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1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L 'Lusso' by Scaglietti

240 bhp, 2,953 cc single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine with triple Weber carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, parallel trailing arms, and Watt Bar, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.48 in. The final iteration of the Ferrari 250 series The 168th of 350 examples produced One of the most comprehensively restored examples, finished in a desirable color combination Matching numbers and Ferrari Classiche certified The Ferrari 250 GT/L, or the “Lusso” as it has become known over time, is widely celebrated as one of the most beautifully proportioned Ferraris ever designed by Pininfarina. Following the Lusso’s premiere at the Paris Motor Show in October 1962, it was widely acclaimed as yet another triumph for both its designers at Pininfarina and coachbuilders at Scaglietti. The Lusso would be the last Ferrari to bear the legendary 250 name, and many thought that Pininfarina had saved their best design for the celebrated 250 chassis for last. Sitting on the shorter wheelbase chassis of the Ferrari 250 model range, power was delivered through the same 2,953-cubic centimeter short block V-12 that was designed by Gioacchino Colombo. As it was the last car in the 250 line, the Lusso would also be the last V-12 Ferrari road car to feature this engine, as displacement would increase to 275 cubic centimeters per cylinder for the next generation of Ferrari road cars. Additionally, the Lusso offered significant chassis upgrades, thanks mostly to lessons learned by the Scuderia in racing the 250 SWB and 250 GTO. These improvements principally consisted of the use of concentric springs around the telescopic shock absorbers and a Watts linkage to laterally stabilize the rear axle. The design of the front end was clearly reminiscent of the 250 GT SWB, which is arguably the greatest dual-purpose race and road car ever created. The design elegantly swept back to the rear and culminated in a Kamm tail with a subtle rear spoiler, which was similar to that on the 250 GTO and the forthcoming 275 GTB. The Lusso is instantly recognizable as a member of the 250 family of Ferraris, and its design language makes it clear that this is a Ferrari for grand touring, as it appears to be visually less muscular than the SWB and GTO. However, three Lussos saw competitive use in the hands of their owners and proved to be successful, testifying to the sporting nature of the engine and chassis. “Lusso” translated into English means luxury, and from one look into the cabin, there is no doubt that luxury is the perfect word to describe the ambiance. Its driver and passenger were lavished with the finest Italian materials in terms of leather, chrome trim, and a Nardi wood-rimmed steering wheel, which was a trademark Ferrari item. Arguably, the most eye-catching part of the interior was the rear luggage shelf, which was quilted in fine Italian leather and designed to support designer luggage that was just as chic as the Lusso itself. The dashboard configuration, thought to be inspired from a previous special-bodied 250 SWB, was also different from previous production Ferrari models, as it featured a large-diameter tachometer and speedometer in the center of the dashboard, which was angled toward the driver for easier readability. Additionally, that luxurious interior ambiance was heightened by the airy “greenhouse” design created for the cabin. Glass surrounds the driver on all sides, and it is only punctuated by thin rear pillars that help house the panoramic rear window. This created a sweeping curve that merged delicately into a tiny rear deck. This design feature was distinct to the Lusso and offered almost 360-degree visibility for the driver, making the car not only stylish but also easier to maneuver through traffic for the driver. In the hands of the motoring press, the car was well-acclaimed, even by Ferrari’s standards. Virtually all journalists who were granted the opportunity to test a Lusso showered the car with praise. Car and Driver declared, “Its proportions approach perfection,” Automobile Revue called it “the most beautiful car in the world,” and Ferrari Magazine called it “one of the all-time classics.” Even five years later, Road & Track proclaimed it as “Ferrari’s most beautiful car,” which is a compliment that cannot be tossed around lightly. According to information complied by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, the Lusso on sale today, chassis 5215GT, was sold new in 1963 by official Ferrari dealer Charles Rezzaghi SA in San Francisco, California. The first owner of the car was a Thomas Pelandini of nearby Moraga, California. Pelandini owned the Lusso for 17 years and then passed it on to Paul Uenaka, of San Jose, California, in 1980. It remained in his possession before passing to the next owner, Joseph Galdi of Tuscon, Arizona. Galdi had the car fully restored in Scottsdale, with the body stripped down to bare metal, a repaint in a gorgeous shade of burgundy, and the interior fitted with new beige Connolly leather. After its restoration was complete, it was featured in a special issue for Road & Track magazine that was titled On Ferrari and written by Ken Gross; its appearance in this magazine is no doubt a testimony to the quality of its restoration. In 2004, Galdi sold the car after 18 years of ownership, and it returned to California, where it would reside for the next few years. It was subsequently sold to Shawn Williams, in Beverly Hills, California, in July 2007. Shortly thereafter, he showed the car at Concourso Italiano, where it won a Gold Award. Following this outing, chassis 5215 was subject to a complete, no-expense-spared, nut-and-bolt restoration. The paint was stripped down to bare metal and the car was disassembled. The interior was replaced with new, correct-type Connolly leather, and it received new carpets, a headliner, and a fresh, correct wrinkle-finish dash, completely restored gauges, a wood-rimmed steering wheel, switches, and all other interior amenities. The undercarriage was completely cleaned and redone, the exhaust was replaced with a new system, the suspension and brakes were rebuilt, and all other mechanical functions were gone through and rebuilt. The engine was taken out, the entire engine bay was cleaned, and everything was refinished, even down to the correct Cheney-type hoses and hose clamps. The carburetion systems were gone through, as were the steering units and cooling systems. The car received all new rubbers, and the molding and trim pieces were refinished. The only thing that the car did not receive was a freshly rebuilt engine, because it was deemed that the compression and mechanical functions of the engine were very good. In all, the restoration process took well over a year-and-a-half to complete. In 2010, the car joined a very prominent collection of Ferraris in North Carolina. Under the even more critical eye of this owner, it was decided that chassis 5215 would undertake a full engine rebuild with Wayne Obry’s Motion Products, in Neenah, Wisconsin, in order to ensure that its mechanical condition matched its impeccable cosmetic condition. Today, this Lusso is arguably one of the finest examples in existence, and it is accompanied by all its original books and tools. Also accompanying the car are numerous records and receipts from the cars restoration and servicing, as well as over 100 photos of the restoration process, which document the complete transformation of the car to show-quality condition. Perhaps even more important is the fact that chassis 5215 is confirmed as completely matching numbers, and it is accompanied with its Ferrari Classiche certification binder. Lussos are desired by many not only for their timeless good looks but also for their marvelous grand touring dynamics and their place in history as the last of the 250 series of Ferraris. They are certainly one of the most fabulous sports cars to ever leave the gates of the Ferrari factory in Maranello, and ownership of one is undoubtedly a requirement of any serious Ferrari collection. The Lusso set the standard for grand touring cars when new, and it continues to be well-regarded in that nature to this day. This car is in absolutely breathtaking condition, and it would undoubtedly do well on the show field or the open road. Titled as 1964. Chassis no. 5215 GT Engine no. 5215 GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
Hammer price
Show price

1967 Ferrari 330 GTS by Pininfarina

300 bhp, 3,967 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Offered from the MacNeil Collection One of the finest 330 GTS available anywhere One of only 99 examples produced; retains its original engine Exquisite restoration; four-time Platinum award winner Accompanied by a set of books and tools Ferrari Classiche certified The replacement to the 275 GTS, the 330 GTS, was designed to be an elegant, open-top, V-12 grand tourer for Ferrari’s best customers looking for the finest automotive experience money could buy. In addition to plenty of room for two plus their luggage, the 330 GTS also boasted an incredible set of performance figures. It boasted a top speed of 150 mph, and the 330 GTS could easily outpace just about any other car on the road when it was new. Unveiled at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1966, its styling was instantly recognizable as a Pininfarina design. The 330 GTS epitomized mid-’60s Italian GT styling with its uncluttered and elegant design, from its classic nose characterized by its shallow egg-crate oval grille to its triple-louvered vents on the rear flanks of the front fenders and on to the seductive tapered tail. The impeccable style carried on to the car’s interior, which was luxuriously appointed with twin leather bucket seats and a wood-rimmed, aluminum steering wheel. With remarkably spacious proportions inside, this was the perfect place to be for a 1,000-mile road trip across the country or for a quick trip across town. Aside from the obvious addition of its convertible top, the 330 GTS was identical to the 330 GTC coupe that had been unveiled a few months earlier at the Geneva Salon. However, the convertible was built in much more limited numbers than its closed sibling. While 598 of the 330 GTC were built in total, only 99 of the 330 GTS would leave the factory gates by the time GTS production concluded in 1968, making the convertible much more desirable than the coupe. Today, these 99 cars are highly sought after by collectors for their fine driving characteristics as well as their gorgeous looks. CHASSIS NUMBER 10689 The 63rd of the 99 330 GTS built, chassis number 10689 was completed by the factory in November 1967, finished in Verde Medio over a Beige Connolly leather interior, and equipped with Borletti air conditioning. It was delivered early in 1968 to Montreal dealer George Wooley, who subsequently sold it through Chinetti Motors to the first owner, H. Lifshutz of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Records indicate that the car was advertised in the Miami Herald in 1978, with 34,000 miles. In 1983 it was sold to Edgar Birner of Connecticut, who had François Sicard restore the car in black with a red leather interior. The 330 GTS remained with Mr. Birner until 2004, when it was sold to Steward Coleman of Asheville, North Carolina, who displayed it extensively, including at the 2006 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, 2006 Euro Festival in South Carolina, and at the 2007 Cavallino Classic, where it won a Silver class award. The current owner acquired chassis 10689 in 2007, and had it certified by Ferrari Classiche later that year. He has since driven and shown the car extensively, in both the United States and Italy. In 2008, it was awarded at the Ferrari Club of America Annual Meet in Toronto, Canada, and at Cavallino Classic. It was then driven on the Tour di Palm Beach and was shown at the Geneva Concours d’Elegance in Geneva, Illinois. The 330 GTS was again shown at the Cavallino Classic and at the Ferrari Club America Annual meet in 2009, but these times won the coveted Platinum award. In 2010, the car was flown to Italy to participate in the Ferrari Tribute to the Mille Miglia, with a route from Brescia to Imola, to Rome and then back to Brescia. It was also shown at the 50th Annual Ferrari Club of America National Field and Driving Concours in 2013, where it won the Trofeo Gran Turismo Award, for an outstanding regularly driven pre-1975 Ferrari, and yet another Platinum award. Despite it already being a Platinum award winner, the owner decided to have the car painstakingly restored in 2013. Finished in the period factory color of Grigio Notte over black leather interior, the car’s current configuration is nothing short of spectacular. Importantly, the car does retain the engine it was delivered with new, and all of the stamped numbers were documented during the Classiche certification process. Every component was inspected and addressed during the restoration, resulting in one of the best examples in existence. Post-restoration, the exquisite 330 GTS was shown at the 2014 Cavallino Classic where it won another Platinum award, confirming the quality and authenticity of the work. Included with the sale are its books in their original leather pouch, the tool roll, the jack in its leather bag, and the Classiche Red Book documenting its certification process. Simply put, this 330 GTS is one of the finest examples to be offered for sale and is ready for its next owner to drive or show in concours events the world over. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is offered from "The MacNeil Collection". Chassis no. 10689 Engine no. 10689

