Nürburgring 1000. The 550A, 550/1500 RS, and RSK of 1957 would follow, which would only increase Porsche’s domination on race tracks around the world. The RS 61, and the RS 60 before it, proved to be the ultimate development of the Spyder platform. These cars, which were still known as the Type 718, had a tubular space frame that was similar to the 1959 RSK, but they utilized a wheelbase that was four inches longer. However, these cars were noticeably different from previous Porsche Spyders due to tightening FIA regulations, with the most visible of these requirements being the installation of a larger windscreen, an increase in cockpit size, and space for the FIA-required suitcase. Nevertheless, Porsche’s Spyders and those who campaigned them were able to make the best of the FIA’s regulations, and they achieved overall victories at the 1960 12 Hours of Sebring and at that year’s Targa Florio. It was clear that the top brass at Porsche saw little reason to change what worked, and they continued production of the Type 718 cars into 1961, but they renamed them RS 61. Like the RS 60, RS 61s were offered to privateers in almost identical format to the cars campaigned by Porsche themselves, and the RS 61 available today is one of those privateer-campaigned Spyders. Chassis 718-066 is one of the earliest RS 61 chassis constructed, and it is graced with a fantastic U.S. racing history under the names of two very well-known privateers, Bob Donner and Don Wester. When asked about the car, Donner’s wife remarked that “it was one of his very favorite cars” and that the family had many fond memories of the car with Bob behind the wheel. There is no doubt that some of those memories come from the 1961 12 Hours of Sebring, which was quite far from Donner’s home state of Colorado. At Sebring, Bob Donner, Don Sesslar, and Ernie Erickson drove 718-066 to an incredible 7th place overall finish and 2nd in their class. Later that year, the car was entered in the USAC Sports Car race at Pikes Peak, where it proved to revel off the mountain air and finish in 1st place. Don Wester, owner of Wester Motors, a Monterey, California, area Porsche and Volkswagen dealer, purchased this RS 61 from Bob Donner in 1963. Under Wester’s ownership, the car was repainted in a distinct two-tone yellow and black paint job, one which was adorned by many of Wester’s cars, making it easy for fans and competitors alike to identify his Spyder on the track. Wester also replaced the Porsche’s original 1,600-cubic centimeter engine with a 1,700 Homer Worth engine for added power and torque; this was something that he did with many of his racing cars. Just like Bob Donner, Wester soon found success in campaigning his Porsche, accumulating eight podium finishes in 1963 alone in SCCA and USRRC races on the west coast of the United States, with two overall wins at SCCA races at Stockton and Cotati. The RS 61 was then purchased by Eldon Beagle, who continued to race the RS 61 in California in 1964. After leaving Eldon Beagle’s ownership, the RS 61 passed through several different owners, including John Grove and G. Grandell, before landing with its current owner in the 1990s. Shortly after this RS 61 was purchased by its current owner, it was fully restored by a specialist that was familiar with this era of Porsches and racing cars in general. Any non-RS 61 items that found their way into the car were stripped and replaced with factory-correct components in order to make the car as original as possible. At this time, a correct 1,600-cubic centimeter engine was fitted to the car, and it was also refinished in its original color combination of silver with red leather bucket seats. After the completion of its restoration in the United States, the car returned with its new owner to Japan, where it resided in a collection of other significant racing cars. Only a handful of RS 61s were produced, meaning that they very seldom come available for sale. This is a splendid example of the breed, as it is still in remarkable condition from its comprehensive restoration and it boasts a significant racing history from two well-known privateers that owned and raced many Porsche racing cars. Chassis number 718-066 has been expertly prepared for either historic racing or rally events, and it would be just as at home on the Colorado 1000 as it would at the Le Mans Classic. Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this car if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Addendum Please note the title is in transit. Chassis no. 718-066 Engine no. P90316

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
Hammer price
Show price

1934 Duesenberg J Walker LaGrande C.C. Convertible Coupe

Formerly the Property of Mr. William Goodwin 265hp 420 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine, dual overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, three-speed manual transmission, front beam axle with live rear axle and four-wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142" The Duesenbergs were self-taught mechanics and car builders whose careers started in the Midwest at the beginning of the twentieth century with the manufacture of cars bearing the Mason and Maytag names. Fred, the older brother by five years, was the tinkerer and designer of the pair. Augie made Fred’s ingenious and creative things work. Their skill and creativity affected many other early American auto manufacturers. Their four-cylinder engine produced by Rochester powered half a dozen marques. Eddie ickenbacker, Rex Mays, Peter DePaolo, Tommy Milton, Albert Guyot, Ralph DePalma, Fred Frame, Deacon Litz, Joe Russo, Stubby Stubblefield, Jimmy Murphy, Ralph Mulford and Ab Jenkins drove their racing cars. In 15 consecutive Indianapolis 500s, starting with their first appearance in 1913, 70 Duesenbergs competed. Thirty-two – an amazing 46 percent of them – finished in the top 10. Fred and Augie became masters of supercharging and of reliability. Their engines, as engines were Fred’s specialty, were beautiful and performed on a par with the best of Miller, Peugeot and Ballot. In 1921, Jimmy Murphy’s Duesenberg won the most important race on the international calendar, the French GP at Le Mans. It was the first car with hydraulic brakes to start a Grand Prix. Duesenberg backed up this performance at Indianapolis in 1922. Eight of the top 10 cars were Duesenberg powered, including Jimmy Murphy’s winner. The Model J was a major departure from Fred Duesenberg's familiar pursuits. He had been designing and building successful racing cars to ever smaller displacement limitations. The racing regulations’ strictures rewarded extremely high specific outputs from small engines and artful compromises between weight and durability. Suddenly Fred was faced with the opposite problem, designing an engine that emphasized torque and smoothness over output, and a chassis and drivetrain that would accept without stress the largest and most elaborate coachwork. His natural talent quickly took the measure of the problem. The Model J that resulted was a completely original concept, created without reliance on pre-conceived notions, not developed from a prior design philosophy, and not limited by established production machinery, methods, tooling or components. A brilliant talent, at the height of his powers, alert and experienced, was turned loose on a new and fresh problem and in fulfilling his charge created a landmark. Such serendipity rarely happens. Did the Duesenbergs succeed in building “the world’s finest motor car”? Many believe they did, including no less an authority than Ken Purdy who penned an extended treatment of the debate for the very first issue of Automobile Quarterly in 1962. Purdy concluded with these words: “…They were honest men and they honestly tried to make the best fast luxury automobile that the world had known to that time. It can be argued that they succeeded, or did not. I think they succeeded.” When introduced in 1929, the Model J Duesenberg more than doubled the horsepower of the then ranking power champions among American motor cars, the Packard 645 and Stutz M. Its "short" wheelbase model was essentially the same as its competitors’ long wheelbase offerings. Duesenbergs received the most opulent and expensive coachwork from the best coachbuilders in America and Europe. Yet rarely was a Duesenberg’s body extravagant in style, reflecting instead the same notions of quality so eloquently expressed by Fred Duesenberg’s chassis and drivetrain. Murphy, Judkins, Holbrook, LeBaron, Willoughby, Rollston and Derham all contributed attractive but practical coachwork to the early Duesenberg Model Js, imposing automobiles that merged elegance, flamboyance and good taste as effectively as the Duesenbergs’ talent merged with E.L. Cord’s money and vision. While most Duesenbergs were coachbuilt to clients’ orders, often with intimate client involvement during design, construction and trimming, Duesenberg also developed an in-house line of bodies from the A-C-D design department. As has been proven repeatedly, there was no shortage of talent within the A-C-D Body & Art Studio, including Gordon Buehrig and Al Leamy. Styled La Grande, Duesenberg’s proprietary designs were built by several coachbuilders and supplied to the Duesenberg factory in Indianapolis where they were mounted and trimmed either to clients’ order or for stock. Although most were built by the Union City Body Company, a few were built by other houses, including Brunn, Weymann, and A.H. Walker (formed by its eponymous founder to succeed the Weymann American Co. in 1934.) Duesenberg’s La Grande bodies have stood the test of time, their classic elegance and tasteful embellishment distinguishing them among the most coveted coachwork on these great chassis. In an era of great designers and coachbuilders, this is an exceptional recognition. Among La Grande designs the spectacular convertible coupes built by A. H. Walker Company are considered among the most attractive bodies ever installed on the mighty Duesenberg chassis. Just three were built (the others were J530 and J531). The Walker convertible coupes are distinguished by the graceful beltline molding that sweeps down from the cowl to a point partway down the rear fender’s leading edge and the long hood that extends across the cowl area to the base of the windshield. These features combine to integrate the hood, cowl, and body into a seamless single entity, while emphasizing the length of the car’s hood. The Walker La Grande convertible coupes also feature an innovative and unique crank operated top mechanism. However, the rake and low height of the windshield, as well as the sweeping tail is what distinguishes the Walker La Grande as one of the prettiest roadsters of the classic era. In appearance, style, craftsmanship and performance there is more than small similarity between the Duesenberg Model J Walker La Grande convertible coupes and the Special Roadsters built by Mercedes-Benz’s in-house coachworks at Sindelfingen, as the Duesenberg’s only real competition in quality and performance was the 500K and 540K. To put these two magnificent automobiles in perspective, however, the 500K was not introduced until some four years after the Duesenberg Model J entered production. The example offered here was sold new to Dr. Frederick Gruneck of Chicago, Illinois, who traded a Murphy bodied Duesenberg convertible coupe for it. It was featured when new in Automobile Topics on January 5, 1935. The second owner of the car was Col. J. W. Dessette of Chicago. In May of 1941, Dessette sold the car to Verne L. Stone of LaGrange, Illinois. Stone kept the car until 1950 when he sold it to Fred Gifford of Chicago, who commenced a comprehensive restoration of the car, completed almost 10 years later, in 1959. Following what would come to be the Duesenberg’s first restoration, Gifford sold the car to David Stewart of Chicago and Florida, who kept it until September of 1971, when he sold it to William Goodwin of Frankfort, Indiana. Goodwin restored the car a second time, and it has been featured in many publications, including Griffith Borgeson’s seminal work Errett Lobban Cord (p. 240) and the Duesenberg issue of Automobile Quarterly in 1972. The car remained with Mr. Goodwin until his death in the late 1990s, when the car was acquired by Dr. Joseph Murphy of Dovestown, Pennsylvania. In 2001 RM Auctions had the honor of being chosen by Dr. Murphy to offer J534 at the Meadow Brook Hall auction where it was the featured cover car and star of the sale. At that time, the Duesenberg was finished in a striking two-tone red color combination and was in very presentable and correct overall condition. After spirited bidding, J534 was purchased by Judge Joseph Cassini III, a prominent New Jersey based collector. Subsequently, Judge Cassini opted to trade J534 to the current vendor as part of a deal to acquire another particularly rare automobile. With the mission of success on the show field, the new gentleman owner sought to the have the car restored to concours standards. He enlisted the assistance of none other than the renowned and multiple Best of Show winning restorer, Mr. Fran Roxas. After further research and thought it was decided that a comprehensive restoration would be undertaken with the goal of one day competing on the 18th green of Pebble Beach. After nearly three years, that dream was fully realized in 2004 when the outstanding Walker La Grande was deservedly and rightfully awarded a Best in Class award and was included within the winner’s circle and Best of Show candidates line. Having realized his goal for the Walker LaGrande, the current owner has decided to allow the next privileged owner to continue the Duesenberg’s undoubted concours success in the years to come. We are truly honored to be able to offer this important motor car here at the Arizona Biltmore on behalf of its distinguished owner. Once again, the Walker La Grande is featured as one of our cover cars, and from the photos presented on these pages one can see how beautiful the lines of J534 truly are. Now resplendent in a handsome midnight blue with red leather interior, it is a sight to see. Even these remarkable photos do not do the car, its restoration or its original design justice. Its condition is simply flawless. Without question, a Roxas restoration stands among the finest in the world today, and this Duesenberg is a perfect example of that standard. The paint is mirror like, the extensive brightwork displays not a blemish and most impressively the engine and bay remain in remarkable condition. The massive Duesenberg engine appears almost illuminated, like a perfect diamond. It is a breathtaking sight to behold and is a testament to the exacting quality of the restoration in itself. Included in the sale of J534 is a dossier of information including photos of the recent restoration as well as several invoices and perhaps most importantly, a good selection of original photographs of J534 that the current owner has acquired over the last several years. It is worth noting that in all the photographs, spanning several decades, J534 has remained consistently impressive in both its appearance and presence. Regardless of color, angle or whether the top is up or down, J534 is one of the best looking and perfectly proportioned Duesenbergs ever built – period. Some 470 Model J Duesenbergs were built and while a good number of them have survived, few have the provenance and style of J534. The new owner will join a select group of prior owners. Even during the period after World War II when Duesenbergs were frequently traded for a fraction of the price of a new Ford or Chevrolet, J534’s first three owners kept it for nine years, eleven years and a quarter-century respectively. Their extended possession of J534 attests to the way J534 has merged with its owners, and will with its fortunate new owner, much in the way E.L. Cord’s aspirations merged with the talents of Fred and Augie Duesenberg to create the world’s finest motor car. The sweeping lines of J534 are perfectly illustrated here in this rare period photograph highlighting the car's fantastic original condition over 40 years ago. Addendum Please note that this car is titled by the engine number. Chassis no. J534

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-01-28
Hammer price
Show price

1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Alloy Berlinetta Comp

The Ex-Vittorio de Micheli and Prince of Lichtenstein Est. 300bhp 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, solid rear axle with semi-elliptic longitudinal leaf springs on four trailing arms, coil springs to the independent wish bone front suspension with telescopic tubular shock absorbers all around and four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2400mm (94.5") GRAND TURISMO FERRARIS OF THE 1950s Once Enzo Ferrari realized that the marques wealthy racing followers would purchase all the Grand Touring road cars that he could produce, this became the preferred method of financing his beloved racing team. In the past, sales of used racing cars and commercial sponsorships had generated funds, but not in a consistent, nor meaningfully voluminous manner. In the 1949 to 1954 period only about 200 road cars left the factory while sales for the first “Series-Produced” GTs, the Boano and Ellena 250 GT models totaled some 150 units in their two and a half years of manufacture. After that, production more than doubled annually with as many as 670 cars sold in the 1964 calendar year. The mechanical specifications GT Ferraris in this glorious era were always based on the company’s current racing cars, a fact which was not lost on sporting motorists who coveted these thoroughbreds – even at the $10,975 US port-of-entry price. This concept also made GT Ferraris an excellent customer racing car because of their dual-purpose personality. Seeing a niche market opportunity the factory built some 94 long wheelbase berlinettas – “The Tour de France” model was based on the Boano/Ellena chassis but with lightweight alloy bodies and slightly improved engine output. “Gentlemen drivers” loved them and virtually dominated European GT racing in the famed TdFs from 1957 to 1959; however, the TdF was only a precursor to the mighty Ferrari that was to follow – the ultimate and even more competitive dual purpose machine – the 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta. THE FERRARI 250 GT SWB By the late fifties it was apparent that Ferrari had perfected the dual-purpose grand turismo automobile with his line of 250 GTs. The Colombo-designed V-12 had evolved into a powerful engine. More important in racing, where it is said, “To finish first, you must first finish,” and in keeping with that all but too true statement the SWB was nothing short of reliable. That reliability also carried over to 250 GTs that never saw the race track, creating very satisfied owners. Ferrari, as astute at catering to clients varied desires as he was at creating winning race cars, was always willing to provide specialized variations on his series-produced cars to satisfy a whim – when the whim was backed by a heavy checkbook. These unique Ferraris are among the most prized by collectors and this particular example, chassis number 1757 GT, is one such model, being a rare alloy “competezione” version. Introduced in 1959, the 250 GT Berlinetta was designed with three objectives: first, to be more aerodynamically efficient; second, to be as compact as possible; and third, to provide appropriate accommodations and luggage space for a true grand turismo automobile. In the process, Pininfarina and Scaglietti created one of the most beautiful automobiles of all time, a succinct, straightforward and purposeful blending of form following function that is pleasing from all aspects. Seven cars, known today as “Interim Berlinettas” were built on the 2600mm long wheelbase chassis before construction was shifted to the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis, a change deemed desirable to improve the cars’ responsiveness in cornering. Still called the 250 GT Berlinetta by Ferrari, its wheelbase has subsequently been firmly attached to the factories model designation to distinguish it from numerous other 250 GT models and the 2600mm chassis “Interim Berlinettas.” As the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta it has established a reputation and following, second only to its successor, the illustrious 250 GTO. Pininfarina’s body design as executed by Scaglietti on the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis excels in all aspects. It is unmistakably Ferrari. It is devoid of superfluous bulk, features or embellishments. Essentially, it redefined the concept of aerodynamic. The driver’s visibility from the ample greenhouse is also excellent while the corners of the car are tightly wrapped around the wheels and its gently rounded masses speak unambiguously of potency and power. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta was immediately successful in racing and remained so until its place at the head of the GT pack was gradually assumed by the GTO. The list of competition successes is so long as to be pointless to recount in detail but included GT category wins at LeMans in 1960 and 1961, Tour de France wins in 1960, 1961 and 1962 and of course Stirling Moss’s pair of Goodwood Tourist Trophy wins in 1960 and 1961. Built in both steel and aluminum, only about 200 were made from 1959 to 1962. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is the last true dual purpose grand turismo built in quantity by Ferrari – or anyone else for that matter – and is in all respects a fitting milestone to mark the end of a legendary age. FERRARI SHORT WHEELBASE BERLINETTA – CHASSIS NO. 1757 GT The 250 GT SWB was homologated by the F.I.A. on June 16, 1960, just in time for that year’s LeMans race which accounts for the fact that in races prior to this date, these Berlinettas were entered in the sports car category. In fact, the LeMans SWB attack began in 1960 as Tavano/Loustel’s Berlinetta won the GT class and finished 4th overall – 5th, 6th and 7th overall also being claimed by the SWB brigade! Certainly these drivers – Tavano, Loustel, Arents, Connell, Dernier, Noblet and Americans Ed Hugus and Augie Pabst (who finished 7th O/A in NART’s GT no. 1759) personified Enzo Ferrari’s “gentleman driver” demographic. Meanwhile in Italy, skilled amateur driver and faithful Ferrari customer Vittorio de Micheli took delivery of GT no. 1757, an alloy Competizione version, on May 11, 1960. It was painted in Rosso Corsa, as it is today as well, and featured rare early SWB series body details. Only 29 cars in this early series were built – all in aluminum and all configured in left hand drive. Number 1757, the SWB GT that RM Auctions is privileged to present here, was the 5th car in this early series. Vittorio de Micheli was by all accounts a very skilled driver since he managed to win over half of the hillclimbs and circuit races he contested in the 1960 to 1962 period. (Please see included competition record for specifics.) After two years of racing and spirited road use, de Micheli sold 1757 to the Prince of Lichtenstein who repainted the car in silver. Five years later Grand Garage Eskert in Windischbrugg, Switzerland passed the SWB to Larry Dent of Auburn, Indiana (1967). By 1969 it was with Ervin Williams of Hickory, North Carolina before going to Carl Reinhardt of Marietta, Georgia in 1971. Reinhardt retained 1757 for some15 years during which it was subjected to extensive restoration work, including a new alloy front body section fabricated by Robbie Robinson of Woodstock, Georgia. In the fall of 1986 an agent for European Auto Sales of Costa Mesa, California inspected this car prior to purchase and reported that the original engine was stamped correctly and many trim pieces were also marked with the number 1757 and was fitted with the original riveted alloy gas tank and outside fuel filler. The transmission, it should be noted, had “gone missing” but a correct ribbed cage alloy gearbox from another car would be included in the sale to European Auto Sales. The car was subsequently sold to Kenji Sasamoto of Kawasaki, Japan in December, 1986. However, it remained in California for a full restoration by EAS before finally being air freighted to Japan one year later. Sasamoto, a true motoring buff, surely Enzo Ferrari’s version of a Japanese “Gentleman Driver”, kept 1757 for more than 18 years before passing it through a California dealer to the present owner. An account of Kenji Sasamoto’s enthusiastic use of 1757 perhaps illustrates best the oft-used “dual-purpose” phrase in connection with these Ferrari SWB cars. It shows participation in many concours in Japan, racing at Monterey in 1995 during the Ferrari feature marque year, the 1996 Tour de France and the Monterey Historics again as well as the 1997 Palm Beach Cavallino Classic Track-Day and Saturday Concours. Certainly no “garage queen” this Short Wheelbase Berlinetta was also raced and shown by its current owner at the 2006 Cavallino Classic. Additionally, the Ferrari is complete with the original quick-change jack as well as a brand new custom made fuel cell currently awaiting installation. The owner reports a comprehensive dossier will accompany the car in its sale and includes photos of the restoration and original FIA papers. Most recently, a full mechanical inspection was executed and included a compression check and leak-down test and the results displaying nothing short of perfection. The SWB is eligible for every important motoring event on the planet, will never be denied entry into any Ferrari club event and will out perform nearly everything in its class with ease at the hands of a skilled driver. Sensational looks coupled with an unsurpassed driving dynamic as well as a definite blue-chip investment for future appreciation, this rare Ferrari auction offering is most worthy of a purchase consideration. Chassis no. 1757GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-03-11
Hammer price
Show price