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-20
Hammer price
Show price

1931 Bentley 8 Litre coupé Sportsman Gurney-Nutting

1931 Bentley 8 Litre coupé Sportsman Gurney-Nutting Titre de circulation hollandais Châssis n° YR5088 - Exceptionnelle à tous points de vue - Historique suivi - La dernière "grande" Bentley - Chef-d'œuvre esthétique - Présentation impeccable - Prix de la Carrosserie la plus élégante au RAC Rally en 1932 - "Best of Show" du Concours d'Elégance de Louis Vuitton en 1999 - Nombreux prix aux rassemblements Bentley Avec ses victoires aux 24 Heures du Mans, Bentley a largement fait ses preuves en compétition. Mais il faut aller plus loin et détrôner Rolls Royce au sommet du luxe britannique, en matière d'automobile. Ainsi, au Salon de Londres 1930, la marque présente la 8-Litre. Elle reprend la technique de l'imposante 6,5 litres, mais ne se refuse aucun superlatif. Le six-cylindres en ligne comporte un arbre à cames en tête et quatre soupapes par cylindre et, avec sa cylindrée de 7 983 cm3, il développe 220 ch à 3 500 tr/mn. Autrement dit, il est d'une souplesse exceptionnelle et les comptes-rendus d'époque en témoignent, comme The Autocar de 1930 : "Tout en offrant les performances d'une voiture de sport (...), cette voiture peut être conduite sur le quatrième rapport, aussi lentement qu'un homme à pied, et accélérer sans difficulté ni à-coup." Jusqu'à la vitesse de pointe, qui s'élève à 160 km/h ! Un chiffre que n'atteignent pas les Rolls Royce, bien que le châssis de la 8-Litre soit plus long que la plus longue des Rolls Royce comparables. Toutefois, malgré ses indiscutables qualités, la Bentley 8-Litre va souffrir comme nombre de ses rivales de la Grande Dépression ayant suivi le crach de 1929, et seuls 100 exemplaires verront le jour, ce qui en fait un modèle particulièrement rare. Bien évidemment, un chef-d'œuvre technique de ce niveau ne peut alors qu'attirer les carrossiers les plus réputés, qui mettent tout leur talent à l'habiller. A côté de Vanden Plas, Gurney-Nutting est un des carrossiers les plus familiers de Bentley, et il y montre une grande sureté de dessin. C'est à lui que l'on doit ce coupé Sportsman, une merveille d'équilibre pour un châssis de cette dimension. Sa beauté sera immédiatement reconnue, car cette voiture remportera dès 1932 le trophée du "Best Coachwork", lors du Rallye du RAC. A cette époque, cette 8-Litre est entre les mains de son premier propriétaire, un personnage peu banal. Le Captain John Moller est en effet un fin pilote d'avion et, sur une photo prise lors du Rallye du RAC 1932, la voiture est équipée d'une mascotte évoquant un Gipsy Moth, l'appareil utilisé habituellement par John Moller. Dans une lettre datant de 1999, Lord Monro of Langholm reconnaît avoir été présent lors de la livraison de la voiture neuve, et précise que sa sœur apparaît sur une des photos en noir et blanc qui accompagnent la voiture. Il indique également que c'est à bord de cette 8-Litre qu'il a pour la première fois roulé à 180 km/h et que lorsque John Moller s'est séparé de sa voiture, il l'a cédée à Sir Edmund Findlay, propriétaire d'un journal en Écosse. Les documents d'entretien montrent que, en 1938, la voiture est régulièrement utilisée et entretenue. En 1955, elle est immatriculée au nom de D.A. Dale, et un document de 1964 montre qu'elle a été quelque temps retirée de la circulation tout en conservant son immatriculation d'origine, SM 8794. Le propriétaire suivant est M. John A. MacQueen, de Deansfield House, à Stafford et c'est lui qui la cède à M. Charles Teall, dans les années 1970. Ce splendide coupé Gurney-Nutting comporte encore tous ses éléments d'origine, et Charles Teall décide de faire complètement restaurer la voiture, avec un résultat époustouflant. Sa provenance, sa qualité et son état permettent ensuite à cette Bentley 8-Litre de remporter de nombreuses récompenses : "Best of Show" au Louis Vuitton Classic 1999 du Hurlingham Club puis, en 2001, deuxième de sa catégorie au Concours d'Élégance de Pebble Beach. Il est peut-être encore plus important de noter les prix attribués par le Bentley Driver's Club, dont les juges présentent une connaissance sans égale de ce type de voiture : en 1997, "Best Vintage Saloon", puis "Best 8-Litre" et plus récemment "Best Vintage Bentley" du rassemblement. Ces trophées et récompenses soulignent la reconnaissance dont bénéficie cette considérable automobile, ce qui n'est guère surprenant compte tenu de ce qu'elle est : la carrosserie Gurney-Nutting est d'une beauté rare, et parvient à donner à ce châssis bourgeois une allure sportive et légère. Les ailes relativement courtes, les marchepieds effilés faisant office de coffre, les roues à voile plein, les pare-chocs minces et discrets, la malle volumineuse mais parfaitement intégrée à la ligne arrière, tout contribue à cette impression de dynamisme et d'équilibre. A l'avant, la haute calandre chromée surmontée d'une mascotte de femme ailée et encadrée de trois projecteurs est un modèle du genre. Le ravissement se poursuit à l'intérieur de la voiture, quand la portière s'ouvre sur un habitacle où le cuir bleu des sièges et des contreportes montre une patine légère, sans accroc. Tout invite à prendre place dans cet ensemble confortable. Le siège conducteur présente un décrochement soigneusement étudié pour permettre de manœuvrer les leviers de vitesses et de frein, et la moquette bleu est impeccable. Le bois garnit le tableau de bord, les entourages de portes et les équipements de courtoisie réservés aux places arrière, alors que le toit ouvrant découvre très largement les deux places avant, transformant la conduite en une agréable promenade aérée et ensoleillée. La planche de bord présente de nombreux instruments de très belle présentation et le moyeu du volant comporte les leviers traditionnels d'avance, starter et accélérateur à main. Il suffit ensuite de lever le capot pour comprendre ce que Bentley voulait faire de sa 8-Litre : l'énorme moteur remplit tout l'espace, dans un étonnant mélange de sobriété et de sophistication. L'ensemble est impeccable et si, d'une façon générale, la voiture peut montrer quelques traces d'usure, elles correspondent à une utilisation normale et un entretien scrupuleux. Ses précédents propriétaires n'ont pas hésité à utiliser cette fantastique Bentley 8-Litre sur de longues distances. Elle saura apporter le même plaisir à celui qui saisira la fabuleuse opportunité que représente sa mise en vente. Véritable monument esthétique et technique, pièce maîtresse de l'histoire de Bentley, témoin de la rivalité au plus haut niveau entre les plus belles marques, cette Bentley 8-Litre est évidemment beaucoup plus qu'une automobile : c'est une œuvre d'art sur laquelle s'érige l'histoire des automobiles les plus prestigieuses du monde. Dutch title Chassis n° YR5088 - Exceptional in every way - Continuous history - The last " big " Bentley - Aesthetic masterpiece - Impeccable presentation - Best Coachwork Award in 1932 at the RAC Rally - Best of Show at the Louis Vuitton Concours in 1999 - Extensive number of Awards at Bentley's meetings With victories to its name in the Le Mans 24 Hours, Bentley had definitely proved itself in competition. To knock Rolls-Royce off the top spot for British luxury automobiles however, it was necessary to go one step further. And so, at the 1930 London Motor Show, the marque presented the 8-Litre. Employing the engineering of the imposing 6.5-litre, this car called for all the superlatives. The in-line six-cylinder engine had a single overhead camshaft and four valves per cylinder and with 7,983cc, it produced 220 bhp at 3,500 rpm. In other words, it was exceptionally versatile and was reported as such in period road tests, such as The Autocar of 1930 : " While offering the performance of a sports car (....), this car can be driven in top gear, as slowly as a man walks, and can accelerate without snatch and without difficulty. " Right through to a top speed of 160 km/h ! This was a higher number than Rolls-Royces were capable of, even though the 8-litre chassis was longer than the longest comparable Rolls-Royce. However, despite these indisputable qualities, and along with many of its rivals, the Bentley 8-Litre suffered from the Great Depression that followed the 1929 Crash and just 100 examples were built, making it a particularly rare model. Naturally, a technical masterpiece such as this attracted the most reputable coachbuilders, who exercised all their talent on creating bodies for the car. It was Gurney-Nutting, one of Bentley's most trusted coachbuilders along with Vanden Plas, who was responsible for the Sportsman coupé, a marvel of design with perfect balance for a chassis of this size. Its beauty was recognised immediately, and the car won the 1932 " Best Coachwork " Trophy at the RAC Rally. At this time, our 8-Litre was in the hands of its first owner, an extraordinary character, by the name of Captain John Moller. Moller was a pilot and a photo taken at the 1932 RAC Rally, shows the car displaying the mascot of a Gipsy Moth that was associated with him. In a letter from 1999, Lord Monro of Langholm recalls having been present when the new car was delivered, and notes that his sister appears in one of the black and white photos that come with the car. He also indicated that it was in this 8-Litre car that he first drove at 180 km/h, and that when John Moller parted with his car, he sold it to Sir Edmund Findlay, a newspaper proprietor from Scotland. The maintenance documents show that in 1938 the car was regularly driven and maintained. In 1955 it was registered in the name of D.A. Dale and a document from 1964 shows that it had been taken off the road for some time while retaining its original registration, SM 8794. The subsequent owner was Mr John A MacQueen of Deansfield House, Stafford, and it was him who sold the car to Charles Teall during the 1970s. This splendid Gurney-Nutting coupé still had all its original components and Teall decided to restore it completely, with breathtaking results. The provenance, quality and condition of this Bentley 8-Litre won it numerous awards : " Best of Show " at the Louis Vuitton Classic at the Hurlingham Club in 1999 and second in class at the 2001 Pebble Beach Concours d'Élégance. It is perhaps more important to note the prizes awarded by Bentley Driver's Club, whose judges share an unrivalled knowledge of this type of car : in 1937 " Best Vintage Saloon ", then " Best 8-Litre " and more recently, the meeting's " Best Vintage Bentley ". These trophies and awards highlight the recognition given to this important automobile, which is not surprising: the Gurney-Nutting coachwork has a rare beauty and succeeds in giving this substantial chassis a light, sporting appearance. The relatively short wings, the streamlined running boards that double up as storage space, the covered wheel hubcaps, the narrow and discreet bumpers and the roomy trunk shaped to fit in with the rear styling all come together to give a dynamic and balanced whole. At the front, the high chrome radiator grille, surmounted by a mascot of a winged female torso, and framed by three headlamps, is a perfect representation of this type of model. Superlatives abound for the interior as well, with the doors opening up to a passenger compartment with blue leather seats and door-linings that display a light and flawless patina. The whole interior is inviting and comfortable. The driver's seat has a carefully designed cut away section to allow easy use of the gear and brake levers, and the blue carpet is immaculate. Wood lines the dashboard, door panels and courtesy equipment for the rear passengers, and the roof opens up over the front seats, transforming the drive into a sunny and airy experience. The dashboard displays a selection of superbly presented instruments and the centre of the steering wheel sports the traditional controls for advance, choke and hand throttle. A glance under the bonnet reveals what this 8-litre Bentley is capable of : its enormous engine fills the available space, in a stunning blend of simplicity and sophistication. The car as a whole is impeccable and if it shows some general signs of wear, this represents normal use and meticulous maintenance. Previous owners have not hesitated to use this fantastic Bentley 8-Litre on long journeys and it is ready to offer the same pleasure to whoever seizes the opportunity this auction sale provides. A true aesthetic and technical achievement, a centrepiece of Bentley's history, a testament to the top-level rivalry between the finest marques, this 8-Litre Bentley is far more than an automobile : it is a work of art encapsulating the heritage of the most prestigious automobiles in the world. Estimation 2 500 000 - 3 000 000 € Sold for 2,190,400 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-07
Hammer price
Show price

1937 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Sport Cabriolet A by Sindelfingen

Best of Show, 2015 Arizona Concours d’Elegance Class award winner, 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Formerly owned by Martha Jordans and Thomas Kreid Factory Spezial Roadster-style design features, including a set-back radiator Beautifully restored by marque expert Jim Friswold Retains its original matching-numbers engine Perhaps the ultimate 540 K cabriolet In an article for the October 1989 issue of Car Collector, Dennis Adler described a Mercedes-Benz 540 K Sport Cabriolet A as “a styling bridge between Mercedes’ more formal cabriolet designs and the sportier 540 K Spezial Roadsters.” Take one glance at that automobile, which is offered here today, and the resemblance is clear. It has the desirable feature of a radiator set back behind the front axle, enhancing the look of the long, sweeping front and rear fenders, which are similar to those found on the roadsters, aside from a lack of chrome adornment. The spare tires are contained in a recess at the rear of the body, while a set of Karl Baisch luggage rests on a shelf behind the front seats, compensating for the space lost by the lack of a traditional trunk. A lower top completes the sleek and spezial look. The offering of this car is accompanied by a copy of its kommission paper and its related excerpt from the karosserie buch, which together detail the story of its delivery. In late 1936, this Sport Cabriolet A was ordered by Martha Jordans and recorded under kommission number 228752. Subsequently, the bare chassis that was assigned to the order, 154146, was delivered by the Stuttgart factory to the coachworks at Sindelfingen on 16 November 1936. Interestingly, the documentation suggests that Miss Jordans placed this order in Paris, although the car was actually delivered on 12 February 1937 to her German home on Albertusstrasse in Mönchengladbach via Daimler-Benz Düsseldorf. Jan Melin’s first volume of Mercedes-Benz 8: The Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s indicates that a total of 83 Cabriolet As of all the styles were built on the 540 K chassis, and it further defines that only 32 of this version, which was introduced in 1936, were constructed. Of additional significance is a handwritten note on the excerpt from the karosserie buch, which indicates the production of only 10 bodies of the 826200 series, and this car, body number 826201, is the first of these. Miss Jordans reportedly later immigrated to the United States, bringing her attractive Mercedes-Benz with her. It can certainly be said that her car has always been well looked after, as it had been in collector hands since relatively early on in its life, beginning with car collector Paul Hauck, of Union, New Jersey. In the Spring 1957 issue of The Classic Car, the car is pictured wearing a pre-1956 New Jersey license plate. It was owned by Hauck until at least 1965, when it was pictured on page 220 of Jan Melin’s second tome on supercharged eight-cylinder Mercedes. In 1989, the 540 K, which was in the ownership of American Mercedes-Benz enthusiast Tom Kreid, was featured in the aforementioned issue of Car Collector. According to Adler’s article, chassis number 154146 previously spent time in San Francisco during the 1970s, and it also spent five years in Colorado. In 1996, it returned to Germany under the ownership of Alfred Richter, of Lampertheim. Mr. Richter found this Mercedes-Benz to be a wonderful driving car, reportedly driving it on several rallies and accruing nearly 30,000 kilometers on the odometer before passing it to the current owner a few years ago. Upon acquiring the car, the owner, a long-time Mercedes-Benz enthusiast and Pebble Beach entrant, commissioned Mercedes expert Jim Friswold, of Tigard, Oregon, to perform a complete concours-quality restoration. After the removal of the body, the chassis was stripped to bare metal and powder-coated, and the suspension was fully rebuilt. The transmission and rear end were completely disassembled and had new bearings and seals installed, while the engine had been previously rebuilt by Reifen-Wagner, of Landshut, Germany, under Mr. Richter’s ownership. The cosmetics were given an equally thorough treatment, with all chrome being re-plated and the body being stripped and refinished in the highly attractive Burgundy color it now wears today. The interior restoration was equally fastidious: the old upholstery had been replaced with Biscuit Tan leather, all of the wood was beautifully refinished, and all instrumentation was fully rebuilt. The leather is of the correct and very high quality German material, as is the material used for the top and headliner. The work was completed in June 2014, and the car’s overall presentation can only be described as “crisp.” Chassis number 154146 was presented at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, placed behind an imposing 770 K and a coachbuilt 630 K. It went on to achieve Best of Show at the 2015 Arizona Concours d’Elegance. This Sport Cabriolet A, wearing the most desirable of the cabriolet body styles, was deemed by Car Collector as “almost a Special Roadster.” More so, it is a rarity that is fit for the astute connoisseur of pre-war classics, and it likewise presents an opportunity for a serious entree into the pre-war arena. Chassis no. 154146 Engine no. 154146

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
Show price

1972 Lamborghini Miura P400 SV by Bertone

385 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC transverse mid-mounted alloy V-12 engine with four Weber twin-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension with A-arms, coil springs with tubular shocks and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.42 in. The finest restored example available today Freshly restored by the best European Miura workshops Original body, engine, and drivetrain; finished in its original colors Desirable split-sump specification Restoration work overseen by Valentino Balboni The original supercar in its ultimate form THE ORIGINAL SUPERCAR The Miura did not need a body to break the mold. The chassis alone, displayed at Geneva in 1966 before a body had even been contemplated, drew demand and orders. That a 27-year-old stylist captured the youthful spirit of his age and translated it into one of the most beautiful bodies of its era was, simply and appropriately, the icing on the mechanical cake. Based upon a transverse mid-mounted V-12, the Miura was the poster child for a petrol-fueled generation, seen in the garages of Miles Davis, Rod Stewart, and Frank Sinatra. Its beautiful styling was rich in fine detail, with the doors’ sensuously curved shape borrowed from the horns of a raging bull and pop-up headlights mounted flush into a smooth front end that seemed to roll up over the driver’s compartment and off a Kammback tail. It was the design that gave birth to the word “supercar,” and it marked a paradigm shift in the design of high-performance automobiles worldwide. Almost overnight, mid-engine placement would be the way to go, and virtually every competitor vied to match the Miura’s muscular, sensual silhouette. Like most supercars that have come after it, the Miura evolved during its production run, with the final variation, the Spinto Veloce, being the most developed and potent. Revised suspension helped to remove the “front-end lightness” that had been so characteristic of earlier cars; in turn, the rear bodywork was widened for a more aggressive stance. Perhaps the most notable change was to the engine, which now featured larger carburetors and different cam timing, making the SV more user-friendly at lower rpms. With the engine producing 385 brake horsepower, the SV had incredible performance; it could sprint from 0–60 mph in just 5.8 seconds, and its top speed was quoted as 180 mph. Super, indeed. CHASSIS NUMBER 5014 According to information on file from Lamborghini historian Giorgio Sant’Ambrogio, this Miura SV, chassis number 5014, was originally delivered through Roman dealership SEA on April 10, 1972, to a lady enthusiast, Anna Germani. As a relatively late-production SV, it was of the most desirable specification, with the split-sump lubrication system that divides the oil between the engine and the gearbox rather than forcing both to use the same lubrication, as on earlier examples. The car later made its way to Japan, where it was featured, in its previous Rosso livery, on the cover of the December 1990 issue of Revival Impression magazine. For some time, it resided with an official Japanese McLaren workshop in Osaka before coming into the possession of its current owner. He immediately submitted the Miura SV to the finest workshops in the world for a Miura, all in the Modena area and many involving former Lamborghini employees. Its restoration was undertaken with absolute disregard for cost. The original color combination of Giallo Miura over Nero leather was proven by discovery of original paint in the front lid and under the trunk lid lock, while the pristine originality of the body itself was supported by the body number, 807, appearing on every single panel originally numbered by the factory. Disassembly and final assembly were handled by the renowned Carrozzeria Sports Cars (Drogo). The body was completely stripped to bare metal via water-cleaning by Water Works Technology of Pordenone. Metalwork restoration was done by Bachelli & Villa (Autosport), after which Carrozzeria Sports Cars expertly applied the paint in the original hue. The interior was trimmed by Bruno Paratelli, who was the Lamborghini factory’s external supplier for many years. The chassis was checked and measured by Marchesi, the original chassis supplier for Lamborghini in-period, with a certificate on file verifying that the frame is perfectly straight and conforming to the original specifications. Mechanical restoration was undertaken by Salvioli, of TopMotors in Nonantola, a former Lamborghini mechanic who spent 30 years working in the developmental department at the factory! All of this work, documented by invoices and a large collection of photographs on-file, was overseen by a noted Lamborghini authority, as well as the renowned factory test driver, Valentino Balboni. Signore Balboni looked at every single detail of the car and the finish of its every nut and bolt, even assisting in the sourcing—at considerable expense—the correct Pirelli CN12 tires. Also included are a user handbook, tool kit, and jack. Freshly completed and not yet shown, this Miura SV is a standout in every regard. While many have been restored authentically, few have been taken to such a pristine standard with oversight and hands-on craftsmanship by many of the men who knew these cars when they were new. The result is a magnificent specimen of the original supercar and, without a doubt, the finest SV ever offered at auction. Chassis no. 5014 Engine no. 30700 Body no. 807

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
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1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

400 bhp, 2,855 cc DOHC mid-mounted V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers, Behr intercoolers, and Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.4 in. The rarest of Ferrari’s supercars The 129th of only 272 examples produced for Group B homologation Delivered new with optional air conditioning and power windows Timing belt service completed in June 2015 at Ferrari of Beverly Hills The year is 1985. Imagine standing on the side of a gravel road in the middle of a forest with dozens of other rabid fans. A dull roar is heard off in the distance. Whatever it is, it’s getting closer. The roar quickly grows louder and louder until it turns into the distinctive bark of a V-8, and then from around the corner… A bright red Ferrari flies over the hill, howling at 7,500 rpm, landing mere feet from where you’re standing. The car, accelerating with brute force, rockets past the group of cheering spectators, and then the driver slams on the brakes, throwing the machine sideways into the next corner. In an instant, the Ferrari screams down the road and out of sight, the engine still howling as the turbos spool up, and it rushes back into the forest. This was Group B rallying. It was introduced in 1982, and its rules and regulations (or lack thereof) beckoned for the creation of some of the most incredible rally machines ever built. The age quickly became known as the Golden Era of rallying. Unfortunately, the scene depicted with that red Ferrari would have never taken place. Group B was short-lived and disbanded by the FIA following a series of major accidents in 1986, leaving what could have been one of the fiercest competitors out of the fray: Ferrari’s newest GTO. The 288 GTO was developed by the factory specifically for entry in Group B, and as such, 200 road cars were required in order to homologate it for competition. However, Group B was banned before Ferrari ever had a chance to enter the series, leaving the car without a series to race in. This did not stop Ferrari from selling the GTO to their most loyal customers though, and 272 examples were built before production ceased. Enzo “Il Commendatore” Ferrari was still alive at this time and oversaw the appointment of the three most coveted letters in Ferrari history for the first time in two decades. Not only was the 288 GTO to be the first and rarest of the supercars that followed, but the “GTO” moniker would not return to Ferrari’s stable until recently with the 599. CHASSIS NUMBER 55181 This 288 GTO, built as a 1985 model, was finished in Rosso Corsa (300/6) over a Nero (VM 8500) interior and fitted with factory air conditioning and power windows, which were creature comforts not often seen on other 288 GTOs. It was sold new in Belgium to its first owner, Phillipe Lancksweert of Belgium, the co-owner of Garage Francorchamps, and was then sold by him to Raymond Peloso, a real estate developer from Newport Beach, California. Peloso offered the car for sale in the Los Angeles Times in October 1986, and at that time, the car was showing 4,600 kilometers on its odometer. By 1995, chassis 55181 made its way to Dean Becker, of Highland Park, Illinois, and returned to California later that year. In 1996, the car was sold to Gary Schaevitz, of Bedford Corners, New York. Schaevitz kept the car for the next four years. After departing from his collection, the car was sold in Florida, where it was owned by Dennis Crowley until the mid-2000s. The Ferrari was then purchased by its current owner, and it has remained wonderfully preserved and properly maintained in his collection ever since. In its current ownership, the car received an annual service in December 2014, which was completed by Ferrari of Central Florida, a timing belt service was completed in June 2015 at Ferrari of Beverly Hills. Also, it is important to note that the car is accompanied by a full set of books. Even though the 288 GTO might have been initially designed and conceived for use in motorsport, it quickly proved itself to be a very capable road car. While it delivers brutal performance and acceleration thanks to its twin turbochargers, rest assured, the 288 GTO can quickly get you to triple digit speeds and the brakes are responsive and very capable of bringing the car back to a stop just as quickly. The interior is comfortable, thanks to its sporting seating position and the added luxuries of factory air conditioning and power windows. The 288 GTO, considered today to be the first of Ferrari’s modern supercars, made an indelible mark on the automotive industry despite never seeing competition. It proved to be a thrilling car to drive on the road, and it is prized as much for its looks as its unique story. It has proven to be the lynchpin to completing the ultimate Ferrari supercar portfolio. As the first and rarest of the series, the F40, F50, Enzo, and LaFerrari included, it is difficult to acquire a proper example, much less one as outstanding as this GTO. While many 288 GTOs have been reupholstered and repainted during restorations, this example remains in fantastic condition as a well preserved and highly original example. As the saying goes, a car can only be original once, and this example would be an ideal acquisition for the enthusiast with an eye for originality. Above all, of course, it is one of only three models in over six decades of Ferrari history to carry the fabled three-letter designation so desirable that its value to collectors will remain uncontested for years to come. Its importance to the marque is rivaled only by the Prancing Horse itself. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions this vehicle will need to be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. Also note the set of books that accompany this car does not include the service/warranty book. Chassis no. 55181

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1955 Ferrari 250 Europa GT Coupé by Carrozzeria Pinin Farina

The finest example of Pinin Farina’s iconic 1950s Ferrari “look” A one-off custom design on the 250 Europa chassis Recipient of numerous concours awards When the doors to the 1953 Paris Salon opened, it marked a new dawn for Ferrari, as this was the event where the company introduced its first road going model to bear the 250 series nomenclature. The 250 was Ferrari’s first true gran turismo, and it was dressed in the Pinin Farina design that would come to be known as the “Ferrari look,” forever intertwining the 250 with the passionate men of Maranello and Turin. Design cues created by the Ferrari-Pinin Farina partnership, like a long, low hood and oval radiator, continue to appear on Ferrari models of the present day. It was this design that has, for decades, embodied the spirit of cruising through the French Riviera, cocooning occupants and luggage in luxury while effortlessly eating up miles. Offered here is the ultimate example of the “Ferrari look,” the sixth of eight custom-bodied 250 Europa GT chassis. Defined by its long nose, short rear deck, and gently sloping roof, design cues that are still evident in Ferraris of today, it is easily distinguishable as a one-off that has several unique features that visually set it apart from other Ferraris of the time. Its nose was elongated and lowered, the fender tips were pulled out, and it did not receive the typical Pinin Farina egg crate front grille. Dual fog lamps were placed in the new grille opening, with the center of the grille being adorned with a large Cavallino Rampante. Chassis 0407GT was also equipped with vertically mounted taillights, which were larger than other 250 Europa GTs, and dual rear windshield wipers, which was an interesting and rare option for any automobile of this era. The interior also benefited from one-off orange interior trim that was literally tailored by the renowned Hermés, of Paris, and a specially fit rally clock that had a retractable clipboard for navigation maps! This 250 Europa was the 26th of just 43 examples produced, according to information complied by noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini and a Heritage Certificate issued by Ferrari. It was finished in a unique shade of grey, Grigio Metallizzato Max Meyer (LC 49), over Pelle Connolly leather (VM 3108) and was sold new by the factory on November 17th, 1955, to a Vincenzo Ferrario, a resident of Rome, Italy, and a frequent Ferrari customer. Shortly after, the car would eventually travel into the United States, where it was sold through Luigi Chinetti to a Hal Rudow, of Seattle, Washington. Interestingly enough, Rudow raced the car at an SCCA event at the Shelton CAP Airbase in March 1960, where he placed 1st in class in the car’s first and only competitive outing. In 1964, it was purchased by Dr. Robert H. and Marilyn Cremer, of Los Angeles, California, and painted blue. The Cremers used the car occasionally until 1970, when it was put into storage in largely original condition. After bringing the car out of storage in 2004, chassis 0407GT passed into the ownership of a well-known private collection, which includes some of the finest Ferraris in the world. A complete restoration of the one-of-a-kind automobile to its as-delivered configuration was thereafter undertaken. Work was completed in mid-2006, and the car made its premier at the 56th annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2006 and was also shown at the 26th Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach, Florida. At the Cavallino Classic, 0407GT was awarded with both a Platinum Award and the Excellence Cup, which was awarded based on the high quality of its restoration and the uniqueness of the automobile itself. Chassis 0407GT would continue to hold its ground on the show field, as it was entered in the Ferrari Grand Touring Class at the 31th annual Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2008, and it took home First in Class. As the first road-legal Ferrari to wear the now legendary 250 name, the Europa GT is a highly desirable automobile to many collectors. This example presents an even more unique proposition considering its custom coachwork. Any Ferrari with custom coachwork is truly an automotive treasure, and 0407GT represents the best of the Ferrari brand, as it has timeless styling, luxurious accoutrements, and, last but certainly not least, impressive performance. It truly has “the look.” Chassis no. 0407GT Engine no. 0407

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
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1933 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental Sports Coupé by Freestone & Webb

A one-off Art Deco coupe The prototype for the famous “razor edge” styling Extensive known ownership history The connoisseur is a man who knows his own tastes and has the money to feed them. He studies what he collects, learns his subject, and is then guided by his knowledge to seek out and acquire only the finest examples. It is by this careful process that the world’s great collections of art objects are assembled. Sir John Leigh was a connoisseur, and the artists he patronized were Rolls-Royce and Freestone & Webb. Working together, the partnership created some of the finest, most beautiful automobiles to run the streets of England during the Classic Era, but none are more fabulous than the streamlined Coupé offered here. Its chassis was engineered to be silent. Its design is anything but. Sir John, a prominent Lancashire cotton magnate and a Conservative member of Parliament for Clapham, had quite the appetite for fine conveyances. The Rolls-Royce Phantom II Continental was ideal for his tastes. It had a wheelbase of 144 inches, six inches shorter than standard, and it came equipped with stiffer springs, for better handling, and a low-ratio rear axle, for better acceleration. Of the 281 Continental chassis built, Sir John Leigh owned four of them, and like a man who has a favorite tailor, all were clothed with bespoke bodies by Freestone & Webb, the London coachbuilders with a reputation for extremely fine quality. Chassis 42PY was ordered by Sir John Leigh in August of 1933, and, as any bespoke car, it took several months to complete. According to the accompanying copies of production cars supplied from Rolls-Royce, the completed machine was tested at Freestone & Webb on December 8, 1933. According to the order sheets, the car was specified “for use in the UK and Continent, mainly fast touring.” Leigh special ordered a number of features, including six-inch gauges for the speedometer and tachometer, and he also specified that the exhaust pipe be dropped three inches from its standard position. Sportiness was what he sought. The body of 42PY is distinguished by its incredibly long hoodline, which is emphasized by cycle-style “helmet” fenders and a lack of traditional running boards or side-mounted spares. This visual trick allows for a relatively spacious four-passenger compartment, yet it gives the car the outward appearance of a sporty two-seater, emphasizing the power lurking under the hood. The Continental chassis was for the Rolls buyer who wanted performance; Freestone & Webb simply put an exclamation point on the idea. The low, window-hugging roofline features remarkable, origami-like, crisp edges, showcasing the earliest hint of what would come to be known as “razor edge” design. Razor edge would come to define the styling of numerous closed Rolls-Royces during the 1940s and 1950s, replacing the rounded roofline that had been common into the 1930s. This is believed to be the earliest automobile with razor edge design, and as such, it is the progenitor of numerous custom bodies that were created in the next two decades. The car was used by Leigh and his wife through the late 1930s, but by July 1938, it was owned by B. Sleath, Esquire of Stratford-on-Avon. It would make sense that the Leighs would have disposed of all of their Phantom II Continentals at this point, as Sir John is understood to have ordered four Phantom IIIs in one day! Like many other fine conveyances of its day, 42PY lay dormant through the war, until being seen driving through London by Anthony Gibbs around 1952. Gibbs extensively wrote about his experience with 42PY in A Passion For Cars; a copy of which is included in the file. As he tells it, on the day his publishing firm went bankrupt due to a two-month printer’s strike around 1952, “I suddenly realized that without seeing it, I had been traveling behind the most beautiful car I had ever seen. It was a big black Rolls, shaped very much as my old Delage, but more beautiful still, because, instead of being a drophead, it had a marvelously square-cut top like a brougham.” Gibbs stopped the driver in the middle of an intersection and struck a deal to purchase the car. He drove it daily during his ownership over the next five years, and his travels with 42PY included a tour across the continent. In a truly amusing anecdote, Gibbs relays the realization that he was being followed at a distance by two marked and three unmarked police vehicles, due to suspicion of being in league with Communist sympathizers. Upon realizing he was being followed, Gibbs decided to make a parody out of the attempted cloak and dagger by leading the procession through the streets of London at 10 mph! Ironically, around 1957, he was stopped in the middle of an intersection in the very same manner that he had stopped the previous owner of the car. The gentleman who stopped him was an American, so when the deal for the purchase of the car was struck, 42PY traveled to the New World in the care of Arthur W. Seidenschwartz, of Waukesha, Wisconsin. Seidenschwartz was an active member of the Rolls-Royce Owners’ Club, and he and 42PY appeared at a number of meets, as well as in several issues of The Flying Lady, which are included with the car. The October 1957 issue shows the car with a caption that describes it as “newly imported.” The car remained with Seidenschwartz for an amazing 35 years, before being passed into the hands of David Scheibel, of Toledo, Ohio, in early 1992. Scheibel quickly commissioned a concours-quality restoration, with hundreds of thousands of dollars spent at that time. From there, Scheibel took the car to a number of RROC meets and concours events. A full list of accolades received is included, but among those are Best in Class and the Gwen Graham Award for Most Elegant Closed Car at the 1992 Pebble Beach Concours, as well as Best of Show Prewar at the 1993 RROC National Meeting , followed by being selected as Best of Previous Best of Show Winners at an RROC National Meeting in 1994. Chassis 42PY was also shown at the 1994 Eyes on Classic Design in Grosse Pointe Shores; while there, it received high accolades, winning Automotive Design of Exceptional Merit, the Rolling Sculpture Award, the Visually Impaired Young Adults Award, and the Best in Show – Interior Award. During Scheibel’s ownership, 42PY was also featured on the cover of the 1993 “Annual Meet” issue of The Flying Lady. Acquired by the current owner in 2000, this very special Rolls-Royce has been carefully maintained, and it remains in excellent condition throughout. As presented, it is further accompanied by a copy of the title, which was issued to Scheibel upon his purchase from Seidenschwartz, as well as a bespoke, large-format album that features exceptional studio photography of the car. Crafted for a connoisseur with tastes ahead of his time, and as a treasured possession of knowledgeable enthusiasts ever since, Sir John Leigh’s groundbreaking Rolls-Royce is the deliciously sinister, razor-edged embodiment of silent speed. Chassis no. 42PY Engine no. KC25

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
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1936 Delahaye Type 135 Competition Court Teardrop Coupé by Carrosserie Figoni et Falaschi