1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

Extremely low-mileage example; 4,156 actual miles Remarkable condition throughout; an immaculate reference piece One of only two Daytona Spiders originally delivered in Rosso Bordeaux Authentic, unmolested and thoroughly superb Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche This superb Daytona Spider, the 85th of only 121 original Spiders, was built to U.S. specifications, with both Borletti air conditioning and a Voxson radio, as well as instruments in miles, left-hand drive and finished in Rosso Bordeaux over Beige seats with black inserts. Completed by the factory in February 1973, it was stored for three years by the famed Chinetti-Garthwaite Imports of Paoli, Pennsylvania. Its official ‘delivery’ date was 8 July 1976, via the famous Algar Enterprises. In late 1976, this car was offered via Brian Motor Cars, Inc. of Flourtown, Pennsylvania. The ad in the New York Times described the car as unregistered and showing 829 miles. Larry Farrell of New York next advertised the car for sale in 1981, describing it as an original spider with under 1,000 original miles. In November of that year it was sold to Dr Laurence W. Wolf of Houston, who covered most of the car’s present mileage, selling it in 1993, with 4,120 miles recorded, to the present owner. This owner, only the third since new, has stored the car now amongst his large collection for nearly a quarter of a century, during which time it has never been shown in public. The Daytona Spider is offered today with 4,156 actual miles, at the time of cataloguing, and in impressively well-preserved, largely original condition. Its top is the original, as is the remarkable tan and black interior, with upholstery that shows only the faintest patina and appears only a few years old, a virtually unmarked steering wheel and an excellent dashboard with fine ‘mouse hair’ and crisp, clear gauges. The only apparent alteration from original specifications has been the installation of a Sony radio, which replaced the original Voxson unit many years ago. Inspection of stampings and finishes throughout the chassis and engine compartment also show superb originality and authenticity. The original top boot and spare wheel are both in the trunk. This is a unique opportunity to purchase one of the lowest mileage Daytona Spiders on the planet, in true ‘time warp’ condition. Few, if any, examples have been as immaculately preserved as this automobile, which carries its wonderful honesty proudly, on every panel, nut and bolt. It is only fitting to offer it here at Maranello, as it wears the same finishes applied by this factory’s artisans 44 years ago. • Chilometraggio molto basso, solo 6.688 chilometri effettivi • In condizioni perfette, un esemplare da prendere come riferimento • Una delle due sole Daytona Spider uscite di fabbrica in Rosso Bordeaux • Autentica, conservata e in una condizione impeccabile • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche Questa straordinaria Daytona Spider, l'ottava di sole 121 Spider prodotte a Maranello, è stata costruita secondo le specifiche statunitensi. Con aria condizionata Borletti e radio Voxson, ha la strumentazione in miglia, la guida a sinistra, la carrozzeria Rosso Bordeaux e i sedili beige con inserti neri. Ultimata nel febbraio del '73, è stata conservata per tre anni dalla famosa Chinetti-Garthwaite Imports di Paoli, in Pennsylvania. La data ufficiale di consegna è l'8 luglio 1976, attraverso la nota Algar Enterprises. Alla fine dell'anno viene messa in vendita dalla Brian Motor Cars, Inc. di Flourtown, Pennsylvania. L'annuncio del New York Times descrive l'auto come non immatricolata e con meno di 1.400 km. Successivamente Larry Farrell, sempre di New York, la rimette in vendita nel 1981, dicendo che questa spider, tutta originale, ha meno di 1.600 km effettivi. Nel novembre dello stesso anno viene comprata dal dottor Laurence W. Wolf di Houston, che è poi il proprietario che le ha fatto fare la maggior parte della strada, rivendendola quindi nel '93 con 6.630 km (registrati nell'atto di vendita), all'attuale proprietario. Appena il terzo in vent'anni di vita della Dayona. Conservata in una nutrita collezione per quasi un quarto di secolo, non è mai stata mostrata in pubblico. Questa Daytona Spider, in gran parte originale e in condizioni incredibilmente ben conservate, al momento della stesura di questo catalogo ha solo 6.688 chilometri effettivi. La capote è la sua originale, come lo sono gli straordinari interni beige e neri, con rivestimenti che mostrano solo una leggerissima patina. Il volante è praticamente intonso, cruscotto e plancia sono eccellenti con il loro bel vellutino e una strumentazione pulita e brillante. L'unico pezzo non originale è la radio Sony con cui è stata rimpiazzata la Voxson già molti anni fa. Guardando con attenzione al resto dell'auto, le stampigliature di telaio e motore testimoniano una straordinaria originalità e autenticità. Capote e ruota di scorta sono entrambe nel baule. È davvero un'occasione più unica che rara di acquistare una Daytona Spider con così pochi chilometri, in un pacchetto incredibilmente ben conservato. Sono davvero pochissimi gli esemplari così immacolati, se davvero ne esistono. Autenticità e conservazione riscontrabili su ogni singolo pannello, dado e bullone. È giusto che un'auto così venga offerta a Maranello, dove gli operai del tempo l'hanno vista uscire dagli stabilimenti pressoché nelle stesse condizioni, ma 44 anni fa. Chassis no. 16783 Engine no. B 2552 Body no. 1230

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
Show price

1957 Maserati 250S by Fantuzzi

235 bhp, 2,489 cc twin cam, dry-sump four-cylinder engine with two 45 DCO3 Weber carburettors, five-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with coil springs, de Dion rear axle with transverse leaf spring, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes, and steel tube frame. Wheelbase: 2,150 mm One of four examples built Believed to be the only example originally equipped with a 2.5-litre engine Retailed through Jim Hall and Carroll Shelby’s distributorship Raced in period by Hall, Shelby, and Alan Connell Highly original and well documented, with factory build sheets and FIA-HTP papers Some of the most brilliant and revered thoroughbreds to emerge from Maserati’s stable during the 1950s were the company’s four-cylinder sports racers, which debuted in 1955. Like Porsche, Maserati took note that the 1.5-litre sports car class lacked significant competition from any manufacturers other than OSCA, so the Tipo 53 project was commissioned utilising the 4CF2 engine, which displaced just under 1,500 cubic centimetres. In due course, the motor was enlarged to displace two litres for the succeeding 200S and 200SI models, and though both cars showed much promise in their duels with Ferrari’s TRCs, Maserati was increasingly preoccupied with its 300S six-cylinder sports racer. Nevertheless, at the Buenos Aires 1000 km on 20 January 1957, a new development of the four-cylinder car appeared during practice. Featuring a version of the 200SI’s engine that was further bored to 2,489 cubic centimetres, the so-called 250S caused quite a stir when Juan Manual Fangio drove it in practice to some of the day’s best lap times, even besting Ferrari’s 3.5-litre V-12 cars. Despite the strong showing, the 250S was deemed to still require further development before properly entering a race. Unfortunately, that plan increasingly fell by the wayside as the 300S dominated the year’s agenda, and Maserati eventually cancelled their race programme altogether following the 1957 season. As a result, only four examples of the sensational 250S were ever built, with three of the four cars featuring enlarged versions of engines that originally displaced two-litres. Chassis number 2432 is believed to be unique among the four 250S examples, as it is the only car originally built with a displacement of 2,489 cubic centimetres. As such, it is, in essence, the only true 250S ever produced, as the others were fitted with engines that began life as 200SI-specification motors. Original Maserati build sheets indicate that 2432 was constructed on 31 December 1957. Like many cars that Maserati retailed to the burgeoning American privateer racing market during this period, two of the 250S examples (chassis numbers 2431 and 2432) were sold in early 1958 to Hall-Shelby Distributors, in Dallas, Texas. Few destinations in American sports car racing could have been more significant, as both Jim Hall and Carroll Shelby would soon forge immense legacies in racing history. As is well known to automotive enthusiasts, within years Hall went on to create his famous big-bore Chaparral sports prototypes, whilst Shelby quickly graduated to driving for John Edgar’s Southern California Scuderia before continuing on to his now-legendary pursuits with Aston Martin and Ford. Hall and Shelby campaigned both 250S cars during the 1958 season’s early events, sometimes using one car solely for practice. Hall finished 3rd overall and a 2nd in class at the SCCA Regional at Mansfield, Louisiana, on 9 March; it also finished 6th overall at the Galveston event on 20 April and took the chequered flag at Eagle Mountain, Texas, on 8 June. As both 2431 and 2432 attended these races, it is not entirely clear which of the two cars enjoyed the aforementioned results; though, it is certain that both were raced by each of the legendary drivers, and most likely, 2432 was responsible for some of these racing triumphs. According to an original letter written by Jim Hall to the Maserati factory on 8 June 1959, the exploits of 2431 and 2432 inspired one of their customers to order engine number 2433 for his 200SI, chassis number 2418. Hall and Shelby experienced some challenges with the proper fit of the pistons to the new motor, eventually discovering that 2433 was of a significantly different design than the engines of 2431 and 2432. The letter (a copy of which is included in this car’s documentation) is particularly telling, not only in its dating of the early history of chassis number 2432, but also as a personally typed letter from the great Jim Hall, which is a valuable piece of documentation in itself. Following their progression to other racing cars, most immediately a Chevy-powered Lister, Hall and Shelby sold both Maseratis, though 2432 may have remained in their possession as late as 21 March 1959, when they entered a 250S in the 12 Hours of Sebring. This was very likely 2432, as 2431 had already been sold to privateer Bobby Aylward at that point. Passing briefly to Gary Laughlin, 2432 was next sold to well-known Maserati racer Alan Connell, and it may have been the exact 250S he used to capture 3rd at the Gran Premio d'Avandaro on 26 April, before retiring early at Lime Rock on 4 July (Connell was also racing chassis number 2430 around this time). Subsequently sold to John Price, 2432 was imported to the United Kingdom around 1973 by Colin Crabbe, who found the car stripped of paint but “running very well”. The car passed through two further British owners prior to being acquired in 1989 by Peter Hannen, who commissioned a sympathetic restoration, needing only to replace the rear differential casing that had cracked at Nürburgring. In 1992, the car was purchased by Robin Lodge and full FIA papers were obtained, whilst Tony Merrick was retained to look after mechanical considerations. Acquired by James Lindsay in 1999, chassis 2432 participated in several events that year, including the Mille Miglia, the V-12 Telecom support race for the French Grand Prix at Magny-Cours, and the Goodwood Revival. In 2001, following a full inspection, the highly original 2432 was deemed to be an appropriately superlative addition to the Laidlaw Collection. Over the ensuing years, it has been impeccably maintained and prepared for racing, with Maserati specialist Sean Danaher rebuilding many of the car’s mechanical components and completely refinishing the exterior. Accompanying the car is a truly immense file of documentation that includes numerous invoices from Mr Danaher, Simon Hadfield Motorsport, Brazell Engineering, and Steve Hart. This file details the next 12 years of 2432’s competitive life at some of Europe’s greatest circuits, including Goodwood, Nürburgring, Monza, Silverstone, Spa, Donington, Hockenheim, and Le Mans. From the first race at Brands Hatch in 2001, and through to the Monaco Historic Grand Prix and all destinations of the Maserati/Ferrari Historic Challenge, podium finishes have been the usual result. In 2010, the engine suffered a catastrophic piston failure. A new replacement block, crankshaft, connecting rods, and all relevant bearings were supplied by Steve Hart to Sean Danaher, who carefully built the new engine, which retained the original numbered cylinder head. This engine, and of course the rest of the car, is in excellent race ready condition, having run for very few hours since the dyno testing that followed the build. In addition to its extreme rarity, as it is perhaps the only example originally built by the factory to 250S specifications rather than upgraded from 200SI specs (and more unequivocally, one of just four ever constructed), 2432 features a large file of documentation, including FIA and VSCC papers, an MSA Historic Technical Passport, factory build sheets, the 1959 correspondence from Jim Hall to the Maserati factory, recent letters from Adolfo Orsi, copious on-going race-preparation invoices, and correspondence from various owners and experts that illustrate the car’s rich history. This 250S is furthermore accompanied by numerous spare parts and original components, including two engine blocks, exhaust manifolds, a flywheel, clutch, rear hub, and gearbox casing, aluminium brake-drum covers, the original driver’s seat and the original headrest fairing (which was replaced with a taller piece to disguise a suitable roll-hoop for improved modern safety), and some interior body panels that were replaced for the sake of aesthetics. Chassis 2432 is a remarkably original example of the powerful 250S, which has been noted by many vintage competitors to deliver far stronger performance than the prior versions of the four-cylinder Maserati. Connoisseurs often agree that, other than the mighty eight-cylinder 450S, the 250S is the best overall performing car that Maserati fielded during this era. Chassis 2432’s rarity, beauty, and history qualify it for the finest of collections. Eminently worthy of presentation at the most discerning international concours d’elegance, participating in the Mille Miglia, or contesting a fresh campaign of vintage competition, this outstanding Maserati sports racing car is highly eligible and most welcome on any of the great historic events. Road registered and highly competitive on the race track, the 250S is one of those rare competition cars in which one can genuinely drive to the circuit, race, potentially win, and enjoy the drive home again. It is truly exceptional and versatile. Chassis no. 2432 Engine no. 2432-1

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-09-08
Hammer price
Show price

1960 Maserati Tipo 61 "Birdcage"

Est. 250 hp, 2,890 cc overhead cam inline four-cylinder engine, two Weber 45 DC03 carburettors, five-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension, rigid de Dion rear axle, four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2200 mm (86.6") Although Maserati had enjoyed competition success with its championship-winning 250F grand prix car, the Modenese company soon found itself in dire financial straits. With the introduction and sales success of the road-going 3500 GT, however, the company’s health improved drastically, prompting a renewed interest in creating a sports car that could be raced, not by the factory, but by privateers. Credit for the resulting Tipo 60/61 goes to engineer extraordinaire Giulio Alfieri who during 1958 created this stunning sports racing car. Its “Birdcage” nickname comes from its unique and very innovative trellis chassis construction, made of a plethora of small tubes between 10 and 15 mm thick. Once welded together (all 200 of them!), they created a structure as rigid as it was light, weighing just 36 kgs, clothed in svelte wheel-hugging aluminium body – a true work of art and testimony to Maserati craftsmanship! Into this structure was fitted the Tipo 60’s 1,990 cc inline two-cam four-cylinder engine, very far back towards the cockpit. Independent front suspension provided superb turn-in while the de Dion rear axle with transverse leaf spring and coil over telescopic shock absorbers made the car easily controllable. In what would become Maserati’s last factory entry in decades, a Tipo 60 was entered at Rouen Les Essarts in July 1959, winning the race outright. Naturally, the phones started ringing off the hook in Modena! Six Tipo 60s were sold before the 1961 upgrade to Tipo 61, which benefited from an increased capacity of 2,890 cc and delivered 250 hp – more than enough horsepower for a 600 kg heavy car. In all, 17 were built, including one Tipo 60 that had been upgraded. The car’s notable wins were the Camoradi team victories at the Nürburgring 1000 kms in 1960 and again in 1961, against the might of rival factory teams. From the beginning, Birdcages were very popular with American competitors. The car offered here, chassis 2470, was no exception. The third-to-last Birdcage built, it was sold new in December 1960 to Jack Hinkle who was not just the proverbial wealthy amateur racer. A laid back, unassuming and popular Texas banker, oilman and then-president of the SCCA, he was described by historian Joe Scalzo as “one of the fastest men in competition today…He is in fact something all new – a wealthy sportsman driver who races as hard as the pros.” Scalzo went on to note that Hinkle was also a bit of an eccentric, having his lawn mower modified so it would run 50 mph…and promptly losing control and flattening his wife’s rose bushes! The results he achieved with 2470 were stellar. In 1961 he entered seven races, of which he won three – La Junta, Colorado and two races in Oklahoma at Ponta City and Norman. He also had two second places finished, one third and just one DNF. The following year, he participated in nine more races, winning three (Nebraska, Oklahoma and Kansas), finishing second in three more, third in two races and again one DNF. Thus, he always finished on the podium, with the exception of the two races he did not finish. Hinkle eventually sold 2470 to a friend, Tracy Bird, who later became one of the founders of the Can Am series. Bird raced it in Castle Rock, near Tucson, on 5th April 1964, finishing fifth. A fire in Bird’s garage did some damage to the front of the car, and to repair it properly, he bought the ex-Roger Penske Birdcage (chassis 2471) from its then-owner Enus Wilson. 2471’s rear end had suffered in an accident, but it had an intact front end. Bird thus repaired 2470 using the factory correct parts from 2471, after which its wreck was scrapped. As a result, 2470 is the second to last Birdcage extant, as 2472, the ex-Camoradi factory car now in the Panini Museum, is the only car with a higher chassis number. Bird’s Maserati then crossed the Atlantic after its acquisition by F1 team owner and bon vivant Lord Alexander Hesketh. In his ownership, it competed with Charles Lucas (aka “Charlie Luke”) behind the wheel, who had previously raced a 250F. This was an era when vintage races were much more casual, cars arrived on flatbeds and starting grids were a patchwork of “run what ya brung.” On 20th May 1974, Lucas started on pole at the Silverstone Open Aston Martin Historic Race and was third for most of the event before retiring on the last lap. He and Lord Hesketh recently shared some of their typically colourful memories with this writer: Charles Lucas: “It was a great car to drive. I don't think there were any old sports racing cars around that were quicker at the time – it even beat Robs Lamplough in his CanAm McLaren at Castle Combe. The best win was probably at the Historic support race for the Austrian GP at the Osterreichring in '75. We had such a good lead, Alexander hung out a pit sign that said 'Cocktails', so we came in to the pits for a quick one!” Needless to say this would not go down well nowadays! Lord Hesketh recalled the same event: “I’d been advised by a friend who had a Tipo 61 to buy one as well so I did. It went to the Osterreichring in 1975. It was then a proper race track. We were disappointed in the GP – rather teed off, actually – and the only other race of the day was the vintage race but the trouble with that one is that it wasn’t really a race, it was meant to be a sort of 70 mph parade. Charles put in a lap at 130 mph. I mean at Zeltweg you’d expect to have a Type 61 unrestricted. This was going to get us into trouble, so we put out a pitboard that said “cocktails” in order to bring him in and slow him down. So he came in we gave him one, we let the whole of the field go by. Then he went out, overtook them all again and won the race. I think that is the only time we took it to a GP and raced it the same weekend.” Later owners included Dieter Holterbosch of Oyster Bay, New York who had it restored and in 1998 sold it to Tony Smith in the U.K. The current owner acquired 2470 from Smith in 2004 and has used it in several Ferrari Historic Challenge Series events. The last Race entered was the 2009 Nürburgring Oldtimer Grand Prix, which the car won. One of the most original Birdcages in existence, it is fitted with a spare race prepared engine. The original engine comes with the car, however. The body is mostly original. Maserati’s racing cars have steadily appreciated in value over the last 20 years as the marque’s rich and successful history gets more and more of the recognition it deserves. The Birdcage is one of the most iconic racers ever to come out of the hallowed Modenese factory. It is a tremendously competitive and enjoyable car to drive and a jewel of engineering. FRENCHTEXT Moteur: quatre cylindres en ligne arbre à cames en tête, env. 250 ch., 2,890 ccm, deux carburateurs Weber 45 DC03, boîte manuelle à cinq rapports, suspension avant indépendante, pont arrière rigide de Dion, freins à disques aux quatre roues. Empattement: 2200 mm (86.6") Bien que Maserati ait eu beaucoup de succès en course avec ses 250F qui remportèrent les deux titres en 1957, la firme Modènaise se trouva soudain en difficultés financières. L’arrivée sur le marché de la nouvelle 3500 GT routière et son grand succès commercial améliorèrent dramatiquement la donne et firent naître l’idée de créer une voiture de compétition en catégorie sport destinée à courir non pas aux mains de l’usine mais dans celles de pilotes privés. Ainsi naquit en1958 la sublime Tipo 60/61 que l’on doit à l’extraordinaire ingénieur Giulio Alfieri. Son surnom de “Birdcage” (cage à oiseaux) est dû à son unique et très innovant châssis à treillis tubulaire constitué d’une pléthore de petits tubes de 10 à 15mm de diamètre. Une fois tous soudés ensemble (il y en avait 200 !), ils devenaient une structure aussi rigide que légère, ne pesant que 36 kg, vêtue dans une svelte carrosserie apparaissant comme moulée sur le châssis et les roues –une vraie œuvre d’art et une grande démonstration de la qualité de l’artisanat de Maserati! Dans cette structure fut monté le moteur quatre cylindres en ligne deux arbres à cames en tête 1,990 ccm, positionné très en arrière vers le cockpit. Sa suspension indépendante permettait une réactivité instantanée du train avant alors que le pont arrière rigide de Dion avec ses ressorts à lames et amortisseurs téléscopiques la rendaient facilement contrôlable. Pour démontrer ses capacités une Tipo 60 fut engagée en course par l’usine à Rouen Les Essarts en Juillet 1959, la dernière participation d’une Maserati officielle en course avant plusieurs décennies d’absence. Elle remporta d’emblée la course et les téléphones se mirent tout de suite a sonner sans interruption à l’usine de Modéne! Six Tipo 60s furent vendues avant l’introduction de la version améliorée, la Tipo 61, en1961. Celle ci bénéficiait d’une augmentation de cylindrée à 2,890 ccm produisant 250 ch. – bien plus qu’il n’en fallait pour une auto ne pesant que 600 kg. Un total de 17 Tipo 61 furent construites, dont une sur une base de Tipo 60. Les plus grandes victoires de la «Birdcage » furent celles de l’écurie Camoradi au 1000 km du Nürburgring en 1960 et à nouveau en 1961, devant une armada d’écuries officielles de constructeurs rivaux. Dés leur naissance les Birdcage furent très appréciées par les pilotes Americains. L’auto présentée ici, le châssis 2470, l’illustre bien. La 14éme des 17 construites, elle fut vendue neuve en Décembre 1960 à Jack Hinkle qui était bien plus qu’un typique pilote amateur fortuné. Ce banquier et prospecteur de pétrole Texan, décontracté et modeste –et président du SCCA (Sports car Club of America)- était décrit par l’ historien Joe Scalzo comme étant “l’un des hommes les plus rapides en course de nos jours….Il est en fait quelque chose de tout nouveau – un pilote dilettante qui attaque aussi fort en piste que les pros.” Scalzo relatait aussi que Hinkle était un peu excentrique, faisant modifier sa tondeuse à gazon pour qu’elle atteigne 80km/h…en perdant tout de suite le contrôle et écrasant les rosiers de son épouse ! Les résultats qu’il obtint avec 2470 furent impressionnants. En 1961 il participa à sept courses, en remporta trois – à La Junta au Colorado et deux en Oklahoma à Ponta City et Norman. Il finit deuxième deux fois, troisième une fois et dut abandonner une seule fois. L’année suivante il prit part à neuf courses, en gagna trois (au Nebraska, en Oklahoma et au Kansas), finit deuxième trois fois, troisième deux fois et, à nouveau, subit juste un abandon. Il avait donc atteint le podium chaque fois exceptées les deux course qu’il ne termina pas. Hinkle vendit par la suite 2470 à un ami, Tracy Bird, qui devint plus tard l’un des fondateurs de la série Can Am. Bird courut avec dans la course de Castle Rock, prés de Tucson dans l’Arizona, le 5 Avril 1964, finissant cinquième. Un incendie dans son garage causa quelques dégâts à l’avant de la voiture, et pour la réparer correctement, il acheta la Birdcage ex-Roger Penske (châssis 2471) a son propriétaire d’alors, Enus Wilson. L’arrière de 2471 avait été endommagé dans un accident mais son avant était intact. Bird répara ainsi 2470 en utilisant les éléments originaux et corrects de 2471, après quoi son épave fut mise à la ferraille. En conséquence de cela 2470 est l’avant dernière Birdcage construite en existence puisque 2472, l’ex auto d’usine Camoradi actuellement dans le musée Panini Museum, est la seule ayant un numéro de châssis plus élevé. 2470 traversa alors l’Atlantique, étant acquise par le Lord Alexander Hesketh propriétaire d’écurie et bon vivant. Il la fit courir aux mains de Charles Lucas (surnommé “Charlie Luke”) qui avait avant cela piloté une 250F. C’était une époque où les courses historiques étaient beaucoup plus humbles et détendues, les autos arrivaient sur des remorques ouvertes et les grilles de départ étaient un allègre et très hétéroclite mélange, toute auto de course présente joignait le bal! Le 20 Mai 1973, Lucas partit en pole position lors d’une course Open Aston Martin Historique à Silverstone et occupa la troisième place avant d’abandonner au dernier tour. Lucas et Lord Hesketh racontèrent récemment certains de leurs souvenirs, typiquement hauts en couleurs, à l’auteur: Charles Lucas: “c’était une auto merveilleusement efficace. Je ne crois pas qu’il y avait à l’époque d’autres anciennes voitures de courses d’endurance plus rapides qu’elle – elle a même battu Robs Lamplough dans sa McLaren Can Am à Castle Combe. La victoire la plus spéciale avec elle fut sans doute celle dans la course historique le weekend du Grand Prix d’Autriche à l’Osterreichring en '75. J’avait un telle avance qu’Alexander me montra le panneau de signalisation avec le mot 'Cocktails', alors je me suis arrêté au stand pour en boire un avant de repartir !” Il va sans dire que cela ne serait pas bien vu du tout de nos jours! Lord Hesketh se souvient de la même course: “J’avais été conseillé par un ami qui avait lui même une Tipo 61d’en acheter une alors je l’ai fait. Elle nous accompagna à l’Osterreichring en 1975. C’était alors un vrai et grand circuit. Le GP fut décevant pour notre écurie - très frustrant en fait- et la seule autre course ce jour là était la course historique mais le problème c’est que ce n’était pas vraiment une course, c’était supposé être une espèce de parade à 100km/h. Charles fit un tour à plus de 200km/h de moyenne. Comprenez qu’à Zeltweg on s’attend tout de même à ce qu’une Type 61 puisse courir sans “muselière.” Nous allions au devant d’ennuis alors nous lui avons montré le panneau de signalisation avec le mot “cocktails” pour le convaincre de s’arrêter et le faire ralentir. Alors il s’est arête au stand, on lui en a donné un, on a laissé passer tous les concurrents. Puis il est ressorti, les a tous re-dépassés et a gagné la course. Je crois que ce fut la seule fois où nous l’avons amenée à un GP et fait courir le même weekend.” Par la suite la voiture appartint à Dieter Holterbosch de Oyster Bay, New York qui la fit restaurer et la vendit en 1998 à Tony Smith au Royaume Uni. Le propriétaire actuel acheta 2470 à Smith en 2004 et l’a utilisée dans plusieurs épreuves du Challenge Historique Ferrari. Sa dernière participation en course eut lieu à l’Oldtimer Grand Prix au Nürburgring en 2009, et se solda par la victoire. Une des Birdcage les plus originales en existence, son moteur actuel est un moteur de rechange, preparé pour la compétition. Par contre le moteur original est vendu en lot avec l’auto. La carrosserie est en majorité originale. Les Maserati de course ont vu leur valeur augmenter de manière continue ces dernières 20 années, conséquence du fait que l’histoire aussi glorieuse que victorieuse de Maserati est de plus en plus appréciée telle qu’elle le mérite par les collectionneurs. La Birdcage est, parmi toutes les autos provenant de la vénérable usine Modénaise, une veritable icône. Elle est extrêmement compétitive et amusante à conduire et un bijou technologique. Chassis no. 2470