A masterpiece of the “French curve” One of three surviving Figoni short-chassis coupes A singular example that is equipped with highly desirable integrated headlights Unique styling features and competition-specification chassis Retained by the factory upon completion A straight line will lead the eye, but it takes a curve to keep the eyes excited. Joseph Figoni defined the automobile as a moving curve; his brilliant mind and pen expressed it as a cohesively fluid shape, likes drops of dense liquid that were held in place around an engine, wheels, and two passengers, who were lucky to be in such company. The result was this car, the Delahaye Type 135 Competition Court Teardrop Coupé. It was the ultimate showcase for passionate, hot French curves: it was full, rounded, flowing, and gorgeous. Few artists before or since have been able to work such out-and-out sex appeal into metal. The ultimate embodiment of Figoni’s automotive sensuality is chassis number 47242, with Figoni et Falaschi body number 609; it is the last of six coupes built by the firm in 1936 on the short 2.65-meter Delahaye Type 135 chassis, and it is one of three to survive today. This chassis, known as the Competition Court, was described by Delahaye: Le Grand Livre as having “a cocktail of parts from the series three Type 135 chassis and the Specials,” as well as some specially made components. It was an “under the counter,” unavailable-to-mere-mortals homologation special—a pre-war 288 GTO for Lost Generation playboys who were friends of the house. This was the ultimate Type 135. Chassis number 47242 was delivered to Figoni bare of coachwork in early September 1936, according to an analysis of other cars bodied by the coachbuilder around this time. The chassis displayed numerous competition engineering features, including a rare, competition four-speed manual transmission, outside-mounted rear springs, a low-mounted engine, an oil cooler mounted below the radiator, and a racing-style fuel tank with dual fillers. Figoni et Falaschi’s coupe bodywork is unique from the other five examples, as it has a slightly different bonnet and features a single row of hood louvers. This is also the only known Type 135 with headlamps faired into the front fenders, which is a nod to the styling trend for the following year of 1937. This feature is not only highly desirable from a stylistic standpoint, as having the headlights positioned lower affords the driver a greater view of the road, but it also increases safety and competitiveness. Signature Figoni styling features include the central tail fin, twin rear windows, rear wheel “spats” matched by small vestigial fins on the rear fenders, and a pronounced molding that flows down the hood and the doors, to finish over the rear fender. Interestingly, although these cars were all special commissions, the Figoni book specifically notes that chassis number 47242 was delivered to the Delahaye factory. Given this special treatment, it is likely that the car was flaunted at early concours d’elegance events, or it was used as a demonstrator. The Delahaye was hidden away during World War II, and it resurfaced in the early 1950s. Whether by coincidence or due to its special status, chassis number 47242 came into the possession of Jean-Pierre Bernard, the sales manager for Delahaye and eventual founder and president of Club Delahaye, who recalled selling it in the Picardie area, near the city of Laon, around 1951 or 1952. It has been verified that chassis number 47242 was registered in the Picardie area on May 28, 1952, with plate number 633 AN 60, which corroborates with Bernard’s recollections. After a stay with an owner in the Burgundy area, the Delahaye was sold to the Southwest of France, and it was registered with Emile Landais, of Gouex in Vienne, near Poitiers, on May 17, 1955, with plate number 916 BE 86. On November 26, 1956, the Delahaye was registered in Paris, with plate number 3384 FN 75, under the name of Jean Escribe, a garage owner at 33 Raynouard Street Paris XVI. Most interestingly, the next owner, Daniel Roy Johnson, was a 40-year-old American from Minneapolis, Minnesota. He gave his address as Hotel Montalembert, on 3rd Montalembet Street Paris VII, and purchased the car on April 23, 1959. Mr. Johnson’s activities at that time are not known, but it is believed that the car stayed with him during his time in Europe, and it did not travel to the United States. After Johnson, 47242 crossed over the French-Italian border and became the proverbial sleeping beauty, where it lay dormant for the next 40 years, reportedly near Lake Garda in Italy. In the late 1990s, chassis 47242 reemerged from its slumber, and news of its survival was announced when it was purchased by Christoph Grohe, of Geneva, from its caretaker, a garage owner in Brescia. Still largely complete, its sunroof had been closed over, but the mechanism for it remained under the sheet metal, and the original chassis plate, showing 47242, was still properly affixed to the firewall. After finding a new owner here in the United States, the car was fully restored for concours display. Soon after its discovery, the car had been fitted with a post-war engine. As part of providing the Delahaye with the restoration it deserved, a correct, original, competition-specification engine was sourced and installed. The extremely rare engine reportedly came from within a few kilometers of the location where the car had lain for so many decades. Given this geographic proximity, its rarity, and the fact that the block has the correct date code for 1936, along with the special Solex carburetors, it is believed that this may, in fact, be the original unit. All other mechanicals were fully rebuilt, the wooden skeleton was repaired in keeping with the level of craftsmanship displayed by Figoni et Falaschi, and the body was carefully prepped and painted to display the incredibly lustrous black finish found today. The interior was similarly restored, and it includes a racing-type tachometer and other blue-faced gauges, which are mounted in the beautifully engine-turned dash. The feature of the interior is the rich, red leather upholstery, which is inset with ostrich and surrounded by ornately carved polished wood trim. The completed car debuted at the 2001 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it garnered a class award. It has since been carefully maintained and admired in a collection with other exceptional motor cars of this caliber. In May 2013, the car reappeared on the show field and was awarded with the coveted Best of Show awards at the Concours d’ Elegance of Texas and the Celebration of Automobiles at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway; both awards were amazingly achieved within one week of each other. Documentation for this car includes a copy of a 1998 letter from Claude Figoni, in which he authenticates the body and provides the original delivery information, as well as photos of the car in its original “as-found” condition, proving the authenticity of its racing features. Here is offered the best in 1930s competition engineering that has been transformed by Joseph Figoni’s sensitive eyes and artist hands into a voluptuous sculpture of leather, aluminum, and steel, with each element poised with the tense, shimmering excitement of a suspended teardrop. Chassis no. 47242 Body no. 609

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
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2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse 'Le Ciel Californien'

1,200 bhp, 7,993 cc quad turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 64-valve W-16 engine, seven-speed dual-clutch semi-automatic sequential transmission, front and rear double-wishbone suspension, and four-wheel carbon ceramic disc brakes with rear airbrake. Wheelbase: 106.7 in The one-off, special-edition “Le Ciel Californien” Unique color scheme, inspired by the 1928 Type 37A raced by Pierre Veyron The first Grand Sport Vitesse shown in North America Displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance and The Quail in 2012, as well as at the Qatar Motor Show in January 2013 Single ownership and under 3,000 miles from new Freshly serviced and still under factory warranty The world’s fastest production convertible THE ULTIMATE VEYRON A supercar in the making. Many would argue that when the first production Veyron rolled off the line at Bugatti’s purpose-built factory in Molsheim, France, it was the most widely anticipated automobile the 21st century has ever seen. The Veyron was the first new car to wear the Bugatti name following the brand’s acquisition by the Volkswagen Group, and it was widely acclaimed as the most incredible car the world had ever seen. Not only was it capable of reaching a top speed of over 248 mph and 0–60 in less than three seconds, it could carry both its driver and passenger in uncompromising luxury at the same time. The Veyron was the brainchild of Ferdinand Piëch, the chairman of the Volkswagen Group and a former engineer who worked on many automotive greats, such as the Porsche 917 and the Audi Quattro, and it was to be designed with utterly no compromises. Under Piëch’s leadership, Volkswagen purchased the rights to Bugatti in 1998 and then instructed its engineers to design a car capable of reaching a top speed of over 400 km/h and an output of over 1,000 horsepower. Many believed that such a request was impossible to fulfill, but such requests were typical of Piëch, who, in 2002, had pressured engineers to produce the Volkswagen Phaeton, a car that Piëch insisted must be capable of being driven all day at 300 km/h in 50 degrees Celsius, while also maintaining an interior temperature of 22.2 degrees Celsius. Nevertheless, the engineers ventured into uncharted territory when designing and engineering a road car capable of such speeds, but the resulting automobile proved to be nothing short of extraordinary. Many believed that since the Veyron was simply such an incredibly well engineered and designed car, its performance simply could not be topped. However, five years after the original Veyron went into production, Bugatti introduced the Super Sport, which replaced the Veyron as the fastest car ever made. The Super Sport, which now boasted 1,200 horsepower and 1,500 Newton meters of torque, was capable of accelerating from 0 to 62 mph in 2.5 seconds, arriving at 186 mph in 16.6 seconds, and achieving an electronically limited top speed of 257 mph. In order to add an additional 199 horsepower to the standard Veyron’s already incredible power output of 1,001, two additional fuel pumps, as well as four larger turbochargers and air coolers, were fitted, and engineers were able to reduce its exhaust back pressure, resulting in a car that could both inhale and exhale more easily. At the same time, reducing the exhaust back pressure also helped to improve the fuel economy over the standard Veyron. Additionally, the car benefitted from improved aerodynamics, which helped to increase its stability at high speeds and increase airflow to the engine and brakes. As the convertible Grand Sport followed the original Veyron, it was only natural for the Bugatti to introduce a topless version of the Veyron Super Sport: the Grand Sport Vitesse. This car was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show in March 2012, and it offered customers the opportunity to experience the speed and performance of the Super Sport in a whole new way. Performance remained remarkably similar to the Super Sport, as it was capable of achieving 0–60 mph in 2.6 seconds and a top speed of 255 mph, making it the fastest production roadster ever built. Bugatti’s engineers also took the time to strengthen the chassis in order to reduce body roll during hard acceleration, deceleration, and cornering, ensuring that the car’s performance would not be compromised due to its lack of a fixed roof. “LE CIEL CALIFORNIEN” The 2013 Grand Sport Vitesse presented here was not immediately delivered to its first and only owner after it was built, as it was retained by Bugatti themselves for promotional purposes, more specifically to be the first Grand Sport Vitesse officially shown in the United States. Looking to show customers that they are cognizant of their past, while also simultaneously looking towards the future, the company chose to model the car’s color scheme off of a particular grand-prix-winning 1928 Type 37A that was raced by Pierre Veyron and is currently owned by car collector and comedian Jay Leno, and as a result, the car was finished in a two-tone exterior scheme of white over light blue. For the interior, Cognac leather was chosen to be used in conjunction with contrasting Light Blue Sport stitching and blue carbon fiber trim. The Vitesse-specific polished-aluminum wheels were also finished in a matching light blue, further accentuating the car’s unique color scheme. Following its completion, its first destination from the factory in Molsheim was the Monterey Peninsula, where it was displayed by Bugatti during festivities surrounding the 2012 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Also of interest, the car’s data tag lists its location of delivery as “Pebble Beach, 2012,” to commemorate the special occasion. It undoubtedly gained the most attention when it was displayed by Bugatti alongside the Type 37A from which it gained its inspiration at The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering. Later that week, the car also appeared at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance on the concept lawn, just a stone’s throw away from several of its ancestors. At this time, the owner negotiated with Bugatti to have it named after the California sky, and it was subsequently fitted with bespoke “Le Ciel Californien” script on the doors. The Vitesse then returned to its native France, where it was displayed once more, at the Volkswagen Group Night during the Paris Motor Show on September 26th. Afterwards, this Grand Sport Vitesse was delivered to its first and only owner, who resides in sunny California and had purchased the car before it was unveiled at Pebble Beach. As he is an enthusiast fond of fine craftsmanship and brilliant engineering, it’s no wonder that an automobile such as this Grand Sport Vitesse quickly earned pride of place in his garage. Bugatti was still very proud of the car, and they decided to show it once more at the Qatar Motor Show in January 2013, where it garnered just as much interest as it had at Pebble Beach and Paris. Eager to test the performance capabilities of his new Vitesse, the owner took the car on a road rally to Sun Valley, Idaho, in September 2013. Owners were allowed to test the top speed of their cars, and this very car reached a top speed of 230.6 mph, resulting in a new event record that bested the previous one by 0.2 mph, which was set by Bugatti’s factory driver and former two-time 24 Hours of Le Mans class-winner Butch Leitzinger, who previously drove another Grand Sport Vitesse on the same course. This was a speed the owner was no doubt comfortable with, as he had been a pilot in the Finnish Air Force earlier in his life. Recently, the car received a full service from Bugatti of San Diego, to ensure that it is fully prepared for road use by its next owner. Additionally, it is important to note that this car comes with an extended factory warranty that was purchased by the original owner upon its delivery, which will remain in effect until May 30, 2019. The current price for such a warrantee costs approximately $255,000. The Veyron is simply a technological tour de force; thus, it has become the poster child for 21st century supercars. Bugatti set the bar for all other supercar manufacturers with the original Veyron, and they improved upon what many thought to be the pinnacle of automotive engineering with the Super Sport and Grand Sport Vitesse. This particular Grand Sport Vitesse is undoubtedly one of the most recognizable modern Bugattis, as it was premiered at Pebble Beach to critical acclaim. “Le Ciel Californien” comes from single enthusiast ownership and has only accumulated less than 3,000 miles from new, and it would undoubtedly be the centerpiece of any collection of modern supercars, as it was for its first and only custodian. It is only fitting that it should be offered on the Monterey Peninsula, just a few miles away from where it was first unveiled to the public and under “the California sky.” Chassis no. VF9SV2C24DM795020

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
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1971 Plymouth Hemi 'Cuda Convertible

A Genuine Example of One of the Eleven 1971 Hemi ‘Cuda Convertibles 500+hp, 425hp rated, 426 cu. in. vee eight-cylinder engine, dual four-barrel carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, Hurst pistol grip shifter, independent front suspension with torsion bars, live axle rear suspension with semi-elliptical leaf springs, front disc, rear drum power assisted hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 108" Three times Chrysler Corporation has relied upon the Hemi to transform its products and image from dull to sparkling, and three times the Hemi has delivered. In an American car market that has been characterized by glitz, fins and bulk, the technical sophistication of Chrysler’s hemispherical combustion chamber V8 engine has been a refreshing demonstration of the appeal of elegant, thoughtful engineering. In the late 60’s and early 70’s it also acquired a bad boy image of politically incorrect power and performance, establishing a mythical presence that has made the Hemi a legend. Hemi History During development work on World War II aircraft engines, Chrysler’s engineers had seen firsthand the potential for hemispherical combustion chamber engines. In addition to the thermal efficiency of the hemi chamber’s low surface area and its low-restriction cross-flow porting, the angle between the valves ideally disposed the ports for efficient breathing in a vee-layout engine. Chrysler was the ideal company to pursue the hemispherical combustion chamber V8. It had a longstanding tradition of investigating, developing and perfecting advanced engineering ideas. Unlike its major competitors, Chrysler had neither overhead valve nor vee-configuration engine history, and thus no preconceived notions of how it should be done. Its engine designers could – and did – explore every conceivable engine idea. Their research showed that the hemispherical combustion chamber not only gave better performance than a comparable wedge-chamber head but also tolerated appreciably higher compression ratios. The hemispherical head V8 was introduced in the Chrysler line in 1951. With 331 cubic inches displacement in a short stroke oversquare design, Chrysler’s FirePower V8 delivered 180 horsepower at 4,000 rpm and 312 lb-ft torque at 2,000 rpm. The performance potential of the Hemi was quickly recognized, most famously with the Chrysler C300 and its successors, which set the pace both on the highway and on NASCAR’s speedways. By 1958, however, manufacturing economics swung the pendulum in favor of the wedge-chamber V8s. The Hemi was phased out in 1959 … but not for long. In the early 60s the 413 and 426 Wedge engines were dominant in drag racing but lacked the continuous high rpm performance needed on NASCAR’s speedways. Dodge and Plymouth were being trounced, a situation that couldn’t be allowed to stand. Faced with a need to develop a high performance, free-breathing engine quickly, Chrysler’s engineers turned to the solution they already knew worked, the Hemi. They stuck with the overall dimensions of the Raised Block 426 Wedge so existing fixturing and machining setups could be employed and maintained the original Hemi’s dual rocker shafts and 58° valve included angle. To adapt the Hemi head to the Raised Block engine, the ingenious Chrysler engineers rotated the combustion chamber toward the engine’s centerline about 8 1/2°. Completed and delivered to the track just days before the 1964 Daytona 500’s green flag, the 426 Hemis proved to be invincible, sweeping the top three places in NASCAR’s most important race. Production of the second generation Hemi ended after the 1971 model year as emission restrictions and insurance surcharges gave horsepower, which had never been entirely socially acceptable, a distinctly antisocial taint. Chrysler would twice more resurrect the Hemi, however, first as a crate engine program for hot rodders and later as a third generation production engine that brought DaimlerChrysler back to the forefront of performance at the beginning of the 21st century. Like some other forms of antisocial behavior, horsepower has proven to be addictive. The Hemi ‘Cuda Of all the Street Hemis built, the most famous, attractive and desirable are the 1970-1971 E-body Plymouth ‘Cudas, combining the visceral delight of the Hemi’s power and torque with the ‘Cuda’s lightweight, streamlined and refined 2+2 platform. The first Barracuda was introduced in 1964 and in the late 60’s Chrysler engineering and Hurst performance shoehorned Race Hemi engines into the Barracuda’s engine compartment for NHRA drag racing. Seventy-five were built, sold and successfully campaigned around the country. When the Barracuda was redesigned for the 1970 model year the engine compartment was made large enough for the legendary 425 horsepower 426 cubic inch Street Hemi. The Plymouth Barracuda was the cleanest, most refined and elegant of all the pony car designs. Distinguished by its wide grille, long, flat hood, short rear deck and ominously raised rear fenders – deliberately shaped like the haunches of an animal crouching before a leap – the appearance of the ‘Cuda left no doubt that this was a serious performance car. Hemi-powered ‘Cudas are surpassingly rare. Built for only two years, 1970 and 1971, their low production numbers reflect the undeniable fact that the combination of the ‘Cuda platform and the Street Hemi engine was irrationally fast. It also was expensive: $871.45 in 1970 and $883.90 in 1971, a prohibitive 70% more than the 390 horsepower 440 Six Barrel. A Hemi ‘Cuda was not for the faint of heart nor for the cautious of pocketbook. Buying one took serious commitment, backed up by an ample budget. In 1971 there were only 119 souls brave and prosperous enough to make the commitment to check off E74, the Street Hemi’s order code, on the ‘Cuda order form. • 108 of them ordered hardtops • Only eleven stepped up for the top-of-the-line ‘Cuda convertible powered by the 426 cubic inch, 425 horsepower dual quad Street Hemi. • Only three of those were confident enough of their driving skills to opt for the Hurst pistol grip shifted four-speed manual transmission. • Only two of those were delivered in the U.S. • Both U.S.-delivered ’71 Hemi ‘Cuda convertibles were B5 Blue with matching interiors. That’s only three, in all the world, that combined the Street Hemi engine with the ‘Cuda convertible body and 4-speed transmission in 1971. One of them is the car offered here, BS27R1B269588, the only one with white soft top and elastomeric front bumper cover. The “Mountain Mopar” Hemi ‘Cuda Convertible Built in February of 1971, this Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda convertible’s first owner, Ronald Ambach, lived in St. Louis, Missouri. He owned it only until the fall, accumulating the car’s only street miles, before selling it to its next owner, Nick Masciarelli, in Ohio. He decided to take the Hemi ‘Cuda Stock Eliminator drag racing and turned to renowned Detroit-area engine builder Tom Tignanelli for a hot Hemi V8. The new owner was in a hurry, and the quickest way to meet his request was to swap the original engine for a fresh race-prepared Tignanelli Hemi. In May of 1973, the Hemi ‘Cuda convertible was sold to John Book and partner John Oliverio in West Virginia who raced it in East Coast and Mid-Atlantic events during 1973 and 1974. Its dramatic appearance, complete with gold-leaf “Mountain Mopar” identification, is documented in several period photos in the car’s documentation file. Fortunately for today’s collectors, the “Mountain Mopar” Hemi ‘Cuda convertible was retired after 1974 and stored in a climate-controlled building in West Virginia. In 1989 it was sold to the Painter brothers. Two years later it was acquired by Milt Robson in Atlanta, Georgia, still in its as-raced condition. Robson commenced a comprehensive restoration using original or new-old-stock parts to its original, as-delivered condition in his shops, which was completed in the early 90’s. Stored inside for virtually its entire life, 269588 was never subjected to the vicissitudes of the elements which afflicted most of its siblings; its original sheet metal and interior are carefully restored and retained. The engine was rebuilt around a correct 1/19/1970 date-coded Chrysler NOS block. In addition to the 426/425 horsepower dual quad Street Hemi and pistol grip Hurst shifted four-speed manual transmission, this unique 1971 Hemi ‘Cuda convertible is equipped with power steering, power brakes, Dana Super Track Pack and AM-FM radio. Importantly, it is the only ’71 Hemi ‘Cuda convertible known to have been delivered with the body-colored Elastomeric front bumper cover. Its original configuration is verified by two separate original build sheets; the ownership history is documented with a continuous sequence of titles. It has been personally viewed by Galen Govier and authenticated by him as one of the seven US-delivered ’71 Hemi ‘Cuda convertibles which have been included in the Chrysler Registry. Finished in B5 Blue inside and out with a white vinyl top, it has been restored to better than showroom condition. Particular attention has been paid to the accuracy of its components and finishes and to the preservation of as much as possible of its almost unbelievable originality, including the carefully preserved original interior. It has been shown only in local shows around Atlanta in the mid 90s, was featured a decade ago in a May 1995 Car Collector magazine article by Dennis Adler and has appeared in several books, copies of which come with the car. Putting a free-breathing, high-rpm engine like the 426 Hemi in a lithe, frisky chassis like the ‘Cuda was exactly what the forces of political correctness inveighed against in the early 70s. In 1972 the Hemi was gone for the second time, its visceral appeal buried in a cascade of social responsibility, “net” horsepower and Highway Fuel Economy ratings. There is nothing politically correct, nothing socially responsible about a Hemi ‘Cuda. The 1971 Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda convertible is wretched excess in a nearly unimaginably limited production package. This is absolutely the most desirable, rare and handsome of all the American Muscle and Pony Cars. Combining the brute power and torque of the legendary dual quad Street Hemi engine with the sleek, aggressive lines of the ‘Cuda convertible, it is the ultimate combination of personal car style and Muscle Car performance, a singular example and the quintessential muscle car of all time. Chassis no. BS27R1B269588

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-01-19
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1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Coupé Aerodinamico by Pininfarina

340 hp, 3967 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 46 DCF carburettors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with double wishbones and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,420 mm (94.5 in.) From the collection of Mr Skip Barber The 12th of 36 built for the factory’s best clients Matching-numbers SWB model with covered headlights Platinum Award winner at the 2012 Cavallino Classic Ferrari Classiche certified Documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini As the echoes of World War II austerity faded in Europe, it occurred to Enzo Ferrari that his wealthiest clients were ready for a superfast road going gran turismo. The result was the 410 Superamerica, which took the big four-litre Lampredi V-12, increased its displacement to 4.9 litres, and wrapped it in a series of elegant coupé and cabriolet bodies by the finest Italian coachbuilders. Truly a bespoke offering, each car was individually tailored to its owner’s requests, blisteringly fast, and sophisticated enough to transport a royal. It was Ferrari’s gift to his best customers: a car that truly proved one had arrived in the hard-to-breach hierarchy of Maranello. Like all Ferraris, the Superamerica enjoyed gradual evolution. By 1959, with the Lampredi V-12 ageing, a new model was introduced with a four-litre version of the Colombo V-12 that powered the 250 Series. Five inches shorter and much lighter than the Lampredi unit, the engine was fitted into the 400 Superamerica, which featured disc brakes, a first on a Ferrari street car, and was offered in two wheelbase lengths. Once more, the Superamerica was exclusive, driven by Enzo himself, as well as by the Aga Khan, Gianni Agnelli, minor European royalty, and major Hollywood stars. No doubt, they were all appropriately impressed by the top speed of 160 mph and its acceleration from 0–100 mph in 18 seconds, figures that remain impressive in an era of variable valve timing and sophisticated direct fuel injection. Car & Driver tested the prototype 400 Superamerica in April 1963, reporting that it was “the best example extant of the true GT car, in the traditional, non-Detroit, non-FIA manner, a closed two-seater, slightly hysterical, and designed expressly for long-distance, high-speed travel…owning one is, or should be, the goal of every automotive enthusiast anywhere”. The car offered here, 3559SA, was built to the most desirable specification, with covered headlights on the short-wheelbase chassis, and was finished in Blu Sera Italver with Blu Connolly leather interior. Originally delivered to Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, Connecticut in 1962, it was supplied new to C.O. Marshall, of Toledo, Ohio, in whose hands it was shown at the 5th annual Ferrari Club of America show in Greenwich in March 1968, winning the Judge’s Choice Award. Marshall installed a new exhaust system in 1968 and then offered 3559SA for sale, with its engine overhauled and showing only 16,000 miles. Four years later, Michael Kerr, of Carrollton, Texas, acquired the car, which by that point had a sunroof installed. He maintained the Ferrari until 1989, at which point it was passed to Arnold and Werner Meier, of Meilen, Switzerland, on the Lake of Zurich. The Meiers would keep 3559SA for a full decade, remedying various items on the car for factory correctness and using it in the manner for which it was intended, whilst also maintaining it properly. In 1993, 3559SA was completely restored by Edi Wyss Engineering, of Zurich, which repainted it the original Blu Sera, removed the sunroof, and restored the roof; the naturale leather interior that was already installed still remained. The car was shown at the 32nd annual Ferrari Club of America meeting at the Hyatt Hotel in Monterey, California, in August 1994, followed by an appearance in the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. In 1997, it was displayed at the 8th annual Concours Automobiles Classiques et Louis Vuitton at Parc de Bagatelle in Paris, rewarded with a win in Class VIII, as pictured in issue number 70 of Automobiles Classiques. Encouraged by this success, Meier drove his Ferrari to the 50th anniversary meeting in Modena and Rome, as seen in the 1997 Ferrari Yearbook. In 2002, 3559SA was shown at the Grand Prix of Montreux. Meier finally parted with his beloved Superamerica in April 2003, and it was displayed by a subsequent owner at the Cavallino Classic at The Breakers in Florida in 2005, before coming into the ownership of its present caretaker, legendary racing driver Skip Barber. Whilst the Ferrari was in fine condition as-purchased, Mr Barber had extensive work performed by noted Prancing Horse specialist Greg Jones, of Florida, a list of which is available for inspection, with the goal of the car being recognized as a Platinum Award-winner at the Cavallino Classic. It was returned to The Breakers in 2012, and it was awarded that sought-after prize in Class 10, Speciale/SF/SA. Having completed a rigorous approval process, the 400 Superamerica has been awarded Classiche certification by the Ferrari factory, the ultimate stamp of approval on a Ferrari’s authenticity and excellence. With the ride-ranging travels and religious maintenance practiced by its loving owners, past and present, this covered-headlight SWB 400 Superamerica stands as among the bluest of the blue-chip Ferraris, and it ranks among the finest examples of its type that RM has ever had the pleasure of offering. Chassis no. 3559SA Engine no. 3559SA

  • CANCanada
  • 2013-05-25
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1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