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2010-05-01
Hammer price
Show price

Delivered new to Embiricos 1937 MERCEDES-BENZ 540K CABRIOLET A Coachwork by Sindelfingen

Delivered new to Embiricos 1937 MERCEDES-BENZ 540K CABRIOLET A Coachwork by Sindelfingen Chassis no. 154083 Engine no. 154083 5,401cc OHV Inline 8-cylinder Engine with Rootes Supercharger 180bhp at 3400rpm With Blower Engaged 4-Speed Manual Transmission 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Drum Brakes * One of only 32 of this design constructed * Exquisite low slung two seater touring car * Original UK delivery * Fine, fresh older restoration completed * One of the great automobiles of its day THE 1930s KOMPRESSOR MERCEDES-BENZ Together with its predecessor the 500 K, the magnificent Mercedes-Benz 540 K was arguably the most noteworthy production model offered by the Stuttgart firm during the 1930s, representing the pinnacle of its pre-war achievements. A development of the 500 K, whose independently suspended chassis it shared, the 540 K was powered by a 5.4-litre supercharged straight-eight engine. The 540 K was one of the first models developed under Mercedes' new chief engineer, ex-racing driver Max Sailer, successor to Hans Nibel, who had died in November 1934 aged only 54. Mercedes-Benz's flagship model, it featured the company's famous Roots-type supercharger system in which pressing the accelerator pedal to the end of its travel would simultaneously engage the compressor and close off the alternative atmospheric intake to the carburettor. This system had been thoroughly proven on the preceding series of Dr Ferdinand Porsche-conceived S cars that had dominated racing during the 1920s, and in effect the 540 K was the last supercharged production Mercedes until relatively recent times. Presented at the Paris Salon in October 1936, the 540 K was hailed by Mercedes-Benz as conjuring up 'visions of breath-taking exploits of racing cars and drivers of international fame, but also of superlative comfort and coachwork of exquisite beauty, fine paintwork, brightly polished metal, the finest hardwoods and leather - massive and yet outstandingly attractive bodies - in short: the car for the connoisseur.' It had an engine that developed 115PS un-supercharged or 180PS (178bhp) with the compressor engaged, while the gearbox was a four-speeder but with a direct top gear rather than the overdrive ratio used on the earlier 500K. With the supercharger engaged, the 540 K's blown straight eight gave it a top speed approaching 110mph (177km/h. Servo-assisted hydraulic brakes provided adequate stopping power. Its performance potential was such that Mercedes-Benz in the UK retained racing driver Goffredo 'Freddy' Zehender as technical adviser and demonstration driver, since the super-charged Mercedes was one of the few genuine 100mph road cars available in the 1930s. Tested by Britain's Motor magazine, the 540 K was judged to have less heavy steering and handling than its predecessor, the 500 K, plus an even more comfortable ride, even though the same all-round independent suspension layout with parallel links and coil springs at the front and swing axles at the rear was retained. The Motor's test car returned 102mph over the timed quarter-mile with the supercharger engaged and 85mph with it disengaged. The servo-assisted brakes came in for fulsome praise, the blower was found to be relatively quiet and the springing more comfortable than that of the 500 K, while the steering and handling also compared favourably with that model. In May 1938, the 540 K was tested by Motor's rival magazine Autocar and achieved the highest maximum speed of any road-test car up to that date: carrying three pas¬sengers, the car reached 104.65mph (168.5km/h) on the race circuit at Brooklands, Surrey. 'One's foot goes hard down, and an almost demonical howl comes in,' reported test driver H S Linfield. 'The rev counter and speedometer needles leap round their dials: there is perhaps no other car noise in the world so distinctive as that produced by the Mercedes supercharger.' Late in 1938, a revised 540 K made its appearance, with oval-section chassis tubes instead of channel frame members, while the adoption of sodium-cooled valves followed the company's highly successful racing practice. The manufacturing record of the 540 K reveals its exclusive nature: 97 being produced in 1936, 145 in 1937, 95 in 1938 and 69 in 1939 before the war ended series production (though three more were built up to July 1942). In recent years, the rarity, style and performance of these big supercharged Mercedes have made them one of the most sought-after of all classic cars on the few occasions they have come on the open market. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED Testament to the quality of the brand over other automobiles in the 1930s era, even as the decade progressed the unapproachable supercharged Mercedes-Benz remained extremely popular with their well-established British clientele. Numerous examples were delivered to the UK including this car. Ordered under commission number 236582, Mercedes fulfilled the requirement of Mr. Embiricos. Of course Embiricos has one of those 'magic of a name' connotations in motoring history, forever being associating with the unique Bentley Aerodynamic Coupe designed by Georges Paulin and built by Pourtout for shipping and banking magnate Andre M. Embiricos and contested Le Mans no fewer than 3 times in the post war era. André Embiricos was not the only member of the family to have a fondness for fine automobiles, his cousin Nicholas carved his own path in contemporary racing with both Bugatti Type 57S and an ERA. It is not confirmed, but seems more likely that it was Nicholas Embiricos who owned the Mercedes offered here as he was certainly resident in England in the late 1930s and is known to have other cars registered in London, including a Bugatti Type 57C. Within a few short years after emigrating to America in 1941 he sadly met his demise in an air accident in Rhode Island. As new, Mr. Embiricos received the very latest version of the two seater cabriolet bodywork that Mercedes now offered, which was stunningly beautiful and distinctive from its predecessor in being more aerodynamic and low slung. The full effect is created by careful revisions to the theme, with the radiator set a full 6 inches behind the centre line of the front wheels, a super low windshield and top, and its lines unblemished by spares, a single extra wheel placed on the swept back tail. According to the definitive work on these cars by Jan Melin, Mr. Embiricos would have been one of only 32 individuals to have received this version of coachwork. As charted by the records of the Ronald H. Johnson archive, a gentleman who ran the Mercedes-Benz Club and charted histories of the marque in the UK, by 1940 the car had passed through Mercedes-Benz of Great Britain to S. Pettit of Pulborough in the Sussex county in the UK and then to a Haulage contractor in 1944. Notes in this archive state that at the point of this third change of ownership the car was still in 'almost new' condition. Finished then in white with pigskin upholstery and with a patent leather roof, the car must have been quite a striking presence wherever it was seen. By the 1980s the car had migrated to America where it came onto the radar of noted aficionado Don Williams of the legendary Blackhawk Collection. Acquired by him, while in his custody a sympathetic and exacting restoration of the bodywork brought it to the jet black scheme it wears today. A direct contrast to its original livery it is undeniably appropriate for the car and accentuates the late form of Cabriolet A beautifully showing how low its windshield and overall profile is. In this scheme, the chrome and whitewalls tires provide exquisite detail features. The interior was clearly refurbished at the same time in a parchment hide, and remains complete and correct with its luggage stowed behind the two seats. A single digit reading on the odometer suggests that barely any mileage has been carried out since this rebuild, a fact endorsed by its stunning condition today. With a pedigree that began in the stable of one of the true motoring sportsmen of his day, and a beautiful still fresh restoration, the Embiricos Cabriolet A awaits a return to the hallowed lawns of Concours fields around the world.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-03-10
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1962 Aston Martin DB4 GT "Zagato"

305bhp at 6000 rpm, 3,679 cc twin overhead camshaft alloy block, twin plug heads, three dual choke 45 DCOE Weber carburetors with twin distributors, four-speed all-synchromesh aluminum-cased David Brown gearbox, independent front suspension with wishbones and coaxial coil springs, Armstrong telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar, rear suspension has a live axle with coil springs and lever action dampers, located by four parallel trailing links and a transverse Watt’s linkage, Girling disc brakes front and rear on separate master cylinders and Borrani center-lock wire wheels with light alloy rims. Wheelbase: 93" (7'9") BEAUTY AND BEAST In the late fifties, the climate in which builders of limited edition sports cars lived and worked could be described as a tropical paradise for creation. Those were the days before blizzards of regulations and mountains of bureaucracy made the atmosphere surrounding low-volume manufacturers seem more like that of an Arctic nightmare. Out of these flourishing conditions could spring the most imaginative of designs. Often, it seems, these creations – with only a decade or two of patina descending on their sensuous aluminum surfaces – rose to be regarded with reverence bestowed only on the classics. In those days, all it often took to get the fancy machinery rolling was a meeting and a handshake. Such a meeting took place at London’s Earls Court in 1959. Aston Martin’s fortune was at its peak, with the DBR dominating sports car racing, and a new grand tourer off to an impressive start. And present right there on the Aston Martin stand, was further indication of the confident posture of the Newport Pagnell firm – the short-wheelbase DB4GT. Thus it was an opportune time for John Wyer, the Aston Martin team manager turned general manager, and Gianni Zagato, to meet. Gianni Zagato was the youngest son of Ugo Zagato, and one of the two brothers who had taken over the Carrozzeria after their father’s death. Ugo Zagato had founded the business back in 1919. His friendship with legendary Fiat engineer Vittorio Jano had led to the design of special bodies for this manufacturer. When Jano moved to Alfa Romeo, Zagato created the look that made him famous – the immortal series of Alfa Romeo sports and racing machines, beginning with the 1500. The arrival of World War II marked the end of this first period of the Zagato chronology. The second period, spanning the era from the mid forties to the late fifties, produced a further collection of memorable sports car creations. These designs expressed the styling philosophy of Elio Zagato, Ugo’s oldest son, who had developed his own unique brand of aerodynamic language, based on experience gained as a part-time race driver. The third period began when Gianni Zagato joined the company after Elio was injured in a road accident. Gianni Zagato modernized the operation and invited a brilliant young stylist, Ercole Spada to come aboard. This association brought about another series of outstanding designs that continued to keep Zagato in the spotlight. The Earls Court encounter did indeed produce a meeting of the minds – Wyer and Zagato shook hands on a limited lightweight edition of Aston’s new DB4 GT, bodied by the Milanese coach builder with the first chassis arriving in Italy in early 1960. The Aston Martin assignment was one of the first tackled by Spada. Only 23 years old at the time, his youthful creation displayed an obvious kinship to Pinin Farina’s short wheelbase Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta. Still, the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato made a bolder, more rousing statement. Spada accomplished this by forcing all his lines and surfaces to converge on the roof, which was conspicuously minimal and smoothly rounded. Particularly illustrative of this conscious effort on the part of the designer, were the side panels, with their strong incline. The effect was further enhanced by the shape of the grille’s aggressively down-turned corners. The result placed the viewer in the presence of a beautiful beast. This Grand Tourer did not only look the part, it also performed the part. While most of the DB4 GT Zagatos had essentially the same chassis and drivetrain specifications as the DB4 GT, and as such were mainly intended for road use, a few were indeed set up for serious work on the racetrack. These machines had their weight reduced further, and while the engine in the standard Zagato already sported cams with a more radical profile, the racing versions, among other tuning measures, were given a higher 9.7:1 compression ratio, resulting in power rising to 314bhp. When the factory decided to concentrate its racing efforts on Formula One in the early sixties, it was left to a few privateers to defend the Aston Martin tradition on the sports car circuit. While DB GTs run by private UK based teams like Equipe Endeavour and Essex Racing and the French Pozzoli/Kerguen/Franc team scored wins and podium finishes, the lightweight Ferrari 250 SWBs proved to be more than a match for the heavier DB4 GTs in international racing. This, despite a star-studded cast of Aston Martin drivers that included Stirling Moss, Innes Ireland, Roy Salvadori, Jim Clark and a young Bruce McLaren. In city traffic, the Zagato, with its heavy controls, was quite a handful. However, once out on the open road with the machinery working vigorously, Aston Martin’s wild beast was in its natural habitat. The steering became light and responsive, and combined with the ample supply of power, invited the type of driving where the negotiations of turns became an intriguing interplay between steering wheel and throttle. Today, the DB4 GT Zagato is appreciated as one of the most outstanding sports racers of its era – a period when the battles of the racing scene were still fought with cars that could be run on the road. CREDIT: RM Auctions wishes to thank author Henry Rasmussen and Motorbooks International for permission to publish the previous general history and overview of the DB4 GT Zagato. (Aston Martin – The Postwar Road Cars) PROVENANCE OF DB4 GT 0190/L DB4GT/0190/L was originally sold to Commander James Murray, a naval attache residing in Paris, France. Ordered through Garage Mirabeau, 0190/L was successfully raced by Roy Salvadori at the May 1962 BRSCC Brands Hatch event, finishing first in class and second overall, outpaced only by the Ferrari GTO driven by Innes Ireland. The car was delivered to its first owner, Commander Murray in June of 1962. Murray took advantage of the “bespoke tailoring” aspect of ordering a new Aston Martin, a concept that survives to this day. He specified that the body should be of a slightly heavier gauge of aluminum in order to minimize stone chips and make it less prone to Parisian parking problems. Special brake covers were fabricated to prevent brake dust from contaminating the shiny finish of the Borrani wheels and a locking glove box lid was ordered – an item not normally included by the factory on these lightweight cars. Since the Perspex of the side and quarter windows tended to deteriorate quickly, proper glass replacements, as on the standard DB4 GT were also factory supplied. A one-off and very attractive grille with vertical bars, designed by Commander Murray himself helped to widen and somewhat soften the normally brutish frontal appearance. Other custom touches, all listed on the original factory buildsheet which accompanies this sale, included DB4 GT seats, dual circuit brakes and special Italiansourced gauges for the instrument panel. Today, the DB4 GT Zagato is appreciated as one of the most outstanding sports racers of its era – a period when the battles of the racing scene were still fought with cars that could be run on the road. The second and third owners, Ude Hansen and Lars Wendal, both of Sweden, are believed to have used the car for local club events. In 1972 Englishman Tom Leake (who had owned 0193) acquired the car and had Robin Hamilton fit two Scintilla magnetos for racing. These magnetos remain on the car today. Photographer Julian Cottrell of London became owner number four after Leake successfully raced for four seasons, including many races at Silverstone. Cottrell then campaigned the car successfully for two years, including a six hour event at Donington. With the car’s value now becoming more evident, Cottrell sold the car to the late Richard Forshaw of Wimbourne, Dorset. In the 1970s the Forshaw family had been appointed service agents for all pre 1963 postwar Aston Martins. Their collection included three DB3Ss and a DB4 GT; the Zagato would stay in this collection for some time. It is interesting to note that the Zagato was used in a photograph on the Forshaw’s stationary. Essentially, anyone who ever ordered parts or a build sheet from the Forshaws received a photo of 0190/L. The car was rarely used or seen while in the hands of the Forshaws but was extensively restored through 1995 to 1997. The body and chassis were refurbished by the well-known restorerAlan Pointer of Bodylines and painted by John Windsor at GTC, both ex-Aston factory craftsmen. At this time 0190/L was resprayed in its original color of Shell Grey, a conservative shade, but one that perfectly showcases designer Ercole Spada’s beautiful body contours. Interestingly, there is no recorded evidence, photograph or mention of 0190/L ever having been crash damaged or rust repaired – remarkable for a car that was raced year after year. Upon close inspection, the chassis may very well be one of the best original examples in existence. The underside of the bonnet shows the original Zagato hammer marks and the boot and bonnet frame retain all the Zagato rudimentary build quality from that period, designating again that the car is a great survivor. The beauty of these original cars is that you truly get a feel for their asymmetrical and hand built nature. As such, they are not perfect by modern massproduction standards and like most Ferrari GTs, (a good example being the GTO) one is struck by the inherent beauty of their lightweight and almost flimsy construction details. With the untimely death of Richard Forshaw, the Zagato was sold at an auction during the Goodwood Festival of Speed to Les Edgar who maintained the Zagato at the Aston factory Works Service Department while in his ownership. Shortly after the current owner acquired the car in the summer of 2002, Aston Martin Ltd. added an interesting bit of history to this example. 0190/L was used extensively in the marketing and promotion of the renewed relationship between Aston Martin and Zagato as they launched the DB7 Zagato Coupe. Aston Martin certainly felt this chassis was one of the ultimate design examples as it was included in the brochure of their new Zagato. 0190/L features its original 3,670 cc engine and David Brown built gearbox and has recently benefited from a $30,000 plus detailing and mechanical refurbishment of its brakes, suspension, transmission, clutch, rear axle and road wheels after which it successfully completed a 500 mile Arizona road rally. Aston Martin specialist Kevin Kay of Redding, California carried out this work and also fitted a new stainless steel exhaust. He confirms that the engine compression and leakdown tests were excellent and meet all normal standards. 0190/L was featured on the cover of the November 2000, issue of Thoroughbred & Classic Car and the May 2003, issue of the Robb Report. An extensive bit of photography and history can also be found in the 1992 book, Aston Martin DB4, DB5, DB6 The Complete Story by Jonathon Wood. If an Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato had to be described in 50 words or less, the April 13, 1962 Autocar road test article probably says it best; “In sheer performance there are not more than a half-dozen road cars in the world which can match the agility of this special-bodied Aston Martin. Obviously its market is limited by its high price. For those to whom this is no barrier, but who are prepared to pay for an uncommonly well engineered vehicle which has the ability to perform credibly on a racing track, and behave with decorum on the public roads with equal facility, it has few rivals.” Chassis no. DB4GT0190L

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-01-28
Hammer price
Show price

1966 Ferrari Dino 206 SP

THE EX-SEFAC FERRARI, PEDRO RODRIQUEZ AND RICHIE GINTHER, NORTH AMERICAN RACING TEAM, CHARLIE KOLB, GEROGE FOLLMER, JO SCHLESSER, MASTEN GREGORY AND PETER GREGG LA FERRARI EX-SEFAC PEDRO RODRIGUEZ E RICHIE GINTHER, NORTH AMERICAN RACING TEAM, CHARLIE KOLB, GEORGE FOLLMER, JO SCHLESSER, MASTEN GREGORY E PATER GREGG Specifications: 218 bhp 1,986 cc dual overhead camshaft V-6 engine, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,280mm (89.75") Lightweight. Aerodynamic. Powerful. The Ferrari 206 SP is the lithe, sinuous, brilliant V-6 son of the V-12 father. It is similar in many respects, but accomplished with conscious differences. The Origins of the Dino Legend When Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien went to Le Mans in 1962 and were assigned the 330 TRI/LM, the last front-engined car to win at la Sarthe, they felt a little cheated. There were better Ferraris in Ferrari’s entry. There were V-8 and V-6 Dinos. Hill and Gendebien knew the mid-engined Dinos were Ferrari’s future. They drove a dinosaur, and their victory was a tribute to their skill and maturity as drivers as much as it was to the durability, stability, reliability and speed of the four-litre 330 TRI/LM, the ultimate Testa Rossa. The V-6 Dinos were introduced in 1957 for the 1.5-litre Formula 2 series. Enzo Ferrari’s son Alfredo – known as “Dino” - had championed the engines’ layout, and Enzo gave the cars Dino’s name after his son’s untimely death in 1956. The detailed design was done by the old master, Vittorio Jano. With twin overhead camshafts, the inherently balanced conventional cylinder bank angle of 60° left no room for carburetors and inlet manifolding, so Jano increased the included angle to 65°, then compensated for the timing problem with crank throws placed 65° and 185° apart. It was ingenious, and it worked. The first Dino sports racing cars were front-engined; mid-engined cars appeared in 1962, the models Hill and Gendebien hoped to drive at Le Mans. Ferrari then dealt with the problems of slipping a V-12 between the driver and the rear wheels, and development of the compact V-6 powered Dinos languished. The Sports Prototypes Ferrari was challenged by Ford in the mid 60s and responded with a series of Sports Prototypes that have earned their position as the most seductively beautiful sports racing cars ever built. The first 330 P was introduced in 1964 and its design clearly showed its evolution from the 250 LM. The 1965 season’s 330 P2, however, was something completely different and it evolved into the Drogo-built 330 P3 the following year, surely the most voluptuous sports racing automobiles ever seen. At the same time Ferrari introduced the 206 S, an even more tightly wrapped, reduced scale rendition of the 330 P3 with the same voluptuous, sensuous shape on a shorter wheelbase that took full advantage of its compact V-6 powerplant. Franco Rocchi designed this third generation twin-cam V-6, returning to Jano’s original 65° vee angle. It would power not only the 206 S but also the street cars needed to meet the FIA’s requirement that Formula 2 engines be based upon a production engine with at least 500 units built – which Ferrari met in cooperation with Fiat in the Dino sports cars. In addition to the Ferrari sports prototypes and Formula 2 cars, the engine would later power the Ferrari Dino road cars and even the Lancia Stratos rally car. Like the 330 P3, the Dino 206 S was bodied by Drogo’s Carrozzeria Sports Cars. It used a multi-tube frame with alloy panels riveted to it for additional stiffness, in essence a semi-monocoque structure. Ferrari’s intention was that 50 of the cars would be built, qualifying it as an FIA Group 4 sports car, but the financial difficulties that would lead to Ferrari’s merger with Fiat three years later prevented that optimistic goal from being met and in the end only some 18 of these wonderful, quick, beautiful sports racers were built. What started out as a Dino 206 S (for Sport) became known as the Dino 206 SP (for Sports Prototype) when there were not enough built to qualify for Group 4. Chassis No. 008 The meticulously and accurately restored example offered here, chassis 008, is the fourth of the series production 206 SPs built, (The first 206 S was built on Ferrari chassis 0842) and the third of the standard alloy spider bodied 206 SPs. It was delivered to the SEFAC Ferrari team and used for testing and evaluation. Some sources indicate it was entered by the factory to be run by Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team in the 1000 km race at Monza April 25, 1966 where it was driven by NART driver Bob Bondurant and SEFAC driver Nino Vaccarella, but was damaged in practice and withdrawn before starting the race. Six weeks later on June 5, Dino 206 SP 008 was again entered for NART in the ADAC 1000 km of the Nürburgring, one of the season’s most demanding races. Driven by the brilliant pairing of Pedro Rogriguez and Richie Ginther, both SEFAC team drivers in 1966, the 206 SP started ninth on the grid and drove to an outstanding third overall and second in class behind another 206 SP, the fuel injected chassis 004 driven by Scarfiotti and Bandini, and the winning Chaparral 2D of Phil Hill and Jo Bonnier which thundered to the overall victory. Remarkably, all three podium finishers were on the same lap of the daunting 22.81 km Nürburgring Nordschleife. On June 18, 1966, still fresh from its podium finish at the Nürburgring, chassis 008, using a SEFAC Ferrari entry, was on hand at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The car, however, was now owned by Chinetti, having been sold by SEFAC Ferrari on June 10. Chinetti put Charlie Kolb and George Follmer in the 206 SP and they started in 32nd position. After an excellent start, oil seeped onto the clutch, rendering it useless, and on just the 9th lap the team withdrew, a fate eventually shared by 40 of the 55 entrants - 73 percent of the starting grid. Kolb’s seat at Le Mans foreshadowed the next stage in 008’s career. After returning to Maranello for servicing and race prep, it was shipped to the U.S. and its next owner, M. Schroeder, who immediately entered it in the August 28 USRRC-Buckeye Cup race in Lexington, Ohio where it was driven by Charlie Kolb. Kolb brought the 206 SP home second in class and sixth overall. Entries at The Road America 500 at Elkhart Lake and the USRRC race at Bridgehampton followed before 008 was purchased by Fred Baker, who arranged to use a Chinetti entry in the 1967 Daytona 24 Hours. A fresh engine rebuild and gearbox overhaul were not completed in time to qualify, and 008 started from the back of the grid as a result. The driving team was strong – Jo Schlesser, Masten Gregory and Peter Gregg. At just over half distance, after moving within sight of a top 10 placing, Gregory made a routine pit stop only to have the engine develop a misfire when it restarted, which turned out to be a stripped distributor drive. Baker again used a Chinetti entry for his Dino 206 SP at the Sebring 12 Hours on April 1. Charlie Kolb and Ed Crawford started from 20th on the grid, where they remained when the green flag fell, sidelined by a broken half shaft. For the remainder of 1967, the 206 SP contested SCCA and USRRC races driven by Lee Cutler and occasionally Charlie Kolb. It was back at Daytona for the 24 hours in 1968 after being rebuilt by Chinetti’s NART mechanics. Now consigned or loaned to Chinetti, he put Kolb and Pedro Rodriguez in Dino 206 SP 008 and Rodriguez qualified an excellent 10th among the three litre Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/2s. Kolb and Rodriguez kept the little Dino among the top 10 until another misfire brought them into the pits and early retirement. Baker decided to sell the car, although Lee Cutler apparently worked out a deal to drive it in later races. Before the end of the year he bought the Dino from Baker, marking the end of its front line racing career. Harley Cluxton bought it from Cutler in 1971, selling it later that year to noted Ferrari collector and enthusiast, Walter Medlin in Kissimmee, Florida. Medlin did nothing with the beautiful little 206 SP except store it among his other cars where it stayed for more than 20 years. In 1995 it was acquired by Symbolic Motor Car Company and given a complete two-year restoration by Rob Shanahan. After completion, it became part of several important Ferrari collections and was proudly displayed at such diverse and important events as Rosso Ferrari at Rodeo Drive and the Goodwood Festival of Speed (both in 1997) and Cavallino Classic in 2004. It was featured in the Japanese magazine CAR in 1998. In 2003 it was returned to Symbolic’s restoration shop where it received a comprehensive refurbishment. It was acquired by the present owner after completion of the work and was displayed at Cavallino Classic in 2004. The vendor reports the Dino is on the button and is in excellent overall mechanical condition. It is a personal favorite of his and while he has not competitively raced it regularly, he is drawn to its character and uniqueness just as Medlin was so many years ago. Most recently, the 206 SP has been returned to its glorious NART livery as it appeared at the 1000 kms of Nürburgring when, it finished 2nd in class behind another Dino and 3rd overall. 1966 Ferrari Dino 206 SP 008 retains its original engine, gearbox and bodywork. Its restoration is of the highest quality and is fresh and sharp. Its history includes ownership and entries by both SEFAC Ferrari and NART. It has been driven by some of the greats in the greatest age of sports car and sports prototype racing: Bondurant, Vaccarella, Pedro Rodriguez, Ginther, Kolb, Follmer, Schlesser, Gregory and even Peter Gregg. Its ownership history is clear. It is fast, responsive and, best of all, a beautiful gem of a car. ITALIANTEXT specifiche: 218 bhp, 1986 cc di cilindrata, motore 6 cilindri a V con due alberi a camme in testa, transaxle con cambio manuale a cinque rapporti, sospensioni indipendenti con molle elicoidali e freni a disco sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2280 mm (89,75") Leggera. Aerodinamica. Potente. La Ferrari 206 SP con motore 6 cilindri è la figlia agile, snella e brillante della versione a 12 cilindri. In molti aspetti è simile, ma tra le due esistono anche consapevoli differenze. Le origini della Leggenda Dino Quando Phil Hill e Olivier Gendebien andarono a Le Mans nel 1962 e furono assegnati alla 330 TRI/LM, l’ultima auto con motore anteriore a vincere a la Sarthe, si sentirono leggermente presi in giro. C’erano infatti Ferrari migliori. C’erano le Dino V8 e V6. Hill e Gendebien sapevano bene che le Dino con motore centrale rappresentavano il futuro della Ferrari. Si ritrovarono tuttavia alla guida di un dinosauro, e la vittoria di cui furono artefici costituì un tributo alla loro capacità e maturità, nonché alla durabilità, alla stabilità, all’affidabilità e alla velocità della 330 TRI/LM, la migliore Testa Rossa. Le Dino V6 vennero introdotte nel 1957 per la Formula 2 a 1,500 cc. Il figlio di Enzo Ferrari, Alfredo – noto come “Dino” - aveva difeso le qualita di quei motori, ed Enzo diede alle auto il nome Dino in seguito alla morte prematura del figlio nel 1956. Il progetto dettagliato fu eseguito dall’anziano maestro Vittorio Jano. Con doppio albero a camme in testa, l’angolo dei cilindri convenzionale ed intrinsecamente equilibrato di 60° non lasciava lo spazio per i carburatori e l’alimentazione, per cui Jano incrementò l’angolo interno fino a 65°, compensando il problema della fasatura con le manovelle poste a 65° e 185°. Era una trovata ingegnosa, e funzionò. Le prime auto da competizione Dino avevano motore anteriore; quelle con motore centrale fecero la loro comparsa nel 1962 ed erano i modelli che Hill e Gendebien speravano di guidare a Le Mans. Poi Ferrari tentò di risolvere i problemi legati a come inserire un motore V12 tra il pilota e le ruote posteriori, e lo sviluppo delle Dino potenziate con il compatto V6 perse di importanza. Prototipi Sport Ferrari venne sfidato da Ford verso la metà degli anni ‘60 e reagì con una serie di prototipi sportivi che divennero famosi per essere le auto sportive da competizione più accattivanti mai state costruite. La prima 330 P venne introdotta nel 1964 e il suo design mostrava un’evidente evoluzione rispetto al modello 250 LM. La 330 P2 della stagione 1965, però, era qualcosa di completamente diverso, e l’anno seguente si evolse nella 330 P3 costruita da Drogo, di certo la più voluttuosa tra le auto sportive da competizione che si siano mai viste. Contemporaneamente Ferrari presentò la 206 S, una variante in scala ancora più ridotta della 330 P3, con le stesse linee sinuose su un passo più corto che sfruttava al massimo il suo compatto propulsore V6. Franco Rocchi progettò questo motore V6 con doppio albero a camme di terza generazione, ispirandosi all’originale angolo a V di 65° ideato da Jano. Questo motore avrebbe equipaggiato non solo la 206 S, ma anche le vetture da strada, per soddisfare i requisiti FIA che imponevano che i motori da Formula 2 avrebbero dovuto contare una produzione di almeno 500 unità, requisiti che Ferrari riuscì a soddisfare in cooperazione con Fiat con le automobili Dino. Oltre ai sport prototipi e alle auto Formula 2 di Ferrari, più tardi questo motore sarebbe stato introdotto sulle Ferrari Dino da strada e persino sull’auto da rally Lancia Stratos. Come la 330 P3, la Dino 206 S era stata carrozzata dalla Carrozzeria Drogo Sports Cars. Utilizzava un telaio multi-tubolare con pannelli in lega fissati ad esso per ottenere una rigidezza maggiore, creando in sostanza una struttura semintegrale. L’intenzione di Ferrari era di costruire 50 di queste automobili e qualificarle nel Gruppo 4 della FIA, ma le difficoltà finanziarie che tre anni più tardi avrebbero spinto Ferrari a fondersi con Fiat, impedirono di raggiungere questo ottimistico traguardo, e alla fine solo 18 di queste bellissime e veloci automobili sportive vennero costruite. Quella che all’inizio doveva essere una Dino 206 S (S sta per Sport) divenne nota con il nome Dino 206 SP (per Sport Prototype) quando non ne erano state costruite abbastanza per potersi qualificare nel Gruppo 4. Telaio N. 008 L’esemplare qui offerto, telaio 008, meticolosamente e accuratamente restaurato, è il quarto prodotto della serie 206 SP, (La prima 206 S fu costruita sul telaio Ferrari 0842) e il terzo della spider con carrozzeria 206 SP. Questo venne consegnato alla squadra SEFAC Ferrari e utilizzato per test e valutazioni. Secondo alcune fonti, lo stabilimento l’aveva iscritta affinché potesse essere pilotata dalla North American Racing Team di Luigi Chinetti alla 1000 km di Monza il 25 aprile 1966, e in quell’occasione a guidarla fu Bob Bondurant della NART e Nino Vaccarella della SEFAC, ma subì danni durante le prove e fu costretta a ritirarsi prima dell’inizio della gara. Sei settimane più tardi, il 5 giugno, la Dino 206 SP 008 venne iscritta per la NART all’ADAC 1000 km di Nürburgring, una delle gare più impegnative di tutta la stagione. Guidata dalla brillante coppia Pedro Rogriguez e Richie Ginther, entrambi piloti del team SEFAC nel 1966, la 206 SP partì nona in griglia e ottenne uno straordinario terzo posto in classifica generale e secondo nella categoria dietro un’altra 206 SP, il telaio 004 guidato da Scarfiotti e Bandini, e la trionfante Chaparral 2D di Phil Hill e Jo Bonnier che tagliò il traguardo finale aggiudicandosi la vittoria. In maniera abbastanza eccezionale, tutti e tre i finalisti che salirono sul podio si trovavano allo stesso giro dei 22.81 km scoraggianti del Nürburgring Nordschleife. Il 18 giugno 1966, poco dopo aver conquistato il podio al Nürburgring, il telaio 008, sfruttando la partecipazione di SEFAC Ferrari, si rese disponibile per la 24 ore di Le Mans. L’automobile era ora di proprietà di Chinetti, essendo stata venduta da SEFAC Ferrari il 10 giugno. Chinetti mise alla guida della 206 SP Charlie Kolb e George Follmer, che partirono dalla 32a posizione. Dopo un’ottima partenza, l’olio iniziò a colare sulla frizione rendendola inutilizzabile, e al nono giro la squadra si ritirò, seguita poi da 40 dei 55 partecipanti: il 73% della griglia di partenza. Il posto di Kolb a Le Mans lasciò presagire i futuri sviluppi della carriera della 008. Dopo che tornò a Maranello per essere riparata e preparata gara, venne imbarcata per gli Stati Uniti e consegnata al suo successivo proprietario, M. Schroeder, il quale lo iscrisse immediatamente alla USRRC-Buckeye Cup del 28 agosto a Lexington, Ohio, dove a guidarla fu Charlie Kolb. Kolb ottenne con la 206 SP un secondo posto di categoria e un sesto in classifica generale. Le partecipazione alla Road America 500 di Elkhart Lake e alla USRRC di Bridgehampton si svolsero prima dell’acquisto della 008 da parte di Fred Baker, il quale organizzò le cose in modo da utilizzare una partecipazione di Chinetti alla 24 Ore di Daytona nel 1967. Non si ebbe modo di eseguire una ricostruzione del motore e un esame accurato del cambio in tempo per le qualifiche, e di conseguenza la 008 partì in fondo alla griglia. Il team di piloti era forte: Jo Schlesser, Masten Gregory e Peter Gregg. A metà gara, dopo essere arrivato quasi a raggiungere un piazzamento tra i primi 10, Gregory fece un normale pit-stop, ma il motore mancò di riaccendersi per un problema allo spinterogeno. Baker sfruttò nuovamente una partecipazione di Chinetti per la sua Dino 206 SP alla 12 Ore di Sebring, il 1° aprile Charlie Kolb e Ed Crawford partirono in 20a posizione, e rimasero sulla griglia quando veniva data la bandiera verde, messi fuori causa dalla rottura di un semiasse. Per il resto del 1967, la 206 SP partecipò alla SCCA e alla USRRC con Lee Cutler e occasionalmente Charlie Kolb alla guida. Fece ritorno alla 24 Ore di Daytona solo nel 1968 dopo essere stata ricostruita dai meccanici della NART di Chinetti. Chinetti, cui ora era stata affidata, mise Kolb e Pedro Rodriguez nella Dino 206 SP 008 e Rodriguez ottenne in qualifica un ottimo 10° posto tra le Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/2s da tre litri. Kolb e Rodriguez riuscirono con la loro piccola Dino a restare tra i primi 10, fino a che un altro guasto al motore li costrinse ai box e ad un ritiro anticipato. Baker decise di vendere l’auto, anche se Lee Cutler sembrò essere riuscito a strappare un contratto per guidarla nelle gare seguenti. Prima della fine dell’anno, egli comprò la Dino da Baker, segnando la fine della sua carriera sportiva da protagonista. Harley Cluxton la comprò da Cutler nel 1971, per poi rivenderla in quello stesso anno al noto appassionato e collezionista di Ferrari, Walter Medlin di Kissimmee, Florida. Medlin non fece altro che conservare la piccola 206 SP in mezzo alle altre sue auto, dove rimase per più 20 anni. Nel 1995, venne acquistata dalla Symbolic Motor Car Company e sottoposta ad un restauro di due anni da parte di Rob Shanahan. Dopo le competizioni, entrò a far parte di importanti collezioni Ferrari, venendo orgogliosamente esibita in diversi e prestigiosi eventi come al Rosso Ferrari a Rodeo Drive e al Goodwood Festival of Speed (entrambi nel 1997) e al Cavallino Classic nel 2004. Nel 1998 apparve nella rivista giapponese CAR. Nel 2003 fece ritorno nell’officina della Symbolic, dove venne sottoposta ad restauro. Fu acquistata dall’attuale proprietario dopo la fine dei lavori ed esposta al Cavallino Classic nel 2004. Il venditore riferisce che la Dino è perfetta e le sue condizioni meccaniche generali ottime. È la sua preferita, e sebbene non sia riuscito a farla partecipare regolarmente a competizioni sportive, è affascinato dal suo carattere e dalla sua unicità proprio come lo era stato a suo tempo Medlin. Di recente la 206 SP è stata restituita coloridella scuderia della NART, dove fece la sua apparizione alla 1000 Km di Nürburgring dove ha ottenuto un 2° posto di categoria dietro un’altra Dino e un 3° posto in classifica generale. La Ferrari Dino 206 SP 008 del 1966 conserva motore, cambio e carrozzeria originali. Il suo è stato un restauro di altissima qualità, e ora appare in tutta la sua bellezza ed eleganza. La sua storia include proprietà e partecipazioni sia da parte di SEFAC Ferrari che di NART. Al suo volante si sono seduti alcuni tra i più grandi piloti di auto e prototipi sportivi da competizione di tutti i tempi: Bondurant, Vaccarella, Pedro Rodriguez, Ginther, Kolb, Follmer, Schlesser, Gregory e persino Peter Gregg. La storia dei suoi passaggi di proprietà è cristallina. È un’auto veloce, reattiva, ma soprattutto un piccolo e affascinante gioiello. Chassis no. 008