352 hp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber 40 DCN17 carburettors, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension by coil springs and wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm One of 121 examples built Comprehensive restoration completed in 1995; highly original example Approximately 20,314 original miles Three recorded owners over the last 40 years Offered with a toolkit Documented history by marque historian Marcel Massini At the Paris Motor Show in October 1968, Ferrari introduced a replacement for the 275 GTB/4. Clothed in Pininfarina-penned berlinetta coachwork that was a dramatic departure from classic Ferrari design language, the new model featured a pointed shark nose with an impossibly long bonnet. Under the hood the car was powered by a further update of the long-running Colombo V-12, now increased to 4.4 litres and featuring dual-overhead cam valve actuation. Originally intended as a stopgap while a planned rear-engine flat-12 road car continued development, the new 365 GTB/4 proved to be more popular than Ferrari might have ever dreamed. A year later at the Frankfurt Motor Show, Maranello presented an open version of the so-called Daytona, featuring a retractable soft top. Without the fastback roofline that endowed the berlinetta with such character, the Daytona Spider substantially re-imagined Pininfarina’s design, making it perhaps even more aesthetically dynamic than the original thanks to its unfettered beltlines. The Spider was also produced in a far smaller quantity, with just 121 examples built until the model was discontinued in 1973. The Daytona Spider has evolved into one of Maranello’s most celebrated models, forever remembered as the company’s final vintage grand touring spider. According to the research of Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, this beautiful Daytona Spider is the 88th car of the 121 examples built. Desirably equipped by the factory with air conditioning, radio, and instruments in miles, the U.S.-specification 365 GTB/4 was finished in Rosso Chiaro and trimmed with an interior of Nero leather. It should be noted that the car continues to authentically wear the same beautiful colour scheme today. Also, benefiting from a short chain of three long-term caretakers since 1976, as well as an awarded rotisserie restoration, this Daytona spider is surely among the finest examples of the rare open Ferrari. Chassis number 16801 was dispatched in February 1973 to famed Ferrari importer Chinetti-Garthwaite and subsequently distributed to William Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors in Reno, Nevada. While initial purchase information is currently unknown, by July 1976 the car had been acquired by Jeffrey Weiss of Miami, Florida, and he accrued approximately 15,000 miles over 11 years of modest use. In July 1987, Mr Weiss sold the Daytona to enthusiast Eric Eichler of Malvern, Pennsylvania, and the Spider was soon treated to some much-needed attention with a full restoration to original factory specifications and colours. While the respected Richard Mullin, then of Karosserie in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, was retained to address all coachwork and paint issues, Charles Pierson of nearby Kimberton conducted a comprehensive mechanical refurbishment. Among other measures, this work included rebuilding the engine, transaxle, suspension, and brakes, as well as a complete electrical overhaul. Invoices demonstrate that Mr Pierson continued servicing the Ferrari as needed through a successful exhibition campaign during the mid-1990s. In May 1994, the car was presented at the 10th Annual Ferrari Concours in Reading, Pennsylvania, winning its class, while a year later at the FCA’s 31st Annual National Meeting at Mid-Ohio, the Daytona won a Gold award, reportedly losing to the winner by a mere 1.5 points. The Spider was also exhibited once again at the FCA Concours at Reading, Pennsylvania, in May 1996. In the early 2000s, the sensationally restored Daytona was purchased by the next owner and imported into Switzerland. In order to legally drive the car in Europe, the owner commissioned the removal of the American-specification side marker lights, and the car has since accrued approximately 1,500 miles. Noting the Daytona’s tremendous condition and overall originality, including the matching-numbers engine, the owner inquired with the manufacturer with interest in sourcing a Ferrari Classiche Red Book. The Classiche department informed him that while chassis number 16801 was authentic in nearly every respect, the removal of the side marker lights would prevent them from issuing a Red Book. For the future owner that might wish to source this ultimate form of factory endorsement, a reconfiguration of the side markers to original specifications should be the only obstacle to Classiche certification. Now offered for the first time in almost 15 years, this breathtaking Daytona Spider currently displays approximately 20,314 original miles, and it features a pristine interior and top, with the namesake Daytona seats even including the original factory inserts. Also accompanied by a full toolkit, this exceptionally rare Ferrari is documented with prior titles, former owners correspondence, and multiple invoices from the 1990s restoration. One of the finest open Daytonas to be encountered, it may be enjoyed on European byways or presented with confidence at finer concours d’elegance and Ferrari Owners Club events. Moteur V12, 4 390 cm3, 352 ch, 2 ACT par banc, six carburateurs Weber 40 DCN17, transmission manuelle cinq rapports, boîte-pont, suspension avant et arrière indépendante avec triangles et ressorts hélicoïdaux, freins à disque à commande hydraulique sur les quatre roues. Empattement 2 400 mm. • Un des 121 exemplaires produits • Restauration complète en 1995 ; exemplaire extrêmement original • Environ 20 314 miles [32 692 km] d'origine • Trois propriétaires enregistrés depuis 40 ans • Vendue avec ses outils • Historique documenté par l'historien Marcel Massini Au Salon de Paris 1968, Ferrari présentait la remplaçante de la 275 GTB/4. Habillée d'une carrosserie berlinette signée Pininfarina et qui tranchait avec le style traditionnel de la marque, la nouvelle voiture affichait un avant effilé terminant un immense capot. La carrosserie dissimulait une ultime évolution du V12 de la marque, initialement conçu par Colombo, cette fois dans une cylindrée 4,4 litres et comportant deux ACT par banc. Conçue comme modèle intermédiaire en attendant la version à moteur 12-cylindres à plat en position centrale, la nouvelle 365 GTB/4 a finalement remporté un succès dépassant largement les espérances de Ferrari. Un an plus tard, au Salon de Francfort, Maranello présentait une version ouverte de celle que l'on appelait désormais Daytona, avec capote repliable. Dépourvue de la ligne arrière fastback qui donnait tout son caractère à la berlinette, la Daytona Spider était retravaillée par Pininfarina qui parvenait à lui donner une forme presque plus esthétiquement dynamique que la version fermée, grâce à sa ceinture de caisse d'une grande pureté. Le Spider était aussi produit en quantité beaucoup plus limitée, seuls 121 exemplaires sortant des ateliers avant l'arrêt du modèle en 1973. La Daytona Spider a fini par devenir un des modèles les plus recherchés de la marque de Maranello, restant dans les mémoires comme le dernier Spider grand tourisme classique. Selon les recherches de l'historien Ferrari Marcel Massini, cette magnifique Daytona Spider est la 88e des 121 exemplaires produits. Équipée d'origine d'un système d'air conditionné, d'une radio et d'un compteur gradué en miles, cette 365 GTB/4 aux spécifications américaines a reçu une teinte "Rosso Chiaro" et une sellerie en cuir "Nero". Il est important de noter que cette voiture porte encore aujourd'hui ce thème de couleurs authentiques. Par ailleurs, n'ayant connu que trois propriétaires depuis 1976, et ayant bénéficié d'une restauration complète, cette Daytona fait certainement partie des plus beaux exemplaires de cette Ferrari décapotable. Portant le n° de châssis 16801, elle était livrée en février 1973 au célèbre importateur Ferrari Chinetti-Garthwaite, puis à Modern Classic Motors, l'établissement de William Harrah, à Reno. Alors que la première appartenance de la voiture n'est pas connue, en juillet 1976 la voiture était entre les mains de Jeffrey Weiss, de Miami (Floride), qui parcourait 15 000 miles [24 140 km] en 11 ans d'utilisation parcimonieuse. En juillet 1987, M. Weiss cédait la Daytona au passionné Eric Eichler, de Malvern (Pennsylvanie), et elle bénéficiait alors d'une remise en état nécessaire et complète en respectant ses spécifications et teintes d'origine. Alors que Richard Mullin, qui dirigeait alors Karosserie in King of Prussia (Pennsylvanie), était choisi pour prendre en charge toute les problèmes de carrosserie et peinture, c'est Charles Pierson, de Kimberton, qui se voyait confier la mission d'une remise en état mécanique. Ces travaux concernaient notamment une restauration du moteur, de la boîte-pont, de la suspension et des freins, en plus d'une remise en état complète du système électrique. Les factures montrent que M. Pierson a continué à entretenir la Ferrari tout au long des années 1990 où elle a pris part à plusieurs évènements. En mai 1994, elle apparaissait au dixième Concours Ferrari annuel à Reading (Pennsylvanie) où elle remportait sa catégorie et, un an plus tard, elle participait au 31e Annual National Meeting du Ferrari Club of America à Mid-Ohio où elle se voyait décerner une Gold Award, ne manquant semble-t-il la première place que d'un point et demi derrière le vainqueur. Le Spider était à nouveau exposé au Concours du FCA à Reading, en mai 1996. Au début des années 2000, la Daytona magnifiquement restaurée était achetée par son propriétaire suivant et importée en Suisse. De façon à pouvoir circuler en Europe en toute légalité, il faisait enlever les feux de position latéraux aux spécifications américaines et, depuis, la voiture a parcouru quelque 2 400 km. Considérant l'état superbe de la Daytona et son authenticité, avec notamment la présence de son moteur d'origine, le propriétaire s'est informé auprès du constructeur de la possibilité d'obtenir un Ferrari Classiche Red Book. Le département Classiche lui a alors répondu que, bien que 16801 soit parfaitement authentique, l'absence des feux de position latéraux l'empêcherait d'obtenir le précieux document. Si le futur propriétaire souhaite bénéficier de cette ultime reconnaissance du constructeur, une reconfiguration des feux de position aux spécifications d'origine devrait constituer la seule condition permettant d'obtenir une certification Ferrari Classiche. Proposée à la vente pour la première fois depuis 15 ans, cette magnifique Daytona Spider affiche actuellement quelque 20 314 miles [32 692 km] d'origine. Elle offre un intérieur et une capote immaculés, les sièges typiques de la Daytona comportant même les inserts d'origine. Cette Ferrari exceptionnellement rare est accompagnée d'une trousse à outils complète, de ses documents de circulation précédents, de la correspondance avec les anciens propriétaires et de multiples factures concernant la restauration des années 1990. S'agissant d'une des plus belles Daytona Spider que l'on puisse croiser, elle peut être utilisée avec bonheur sur les petites routes d'Europe ou présentée en toute confiance aux concours d'élégance les plus réputés, ainsi qu'aux rassemblements de clubs Ferrari. Addendum Contrary to the printed catalogue this lot is sold on Bill of Sale only. Chassis no. 16801 Engine no. B 2630

  • FRAFrance
  • 2017-02-08
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1995 Porsche 911 GT2

Type 993. 430 bhp, 3,600 cc SOHC air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin turbochargers and Bosch Motronic M 5.2 management, six-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with McPherson struts, Bilstein coil-over dampers, and an adjustable anti-roll bar; independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms, Bilstein coil-over dampers, and an adjustable anti-roll bar; and four-wheel cross-drilled ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,272 mm Offered from a private collection of exceptional Porsches Acquired new by the current owner; 12,730 kilometres One of about 57 road-going 993 GT2s Unmodified with its original drivetrain Porsche Certificate of Authenticity When Porsche introduced the new 993 for 1995, it was to be the last of the great air-cooled 911s. The new coupé retained only the roof and front deck lid from the preceding 964 model. New features included the redesigned bodywork, poly-ellipsoid low-beam and variable focus high-beam headlights, and a six-speed transmission. A new multi-link rear suspension carried upper and lower A-arms with transverse links. Both the front and rear sub-frames were now so strong that if they were bent in a crash they had to be replaced, as they could not be straightened. There were new wheels as well, and the brake discs and pads were enlarged for greater stopping power. Porsche’s success with the four-wheel drive 961, along with Audi’s rally wins with the Quattro and the later track success of the Nissan Skyline, led to all-wheel-drive being banned by most sanctioning bodies by the mid-1990s. This presented a problem for Porsche, whose Turbo was driven by all four wheels; the solution was the GT2, which was to be rear-wheel-drive. A side benefit turned out to be significant weight savings, and the GT2 was instantly competitive. Examples include Dave Maraj, of Champion Porsche in Pompano Beach, Florida, who Porsche proved to be a constant threat in IMSA in the hands of Hans Stuck Jr., Derek Bell, Thierry Boutsen, and Bill Adam. The car finished 2nd in class at the 1995 Sebring 12 Hours, 2nd again at Watkins Glen, won its class at the 1996 Sebring 12 Hours, and placed 2nd at 1997 Daytona 24 Hours. A side effect of all this competition success was that Porsche had to build a number of street GT2s in order to homologate the model for racing. At about 430 horsepower, the GT2s ran higher boost than the standard Turbo model and developed almost as much horsepower as their racing counterparts. They shared cutaway fenders with the Carrera RS and had removable and replaceable bolt-on flares in order to fit wider wheels for racing and also for quick replacement in the event of any race-related damage. The GT, as it was initially dubbed, is highly prized by Porsche collectors. This exceptional GT2 was purchased new by the current owner, an avid collector of Porsche’s greatest limited-production modern supercars. Ordered in October 1994, this car was acquired new in February the following year from Porsche Zentrum Ludwigsburg in Germany. Copies of the original purchase order from Porsche are included on file. Only 194 GT2s were built over three years, of which approximately 57 were completed to road-going specification. This stunning example was finished in eye-catching Riviera Blue with its interior trimmed in black carpeting with subtle black and grey leather seats. The seat backs, seat belts, door pulls, and “GT” stitching are in matching blue. Having been driven 12,730 kilometres at the time of cataloguing, the race-inspired GT2 presents in exceptional condition throughout, with only minor signs of being enjoyed by its enthusiast owner. The engine bay, including the original engine, is exceptionally clean, as is the front storage compartment. The Porsche also includes its original owners’ manuals and service booklet, in their original leather pouch, which note the car’s regular and fastidious maintenance by Porsche Zentrum Flughafen Stuttgart. This original and unmodified Porsche GT2 is offered in excellent condition and is accompanied by detailed records of its Porsche dealer service history. As road-going GT2s seldom come to market, of which many were used competitively, the opportunity to acquire an unmolested low-mileage and single-owner example is one not to be missed by the discerning Porsche collector. Chassis no. WP0ZZZ99ZTS392064 Engine no. 61T00978 Gearbox no. 2002003

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2016-09-07
Hammer price
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1973 Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

352 hp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber 40 DCN17 carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension by coil springs and wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. The 91st of only 121 original Daytona Spiders built An original U.S.-delivery car; factory air conditioning and Borrani wire wheels Equipped with its numbers-matching original engine Offered from 15 years in a prominent private collection A superb example with clean history from new ALONG CAME A SPIDER To many enthusiasts, the only way that Ferrari could improve upon its incredible 365 GTB/4 Daytona was to produce an open version. Such a model was intended from early on, and a prototype version was displayed at the 1969 Frankfurt Motor Show. It attracted considerable press and public attention, as it managed to preserve the character and performance of the berlinetta while adding the thrill of open-air motoring. Production examples of the Spider began to be released in 1971 and were sold through early 1974. Automotive journalist Henry Rasmussen, in his book, The Survivors: Ferraris for the Road, memorably described the model as “breathtaking beautiful from any angle, the flowing simplicity of the enormous hood, the impossible rake of the windshield, the surprise angle of the cut-off rear—it all worked together as a coordinated whole.” The Spider was considerably rarer than the berlinetta; while 1,406 closed Daytonas were made, production of the Spider was limited to only 121 examples. These were the final front-engined convertible Ferraris produced until the introduction of the 550 Barchetta, some 30 years later. While numerous berlinettas have been “cut” since, it is these genuine Spiders that are desirable and sought after by collectors, and which can instantly transform a mere Ferrari collection into one of the world’s finest. They are traded publically only a few times every year and are always the subject of fierce competition when they do. Simply put, they are among the most universally loved of modern Ferrari GTs. CHASSIS NUMBER 16847 Chassis number 16847, offered here, is an original Daytona Spider, the 91st of the 121 built. Originally finished in Argento over a Nero interior and equipped for the United States market with factory Borletti air conditioning, it was originally delivered to William Harrah’s famous distributor Modern Classic Motors of Reno, Nevada. Subsequently, it was sent to Ron Tonkin Gran Turismo in Portland, Oregon, and was sold by the Tonkin dealership to original owner Ian Chiles on 15 January 1974. Mr. Chiles is believed to have been a member of the prominent local family that owned the Fred Meyer chain of supermarkets. The car was traded back to Ron Tonkin Gran Turismo in 1975 and was subsequently sold to a new owner in California. It would remain in the Western United States for the next 15 years. Records note its ownership in 1978 by Jerry Schwarz of Granada Hills, California; in 1979 by Ralph Tingle of Santa Fe, New Mexico; and in 1986 by Sid Ferris, back in its original hometown of Portland. In 1990, the Daytona was acquired by two enthusiasts in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and would remain there for several years. By this time, the car had been refinished in its present color scheme, Rosso Corsa with tan interior and a black top, the most classic livery for the model. Following a brief stint in Florida, it returned to Pittsburgh and was sold to Pittsburgh Penguins player Tom Borasso. In 1999, the car was shown at the Cavallino Classic and driven in the accompanying Tour di Palm Beach. Thereafter, it was advertised in the Ferrari Market Letter by Ron Spangler, describing it as a “very original car, well sorted recently by Shelton.” That advertisement led to its acquisition soon thereafter by the current owner, a renowned sports car connoisseur on the East Coast, in whose fabulous collection it has since resided alongside other rare and important Ferraris from the company’s broad history. The Spider has been well-looked-after in the present 15-year ownership. It was recently subjected to two years of conscientious restoration work, taking care to preserve the car’s original components, while reviewing all mechanical systems for operational quality. During this time, the body was refinished with a bare-metal repaint, completely new brightwork, and a new interior and trunk lining. The car is still equipped with the original air conditioning system, a most desirable feature, plus beautiful Borrani chrome wire wheels. In addition, it is offered with the original tool roll, incorporating a combination of original and reproduction tools. Only 121 Daytona Spiders were produced, and the majority of them were used hard and fast, as their manufacturer had intended. It is rare to find one, and rarer still to find one with a clean, “no stories,” “no drama” history that has left it today much as it was delivered when new. This is one such fine example, offered from a good home where it has enjoyed the best of long-term care. Chassis no. 16847 Engine no. B2620 Body no. 1259

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1966 Ferrari 275 GTS by Pininfarina

260 bhp, 3,286 cc DOHC V-12 engine with three Weber twin-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of the all-time road going Ferraris; one of 200 built Fresh restoration by Ferrari specialists Patrick Ottis and Brian Hoyt Long-term German and American history Wonderful colors and presentation The 275 GTS premiered alongside the 275 GTB at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, and to the casual onlooker, these coupe siblings looked like completely different automobiles. Yet, that couldn’t be farther from the truth. Both cars looked wholly different, but underneath they bore similar 3.3-liter Colombo V-12s, chassis, and suspensions. This new spider, the replacement for the 250 GT Series II Cabriolet, was clearly intended for the American market, particularly in warmer climates, where the attractiveness and marketability of a high-performance grand touring cabriolet had long been established. While the 275 GTS and GTB share the same base nomenclature and underpinnings, the differences are mostly cosmetic. The 275 GTB was often considered to be the more aggressive of the two, while the GTS was thought by many to be better suited for grand touring duty; although, with a top speed in excess of 140 mph, it was certainly no slouch. In support of this claim, the 275 GTS was equipped with less heavily bolstered seats than the GTB, but they were still beautifully trimmed in Connolly leather. Each body was constructed in a different location, with the GTB being constructed in Modena, at Scaglietti’s facilities, and the GTS being produced at Pininfarina, in Turin. However, just 200 GTS models were constructed, with the majority being sent to the United States, making them far scarcer than their berlinetta siblings. The example offered here is documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini as having been completed by the factory in February 1966 and supplied new to Auto Becker, the famous dealer in Düsseldorf, Germany. The car was sold in March 1966 to its original owner, Mr. Hartmann, and then, three years later, it passed to a Munich resident, for whom it was registered as M-TS 151. During the Munich resident’s ownership, the car was serviced and maintained by the Ferrari factory’s Assistenza Clienti in Modena, recording 29,189 kilometers at the time of its service in April 1969. The car was exported from Germany to California in the 1970s, and on August 21, 1977, it was advertised in the Los Angeles Times by a Mr. Holz, then with 66,000 miles. In 1983, it was sold to well-known Golden State enthusiast Bob Moe, in whose ownership it remained in storage for about 25 years. More recently, following tenure with a California Ferrari dealer, it underwent a ground-up restoration by renowned specialists Brian Hoyt (Perfect Reflections) and Patrick Ottis, with full documentation on file. The car is finished in Nero with Rosso seats, with an otherwise body-colored interior, and it has a menacing, racy appearance that is unusual to this model, which is accented by the use of blackwall tires on chrome wire wheels. Correct detailing and stickers are to be found under the hood, and the Marchal headlights have the proper lenses. Correct metric nuts and bolts were used throughout, just as the factory had once done it. Inside and out, the body finishes are superb, which is evidence of both the quality of restoration and the careful maintenance in the present owner’s well-known collection. Crystal-clear Veglia gauges record a mileage of 91,179, which is believed to be original. This is not only a thrilling driver’s Ferrari but also a splendidly restored 275 GTS, and it would be a perfect addition to any collection of Prancing Horses. Chassis no. 08313 Engine no. 8313 Body no. 175194

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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2013 Ferrari LaFerrari Prototype

Used for the private LaFerrari preview in 2013 Reference car used in the factory Atelier for customer configuration sessions Produced in late 2012 as a pre-production model, this LaFerrari prototype holds a special place in the hierarchy of the revered model and is likely memorable to any enthusiast lucky enough to purchase a LaFerrari new. This was the very first LaFerrari that most laid eyes on, as it was used by Ferrari during the private preview for the model in 2013. After the LaFerrari’s official unveiling to the public at the 2013 Geneva Motor Show, chassis number 194925 continued to play a significant role in the model’s history. Kept in the factory Atelier throughout 2013, it was made available to every client who travelled to Maranello to configure their new LaFerrari, allowing clients to carefully analyse and consider the specification of their own car alongside a completed car for reference. Offered for sale for the very first time, this is a remarkable opportunity to purchase an exceptionally interesting and significant LaFerrari directly from the factory. Please note that this is a prototype vehicle not homologated for road use and therefore cannot be road registered. Ferrari recommends that this car remains stationary and inactive, for static display only. The winning bidder will be required to sign a from with Ferrari acknowledging this. • Usato per l'anteprima esclusiva de' LaFerrari nel 2013 • Auto di riferimento utilizzata nell'Atelier della fabbrica come modello per le personalizzazioni dei clienti Prodotto alla fine del 2012 come pre-serie, questo prototipo LaFerrari ha un posto tutto suo nella storia del modello ed è probabilmente un pezzo memorabile per qualsiasi collezionista così fortunato da possedere già una LaFerrari. Questa infatti è la prima LaFerrari che il mondo abbia mai visto, dato che è stata usata dalla Casa di Maranello durante l'anteprima privata nel 2013. Dopo esser stato presentato al pubblico al Salone dell'auto di Ginevra del 2013, il telaio numero 194925 ha continuato a svolgere un ruolo significativo nella storia del modello. Esposto nell'Atelier della fabbrica per tutto il 2013, è stato messo a disposizione dei clienti che venivano a Maranello per configurare la propria LaFerrari, dando loro la possibilità di avere un parametro di riferimento per le loro personalizzazioni. Messa in vendita per la prima volta, è un'occasione notevole per acquistare una LaFerrari particolarmente interessante e significativa per la storia del modello. Con il valore aggiunto di acquistarla direttamente dalla fabbrica. Si prega di notare che si tratta di un prototipo non omologato per l'uso stradale e che pertanto non può essere immatricolato. Ferrari inoltre raccomanda che quest'auto venga usata come display statico e, quindi, inattivo. Addendum Please note that this is a prototype vehicle not homologated for road use and therefore cannot be road registered. Ferrari recommends that this car remains stationary and inactive, for static display only. The buyer is required to sign a special agreement with Ferrari acknowledging this. Please note that this lot is subject to VAT on the full purchase price (both on the hammer price and commission). Should you require further information, please speak to RM Sotheby's Administration department. Si prega di notare che si tratta di un prototipo non omologato per l'impiego stradale e che pertanto non può essere immatricolato. Ferrari raccomanda che l'auto rimanga inattiva e che venga usata solo per esposizione statica. L'acquirente è inoltre tenuto a firmare uno speciale accordo con Ferrari in merito al suo utilizzo. Inoltre si fa presente che a questo lotto verrà applicata l'IVA sull'intero prezzo di acquisto, cioè sia sul valore finale che sulla commissione. Per ulteriori informazioni, si consiglia di rivolgersi direttamente all'amministrazione di RM Sotheby's. Serial no. 194925

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
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1967 Ferrari 330 GTS by Pininfarina

300 bhp, 3,967 cc single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine with triple Weber carburettors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm One of 99 built; a matching-numbers example Best of Show at the 2011 Concorso Italiano The subject of a comprehensive mechanical and cosmetic restoration In its July 1967 issue, Car and Driver magazine described the driving experience of Ferrari’s new convertible as such: “Depress clutch. Find neutral. Turn ignition key. Give the gas a tiny, nervous touch. Oh my God!” The 330 GTS’s performance, which included a top speed of 150 mph and a quarter-mile dash time of 15 seconds at just under 100 mph, was otherworldly. Yet, it was only part of the story. From its classic Ferrari nose treatment, fitted with a characteristic shallow egg-crate oval grille, to the triple louvered vents on the rear flanks of the front wings, and on to the seductive tapered tail, its design epitomised mid-1960s Italian GT styling. Inside the luxuriously appointed interior were twin leather bucket seats, a wood-rimmed aluminium steering wheel, and full instrumentation, and the interior accommodations were remarkably spacious. Chassis number 17019, one of only ninety-nine 330 GTSs produced, was shipped to Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, Connecticut, in early 1968. After immediately being sold to Loeber Motors Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, it passed through a succession of owners, including Dr Stuart L. Resch, of New York, in 1970. In 1974, Steve Gross, of Westport, Connecticut, acquired the 330 GTS via Chinetti Motors. Save for a repaint performed in the early 1970s, it reportedly remained a largely original car until 2006. That year, the car was acquired by an astute collector from California, who had Patrick Ottis Company, of Berkeley, California, sort the suspension and perform some general maintenance. Afterwards, it went on to add some 7,000 miles to the odometer in joyful touring. When it came time for the engine to be rebuilt, Ottis’s team was entrusted with the mechanical work, whilst the coachwork and cosmetics were entrusted to the renowned firm of Rudi & Company, of Victoria, British Columbia. Under the care of Koniczek and his team, the car was completely taken down to bare metal. Old front-end damage was properly repaired, and any oxidation issues were addressed, which was a significant investment that has ensured the integrity of the car for years to come. In addition to the outstanding body and paint work, every piece of chrome was re-plated, the interior was reupholstered, and the gaskets and glass were replaced. Ottis’s shop was directed to perform the engine rebuild as thoroughly and correctly as possible. The meticulous machine work was complemented by the installation of new valves and pistons, resulting in outstanding appearance and performance. When the work had been completed, the car was returned to Ottis’s Berkeley facility, where the engine was installed and properly worn-in. The 330 GTS was subsequently brought to Brian Hoyt’s Perfect Reflections, to ensure that it was dialled-in for correctness of presentation, down to the rubber seals and the smallest pieces of hardware. Chassis 10719 is presented in Blu Scuro, with a Claret and black leather interior and black cloth top, and it is absolutely stunning. The fit and finish of its panels is excellent, with even gaps, and the quality of the engine bay remains at a concours level, as does that of the underside. The interior boasts the standard leather seats and power windows, as well as optional air conditioning and a Becker AM/FM radio, and the car rides on sparkling Borrani wire wheels shod in Michelin XWX tyres. It is no surprise that when shown in 2011 at the Concorso Italiano in Monterey, California, this car was awarded the Ferrari Club of America Pacific Region Vintage Concours Award and received Best of Show honours. In its present ownership, the 330 GTS has continued to be well maintained by a professional staff. Accompanying the car is a correct jack bag and a nicely appointed tool roll. This award-winning automobile is a Ferrari that speaks for itself. Moteur V-12, 3 967 cm3, 300 ch DIN, 1 ACT par banc, trois carburateurs Weber, boîte manuelle cinq rapports transaxle, suspension à quatre roues indépendantes, freins à disques sur les quatre roues. Empattement: 2 400 mm. Un des 99 produites ; numéros concordants Best of Show au Concorso Italiano 2011 A bénéficié d'une restauration complète, mécanique et cosmétique Dans son numéro de juillet 1967, le magazine Car and Driver décrit ainsi la mise en route du nouveau cabriolet Ferrari : « Appuyez sur la pédale d'embrayage. Vérifiez que le levier de vitesse soit au point mort. Tournez la clé de contact. Donnez un petit coup d'accélérateur rapide. Oh mon Dieu ! » Les performances de la 330 GTS, dont la vitesse de pointe atteignait 240 km/h et qui couvrait le 400 mètres départ arrêté en 15 secondes, étaient véritablement hors du commun. Et encore, ce n'était qu'un aspect des choses. Depuis le dessin classique de l'avant, doté de la classique grille « coupe-frites » dans une calandre ovale, jusqu'aux triples louvres placées sur les ailes avant, en passant par le séduisant coffre arrière effilé se terminant en léger pan coupé, les lignes de cette voiture symbolisaient à elles seules le style des GT italiennes de la moitié des années 1960. Remarquablement spacieux et richement équipé, l'habitacle comportait deux sièges baquets en cuir, un volant à jante bois et branches en aluminium et une instrumentation complète. Cette voiture (numéro de châssis 17019), qui fait partie des 99 exemplaires de 330 GTS produits, a été expédiée au début de l'année 1968 à Luigi Chinetti Motors, à Greenwich (Connecticut). Après avoir été immédiatement vendue à Loeber Motors Inc. à Chicago (Illinois), elle est passée entre les mains de plusieurs propriétaires dont le Dr Stuart L. Resch, de New York, en 1970. En 1974 Steve Gross, de Westport (Connecticut), faisait l'acquisition de cette 330 GTS via Chinetti Motors. A part une peinture réalisée au début des années 1970, cette voiture serait restée largement d'origine jusqu'à 2006. Cette année-là, la voiture était achetée par un collectionneur avisé de Californie, qui la confiait à Patrick Ottis Company, de Berkeley (Californie), pour réviser la suspension et réaliser certains travaux d'entretien. Ensuite, il profitait du plaisir de la voiture et couvrait quelque 11 000 km. Quand est venu le moment de refaire le moteur, c'est l'équipe d'Ottis qui fut chargé de ces travaux mécaniques, alors que la carrosserie et les travaux cosmétiques étaient confiés à l'entreprise réputée Rudi & Company, de Victoria (British Columbia). Entre les mains de Koniczek et son équipe, la voiture était complètement démontée et le métal était mis à nu. Un ancien dommage à l'avant était convenablement réparé et toutes les parties rouillées étaient prises en charge et traitées, ce qui représentait un investissement significatif qui a permis d'assurer l'intégrité de la voiture pour encore des années. En plus de l'excellent travail sur la carrosserie et la peinture, chaque pièce de chrome était refaite, la sellerie était rénovée et les joints et vitrages étaient remplacés. L'atelier d'Ottis s'occupait de son côté de la reconstruction du moteur, aussi complètement et aussi correctement que possible. Le travail méticuleux sur le bloc était complété par l'installation de pistons et de soupapes neufs, ce qui permettait d'obtenir une présentation et des performances remarquables. Une fois les travaux terminés, la voiture revenait dans les locaux Ottis de Berkeley, où le moteur était remis en place et correctement rodé. La 330 GTS était ensuite amenée chez Brian Hoyt, de Perfect Reflections, pour vérifier que tous les détails de présentation soient corrects, jusqu'aux joints de caoutchouc et aux plus petites pièces mécaniques. De couleur Blu Scuro, avec un intérieur en cuir Claret et noir et une capote en toile noire, cette voiture est absolument splendide. L'ajustement et la finition des panneaux sont excellents, avec des espaces égaux, et la qualité de présentation du compartiment moteur est du niveau concours, de même que les soubassements. L'intérieur dispose de sièges standard en cuir et de vitres électriques, ainsi que d'un système optionnel d'air conditionné et d'un autoradio Becker AM/FM. Elle est équipée de splendides jantes Borrani à rayons chaussées de pneus Michelin XWX. Il n'est pas surprenant que, lorsqu'elle a été présentée en 2011 au Concorso Italiano de Monterey (Californie), cette voiture ait reçu la Ferrari Club of America Pacific Region Vintage Concours Award, ainsi que le très envié Best of Show. Entre les mains de son propriétaire actuel, cette 330 GTS a continué à bénéficier d'un entretien rigoureux par une équipe professionnelle. La voiture est accompagnée d'un sac de cric correct et d'une trousse à outils joliment présentée. Cette Ferrari 330 GTS, gagnante de concours, parle pour elle-même. Chassis no. 10719 Engine no. 10719

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2014-05-10
Hammer price
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1959 Ferrari 250GT California (LWB)