  • ITAItaly
  • 2007-05-20
Hammer price
Show price

2003 Ferrari Enzo

651 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic ME7 fuel management, six-speed manual paddle-shift F1 transmission, front and rear independent wishbone suspension with coil springs, electronically controlled shock absorbers and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel Brembo vented carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.4 in. Purchased new and offered by the renowned designer Tommy Hilfiger Driven just 3,620 miles and fastidiously maintained by one owner Garaged among his preeminent collection Offered with manuals and tools If one manufacturer can claim to have created the definitive mold for a modern evolution of consistently amazing hypercars, it must be Ferrari. From the competition-bred 288 GTO and F40 of the late 1980s, through the voluptuous F50 of the 1990s, Ferrari combined unparalleled performance and breathtaking designs to build small batches of impeccable road machines for ultra-exclusive buyers. These were undeniably the most formidable production sports cars of their days. After F50 production concluded in 1998, tifosi dreamt of what exotic machine Maranello would devise next—and what form it would take. Speculation was rampant over whether the next model would employ a rear-mounted V-8 or V-12, and if the packaging would be spartan and purposeful like the F40, or luxurious and evocative of vintage designs like the F50. In mid-2002, Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo ended the wait with the introduction of the forthcoming Ferrari Enzo. Though the model’s name required no explanation, he reasoned that after Ferrari had named cars for historically important locales like Maranello and Modena, the time had finally come to honor the company’s founder. He also clarified that the new model would have a strong connection to Formula 1 racing, as the manufacturer had just won the 1999 and 2000 Manufacturers’ Championship, and the 2000 Drivers’ Championship. Michael Schumacher was, in fact, just getting started on his historic dominance of F1, a still unequaled feat of five consecutive championships. Formally debuting at the 2002 Paris Motor Show, the Ferrari Enzo certainly delivered on the premise of its design brief. Like a Formula 1 car, the Enzo utilized futuristic materials to achieve maximum weight savings, with a foundational chassis tub made of carbon fiber and Nomex honeycomb weighing just 200 pounds. Aluminum sub-frames were then mounted on the tub, and these laid the groundwork for the mounting of Pininfarina’s unique coachwork. Penned by designer Ken Okuyama during a lunch break, the Enzo’s external design mimicked the shape of an open-wheel race car, though as if wrapped in a skin extending over the fenders and cockpit. Aerodynamically perfected in Pininfarina’s wind tunnel, the body was comprised of panels woven from carbon fiber and Kevlar. Nineteen-inch alloy wheels, anchored by 15-inch Brembo carbon-ceramic disc brakes, and unique scissor doors, respectively, completed the Enzo’s chassis and cabin, finishing a car that was highly technological and endlessly fascinating. Into this phenomenal marriage of chassis and body, a new purpose-built engine was placed behind the driver, continuing the manufacturer’s long-running configuration for sports prototypes and hypercars. The concurrent 90-degree V-8 was essentially extended by two cylinders on each side and altered in angle, creating the 65-degree Tipo F140B V-12 engine. Displacing almost six liters, the F140 was the largest engine built by Maranello since the 712 Can-Am race car of the 1970s. It was packed with racing components such as Nikasil-lined cylinder walls, titanium connecting rods, and a telescoping intake manifold designed to boost torque, ultimately developing 651 horsepower and 485 foot-pounds of torque, earth-shattering numbers even by today’s standards. The F140’s evolutions would go on to power the 599 series, the F12 Berlinetta, and LaFerrari. With power transmitted via a six-speed dual-clutch transaxle that was actuated with column-mounted paddle-shifters, the Enzo reached 60 mph from standstill in just 3.3 seconds and a top speed of 218 mph. Production was eventually capped at 400 units, so this was a car whose engineering was also matched by its rarity. As unique and captivating today as it was in 2002, the Ferrari Enzo continues to hold sway with collectors, unmistakably carrying the mantle of Maranello’s defining millennial hypercar, the genetic link between the sensuous F50 and the hybrid LaFerrari. Claiming low mileage and the consistent care of just one owner since it was purchased new, chassis number 133026 is a particularly desirable example of the vaunted Ferrari hypercar. It may be superfluous to say that many Enzos were purchased new by celebrities and luminaries of great influence, but this car is a particularly notable example, having been acquired new by the famed designer Tommy Hilfiger. Best known for his eponymous clothing line and its myriad accessories, Mr. Hilfiger has been one of the leading designers in fashion for over 30 years. Like many of his contemporaries, he is also a passionate automotive enthusiast and the owner of a pedigreed collection of classics and modern exotics. Hitting his professional stride just as the Schumacher years approached, Hilfiger eventually became a sponsor of the Scuderia Ferrari during the early 2000s, and he even designed the drivers’ uniforms. It is little surprise that his name was prioritized by the factory for ownership of one of the 399 customer cars (the 400th car was famously earmarked for the Pope). Taking delivery of his Enzo from Miller Motorcars in Greenwich, Connecticut, Mr. Hilfiger garaged the car at his Greenwich home, where he used it for occasional drives around town. About five years ago, the Ferrari was relocated to Hilfiger’s home in Florida, where the car continued to be dutifully maintained and rarely driven. Serviced by The Collection in Coral Gables, Florida, in early 2015, the Enzo also received a new set of Scuderia Potenza tires. When an annual service was performed in September 2016, the odometer displayed just 3,620 miles. Accompanied by tools and manuals, chassis number 133026 is one of very few Enzos that have been retained by the original owner, and it claims no extreme use as well as consistent maintenance among a carefully curated collection of some of the world’s finest automobiles. “I love Ferraris,” Hilfiger asserts with passion. “Tommy Hilfiger [the brand] sponsored the [Scuderia Ferrari] team and I designed the F1 uniforms during the Schumacher years. When the Enzo launched, Jean Todt and Luca De Montezemolo made sure I got one. I’ve bought and sold cars for many years. I love the 458 Speciale, the California, the older Daytonas, and LaFerrari. I also have Bentleys, Rolls-Royces, Range Rovers, and vintage American cars. Some are works of art! My lifestyle is changing so I don’t drive fast sports cars as I used to, but prefer driving my Rolls Dawn these days, or my Maybach. Cars are similar to fashion, always evolving in style!” This sensational time-capsule Enzo offers enthusiasts an opportunity to acquire a unique example with unparalleled celebrity provenance. Tommy Hilfiger is undeniably one of the biggest names in modern fashion, and while his tastes may have evolved beyond the need for a 200 mph hypercar, the Enzo will forever stand as a timeless accomplishment of sports car engineering and design. This outstanding example is among the finest offered in many years and would make a crowning addition to any collection. Chassis no. ZFFCW56A330133026 Engine no. 76029

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
Hammer price
Show price

1938 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A

1938 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A Coachwork by Sindelfingen Chassis no. 154076 Engine no. 154076 Body no. 828610 Together with its predecessor the 500 K, the magnificent Mercedes-Benz 540 K was arguably the most noteworthy production model offered by the Stuttgart firm during the 1930s, representing the pinnacle of its pre-war achievements. A development of the 500 K, whose independently suspended chassis it shared, the 540 K was powered by a 5.4-litre supercharged straight-eight engine. The 540 K was one of the first models developed under Mercedes' new chief engineer, ex-racing driver Max Sailer, successor to Hans Nibel, who had died in November 1934 aged only 54. Mercedes-Benz's flagship model, it featured the company's famous Roots-type supercharger system in which pressing the accelerator pedal to the end of its travel would simultaneously engage the compressor and close off the alternative atmospheric intake to the carburettor. This system had been thoroughly proven on the preceding series of Dr Ferdinand Porsche-conceived S cars that had dominated racing during the 1920s, and in effect the 540 K was the last supercharged production Mercedes until relatively recent times. Presented at the Paris Salon in October 1936, the 540 K was hailed by Mercedes-Benz as conjuring up 'visions of breath-taking exploits of racing cars and drivers of international fame, but also of superlative comfort and coachwork of exquisite beauty, fine paintwork, brightly polished metal, the finest hardwoods and leather - massive and yet outstandingly attractive bodies - in short: the car for the connoisseur.' It had an engine that developed 115PS un-supercharged or 180PS (178bhp) with the compressor engaged, while the gearbox was a four-speeder but with a direct top gear rather than the overdrive ratio used on the earlier 500K. With the supercharger engaged, the 540 K's blown straight eight gave it a top speed approaching 110mph (177km/h. Servo-assisted hydraulic brakes provided adequate stopping power. Its performance potential was such that Mercedes-Benz in the UK retained racing driver Goffredo 'Freddy' Zehender as technical adviser and demonstration driver, since the super-charged Mercedes was one of the few genuine 100mph road cars available in the 1930s. Tested by Britain's Motor magazine, the 540 K was judged to have less heavy steering and handling than its predecessor, the 500 K, plus an even more comfortable ride, even though the same all-round independent suspension layout with parallel links and coil springs at the front and swing axles at the rear was retained. The Motor's test car returned 102mph over the timed quarter-mile with the supercharger engaged and 85mph with it disengaged. The servo-assisted brakes came in for fulsome praise, the blower was found to be relatively quiet and the springing more comfortable than that of the 500 K, while the steering and handling also compared favourably with that model. In May 1938, the 540 K was tested by Motor's rival magazine Autocar and achieved the highest maximum speed of any road-test car up to that date: carrying three pas¬sengers, the car reached 104.65mph (168.5km/h) on the race circuit at Brooklands, Surrey. 'One's foot goes hard down, and an almost demonical howl comes in,' reported test driver H S Linfield. 'The rev counter and speedometer needles leap round their dials: there is perhaps no other car noise in the world so distinctive as that produced by the Mercedes supercharger.' Late in 1938, a revised 540 K made its appearance, with oval-section chassis tubes instead of channel frame members, while the adoption of sodium-cooled valves followed the company's highly success¬ful racing practice. The manufacturing record of the 540 K reveals its exclusive nature: 97 being produced in 1936, 145 in 1937, 95 in 1938 and 69 in 1939 before the war ended series production (though three more were built up to July 1942). In recent years, the rarity, style and performance of these big supercharged Mercedes have made them one of the most sought-after of all classic cars on the few occasions they have come on the open market. Delivered in Berlin on 5th February 1938, chassis number '154076' was first owned by 'Tauentzien – Verlag', an advertising agency whose proprietor was one Georg Niedermeier. This particular 540 K Cabriolet A with its attractive enclosed spare wheel and sporty rear end not unlike those of certain 'Spezial Roadsters' is featured in Jan Melin's reference work: 'Mercedes-Benz Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s' (Volume 2, pages 222 & 223) in which it is pictured just after its restoration to concours condition at 'Reifen Wagner' in Germany, well known specialists for these Kompressor cars. Shown at the Louis Vuitton Bagatelle concours in 2001, the 540 K was owned in 2002 by Kenneth McBride of Seattle, WA, USA, returning to Europe in 2004 when it was purchased by the renowned Mercedes-Benz collector Etienne Veen. The current private vendor purchased the car from him in February 2006. Fully serviced and on the button, it comes with a UK V5C registration document. Offering elegant two-seater accommodation allied to breathtaking performance, this rare and stylish 540 K cabriolet A represents the very best that money could buy in the late 1930s and is a fine example of this classic German model. As its maker said: 'a car for the connoisseur'. Bonhams recommend close inspection of this highly desirable, rare and beautifully presented motor car. 1938 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A Karosserie Sindelfingen Fahrgestell-Nr. 154076 Motor-Nr. 154076 Zusammen mit seinem Vorgänger, dem 500 K, ist der großartige Mercedes-Benz 540 K das begehrenswerteste Fahrzeugmodell des Stuttgarters Herstellers aus den 1930er Jahren. Der 500 K teilt sich mit seinem Nachfolger, dem 540 K, das Fahrgestell mit an Doppel-Querlenkern geführten Vorderräder und der mit einer Ausgleichsfeder versehenen Pendelachse für die Hinterräder. Für den 540 K steht der auf 5,4 Liter Hubraum vergrößerte Reihenachtzylinder Kompressor-Motor zur Verfügung. Dieses Modell war eines der ersten Modelle unter dem neuen Chefentwickler und Ex- Rennfahrer Max Sailer. Er wurde Nachfolger von Hans Nibel, der im Alter von nur 54 Jahren im November 1934 verstorben war. Durch sein markantes, Aufheulen' beim Betätigen des Kompressors, welcher zugeschaltet wird, nachdem man das Gaspedal gänzlich durchgetreten hat, erlangte der 540 K seine markenspezifische Berühmtheit. Die zusätzliche Leistungssteigerung durch den Roots-Kompressor, der bereits sehr erfolgreich im Mercedes-Benz S zum Einsatz kam, eine Entwicklung von Dr. Porsche, verhalf dem 540 K zu seinem besonderen Status. Er war das letzte Fahrzeug von Mercedes-Benz mit einem Kompressor bis in die Neuzeit hinein. Vorgestellt wurde der 540 K auf dem Pariser Autosalon im Oktober 1936. Er wurde vom Hersteller stimmungsvoll wie folgt beschrieben: ,,Visionen atemberaubender Heldentaten von Rennwagen und ihren international bekannten Fahrern, aber auch überlegener Komfort und Karosserien von erlesener Schönheit, feinster Lack, hochglanzpoliertes Metall, feinste Edelhölzer und Leder – solide und doch überaus attraktive Karosserien – kurzum: das Auto für den Kenner". Sein Motor liefert 115 Kompressor-lose PS, mit Kompressor 180 PS. Ein Viergang Schaltgetriebe, dessen vierter Getriebegang einem Direktgang entspricht und die Overdrive-Variante des 500 K ersetzte, sorgt für den nötigen Vorwärtsdrang. Der mit dem Kompressor ausgestattete Reihenachtzylinder ermöglicht eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit von nahezu 180 km/h. Die Bremsen, mit hydraulischer Unterstützung, bringen das Fahrzeug im Notfall zum Stillstand. Als technischer Berater und Demonstrationsfahrer führte der Rennfahrer Goffredo ,,Freddy" Zehender, der auf Wunsch von Mercedes-Benz UK engagiert war, das Fahrzeug bereitwillig der Kundschaft vor, da es sich um einen der wenigen Wagen handelte, der die magischen 100 mph (160 km/h) übertreffen konnte. Nach Einschätzung der Tester der englischen Zeitschrift Motor hatte der 540 K eine weniger schwergängige Lenkung und Fahrwerk und eine noch komfortablere Federung als sein Vorgänger, der 500 K, obwohl er ihm technisch weitestgehend entsprach. Der Testwagen erreichte mit eingeschaltetem Kompressor eine Höchstgeschwindigkeit von 102 mph (ca. 160 km/h) nach der Viertelmeile, und 85 mph (ca. 140 km/h) bei ausgeschaltetem Kompressor. Im Mai 1938 testete die Konkurrenz Autocar einen 540 K und erreichte mit diesem Wagen die höchste je gefahrene Höchstgeschwindigkeit eines Testwagens für den Straβengebrauch: mit drei Passagieren fuhr der Wagen auf der Brooklands-Rennstrecke im englischen Surrey 104.65 mph (168.5 km/h). ‚Sobald der Fuβ runter geht, setz ein fast dämonisches Heulen ein' berichtete der Testfahrer H S Linfield. ‚Die Tacho- und Drehzahlmessernadeln springen in ihren Instrumenten herum: es gibt wahrscheinlich kein Motorgeräusch, was unverwechselbarer ist als das des Mercedes Kompressors'. Gegen Ende des Jahres 1938 wurde ein überarbeiteter 540 K vorgestellt. Er hatte ein Fahrgestell mit Trägern ovalen Querschnitts anstelle von U-Profilen; Natrium-gefüllte Ventile waren ein Ergebnis der erfolgreichen Praktiken aus dem Rennsport. Werkseigene Produktionszahlen belegen den exklusiven Status dieses Fahrzeugs: 97 Exemplare - 1936, 145 Exemplare – 1937, 69 im Jahr 1938 und 1939, bis zum Beginn des 2. Weltkriegs – zu diesem Zeitpunkt wird die Produktion eingestellt. Entsprechend der Unterlagen von Mercedes-Benz wurden drei weitere Fahrzeuge bis zum Juli 1942 gefertigt. Dieser Wagen mit der Fahrgestellnummer 154076 wurde am 5. Februar 1938 an den Erstbesitzer in Berlin ausgeliefert. Es war der Tauentzien-Verlag, eine Werbeagentur, die einem Georg Niedermeier gehörte. Er ähnelt mit seinem verkleideten Ersatzrad und sportlichem Heck etwas den Spezialroadstern und wird in Jan Melin's Standardwerk 'Mercedes-Benz Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s' (Volume 2, pp 222 & 223) abgebildet. Die Abbildungen zeigen den Wagen nach dessen Restaurierung im Concours-Zustand von Reifen Wagner in Deutschland, einem renommierten Restaurationsbetrieb für Kompressor Mercedes-Benz. Der 540 K wurde 2001 auf dem Louis Vuitton Bagatelle Concours gezeigt und befand sich 2002 im Besitz von Kenneth McBride in Seattle, bevor er 2004 wieder nach Europa in die Kollektion des bekannten Mercedes-Benz Sammlers Etienne Veen gelangte. Der aktuelle Besitzer erwarb den Wagen von ihm im Februar 2006. Gewartet und startbereit wird er mit englischer V5C-Zulassung angeboten. Dieser elegante Zweisitzer mit überwältigender Leistung gehörte zum Besten, was man in den späten 30er Jahre kaufen konnte und ist ein wirklich guter Vertreter seines Typs. Wie der Hersteller proklamierte: ,,Ein Wagen für den Kenner." Bonhams empfiehlt die eingehende Erwägung dieses seltenen und begehrten Automobils.

  • DEUGermany
  • 2015-03-28
Hammer price
Show price

1938 Talbot-Lago T23 Teardrop Coupe by Figoni et Falaschi

115 bhp, 3,996 cc inline six-cylinder engine with hemispherical combustion chambers and twin carburetors, Wilson four-speed preselector gearbox, independent front suspension with transverse leaf spring, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 116.14" • The sole Jeancart-style, four-liter Talbot-Lago T23 Teardrop Coupe built • One of five Jeancart-style cars built and one of the four examples remaining • A former Pebble Beach Elegance in Motion winner • Expertly restored and properly sorted for fast driving, as originally intended The Talbot-Lago “Teardrop” by Figoni et Falaschi – The Pinnacle of Prewar Elegance Without doubt, the Talbot-Lago Teardrop Coupes by Figoni et Falaschi represent the crowning achievement of French design and engineering during the 1930s. It is believed that just 16 Teardrops were built in total, in two slightly different body styles. The first car in the “Jeancart” design, after the name of its first owner, was a beautiful, aerodynamic coupe with a long, streamlined rear-end treatment. Only five such cars were built and, of those, just four remain today; this car, Chassis 93064, was the sole Jeancart-style Teardrop originally built upon a four-liter, T23 “Baby” chassis. The other 11 Teardrop Coupes were built in the “New York” style, named after the car exhibited at the 1937 New York Auto Salon. Except for one car on a T23 chassis, these “New York” cars were all based upon the shorter T150-C chassis. Chassis 93064 – Singular Perfection While hardly a long-wheelbase chassis by the standards of the coachbuilt era, the effect of the 2.95-meter wheelbase of the T23 chassis, combined with the Figoni Teardrop coachwork, is simply breathtaking. Blessed with a physical presence unlike many of its counterparts, the slightly wider track of 93064 gives it a very balanced and particularly sporting stance. Existing records indicate that 93064 was ordered as a “Baby 4L” chassis with Style 9221 Model Jeancart coachwork, which was built by Figoni et Falaschi as job number FF685. Following completion, it was delivered on February 21, 1938 to a French resident registered as 199 ADY 75. Predictably, its exceptional beauty made it prominent at period concours events, with contemporary magazines showing it in the company of a striking woman at its first showing at the Concours d’Elegance de l’Auto in June 1938. Chassis 93064 made its way to Southern California during the late-1940s, having likely been imported by a returning member of the American armed services. At this time, David Radinsky, a Denver, Colorado native, acquired the Teardrop. He later sold the car to machinist Paul Major, who for many years was seen driving the car in the Denver, Colorado area. At this point, the headlights had been recessed into the front fenders, and the taillights were now flush-mounted with the rear fenders. Sometime in the mid-1950s, the trafficators ceased to work, prompting Major to add turn signals at the tops of the head and taillight housings. Bumpers from a prewar Cadillac were also fitted to the car. Under Major’s ownership, 93064 was featured and photographed for an article in Rocky Mountain Autolife, written by Ronald C. Hill, a friend of Major’s. According to Hill, Major offered the car at auction in September 1966 at Arthur Rippey’s Veteran Car Museum, although it appears to have remained unsold. It was again offered at the same venue in November 1967, this time selling to a buyer in Atlanta, Georgia, believed to have been named Millbank. In the early-1970s, Mr. Millbank shipped 93064 to Paris for restoration by noted French coachbuilder Henri Chapron, and it made its post-restoration debut in Paris upon completion in 1974. During the restoration, the car was returned to its original colors and several small touches were added: the headlights were modified slightly, the rear directional signals were removed, and the bumpers were changed to the more appropriate single-blade style. At some point in the late-1980s, 93064 was purchased by a Japanese collector and remained there until its next owner, Mr. Charles Morse, returned it to America. Soon after Mr. Morse received the car, the engine and mechanicals were restored. A body-off-frame restoration was deemed unnecessary, but the cosmetics were freshened with new paint and interior. In 2000, the Teardrop received the Elegance in Motion Award at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Prior to selling 93064 to John M. O’Quinn in early-2006, Mr. Morse reported to RM Auctions that the race-bred Talbot-Lago chassis and power train, combined with the lightweight Figoni et Falaschi Teardrop Coupe coachwork, resulted in an exquisite driving experience. He also noted that the unassisted steering was surprisingly quick and light, and that the Wilson preselector gearbox was smoother than a conventional manual gearbox, with positive coupling and quick gear changes. In Mr. Morse’s ownership, the four-liter engine was adapted to Winfield carburetors for improved throttle response and a broader power band. Mr. Morse extensively toured the Talbot just as it was originally intended, and following its second running on the Colorado Grand, the noted mechanic and restorer, Mr. Jim Stranberg, rebuilt the Talbot’s steering mechanism and front suspension. A road test around this time revealed the Talbot to have been in excellent operating order. Next, the Teardrop was shipped to expert restorers Carrosserie Tessier in France, who undertook a complete body-off-frame restoration with virtually no expense spared. The body’s wooden sub-structure was carefully examined and repaired, with an estimated 80 percent of the original woodwork saved and preserved. The flowing sheet metal was extensively repaired as well, with an estimated 90 percent of the original metalwork remaining. New front and rear bumpers were installed as the prior units had become separated from the car at some point, and new front lights were also installed. The chassis and mechanical components were fully restored, including a full engine overhaul, which retained all original engine parts except for a new set of pistons. At this time, the somewhat difficult Winfield carburetors were replaced with period Solex units, more in keeping to the original specification of the car. The interior upholstery was completely restored to original specification, and the stunning exterior was refinished in Lago Blue, the same color it wore when it was displayed at the Concours d’Elegance de l’Auto in 1938. The current owner, a prominent and discriminating European collector, acquired 93064 in late-2010. Care was entrusted to Geoff Squirrel, who possesses some 30 years of experience with this type of car; his particular expertise extends to Talbot’s characteristic Wilson preselector gearboxes. Mr. Squirrel carried out the majority of the work required to sort the car for proper operation and driving enjoyment, with the work including balancing the flywheel, clutch and driveshaft, adjustments to the gearbox, rebuilding of the radiator, and attention to the electrical system. Suspension work included the correct adjustment of the shock-absorbers, lubrication of the chassis and springs, proper rear-wheel fitting, and balancing of all four wheels. In addition, the tachometer was returned to working order, the windshield wipers were repaired for proper operation, and the carburetors were set up and adjusted. Road testing ensured all mechanical systems now worked as they should. When Mr. Squirrel completed this work, the car was UK MoT-tested, road-registered, and test-driven over 1,200 kilometers. During this time, it became apparent that the original pressed-steel brake drums were no longer serviceable, and new cast-iron brake drums were designed and manufactured specifically for this car. After fitting, it was clear that the new brake drums literally transformed this final area of the car, which was found to be lacking. Accordingly, 93064 is now capable of fast touring, as originally intended, with braking to match its considerable performance. As offered, the car is complete with a custom-made indoor cover, the original brake drums, and a history file with invoices detailing the work completed, including well-written and understandable operating instructions. This 1938 Talbot-Lago T23 Teardrop Coupe is a masterpiece of French artistry, with its proportions and gently sweeping curves representative of France’s leading prewar design themes. Freshly restored and listed in the Registre Talbot, Chassis 93064 stands particularly tall as the sole Jeancart-style Teardrop Coupe built by Figoni et Falaschi on the race-bred T23 chassis. A historic automobile of truly epic proportions, it is without exaggeration a piece of rolling sculpture. In addition to its incredible rarity and achingly beautiful styling, 93064 is also fast and well-braked with excellent road manners, ready to be driven virtually anywhere—as much a joy to drive as it is to behold. Addendum Please note should this vehicle remain in the United States, 2.5% duty on the hammer price is applicable. Chassis no. 93064 Engine no. 80572 Figoni no. 685

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-08-17
Hammer price
Show price

1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy Long-Nose Design by Pininfarina Coachwork by Scaglietti

1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy Long-Nose Design by Pininfarina Coachwork by Scaglietti Chassis no. 07927 Engine no. 07927 3,286cc SOHC V12 Engine 3 Weber Carburetors 280bhp at 7,600rpm 5-Speed Manual Transaxle 4-Wheel Independent Suspension 4-Wheel Disc Brakes *Rare factory test far allotted to compete in the Monte Carlo Rally *Retains matching numbers engine *Desirable alloy bodied, long-nose example *Well-documented history and provenance *Offered with books, tools and Ferrari Classiche Red Book once issued by Ferrari THE FERRARI 275 GTB A perhaps apocryphal story ascribes Enzo Ferrari's motivation in replacing the 250 GT Lusso with the 275 GTB to his belief that the Lusso was too beautiful to convey properly the image of Ferrari. Like many Ferrari stories, it may be less than fully accurate, but contributes to the myth that surrounds the marque. Its logic, however, is supported by the judgment of history: the aggressive 275 GTB is today more coveted by collectors than the Lusso, even though the Lusso's design has endured the test of time to be generally agreed as among the most pure and beautiful products of the collaboration between Ferrari and Pininfarina. The 275 GTB has other distinctive attributes, not least its place as the first fully independent suspension transaxle-equipped Ferrari road car, and for the power and tractability of its 3.3-liter 60° V12 engine developed from the 1½ liter Colombo "short block" originally designed in 1947. The engine was mounted low and further back, taking advantage of some of the space created by moving the transmission to a unit with the differential. Performance, handling and technical advancements aside, it is the coachwork penned by Pininfarina and executed with individuality and attention to detail by Scaglietti that creates the 275 GTB's image: aggressive, svelte and taut with power and potential. In common with the best designs, the 275 GTB integrates form with function. There is nothing pretentious. Every feature has a functional purpose, from the covered headlights to the Kamm tail and small aerodynamic spoiler. The long hood that so eloquently defines the 275 GTB's performance intention is the direct result of the engine setback. Large tires dictate the tall, bulging fenders. The sloped windscreen and fastback roof are only as tall as driver's headroom and visibility requires. Each vent and curve has a purpose finely calculated to only one end: creating the finest, fastest road-going Berlinetta in the world. As Ferrari quarreled with the FIA in the mid-1960s over the marque's grudging change from front- to mid-engine placement in its sports-racing cars, the 275 GTB carried on as the mainstay of the marque. Ferrari knew this highly evolved Berlinetta, with its improved rear suspension and the balance permitted by its rear-mounted transaxle, would, like all good Ferraris of the time, be driven from showroom floor to race tracks around the world. Each 275 GTB is, essentially, unique. Still small enough to cater to individual client's desires and essentially self-contained, Ferrari could offer an almost infinite variety of performance features and appointments. Coachbuilder Scaglietti still employed artisans who constructed each body by hand, imparting the individuality of bespoke construction to every car. The most desirable 275 GTBs today are the few that received lightweight, aluminum coachwork. Within Ferrari, improvements were regularly incorporated as the 275 GTB evolved given experiences and suggested refinements. On the aesthetic front, the biggest change was made about a year into the production run in 1965 with the re-design of the nose. It was found that the early cars had a tendency to create front-end lift at high speeds, so the nose was slightly lengthened and made slimmer, a look even more evocative of the 250 GTO. 275 GTBs have since been categorized as short or long-nose cars. If there is one Ferrari to own within the span of the marque's first quarter-century it is the 275 GTB. Blistering performance, quick, responsive handling, ideal weight distribution and the aggressive Pininfarina designed Scaglietti coachwork, with elements of the legendary 250 GTO, make it a milestone. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This beautifully restored 275 GTB - chassis no. 07927 - is one of as few as 60 examples of the celebrated two-cam model clothed in lightweight alloy coachwork. Stunning indeed, this 275 GTB drove out of the Carrozzeria Scaglietti atelier in Modena in late 1965, with the alloy coachwork dressed in Celeste blue paint over blue upholstery, it went straight back to the Ferrari factory. According to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, this alloy bodied 275 was used as a 'Prova' or test car for several months before being sold to the first customer. In the 11th edition of the 1991 Ferrari World magazine, rally driver Giorgio Pianta, describes his experience with two factory test 275 GTBs being prepared for the 1966 Monte Carlo Rally. One of the cars was 06003, and the other car is believed to have been 07927. Mr. Pianta describes in the article: 'The testing period, though long (12,000 km), was nonetheless the most exciting, because we had two vehicles; one yellow which eventually became the race car, and the other metallic blue, made of aluminum, which we unfortunately ruined because the studs which came out of the tyres at high speed perforated the mudguards'. So, what Ferrari did, they took the engine out of 07927 and stuck it in 06003 for the race. Presumably, 07927 had a stronger engine. For scrutineering purposes, '06003' was over stamped on the engine pad, while the internal number was left alone. After the Monte Carlo Rally, 07927 was re-fitted with its original engine, and was in May 1966, 07927 sold new to the Ferrari dealer, Romeo Pedina of Perugia, Italy. Documentation suggests that in 1970 the car went to the States and N. Randall Thomas of Orlando, Florida purchased it three years later. Thomas exhibited his beloved 275 GTB at several events, including the 2nd Annual Ferrari Club of America Regional Meeting and Concours in Gainesville, Florida, in 1975. At some point the car underwent a color change to the traditional, but less eye-catching, Ferrari Red with black interior. Eventually, the 07927 was acquired by Tom Lafortune - a Ferrari aficionado and resident of Long Beach, California, who kept the car for 14 years, during which all systems were expertly maintained or rebuilt. Lafortune sold the Ferrari in 1992 to David Amar, son of Daniel Amar, who kept it at his residence in Geneva, Switzerland. Amar drove the Ferrari with dedication and verve and in November, 1999, shipped it to Modena, Italy, where at 38,000kms the engine was overhauled by Giuseppe Garuti, and the coachwork redone by Bachelli & Villa (Carrozzeria Auto Sport) in Bastiglia, at a total cost of 51,750,000 Lire. Following further improvements to the tune of $7,000, at DK Engineering commissioned by Brian Classic & Co. of Manchester, England, the car was bought in 2005 by Edward Nigro, a collector who spent time between his homes in Oregon and Carmel, California. In the following years Nigro exhibited his superb red and black 275 GTB at both the Concorso Italiano and Concours on the Avenue in Carmel, California, adding 2nd in Class to the car's numerous accolades. In 2011, Nigro felt the car warranted a wardrobe change and commissioned an open-wallet cosmetic restoration. It was delivered to Ferrari specialist John Bagioli's Forza Motors of Monterey, and emerged two years later resplendent in its original Celeste on blue color scheme. Fresh out of Forza, Nigro presented the Ferrari at the XXIII Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach, Florida, in 2014 - the car's first sortie in its magnificent factory correct garb. Flush with success, Nigro sold the 275 GTB to the current owner - a highly respected Ferrari expert and collector, who immediately entered the car into the 51st Annual Ferrari Club of America National Meeting and Concours d'Elegance at Leesburg, Virginia, and was rewarded with the Trofeo Gran Tourismo Award for the Most Outstanding Pre-1975 Ferrari Regularly Driven. Most recently, this splendid Ferrari revisited the Forza shop in Monterey for a complete engine overhaul. The engine was then shipped back to Maranello, Italy, where Ferrari Classiche correctly re-traced or stamped the original factory engine with number 07927, noting that the internal engine number, 810/64 was always correct and unchanged. 07927 was inducted in the full Ferrari Classiche program at the same time, and the Red Book Certification book will be available for the new owner once it has been issued by Ferrari. Now sporting factory correct blue paint and interior over the factory original engine stamped with correct identification numbers, this stunning alloy bodied 275 GTB will impress both mechanically and cosmetically, and is accompanied by an exhaustive chronology of ownership, concours appearances and awards. As a former test car, it is recognized by marque specialists as a unique example of the celebrated model, and represents an extraordinary opportunity to own a superlative car from a superb era of Ferrari.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder

Engine # 0923 GT Design: Pinin Farina Coachwork: Scaglietti Specifications: 240bhp, 2,953cc, overhead camshaft alloy block and head V-12 engine, with four-speed gearbox, independent front suspension via A-arms, coil springs and telescopic shocks, and rear suspension via live axle, semi-elliptical springs and hydraulic shocks, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600mm (102.4 in.) V5 UK registration document Ferrari Classiche Certification Package. This lot is EC taxes paid and originates from the UK. Towards the end of 1957, when the Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Cabriolet went into production, a prototype for another open-top car appeared aimed at the US market. It was called the Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder and was thought by many aficionados to be one of the most beautiful cars ever to come out of Maranello – a view still held by many to this day. These open cars were quite different in concept and execution. The Pinin Farina Cabriolet was based on the Pininfarina Coupé, a luxurious gran turismo. The California Spyder was a much sportier car, based on the dual-purpose berlinettas also designed by Pinin Farina, though built in small numbers in Modena by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, which was partly owned by Ferrari. The procedure was described by Ferrari in their official history and catalogue as a simple one: “Pinin Farina prepared the prototype, which was then sent to Maranello to be inspected by Enzo Ferrari. Although the final decision was naturally his, the dealers also had an important say in the matter and were often called in to give their opinions.” Scaglietti would then take over: “His job was to produce the set number of ‘reproductions’ of the model and to equip himself for the task on the basis of the systems in use at Maranello, which was far more ‘artisan’ in approach than those used by Pinin Farina.” Certainly in the case of the 250 GT California Spyder Ferrari’s two US distributors did have serious input in the design of the new car. Luigi Chinetti, a man who was truly passionate about the cars that bore the prancing horse, had set up his Ferrari business in New York. Chinetti, born in Milan, eventually moved to Paris where he raced and sold cars. In 1933, he won the Le Mans 24 Hour race on his first attempt, driving an Alfa Romeo with co-driver Raymond Sommer. The following year he won the Spa 24 Hours with Louis Chiron and won his second Le Mans in 1934 with Philippe Etancelin. Chinetti was the winner of the first post-war Le Mans 24 Hours in 1949, driving a Ferrari 166 MM – the first internationally important victory for the new marque. Having set up the first, and for a while the only, Ferrari dealership in the US, Chinetti later had all the territory east of the Mississippi River, which amounted to about half the country. Luigi Chinetti was also the founder of NART – the North American Racing Team, the racing arm of Chinetti’s distributorship. NART quickly established Ferrari in American racing, earning accolades and victories for many years. John von Neumann was originally from Vienna and immigrated with his family to New York City in 1939. After serving in the US Army in the Second World War he moved to Los Angeles where he joined Roger Barlow’s International Motors, the city’s largest foreign car dealership, and formed the California Sports Car Club. Von Neumann set up on his own with Competition Motors in North Hollywood. He immediately began racing the types of cars that the company sold in order to promote the business. Von Neumann’s first Ferrari was a 500 Mondial, with which he finished second overall and first in class at Palm Springs in October 1954. From then on he was in love with the red cars from Maranello, and they became his weapon of choice on the track. Eventually, in 1957, a Ferrari dealership was added to his thriving business. Luigi Chinetti and John von Neumann both recognised a gap in the market for a higher performance open-top car in America that wasn’t filled by the luxurious 250 GT Cabriolet. It seemed obvious to base this car on the 250 GT Tour de France Berlinetta, which lacked a convertible version. The Tour de France was originally known as the 250 GT Berlinetta. The Tour de France nickname was added after the car’s domination of the legendary and gruelling ten-day French event, in which the car’s performance, reliability and durability made it a success. Alfonso de Portago drove one for the first time in the race in 1956. The car performed faultlessly and Portago took the overall victory from Stirling Moss, driving a Mercedes 300SL. The 250 GT TdF proved to be truly versatile, winning races on the great circuits of the world whilst being equally at home on public roads. 14 California Spyders were built during 1958, with the remaining 36 cars built between 1959 and 1960, including at least three fitted with alloy bodies; they were constructed to full competition specifications. When the 250 GT SWB (short wheelbase) Berlinetta was launched, it was followed shortly thereafter by the corresponding SWB California Spyder – introduced at the Geneva Salon in March 1960. By the time production came to a close, a total of just 105 Spyders had been built, 50 of them on the LWB chassis. The Ferrari 250 GT LWB California presented here, chassis number 0923 GT, was the third of these impressive cars to be built. Factory-ordered in the more desirable covered headlight configuration, it remains fitted with its original and early type 508 C chassis, with a 128 C type engine and 508 C gearbox and rear axle. 0923 GT was completed on 9 July 1958 and delivered new to von Neumann’s Ferrari Representatives of California in Hollywood. During the 1960s the car remained in California in the ownership of Don Hampton and Dr Constantine Voyagis. From 1968 the car was owned by Marshall Matthews of Woodside, California. The car was described at this time as wearing California registration BAW 119. It had side vents, full bumpers front and rear, and was painted red with a black interior. 0923 GT was shown at the 28th Pebble Beach Concours d’Elégance by Matthews, who eventually sold the car to Carey Kendall from Santa Barbara. From 1998 the car was owned by Patrick Smiekel. In 1999 this Ferrari was sold through Garry Roberts of Costa Mesa, California, to a highly respected UK-based collector. At this time the car was described as being in good original condition with no rust and good body fit. It was running well, with nice chrome, a clean engine bay, an original and clean-looking chassis, with a recent full mechanical service just performed. In the past years chassis 0923 GT car was entered in many prestigious events. It was shown at the Ferrari Owners’ Club’s Annual Concours at Broughton Castle and was driven by the owner at the 1999 Goodwood Revival meeting. The car was shown at the Louis Vuitton Concours at the Hurlingham Club in 2000, before which it had been repainted in Rosso Rubino and retrimmed with tan interior. In 2006 this California participated in the Cartier Style et Luxe Concours at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. 0923 GT has very recently undergone a full mechanical overhaul at Ferrari specialists GTO Engineering. All mechanical components were checked and overhauled and the engine has undergone a full rebuild, making the car ready to be enjoyed at events. Chassis 0923 GT can be described as being in close to perfect condition, both aesthetically and mechanically. This lovely Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder is featured in the definitive books on the model, George M Carrick’s The Spyder California and Ferrari Spyder California by Stanley Nowack. Although intended to be a street car, the California Spyder’s racing lineage was evident in the performance of several examples that did, in fact, lead successful lives on the track. Amateur racer Bob Grossman won his class in the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) in 1959 in his LWB. Nine alloy-bodied LWB cars were believed to have been built and raced successfully internationally. Grossman and Fernand Tavano finished fifth overall at Le Mans in 1959, and in the same year at the Sebring race Richie Ginther and Howard Hively finished ninth overall and first in class. The LWB California offers great performance and superb history in competition; a list of the cars’ first owners reads like an address book of celebrities of the late fifties and early sixties. According to one early magazine article, the writer reported the car as “having the most beautiful body this side of the Riviera”. Ferrari LWB California Spyder, chassis number 0923 GT, is presented in lovely condition with rich Rosso Rubino factory-covered light coachwork and an exquisitely supple tan hide interior. The 250 GT TdF has long been regarded as perhaps the ultimate road/race berlinetta Ferrari ever produced. Cloaking that superlative chassis with the definitive spyder coachwork was a master stroke of brilliance, the perfect symphony of sound and beauty: the blending of the most achingly beautiful automotive form with the most glorious, soul-stirring automotive aria of all. ITALIANTEXT Motore # 0923 GT Designo: Pinin Farina Carrozzeria: Scaglietti Motore V12 monoblocco e testata in lega con camme in testa, 2.953 cm3 di cilindrata, 240 CV, con cambio a quattro rapporti, sospensioni anteriori indipendenti a bracci triangolari con molle elicoidali e ammortizzatori telescopici, e sospensioni posteriori sull’asse motore con molle semi-ellittiche e ammortizzatori idraulici, con freni a disco idraulici sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2.600 mm Documento d'immatricolazione britannico Certificazione Ferrari Classiche. Questo lotto è sdoganato in Europa e proviene dal Regno Unito. Sul finire del 1957, contemporaneamente all’entrata in produzione della Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Cabriolet fu presentato il prototipo di un’altra vettura aperta, ideata appositamente per il mercato statunitense: la Ferrari 250 GT California Spider, considerata ancora oggi da molti appassionati come una delle vetture più fantastiche costruite nella storia della casa di Maranello. Queste due vetture aperte erano abbastanza differenti l’una dall’altra, sia concettualmente sia nell’esecuzione. La Pinin Farina Cabriolet era una derivazione della Pininfarina Coupè, una gran turismo di lusso. La California Spider era una vettura molto più sportiva, derivata dalle berlinette per uso stradale e da gara progettate anch’esse da Pinin Farina, ma realizzata in numeri più limitati a Modena dalla Carrozzeria Scaglietti, controllata quasi interamente dalla Ferrari. La procedura, molto semplice, è riportata nella storia e nel catalogo ufficiale Ferrari. “Pinin Farina preparava il prototipo, che veniva poi inviato a Maranello per essere controllato da Enzo Ferrari. Nonostante la decisione finale fosse ovviamente la sua, anche i concessionari giocavano un ruolo importante e venivano spesso chiamati a fornire il loro parere.” A quel punto il lavoro passava nelle mani di Scaglietti. “Il suo compito era di realizzare il numero prestabilito di “riproduzioni” del modello e di attrezzarsi per il lavoro sulla base dei sistemi utilizzati a Maranello, che erano molto più “artigianali” nell’approccio rispetto a quelli usati da Pinin Farina.” Nel caso della 250 GT California Spider, i due concessionari statunitensi Ferrari giocarono sicuramente un ruolo importante nell’influenzare la nuova vettura. Luigi Chinetti, un vero appassionato delle vetture del cavallino rampante, aveva concessionario Ferrari a New York. Milanese di nascita, Chinetti si era trasferito da giovane a Parigi, dove aveva aperto un’officina adibita anche alla vendita di vetture da corsa. Iniziò anche a gareggiare. Nel 1933 vinse al suo primo tentativo la 24 Ore di Le Mans, alla guida di un’Alfa Romeo in coppia con il copilota Raymond Sommer. L’anno successivo vinse la 24 Ore di Spa con Louis Chiron e la sua seconda Le Mans nel 1934, con Philippe Etancelin. Chinetti vinse anche la prima 24 Ore di Le Mans dell’immediato dopoguerra, nel 1949, alla guida di una Ferrari 166 MM, che coincise con la prima vittoria internazionale importante per il nuovo marchio. Dopo aver aperto il primo e per molto tempo unico concessionario Ferrari negli Stati Uniti, Chinetti divenne l’importatore principale della Ferrari per tutto il territorio a est del fiume Mississippi, grande metà degli Stati Uniti. Luigi Chinetti fu anche il fondatore del N.A.R.T., il North American Racing Team, ossia il ramo corse del concessionario di Chinetti. La scuderia N.A.R.T. segnò rapidamente il successo della Ferrari nelle corse sul territorio americano, ottenendo successi e vittorie per molti anni. John von Neumann, viennese di nascita, si trasferì con la famiglia a New York nel 1939. Dopo aver prestato servizio nella Seconda Guerra Mondiale nell’esercito statunitense, si trasferì a Los Angeles dove lavorò nel concessionario di vendita di auto estere più grande di Los Angeles, l’International Motors di Roger Barlow. Sempre a Los Angeles fondò il California Sports Car Club. Von Neumann creò poi un proprio concessionario a Hollywood, denominato Competition Motors. Per promuovere l’attività, iniziò a gareggiare con i modelli in vendita presso l’azienda stessa. La prima Ferrari di Von Neumann fu una 500 Mondial, con la quale giunse 2° in classifica generale a Palm Springs nell’ottobre del 1954. Da quel momento si innamorò delle rosse di Maranello, che divennero i suoi bolidi preferiti sui circuiti americani. Nel 1957 aggiunse un concessionario Ferrari alla sua già fiorente attività. Luigi Chinetti e John von Neumann si erano accorti che sul mercato americano mancava una vettura aperta ad altissime prestazioni, e tale vuoto non veniva colmato dalla gran turismo di lusso 250 GT Cabriolet. La mossa più ovvia era ispirarsi alla 250 GT Tour de France Berlinetta, che non aveva una versione cabriolet. La Tour de France originariamente si chiamava 250 GT Berlinetta. Il soprannome Tour de France le fu dato dopo aver dominato la leggendaria ed estenuante corsa francese, che durava dieci giorni. Le prestazioni della vettura, la sua affidabilità e la sua resistenza contribuirono a decretarne il successo. Alfonso de Portago fu il primo a guidarne una in gara nel 1956. La vettura fu impeccabile e Portago si classificò primo nella graduatoria finale, scalzando Stirling Moss, su una Mercedes 300SL. La 250 GT TdF si rivelò veramente versatile, vincendo corse sui più famosi circuiti del mondo, e dimostrandosi perfettamente a suo agio anche sulle strade normali. Nel 1958 furono realizzate 14 California Spider, mentre le restanti 36 furono costruite tra il 1959 e il 1960. Di queste, almeno tre erano dotate di scocca in lega, e realizzate conformemente agli standard da corsa. Al lancio della 250 GT SWB (a passo corto) Berlinetta fece seguito a breve intervallo quello della corrispondente SWB California Spider – introdotta al Salone di Ginevra nel marzo del 1960. Dal lancio alla fine della produzione erano state prodotte in totale solo 105 Spider, 50 delle quali sul telaio LWB (a passo lungo). La Ferrari 250 GT LWB California qui presentata, con numero di telaio 0923 GT fu la terza di queste impressionanti vetture a essere realizzate. Ordinata nella configurazione con fari carenati più ambita, conserva ancora il telaio originale tipo 508 C primo modello, con un motore tipo 128 C. La 0923 GT fu completata il 9 luglio 1958 e consegnata nuova al concessionario Ferrari di von Neumann a Hollywood, in California. Durante gli anni Sessanta la vettura restò in California, di proprietà di Don Hampton e del Dr. Constantine Voyagis. Dal 1968 passò a Marshall Matthews di Woodside, in California. La vettura aveva la targa “BAW 119” della California. Aveva inoltre prese d’aria laterali, era completa di paraurti anteriori e posteriori e verniciata di rosso con interni in nero. La 0923 GT fu esposta al ventottesimo Pebble Beach Concours d’Elégance, e fu venduta da Matthews a Carey Kendall di Santa Barbara. Dal 1998 l’auto divenne di proprietà di Patrick Smiekel. Nel 1999 fu venduta da Garry Roberts di Costa Mesa, in California, a un importante collezionista inglese. In quel periodo la vettura veniva descritta in ottime condizioni originali, senza segni di ruggine e con telaio e carrozzeria in ottime condizioni. Era perfettamente funzionante, con cromature ottime, un vano motore pulito, un telaio originale e in perfetto stato, ed era appena stata eseguita una revisione meccanica completa. Negli ultimi anni la vettura 0923 GT ha partecipato a numerosi eventi prestigiosi. Fu esposta al concorso annuale del Ferrari Owners Club presso il Broughton Castle e fu guidata dal proprietario in occasione del Goodwood Revival Meeting del 1999. Partecipò in seguito al concorso Louis Vuitton all’Hurlingham Club nel 2000, prima di venire riverniciata in Rosso Rubino e dotata di interni beige. Nel 2006 questa California ha partecipato al concorso d’eleganza Cartier Style et Luxe in occasione del Goodwood Festival of Speed. La 0923 GT è stata sottoposta da poco a una revisione meccanica completa presso la GTO Engineering specializzata in Ferrari. Tutti i componenti meccanici sono stati controllati e revisionati e il motore è stato interamente ricostruito. La vettura è pronta per partecipare con successo a tutti gli eventi futuri. La 0923 GT si può descrivere in condizioni sia estetiche sia meccaniche praticamente perfette. Questa splendida Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider è descritta nelle monografie The Spyder California di George M Carrick e Ferrari Spyder California di Stanley Nowack. Nonostante fosse stata concepita come vettura stradale, la linea della California Spider è indiscutibilmente da corsa, come dimostrano anche le eccezionali performance su circuito che segnarono il suo successo. Il pilota Bob Grossman a bordo della sua LWB si classificò al primo posto della sua categoria nel campionato dello Sports Car Club of America (S.C.C.A.) del 1959. Sono Nove in tutto le vetture LWB realizzate con scocca in lega, che ottennero successi in corse internazionali. Grossman e Fernand Tavano finirono al quinto posto generale nella Le Mans del 1959, e lo stesso anno nella corsa di Sebring Richie Ginther e Howard Hively ottennero un nono posto generale e un primo posto nella loro categoria. La LWB California unisce grandi prestazioni a una storia leggendaria nel mondo delle corse; scorrendo l’elenco dei primi possessori sembra di leggere un’agenda delle celebrità di fine anni Cinquanta, inizio anni Sessanta. Su un articolo di una rivista dell’epoca, la vettura veniva descritta come “la piú bella vettura mai visto su questo lato della Riviera.” La Ferrari LWB California Spider, numero di telaio 0923 GT, viene presentata in condizioni perfette, con sfarzosa carrozzeria di colore Rosso Rubino e interni in pelle beige squisitamente flessuosi. La 250 GT TdF è da sempre vista come la più esclusiva berlinetta Ferrari da strada/corsa mai realizzata. Nel suo abito da spider che cela un telaio da favola, rappresenta per fascino ed eleganza il vero tocco da maestro, una sinfonia perfetta nel suono e nella bellezza: la bellezza più dirompente nel mondo dei motori, combinata con un’aria tra le più gloriose e trionfanti. Un suono capace di andare dritto all’anima. Addendum This car will have to be returned to Ferrari Classiche after the auction for fitting of the original exhaust and replacing of the rear leaf springs. Cost for this work will be paid for by the Vendor. Chassis no. 0923GT

  • ITAItaly
  • 2008-05-18
Hammer price
Show price

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder

240 bhp, 2,953 cc, overhead-camshaft alloy block and head V12 engine, with four-speed gearbox, independent front suspension via A-arms, coil springs and telescopic shocks, and rear suspension via live axle, semi-elliptic springs and hydraulic shocks, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4" - One of only 50 built - Delivered new to Prince Vittorio Emanuele di Savoia - Matching numbers - Multiple awards, including Platinum Award and Pebble Beach class win The 250 GT Pinin Farina Spyder Towards the end of 1957, when the Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Cabriolet went into production, a prototype for another open-top car appeared, aimed squarely at the U.S. market. It was called the Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder and was thought by many aficionados to be one of the most beautiful cars ever to come out of Maranello – a view still held by many to this day. The California Spyder’s development was spurred on by the recognition that Stateside buyers wanted a fast, sparsely equipped convertible Ferrari sports car, the convertible counterpart of the Tour de France berlinettas. Whether it was Luigi Chinetti or John von Neumann who first pointed this out to Ferrari is immaterial. What is important, however, is that Ferrari responded with the California Spyder. These open cars were quite different in concept and execution to their PF Cabriolet counterparts. The Pinin Farina Cabriolet was based on the Pininfarina Coupe, a luxurious gran turismo. The California Spyder was a much sportier car, based on the dual-purpose berlinettas also designed by Pinin Farina, though built in small numbers in Modena by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, which was partly owned by Ferrari. The procedure was described by Ferrari in their official history and catalogue as a simple one: “Pinin Farina prepared the prototype, which was then sent to Maranello to be inspected by Enzo Ferrari. Although the final decision was naturally his, the dealers also had an important say in the matter and were often called in to give their opinions.” Scaglietti would then take over: “His job was to produce the set number of ‘reproductions’ of the model and to equip himself for the task on the basis of the systems in use at Maranello, which was far more ‘artisan’ in approach than those used by Pinin Farina.” California Spyder production began in 1958, and some 11 examples had been built by the time it was announced as a separate model in December 1958. All told, 14 California Spyders were built during 1958, with the remaining 36 cars built between 1959 and 1960, including at least three fitted with alloy bodies; they were constructed to full competition specifications. Certainly in the case of the 250 GT California Spyder, Ferrari’s two US distributors did have serious input in the design of the new car. Luigi Chinetti, who set up the first, and for a while the only, Ferrari dealership in the US, later had all the territory east of the Mississippi River, which amounted to about half the country. Luigi Chinetti was also the founder of NART – the North American Racing Team, the racing arm of Chinetti’s distributorship. The other influential distributor was the Austrian-born John von Neumann, whose racing and dealership interests were based out of California. Both Chinetti and von Neumann recognized a gap in the market for a higher performance open-top car in America that was not filled by the luxurious 250 GT Cabriolet. It seemed obvious to base this car on the 250 GT Berlinetta (Tour de France), which lacked a convertible version. The Tour de France was originally known as the 250 GT Berlinetta. The Tour de France nickname was added after the car’s domination of the legendary and grueling ten-day French event, in which the car’s performance, reliability and durability made it a success. In the end, 14 California Spyders were built during 1958, with the remaining 36 cars built between 1959 and 1960, including at least seven fitted with alloy bodies, constructed to full competition specification. When the 250 GT SWB (short wheelbase) Berlinetta was launched, it was followed shortly thereafter by the corresponding SWB California Spyder, which was introduced at Geneva in March 1960. By the time production came to a close, a total of just 106 California Spyders had been built, 50 of them on the LWB chassis. One California Spyder was entered by NART at Sebring early in 1959 and driven by Richie Ginther and Howard Hively. It finished ninth overall (behind four Testarossas and four Porsche RSKs) and won the GT class. Le Mans in 1959 conclusively demonstrated the performance of the California Spyder as the NART-entered, alloy-bodied car driven by Bob Grossman and Fernand Tavano finished fifth overall. Chassis no. 1489 GT The original left-hand drive LWB California Spyder offered here, s/n 1489 GT, was completed by the factory on September 19th, 1959 as the 32nd of 50 examples that would ultimately be built and was delivered new to its first owner Prince Vittorio Emanuele di Savoia of Italy, resident in Geneva, Switzerland. Born in 1937, Vittorio Emanuele has led quite a colorful life and is the only son of the last King of Italy, Umberto II. He has lived most of his life outside Italy, primarily in Switzerland, following the referendum of 1946, whereby the Italian people voted in favor of a republic. He has worked in a variety of professions, from banker to aircraft salesman and was famously married to Swiss heiress and water skier Marina Ricolfi-Doria. By 1962, 1489 GT was offered for sale by German racing driver and car dealer Wolfgang Seidel in Dusseldorf. The car was owned by Dr. Hans Hardt of Waldernbach, Germany in the mid-1960s before it was exported to the United States in 1968. Mrs. Ellis Little of Greenfield, New Hampshire owned the car in 1970, and it has remained stateside ever since. It is known to have been in Philadelphia in 1980 at Mark Smith’s Old Philadelphia Motorcar Corp. before being restored two years later at Bob Smith Coachworks in Gainesville, Texas. At that time, it was converted to covered headlight specification and repainted black with a red stripe and red leather interior. In 1992 Smith showed the car during the 27th Annual Ferrari Club of America National Meeting in the Washington, DC area, where it placed First in Class Three. Collector Anthony W. Wang then showed the car at the exclusive Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance later in the year, where it again placed first in its class (Class M – Ferrari Custom Coachwork through 1964). The car continued to participate in a number of events, including the Blackhawk Collection invitational at Danville, California and the third annual Colorado Grand in 1991. Anthony Wang sold the car to RM Classic Cars Inc. in May 1998. While in RM’s possession, the car attended the 1998 FCA National Meet in Toronto, Ontario, where it was involved in both the track day and the concours, at which it won a gold award. In September of 1998, Richard Sirota, another noted collector from New York, acquired the car and brought it to the Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach the following year, where it won the coveted Platinum Award. In fact, Sirota also participated in the Colorado Grand in 1999. One year later it was sold to a very prominent collection in Japan and later shown in 2004 at The Quail – A Motorsports Gathering in Carmel Valley. Noted enthusiast Enrique Landa purchased the car in 2006, brought it back to The Quail the same year and, once again, participated in the Colorado Grand. The current owner has enjoyed the car since the summer of 2008. It has fulfilled its objective in providing sunny afternoon drives, trips to concours and shows and is certain to fulfill those same for its new owner. Few cars are as perpetually desirable, timelessly gorgeous and rarely available as a Ferrari California Spyder. This is one of the finest examples we’ve ever offered. Chassis no. 1489GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
Show price

1995 Ferrari F50

520 bhp, 4,698 cc V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic 2.7 engine management, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and unequal-length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 101.6 in. Originally delivered to famed heavyweight Champion boxer Mike Tyson Only 5,694 actual, well-maintained miles Immaculate condition; original hardtop, “circus box,” tool kits, and manuals Ferrari Classiche certified Every tifosi has dreamt of piloting a Formula 1 car on the open road. No traffic. No stop lights. No speed cameras. Just the sound of the car’s exhaust note reverberating off buildings—let alone the feeling of sheer of speed—would be enough to tug at the heartstrings of car enthusiasts anywhere. In essence, the Ferrari F50 was just that: an F1 car at heart, but it had been designed and engineered to be driven on the road. At its heart was a 4.7-liter naturally aspirated V-12 engine with five valves per cylinder and twin overhead camshafts per bank, derived directly from the engine used in the 1990 Formula 1 season. As fitted to the F50, it was capable of producing 520 horsepower at 8,000 rpm but was capable of reaching an eardrum-shattering 10,000 rpm. The six-speed longitudinal gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine, between which the oil tank was mounted for the dry-sump engine lubrication system. To help rein in the power, massive drilled and ventilated disc brakes were fitted with Brembo-supplied four-piston brake calipers. This fanatical attention to detail in adding performance and reducing weight paid massive dividends in terms of performance. Capable of rocketing to 60 mph from a standstill in just 3.6 seconds, the F50 could accelerate onwards toward a top speed of 202 mph if the driver was brave enough to keep accelerating. Even more incredible was the car’s time for a standing mile – just 30.3 seconds. The example offered here was the 73rd of the 349 F50s produced, one of only 50 U.S.-spec examples made. Delivered to Nader Amirvand of Auto Market in Fountain Valley, it was subsequently sold with a new 456 in a package deal, reportedly at full sticker price, to the legendary heavyweight Champion boxer Mike Tyson. The car remained with Mr. Tyson, its original owner, for several years, before being resold through a Seattle broker to local computer magnate, Kevin Marcus, with 4,900 miles. Having remained virtually unused in Mr. Marcus’ ownership, the car was sold in 2005 through Ferrari broker Michael Sheehan to an enthusiast in Georgia, who commissioned an engine-out service and full electronic updates by Rod Drew of the well-known F.A.I. in Costa Mesa, California. As part of this work the rear seal was replaced; oil and water pumps rebuilt; the dashboard pod removed, serviced, and reinstalled; the lighting system upgraded; the ride height actuator replaced; and new tires installed. In 2010 at 5,320 miles, the then-owner, a Ferrari dealership owner and renowned collector of both vintage and modern Ferraris, had his dealership replace the fuel bladders, perform a full engine-out service, and replace the main seals and all fluids, etc., at a cost of $36,000. An oil service and annual maintenance followed in May 2011 at 5,326 miles, and a full brake system service followed, five years later, at 5,694 miles. The car has never been driven hard and, accordingly, remains in beautiful condition with 5,694 miles recorded at the time of cataloguing. It is accompanied by a partial service history, as well as the two sets of tools in the front deck, owner’s manuals and warranty booklet in their leather folio, wheel socket, car cover in bag, both the removable hardtop and emergency soft top with bag (in fine condition), utility light, its window sticker, and the “circus trunk” containing roll bars and a carbon rear tonneau cover. In its current ownership, the car has received full Classiche certification by the Ferrari factory, with the Red Book accompanying the car to sale. Subsequent to its Classiche certification, the owner elected to have the desirable aftermarket Tubi exhaust installed, for better performance and an even sweeter exhaust note. An extremely high-quality, Classiche-certified and well-accessorized F50 with a very interesting history indeed, this is a hypercar that packs a considerable punch. Chassis no. ZFFTG46A0S0104220

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
Show price

1982 Porsche 956 Group C Sports-Prototype

620 bhp, 2,650 cc DOHC air-cooled flat six-cylinder engine with Motronic electronic fuel management and two KKK turbochargers, five-speed manual gearbox, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and Bilstein dampers, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,650 mm Placed 3rd overall in the iconic Porsche 1-2-3 finish at the 1982 24 Hours of Le Mans One of 10 factory-team examples from 1982 Raced by numerous important Porsche drivers, including Derek Bell and Jürgen Barth Foundation of the 956 saga; a well-documented Porsche legend Few race cars of the Porsche pantheon are as universally acclaimed as the 956. The car is a brilliantly engineered aesthetic wonder. It was born of another round of FISA rule changes that ultimately resulted in the emergence of several marque innovations. The 956 was the first Porsche race car to feature monocoque construction, with even the engine serving as a load-bearing component. The 956 was also the first such car to feature so-called ground effects, which are the aerodynamic channelling body features that maximise cornering force. The 935/76 flat-six turbocharged engine, which was a development of the company’s foray into Indy racing, was tuned to meet the new Group C regulations, which limited fuel use during races. The 956 was a winner from the start, as it took a 1-2-3 finish at the 1982 24 Hours of Le Mans in just its second race. The model then dominated the next few seasons, with the Rothmans-sponsored Porsche factory team winning Le Mans again in 1983 and privateering 956s taking the honour in 1984 and 1985. After four straight wins by the 956 at Sarthe, FISA changed Group C rules again, in an apparent attempt to do away with the unbeatable car. Despite these measures, the modified development of the 956 that emerged, the 962, posted an equally impressive run in Group C and the IMSA-GT series in the United States. In total, the 956 and its derivative dominated prototype racing for over 10 years, undergoing remarkably little modification during that time, which is a true testament to the success of its design. Chassis 956-004 is the fourth of just ten factory examples produced in the 956’s first year. The car was completed on 18 June 1982, and it set off for Le Mans the following morning. The car, running as #3, was fitted with a long-tail rear bonnet (for improved stability on the Mulsanne Straight) and was driven by Hurley Haywood and Al Holbert, with factory test driver (and current Porsche guru) Jürgen Barth taking over for Haywood after he became ill. At 4:00 a.m. on Sunday morning, the car was in 9th place, climbing to 4th within six hours. At just over 23 hours, 956-004 entered the top three, holding position through to the remainder of the race to finish 3rd in Porsche’s famous 1-2-3 sweep. Following Le Mans, 956-004 was fitted with the shorter high-downforce rear bonnet, and it assumed the duties of car #2, but it was now piloted by the legendary Derek Bell and Australian driver Vern Schuppan. At the 1000 KM of Spa on 5 September 1982, the car finished 2nd, but a tyre failure at the Fuji 6 Hours on 3 October resulted in a DNF. The car returned to form at Kyalami on 6 November, taking 2nd place. Entering the 1983 season, 956-004 faced somewhat of a disadvantage, as the new 1983 customer cars featured lighter chassis. As such, 004 was used as a reserve during Monza and Spa in the spring of 1983, and then it was ultimately withdrawn from Le Mans after being officially entered for Schuppan and Barth. Interestingly, the car was instead driven for qualifying by Bell, Barth, and Jacky Ickx, and they simultaneously used it as a camera car for a John Frankenheimer film that was never actually released. Following accidents to two other factory cars, 956-004 was again pressed into duty at Spa on 4 September, where it was driven by Bell and Stefan Bellof to a 2nd place finish. The car took the quickest time in the first session of qualifying at Brands Hatch two weeks later, and it finished 3rd in the race on 18 September. Chassis 004 concluded the season at Fuji as a camera car, and it returned in 1984 in a subsidiary role, serving as a spare car at Monza on 23 April 1984. On May 13, at Silverstone, the car was again raced as a camera car, although now under the banner of GTi engineering, and it was driven by Richard Lloyd and Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason. Entering the swansong of its competition life, 956-004 raced at the Spa 1000 KM on 2 September, taking 6th place as car #3 and being driven by Schuppan and John Watson. At Fuji, on 30 September, Lloyd again drove the 956 as a camera car, and on 2 December, the 956 concluded its competition career with an 8th place finish at Sandown Park in Australia, where it was piloted by Schuppan and 1980 F1 Champion Alan Jones. Although it was delivered to Monza in April 1985 for possible entry, and it was used for many practice laps by Jacky Ickx, 956-004 was ultimately relegated to spare-car status for the race, marking the finish of its well-documented racing pedigree. After several major accidents in customer cars, and in an effort to improve safety, Porsche nominated chassis 004 and 010 as candidates for further safety testing. This car was then directly purchased from the factory on 14 August 1990, by Willi Kauhsen, a former privateer who raced Porsches during the late 1960s and early 1970s. This transaction was reportedly conducted directly between Mr Kauhsen and then-Porsche chief Dr Ulrich Bez (now the CEO of Aston Martin) at the behest of renowned Weissach engineer Helmut Flegl. Mr Kauhsen arranged for a factory-supervised rebuild as a component of his purchase, and the process was overseen at Weissach by mechanics Walter Marelja and Dieter Hecker, the original members of the 956 development team. Following completion of the restoration, the execution was assured by a careful inspection in July 1992 by Rolf Sprenger, Porsche’s onetime chief of maintenance and service. Chassis 956-004 has been rarely used or driven since restoration, and it has not experienced significant time apart from its appearance at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in 2012. This car, which was acquired by the consignor more recently, boasts associations with some of Porsche’s most important drivers, including Derek Bell and Jürgen Barth, and it has a bona fide competition record of great merit, including its memorable 3rd place finish at Le Mans in 1982. This Rothmans Porsche 956 is one of the most iconic racing cars to come to market in recent years. Since retiring, this important 956 has been owned by just three dutiful caretakers, and the car now warrants serious consideration by any dedicated Porsche collector or aficionado of modern prototype race cars. Moteur six-cylindres à plat refroidi par air, 2 650 cm3, 620 ch, deux ACT par banc de cylindres, injection électronique Motronic, deux turbocompresseur KKK, boîte manuelle cinq rapports, quatre roues indépendantes avec ressorts hélicoïdaux et amortisseurs Bilstein, freins à disques ventilés sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 650 mm. Troisième au classement général, lors du triplé Porsche historique aux 24 heures du Mans 1982 Un des 10 exemplaires usine de 1982 Confiées à de nombreux pilotes Porsche de talent, dont Derek Bell et Jürgen Barth A contribué à la saga 956 ; une Porsche de légende, bien documentée Au Panthéon Porsche, rares sont les modèles de compétition aussi universellement admirés que la 956. Merveille esthétique, magnifiquement conçue, elle est née d'une nouvelle règlementation FISA qui a généré chez Porsche de nombreuses innovations. Ainsi, la 956 est la première Porsche de compétition qui présente une conception monocoque, avec un moteur porteur. La 956 est aussi la première du genre à exploiter l'effet de sol, une technique aérodynamique canalisant l'air sous la voiture pour la plaquer sur le bitume et augmenter la vitesse de passage en courbe. Le moteur six-cylindres turbo 935/76, développement de celui utilisé lors d'une incursion dans le championnat Indy, avait été adapté aux nouvelles règles du Groupe C, qui limitaient la quantité de carburant pendant les courses. D'emblée, la 956 était une réussite et remportait les trois premières places aux 24 Heures du Mans 1982, sa deuxième course. Le modèle a ensuite dominé les saisons suivantes : l'équipe Porsche usine, aux couleurs Rothmans, s'adjugeait à nouveau la victoire aux 24 Heures du Mans en 1983, cet honneur revenant en 1984 et 1985 à des écuries privées. Après quatre victoire d'affilée sur le circuit de la Sarthe, la FISA modifiait à nouveau les règles du Groupe C, dans une tentative de mettre fin à la suprématie de cette voiture invincible. Malgré ces changements, la nouvelle 962 qui en découlait se révélait tout aussi impressionnante en Groupe C et dans les séries IMSA aux États-Unis. Au total, la 956 et ses dérivés ont dominé les courses d'endurance pendant plus de 10 ans, tout en ne connaissant que peu de modifications, ce qui souligne la qualité de la conception d'origine. La voiture portant le n° de châssis 956-004 est la quatrième d'une série de 10 exemplaires usine produits pour la première année de la 956. Terminée le 18 juin 1982, la voiture était envoyée au Mans dès le lendemain. Portant le n°3 pendant la course, elle était équipée d'un capot arrière "longue queue" (pour une meilleure aérodynamique sur la ligne droite des Hunaudières). Elle était confiée à Hurley Haywood et Al Holbert, alors que Jürgen Barth, pilote d'essai Porsche et actuellement spécialiste de la marque, remplaçait Haywood qui était tombé malade. A 4h du matin le dimanche, la voiture occupait la neuvième place, remontant en quatrième position en six heures. Après 23 heures de course, 956-004 entrait dans le top-3, conservant sa place jusqu'à la ligne d'arrivée qu'elle franchissait en troisième position, dans le fameux triplé Porsche de cette année-là. Après les 24 Heures du Mans, 956-004 était équipée d'un capot arrière court et devenait la deuxième voiture de l'équipe officielle, confiée cette fois au légendaire Derek Bell et au pilote australien Vern Schuppan. Aux 1000 Km de Spa, le 5 septembre 1982, elle terminait deuxième, mais un problème de pneu aux 6 Heures de Fuji, le 3 octobre, la contraignait à l'abandon. La voiture revenait en pleine forme à Kyalami, le 6 novembre, pour s'emparer de la deuxième place. Pour la saison 1983, 956-004 partait avec un léger handicap puisque les nouvelles versions 1983 comportaient un châssis plus léger. Elle était donc utilisée comme voiture de réserve à Monza et à Spa au printemps 1983, avant d'être retirée du Mans où elle avait été officiellement engagée pour Schuppan et Barth. En fait, elle était utilisée aux essais par Bell, Barth, et Jacky Ickx, tout en servant de voiture-caméra pour un film de John Frankenheimer qui n'a finalement jamais vu le jour. A la suite d'accidents survenus sur deux voitures d'usine, 956-004 reprenait du service le 4 septembre à Spa, où Bell et Stefan Bellof la conduisaient à la deuxième place. La voiture signait le meilleur temps lors de la première séance d'essais à Brands Hatch deux semaines plus tard, et terminait troisième de la coure, le 18 septembre. Le châssis 004 concluait la saison sur le circuit de Fuji comme voiture-caméra et, en 1984, se contentait d'un rôle secondaire, servant de voiture de réserve à Monza, le 23 avril 1984. Le 13 mai à Silverstone, cette fois sous les couleurs GTi engineering, elle était utilisée à nouveau comme voiture-caméra entre les mains de Richard Lloyd et de Nick Mason, batteur des Pink Floyd. Entamant le chant du cygne de sa carrière en course, 956-004 participait aux 1000 Km de Spa le 2 septembre avec le numéro 3, terminant sixième entre les mains de Schuppan et John Watson. Sur le circuit de Fuji, le 30 septembre, la 956 concluait sa carrière avec une huitième place à Sandown Park, en Australie, pilotée par Schuppan et Alan Jones, Champion du monde de F1 1980. Bien qu'elle ait été acheminée à Monza en avril 1985 pour un éventuel engagement, et qu'elle ait été abondamment utilisée aux essais par Jacky Ickx, elle était finalement reléguée au statut de voiture de réserve, signant la fin d'une carrière en compétition riche et bien documenté. Après plusieurs accidents majeurs avec des voitures de série, et cherchant à améliorer la sécurité, Porsche choisissait d'utiliser les châssis 004 et 010 pour des tests de résistance. Cette voiture était ensuite achetée directement à l'usine, le 14 août 1990, par Willi Kauhsen, ancien pilote privé ayant couru en Porsche à la fin des années 1960 et au début des années 1970. Cette transaction aurait été conclue directement entre M. Kauhsen et Dr Ulrich Bez, alors directeur de Porsche (aujourd'hui directeur général d'Aston Martin), sur la décision de Helmut Flegl, ingénieur réputé de Weissach. M. Kauhsen demandait qu'une reconstruction supervisée par l'usine soit incluse dans la transaction, et l'opération était alors supervisée à Weissach par les mécanos Walter Marelja et Dieter Hecker, membres de l'équipe de développement de la 956. Une fois la restauration terminée, une inspection détaillée était menée à bien en juillet 1992 par Rolf Sprenger, qui avait été chez Porsche directeur de l'entretien. Le châssis 956-004 a été peu montré ou utilisé depuis sa restauration, et a peu roulé à part une apparition au Festival of Speed de Goodwood, en 2012. Cette voiture, acquise plus récemment par son actuel propriétaire, affiche des liens avec certains des meilleurs pilotes Porsche, dont Derek Bell et Jürgen Barth. Elle présente un authentique palmarès en compétition d'une grande richesse, dont une mémorable troisième place aux 24 Heures du Mans 1982. Cette Porsche Rothmans est une des voitures de compétition les plus emblématiques qui soient apparues ces dernières années sur le marché. Depuis sa retraite, cette importante 956 n'a connu que trois propriétaires attentionnés, et elle justifie la considération sérieuse de tout collectionneur Porsche, ou de tout passionné de prototypes d'endurance moderne. Addendum Please note that further to the catalogue description, this Porsche 956 is one of only three works cars produced in 1982. Works Rothmans Porsche 956’s only took part twice in Le Mans, making it even rarer than stated in the catalogue description. Chassis no. 956-004 Engine no. 956-131

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-05
Hammer price
Show price

1957 Ferrari 250 GT LWB Tour de France

2,953 cc single overhead-camshaft V12 engine with three Weber carburettors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm (102.4") The Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta not only has breathtaking looks, but it is also unquestionably one of the greatest Ferrari racing cars ever built and a car of such class that the various versions that followed have become legendary in their own right. The last 250 MMs had been built by 1954 and work began on what would become the 250 GT Berlinetta “Tour de France.” A stronger, new tubular chassis was employed with a wheelbase of 2,600 mm. The elliptic leaf spring suspension was replaced with wishbones, coil springs and shocks, and the Colombo Tipo 112 short block V12 engine was fitted. This car was chassis number 0369 GT, the prototype Pinin Farina Berlinetta. Between April and July 1955, Pinin Farina built three more 250 GTs, and in October, another car was shown at the Paris Salon before Pinin Farina made a further two prototypes, one of which was owned by the Marquis de Portago. In December 1955, he scored the first victory for the car, which, by the end of the decade, amounted to a massive catalogue of race wins. The first production car was built in November 1956, and production was now the responsibility of Scaglietti in Modena. That year saw the real start of the 250 GT Berlinetta’s competition career. It would win more races than either of its legendary successors, the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta and the 250 GTO. Olivier Gendebien won the GT class in the Tour of Sicily at the beginning of 1956, but it was the Tour de France of that year which became the GT Berlinetta’s most important race and put this car into the annals of motor sport history. In 1956, in his first attempt, Alfonso de Portago took the victory, with Stirling Moss in a Mercedes 300 SL second and Gendebien third in the first Pinin Farina ex-works development car. From then on the name of the race in which Ferrari had scored the famous victory came into common usage for the name of this model. In fact, Gendebien drove a Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France to victory for the next three consecutive years in the race whose name the car had now unofficially taken. Altogether, there were five series of 250 GT Long Wheelbase Berlinettas. About 29 series III cars were built, which retained the attractive and very desirable covered headlights of its predecessors but had just a single louvre. The 250 GT Tour de France we have the pleasure of offering here, chassis 0925 GT, is one of those cars and was completed on 20th December 1957 as a left-hand drive example in red with a tan interior and a factory roll bar. The car was sent new in ’58 to official Los Angeles Ferrari dealer Otto Zipper, from where it was sold to William “Bill” Harrah, the famous casino mogul of Nevada. Born in 1911, Harrah had casino ventures which amounted to a business empire in Reno and Lake Tahoe, the lavishness of which was equalled by his extraordinary car collection that he began assembling in the late 1940s. By 1964, he established Modern Classic Motors, which among other marques, became the official Ferrari dealer for 11 U.S. states. At its peak, his museum collection contained 1,200 cars, and his personal collection included a 250 LM, a 410 Superamerica and this 250 GT Tour de France, to name but a few very valuable cars. Chassis 0925 GT remained in Harrah’s collection for many years and was rarely driven and always stored in Sparks, Nevada. Following his passing in 1978, the car remained in the collection and was finally sold to a buyer in Switzerland in 1988, three decades after it was first built. It traded hands at auction in Monaco the same year before being advertised for sale in New York. Baron Dr. Franz Mayr-Melnhof-Saurau of Graz, Austria purchased the car in 1989 and stored it at Terry Hoyle’s workshop in England. He ultimately traded the car in 1992 to Takeo Kato of Japan in exchange for a 330 LMB. Ingeborg and Harald Mergard of Germany became the next owners in 1993, and the car has since been seen in numerous classic events. They drove it in the Tour de France Automobile the same year. Terry Hoyle rebuilt the engine before the two participated in the Rallye du Maroc. Hoyle drove the car himself for the Mille Miglia and the Coppa d’Oro delle Dolomiti. Between late ’93 and ’94, the gearbox and steering box were rebuilt, and the car was restored by marque specialists DK Engineering. Since that time, it has participated twice more in the Mille Miglia, once in 1995 with the Mergards and again in 1998 with Kevin Jones of DK Engineering and Franco Pirro, father of Emanuele Pirro, the five-time Le Mans winner. Thereafter the car was shown at the Cartier Style et Luxe Concours during the Goodwood Festival of Speed (2004) and was even featured in the German car magazine Auto Zeitung. As of January 2010, 0925 GT shows less than 17,600 miles and, given what we know of its extraordinary history, this is almost certainly original mileage. Never raced in period and stored for many years in Harrah’s ownership, it is the most original Tour de France Ferrari we’ve ever offered. Its all-alloy bodywork, desirable covered headlamp design and stunning red finish are a feast for the eyes. It is Ferrari Classiche Certified and could compete with distinction in any of the great events around the world. FRENCHTEXT Moteur V12 2,953 ccm arbre à cames en tête avec trois carburateurs Weber, boîte manuelle à quatre rapports, suspension avant indépendante à triangles parallèles et ressorts hélicoïdaux, pont arrière rigide avec ressorts à lames, freins hydrauliques à tambours aux quatre roues. Empattement: 2,600 mm (102.4") La Ferrari 250 GT Berlinette est non seulement belle à couper le souffle mais est aussi sans le moindre doute l’une des Ferrari de competition les plus importantes et une auto d’une classe telle que les diverses versions qui suivirent devinrent elles mêmes légendaires. Les dernières 250 MM avaient été construites en 1954 et c’est alors que commença l’élaboration de ce qui allait devenir la 250 GT Berlinette “Tour de France.” Un châssis tubulaire plus robuste fut choisi avec un empattement de 2,600 mm. La suspension à ressorts à lames fut remplacée par des triangles, ressorts hélicoïdaux et amortisseurs téléscopiques et le moteur V12 Colombo Type 112 « bloc court » fut monté. Cette première auto était le numéro de châssis 0369 GT, le prototype Pinin Farina de la Berlinette. Entre Avril et Juillet 1955, Pinin Farina construisit trois autres 250 GT, et en Octobre une autre fut présentée au Salon de Paris avant que Pinin Farina ne réalise deux prototypes de plus, dont l’un appartint au Marquis de Portago. En Décembre 1955 il remporta la première victoire de ce modéle, inaugurant un palmarés qui, à la fin de la décennie ferait état d’une énorme liste de victories. Le premier exemplaire de production fut assemblé en Novembre 1956, et la production était depuis peu la responsabilité de Scaglietti à Modène. C’est l’année qui vit les vrais débuts de la Berlinette 250 GT en compétition. Elle allait remporter plus de courses que ses descendantes, aussi bien la 250 GT Berlinette châssis court que la 250 GTO. Olivier Gendebien gagna la catégorie GT au Tour de Sicile début 1956, mais ce fut le Tour de France de cette année là qui devint la course la plus importante pour la Berlinette 250GT et l’inscrivit dans les annales de l’histoire du sport automobile. En 1956, lors de sa première tentative Alfonso de Portago arracha la victoire, devant Stirling Moss, deuxième en Mercedes 300 SL, et Gendebien troisième dans le premier prototype d’essais ex ateliers Pinin Farina. Dés lors le nom de cette course dans laquelle Ferrari avait remporté cette célèbre victoire devint le surnom accepté pour ce modèle. En fait, Gendebien pilota une Ferrari 250 GT Tour de France vers la victoire pendant les trois années suivantes, scellant encore plus cette appellation. Il y eut, en tout, cinq séries de Berlinettes 250 GT châssis long. Environ 29 voitures de série III furent produites, gardant les phares carénés, aussi jolis que recherchés, de la série précédente mais avec juste une prise d’air sur chaque flanc. La 250 GT Tour de France que nous avons le plaisir d’offrir ici, le châssis 0925 GT, est de celles ci et fut terminée le 20 Décembre 1957 en tant que conduite à gauche en rouge avec intérieur beige et un arceau de sécurité installé par l’usine. Elle fut expédiée neuve en 58 au concessionnaire Ferrari agréé de Los Angeles, Otto Zipper. De là elle fut vendue à William “Bill” Harrah, le célèbre propriétaire de casino du Nevada. Né en 1911, Harrah avait un véritable empire dans le domaine des casinos à Reno et Lake Tahoe, dont le luxe extrême était égalé par son extraordinaire collection de voitures qu’il avait commencé à assembler à la fin des années 1940. En 1964 il établit Modern Classic Motors, qui devint l’agent officiel de Ferrari et d’autres marques pour 11 Etats Américains. A son apogée son musée contenait 1,200 voitures et sa collection personnelle hébergeait une 250 LM, une 410 Superamerica et cette 250 GT Tour de France, pour ne citer que quelques autos remarquables. Le châssis 0925 GT resta dans la collection d’Harrah de nombreuses années, elle fut rarement conduite et toujours entreposée a Sparks au Nevada. Après son décès en 1978, l’auto resta dans la collection et fut finalement, trois décennies après sa construction, vendue à un acheteur en Suisse en 1988. Elle changea de mains en enchère à Monaco la même année avant qu’elle n’apparaisse sur une petite annonce à New York. Le Baron Dr. Franz Mayr-Melnhof-Saurau de Graz en Autriche l’acheta en 1989 et la remisa dans l’atelier de Terry Hoyle en Angleterre. Il finit par l’échanger en 1992 contre une 330 LMB avec le Japonais Takeo Kato. Les Allemands Ingeborg et Harald Mergard devinrent les propriétaires suivants en 1993, et l’auto a depuis été vue dans nombre d’évènements historiques. Ils participèrent au Tour de France Automobile/Tour Auto la même année. Terry Hoyle, expert reconnu, refit le moteur avant que le couple ne participe au Rallye du Maroc. Hoyle lui même conduisit la voiture aux Mille Miglia et à Coppa d’Oro delle Dolomiti. Entre la fin 93 et fin 94, la boîte et la direction furent reconstruites et l’auto restaurée par les spécialistes Ferrari DK Engineering. Elle a depuis lors participé deux fois de plus aux Mille Miglia, une fois en 1995 avec les Mergard et à nouveau en 1998 avec Kevin Jones de DK Engineering et Franco Pirro, père d’Emanuele Pirro, le quintuple vainqueur des 24 Heures du Mans. Après cela l’auto fut exhibée au concours Cartier Style et Luxe durant le Goodwood Festival of Speed (2004) et fut même le sujet d’un article dans le magazine Allemand Auto Zeitung. A la date de Janvier 2010, 0925 GT a moins de 17,600 miles (28,300 kms) au compteur et, étant donné ce que nous savons de son extraordinaire histoire ceci est quasi certainement le kilométrage original. N’ayant jamais couru à l’époque et ayant été entreposée de nombreuses années aux mains de Harrah, elle est la Ferrari Tour de France la plus originale que nous ayons offerte. Sa carrosserie tout alu, ses phares carénés convoités et sa livrée rouge stupéfiante sont un véritable festin visuel. Elle est certifiée Ferrari Classiche et pourrait participer avec distinction à tous les grands évènements historiques de par le monde. Addendum Please note that this car was produced in 1958 and not in 1957 as stated in the catalogue, Chassis no. 0925 GT

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2010-05-01
Hammer price
Show price

1984 Ferrari 288 GTO

400 bhp, 2,855 cc DOHC mid-mounted V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers, Behr intercoolers, and Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.4 in. The first 288 GTO officially delivered in Japan Formerly the long-term property from new of Yoshiho Matsuda Under 11,000 actual kilometers; original books, tools, and documents One of the finest available anywhere THE SECOND GTO By 1984, the words Gran Turismo Omologato already carried an enormous amount of weight in the Ferrari world. For years, the 250 GTO had been considered the finest sports racer that Ferrari had ever produced. With an incredible racing record, which was only rivaled by its sensational driving dynamics, the 250 GTO had already been cemented into sports car lore as nothing short of a legend. For Ferrari to revive that legendary moniker, the new GTO would be expected to match or surpass the 250 GTO’s record in motorsport. Looking to contend in the FIA Group B, Ferrari produced and designed the 288 GTO in order to homologate it for competition within that series, calling for a production run of 200 cars. Group B was incredibly popular following its introduction in the early ’80s, especially in Europe, and Ferrari was eager to jump into the fray, as they were certain that their car would be unmatched in competition. However, Group B was cancelled shortly thereafter, leaving a fully developed and homologated car but no series to compete in. It was clear that the public was highly anticipating Ferrari’s newest no-compromises supercar, and the 288 GTO was certainly not going to disappoint the brand’s fans or customers, even without a place to race. While it shared visual cues with the 308 and 328, there was no denying that the 288 GTO was much more special. It was visually much more aggressive, with GRP and carbon compound utilized for the majority of the bodywork, and while the doors, decklid, and bonnet were formed from lightweight aluminum, its imposing shape hinted at what lay under the hood. The race-bred, 2.8-liter V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers pumped out a monstrous 400 horsepower with 366 foot-pounds of torque. The 288 GTO could rocket to a top speed of 189 mph, making it the fastest road car ever produced at the time of its unveiling. Its acceleration was equally impressive, and the car could reach 60 mph from a standstill in 4.8 seconds and 100 mph in 10.2, which was fast enough to keep everything short of a fighter jet in its rearview mirror. Performance aside, the 288 GTO’s interior was graced with a host of modern amenities. The Kevlar-framed bucket seats were lined in leather, and buyers could request air conditioning, electric windows, and an AM/FM radio/cassette stereo as optional extras. Other than those few extras, the 288 GTO sacrificed nothing to distract the driver from the task at hand. The new GTO clearly resonated with Ferrari’s clientele, as 272 examples were built by the time production ceased, which was over 25 percent more than the amount required for homologation. The 288 GTO was the first in the lineage of modern Ferrari supercars, and it remains incredibly rare, as they are seldom seen out and about or even offered for public sale. CHASSIS NUMBER 55237 The example offered here, chassis 55237, was the 137th Ferrari 288 GTO built and was fitted from the factory with air conditioning, power windows, red seat inserts to match the exterior paintwork, and the optional Ansa sport exhaust, as noted in Joe Sackey’s definitive work, The Book of the 288 GTO. On April 10, 1985, it became the very first example of its kind officially imported into Japan, by official Ferrari importer Cornes & Company. The original owner was someone very prominent in worldwide Ferrari circles, Yoshiho Matsuda. One of the world’s foremost automobile collectors, Mr. Matsuda was particularly noted for what was, at the time, the world’s finest and most complete Ferrari collection, housing some of the marque’s most valuable and significant automobiles, including a trio 250 GTOs, in a museum-like setting. Mr. Matsuda registered this car for the road and used it regularly on local streets in Japan, undoubtedly garnering significant attention. The car remained in his collection for a remarkable quarter of a century, a testament to the 288 GTO’s impressive driving dynamics. By the time that it left his ownership in 2010, it had accumulated just 9,500 kilometers from new. Just prior to its sale that year, the car had received a major service, including a replacement of the timing belts, at a cost of over ¥2,000,000, ensuring that it was ready for its new owner. Following its Matsuda ownership, chassis number 55237 remained in Japan until its importation to the United States several years later and was shortly thereafter purchased by the current owner for his own esteemed stable. In his fastidious ownership, it remains in exemplary condition, having been driven about 1,000 kilometers since leaving Japan. Importantly, it is accompanied by a history file that, by 288 GTO standards, is remarkably detailed and complete, including the original Japanese importation forms, registration documents, and service receipts, as well as the original tool set, jack, and spare keys. The 288 GTO, now heralded as the first of Ferrari’s incredible series of supercars, was robbed of its chance to earn its fabled name through the crucible of motorsport, but it more than lived up to its predecessor’s reputation as a fabulous driving machine. It has become a staple in many of the world’s greatest collections of Ferraris, just as this fine example was for Yoshiho Matsuda. This GTO, which has been very well maintained both under his tenure and since, has already proven itself worthy of two of the finest Ferrari collections on the planet, and it will undoubtedly continue to do so for its next caretaker. Chassis no. ZFFPA16B000055237

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-03-12
Hammer price
Show price
Advert