Est. 240 bhp, 2,953 cc overhead camshaft alloy block and head V-12 engine, four-speed gearbox, independent front suspension via A-arms, coil springs and telescopic shocks, and rear suspension via live axle, semi-elliptical springs and telescopic shocks, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm (102.4 in.) Towards the end of 1957, when the Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Cabriolet went into production, a prototype for another open-top car appeared, aimed at the US market. It was called the Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder and was thought by many aficionados to be one of the most beautiful cars ever to come out of Maranello – a view still held by many to this day. These open cars were quite different in concept and execution. The Pinin Farina Cabriolet was based on the Pininfarina Coupé, a luxurious gran turismo. The California Spyder was a much sportier car, based on the dual-purpose berlinettas also designed by Pinin Farina, though built in small numbers in Modena by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, which was partly owned by Ferrari. The procedure was described by Ferrari in their official history and catalogue as a simple one: “Pinin Farina prepared the prototype, which was then sent to Maranello to be inspected by Enzo Ferrari. Although the final decision was naturally his, the dealers also had an important say in the matter and were often called in to give their opinions.” Scaglietti would then take over: “His job was to produce the set number of ‘reproductions’ of the model and to equip himself for the task on the basis of the systems in use at Maranello, which was far more ‘artisan’ in approach than those used by Pinin Farina.” Certainly in the case of the 250 GT California Spyder, Ferrari’s two US distributors did have serious input in the design of the new car. Luigi Chinetti, who set up the first, and for a while the only, Ferrari dealership in the US, later had all the territory east of the Mississippi River, which amounted to about half the country. Luigi Chinetti was also the founder of NART – the North American Racing Team, the racing arm of Chinetti’s distributorship. The other influential distributor was the Austrian-born John von Neumann, whose racing and dealership interests were based out of California. Both Chinetti and von Neumann recognised a gap in the market for a higher performance open-top car in America that was not filled by the luxurious 250 GT Cabriolet. It seemed obvious to base this car on the 250 GT Berlinetta (Tour de France), which lacked a convertible version. The Tour de France was originally known as the 250 GT Berlinetta. The Tour de France nickname was added after the car’s domination of the legendary and gruelling ten-day French event, in which the car’s performance, reliability and durability made it a success. In the end, 14 California Spyders were built during 1958, with the remaining 36 cars built between 1959 and 1960, including at least seven fitted with alloy bodies, constructed to full competition specification. When the 250 GT SWB (short wheelbase) Berlinetta was launched, it was followed shortly thereafter by the corresponding SWB California Spyder, which was introduced at Geneva in March 1960. By the time production came to a close, a total of just 106 California Spyders had been built, 50 of them on the LWB chassis. The California Spyder (LWB) presented here, chassis no. 1487 GT, an original covered-headlight example, was ordered new on 11 June 1959 by Paul H. Norair, an active Washington, DC-area SCCA member, for Henry E. Mergner, a Chevrolet dealer also based in DC. Invoiced to Chinetti Motors on 17 September, the car was shipped aboard the SS Franco Zeta from Livorno, Italy, arriving in New York. Upon its arrival, however, the car was registered on New York license plates and instead sold new in 1959 to Judge Samuel Leibowitz of Connecticut. In 1960, chassis no. 1487 GT enjoyed an active racing career, driven by Pierre Mion at Cumberland, Bridgehampton and Lime Rock. On 10 July, Mion entered the six-hour race at Marlboro with Mergner, placing second overall. The car was subsequently sold by Chinetti to the Rodriguez family in Mexico. The brothers Pedro and Ricardo Rodriguez were of course very well-known racing drivers, the former enjoying quite a successful career in Formula 1 as well. On 9 October 1961, Pedro, then aged 21, raced in the Gran Premio Indipendenza in Mexico and won the GT class, an event pictured in the 1961 Ferrari Yearbook. Following its Rodriguez family ownership, 1487 GT was registered in 1964 in the name of Dr. Erle H. Heath of Pittsburgh, a noted Duesenberg collector. The car changed hands briefly once more and was acquired in 1967 by Houston oil baron John Mecom, Jr., who registered the car in Texas and painted it in the livery of his racing cars, pale Cadillac blue. In 1969 his California Spyder (LWB) was at Del Lee’s Pontchartrain Motor Company in New Orleans, which was incidentally where Mecom owned the New Orleans Saints professional American football team. John Jumer of Illinois eventually acquired the car and kept it for about 25 years, until his passing in 1994. The car, which had remained in storage for many years, was eventually sold by his family and briefly passed through one more individual before it was acquired in 1998 by the previous owner, Stephen Pilkington. Pilkington brought the car to the UK and then conducted a full restoration, stripping the body to bare metal and overhauling all mechanical parts. The wheels were rebuilt and fitted with new tyres and the interior was completely re-trimmed in red leather, as per original specifications. The original engine block, which had been separated from the car years earlier, was purchased by Pilkington in March 1999 and reunited with its original chassis after being sent to DK Engineering where it was completely rebuilt. Following completion of this restoration, Pilkington showed the car in July 2003 during the Ferrari Owners’ Club Annual Concours at Broughton House before it was acquired by the vendor later that year. A devoted and highly respected Ferrari enthusiast, he commissioned additional restoration work at Bob Smith Coachworks in Texas. The restoration, conducted to concours standards, was rewarded in 2005 with the prestigious Platinum Award at the Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach before being shown at Pebble Beach in 2005. The car has been properly maintained and cared for in his esteemed private collection ever since and remains in outstanding condition throughout. The 250 GT “Tour de France” has long been regarded as perhaps the ultimate road/race berlinetta Ferrari ever produced. Cloaking that superlative chassis with the definitive spyder coachwork was a master stroke of brilliance, the perfect symphony of sound and beauty: the blending of the most achingly beautiful automotive form with the most glorious, soul-stirring automotive aria of all. ITALIANTEXT 240 CV (stimati), 2.953 cm³, motore V12, con blocco e testa in alluminio, con un albero a camme in testa per bancata, cambio manuale a quattro marce, sospensioni anteriori a ruote indipendenti con quadrilateri trasversali con molle elicoidali e ammortizzatori telescopici, assale posteriore rigido con balestre semi-ellittiche e ammortizzatori telescopici, freni a disco idraulici. Passo: 2.600 mm. Verso la fine del 1957, quando già era in produzione la 250 GT Cabriolet di Pinin Farina, apparve il prototipo di un’altra vettura aperta, studiata per il mercato americano. Fu denominata 250 GT California Spyder e fu ritenuta da molti appassionati una delle più belle Ferrari mai prodotte, un punto di vista condiviso ancora oggi da molti. I due spider erano piuttosto diversi fra loro, sia a livello di progetto che di produzione. La Cabriolet era basata su una lussuosa gran turismo, la 250 GT coupé di Pinin Farina; la California Spyder era molto più sportiva, basata sul telaio dal duplice uso delle Berlinette; anch’essa disegnata da Pinin Farina, venne costruita in pochi esemplari, dalla Carrozzeria Scaglietti, a Modena, nella quale era socio anche Ferrari. La storia, raccontata nelle pubblicazioni ufficiali Ferrari e nei cataloghi, è semplice: “Pinin Farina costruì il prototipo che fu quindi inviato a Maranello per essere esaminato da Ferrari. Sebbene la decisione finale fosse sempre sua, anche i concessionari potevano dire la loro in materia e furono spesso chiamati ad esprimere le loro opinioni”. Scaglietti fu poi incaricato della produzione: “Il suo lavoro era di produrre il numero stabilito di esemplari del modello, adattandosi agli standard qualitativi di Maranello, il cui approccio era molto più “artigianale” di quello di Pinin Farina”. Certamente nel caso della 250 GT California Spyder, i due distributori americani della Ferrari diedero un importante contributo al progetto della vettura. Luigi Chinetti, che era stato il primo e per lungo tempo l’unico concessionario Ferrari degli USA, in seguito ebbe tutta la zona a est del fiume Mississippi, che rappresentava il 50% del mercato. Egli creò anche la NART (North American Racing Team), la sua squadra corse. L’altro influente distributore fu John von Neumann, di origini austriache, i cui interessi sia nelle corse che nelle vendite avevano base in California. Sia Chinetti che von Neumann si accorsero di una potenziale nicchia nel mercato americano delle spider ad alte prestazioni, che non poteva essere riempito dalla lussuosa 250 GT Cabriolet. Era quindi necessario basarsi sulla 250 GT Berlinetta (Tour de France), che non aveva una versione aperta. La Tour de France, originariamente conosciuta solo come 250 GT Berlinetta, fu così denominata a seguito dell’incontrastato dominio che esercitò sulla leggendaria ed estenuante corsa francese, che durava ben 10 giorni, grazie alle sue prestazioni, affidabilità e robustezza. In totale 14 California Spyder furono costruite nel 1958, ed altre 36 fra il 1959 e il 1960; almeno sette esemplari furono dotati di carrozzeria in alluminio e specifiche da corsa. Quando fu lanciata la 250 GT Berlinetta sul telaio a passo corto, venne subito dopo presentata, al Salone di Ginevra del 1960, anche la corrispondente California Spyder a passo corto. In totale furono prodotte 106 California Spyder, 50 delle quali sul telaio a passo lungo. La California Spyder a passo lungo offerta, telaio 1487 GT, originariamente costruita con fari carenati, fu ordinata l’11 giugno 1959 da Paul H. Norair, di Washington, membro attivo della SCCA del DC (District Columbia), per Henry E. Mergner, un concessionario Chevrolet della stessa zona. Fatturata il 17 settembre alla Chinetti Motors, fu imbarcata a Livorno sulla SS Franco Zeta e inviata a New York. In verità, al suo arrivo la vettura fu immatricolata a New York e venduta al giudice Samuel Leibowitz, del Connecticut. Durante il 1960 la 1487 GT fu guidata in corsa da Pierre Mion a Cumberland, Bridgehampton e Lime Rock; il 10 luglio partecipò anche, in coppia con Mergner, alla Sei ore di Marlboro, piazzandosi secondo assoluto. Quindi la vettura venne venduta da Chinetti alla famiglia Rodriguez, in Messico; i fratelli Pedro e Ricardo Rodriguez erano piloti molto conosciuti, con quest’ultimo che aveva già attenuto buoni risultati anche in Formula 1. Il 9 ottobre 1961, il 21enne Pedro corse il Gran Premio Indipendenza, in Messico, vincendo la classe GT; l’evento è riportato anche sull’Annuario Ferrari del 1961. Dopo la proprietà Rodriguez, la 1487 GT fu registrata al nome del Dr. Erle H. Heath, di Pittsburgh, un noto collezionista di vetture Duesenberg. Poco dopo la vettura passò ancora di mano e nel 1967 fu acquistata dal petroliere di Houston, John Mecom Jr., che la registrò in Texas e la fece riverniciare nel colore delle sue vetture da corsa, un blu chiaro Cadillac. Nel 1969 la California Spyder era presso la Del Lee Pontchartrain Motor Company di New Orleans, città della squadra professionista di football americano New Orleans Saints, che era di proprietà dello stesso Mecom. John Jumer, dell’Illinois, la acquistò e la tenne per 25 anni fino al 1994, anno della sua morte. Per alcuni anni la vettura fu messa in un deposito e in seguito venduta dalla famiglia Jumer; passò ancora una volta di mano, prima di essere acquistata, nel 1998, dal penultimo proprietario, Stephen Pilkington. Questi portò la vettura in Gran Bretagna e la restaurò, portando la carrozzeria a nudo e revisionando tutta la meccanica. I cerchi vennero ricostruiti e dotati di pneumatici nuovi, gli interni furono rifatti in pelle rossa, secondo le specifiche originali. Il blocco motore originale, che era stato sostituito anni prima, fu acquistato da Pilkington nel 1999 e rimontato sul telaio dopo essere stato fatto restaurare dalla DK Engineering. Alla fine del restauro, Pilkington presentò la vettura, nel giugno 2003, all’annuale concorso del Ferrari Owners’ Club alla Broughton House. Alla fine dell’anno, la 1487 GT fu acquistata dall’attuale proprietario, un devoto e stimato appassionato Ferrari, che ordinò ulteriori lavori di restauro alla Bob Smith Coachworks, in Texas. Nel 2005 la vettura fu premiata con Targa Platino al prestigioso concorso Cavallino Classic a Palm Beach, e fu presentata a Pebble Beach. Da allora è sempre stata tenuta con cura e attenzione, ed è tuttora in straordinarie condizioni generali. La 250 GT Tour de France è stata a lungo ritenuta la migliore Berlinetta Ferrari dal duplice uso strada/corsa. L’aver vestito quello straordinario telaio con una stupefacente carrozzeria spider fu un colpo da maestro per una perfetta sinfonia di suoni e bellezza: l’unione della linea più bella con il rombo più glorioso ed emozionante. Chassis no. 1487 GT

  • ITAItaly
  • 2009-05-17
Hammer price
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1956 Maserati A6G/54 Coupe Series III by Frua

160 bhp, 1,985 cc DOHC twin-plug inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber 40 DCO3 carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs and shock absorbers, live rear axle with quarter-elliptical leaf springs and shock absorbers, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 100.4 in. Offered from a private collection Displayed at the 1956 Turin Auto Salon The sole surviving example of two coupes built by Frua on the series III chassis One of 22 Frua-bodied cars overall, and 65 total examples built Extensive documentation, including factory build sheets, correspondence with marque historians, period photographs, restoration invoices and photos, and FIVA passport Restored by marque experts over the last 10 years Class winner at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance THE A6G/54 First introduced at the 1947 Geneva Auto Salon, the A6 1500 was Maserati’s primary post-war road-going model and featured an inline six-cylinder motor that would become the mainstay of Modena’s production for the next 20 years. A cycle-winged competition version of the car soon appeared called the A6 GCS, with the “G” denoting ghisa (for cast iron black), and the “C” and “S,” respectively, standing for corsa and stradale. Featuring a single overhead-cam 2-liter version of the inline six, this model performed quite well over the ensuing season, even winning the Italian Championship while piloted by the famed Giovanni Bracco. The success of the first GCS led to a more evolved version wearing full coachwork in both coupe and spider forms, from firms like Allemano, Frua, and Zagato, which in turn led to the creation of the A6G/53 sports racer. However, as the design was still deemed to lack adequate road manners, Maserati revised the A6G in 1954 with a detuned version of the Formula 2 engine that Giaocchino Colombo had engineered for the firm after his departure from Ferrari. The new road-going version of the 2-liter racing motor utilized a dual overhead camshaft, driven by a triple-rowed timing chain, and the former racer’s dry sump was exchanged for a new finned alloy wet sump. The resulting A6G/54 was built in a modest batch of 65 cars through 1957, and given their hand-built quality, race-pedigreed mechanicals, and extraordinary coachwork, it is little wonder that they are considered the equal of the day’s finest Ferraris or Alfa Romeos. Also the last model built under the watch of the Maserati brothers, who had just completed their management contract with new company owner Adolfo Orsi, the A6G/54 can be considered the ultimate evolution of the brothers’ original vision. CHASSIS NUMBER 2181 Boasting rarity, a recent restoration to concours-winning standards, and extensive documentation, this beautiful A6G/54 is one of two third-series cars bodied as coupes, and the only example still known to exist. According to correspondence from official Maserati historian Ermanno Cozzo to esteemed marque specialist Walter Bäumer, chassis number 2181 was delivered to Pietro Frua for coachwork in August 1956. Frua mounted a coupe body that was a typically voluptuous study in balanced stance and curves, utilizing a semi-fastback roof, scooped hood, and the famed trident-adorned grille. Considering the coupe’s overall profile, fastback glass section, and the two-tone paint finish of rosso capped with a nero roof, the A6G very much echoed the aesthetics of Boano’s concurrent coachwork for the Ferrari 250 GT. In November 1956, the unusual Maserati was exhibited at the Turin Auto Salon before returning to the factory, where testing and final assembly were completed. Factory build sheets were consequently dated on 5 December 1956. Following completion, the A6G was dispatched to the United States, destined for Charles Rezzaghi’s Mille Miglia Motors in San Francisco. A one-time competition driver for Alfa Romeo, Rezzaghi was an official Maserati importer from 1954–1957, and a fixture on the West Coast’s European car community and SCCA racing scene. From San Francisco, chassis 2181 was delivered in January 1957 to the Pomona road races for display, as depicted in a color photo in the car’s file. The Maserati had been handsomely adorned with a black stinger pattern extending from the hood’s trailing edge almost to the nose, giving the touring car a particularly sporty visage. The A6G was later sold to Stanley Sugarman, a Maserati privateer who moonlighted as the CEO of U.S. Pipe & Supply Corp. in Phoenix, Arizona. After passing to at least one more Arizona-based owner, possibly Frank Hoke of Phoenix, the car was sold around 1963 to J.S. Massa of California. Over the following few years, the A6G/54 was sold again and an unidentified owner removed the original factory twin-cam engine and replaced it with an American V-8, a fairly common practice at the time. Later in the 1960s, the car was purchased by Maserati dealer Bob Allinger of Los Gatos, California. By 1978, chassis 2181 was sold to Michael Adams of Valley Center, California, and he installed the engine and gearbox from a Maserati 3500 GT, bringing the car to a slightly more authentic state. In 1991 the A6G was purchased by Ed Morgan of San Francisco, and in 2007 it briefly passed through the esteemed collection of Peter Hageman in Kirkland, Washington. In 2007, the aging Maserati was acquired by Volkmar Spielmann of Germany, and he immediately re-imported the car to Europe and set about a full restoration. Walter Bäumer was retained as a consultant, and he sourced a correct A6G/54 dual-cam motor (number 2104) from the United States, while locating a proper gearbox and suspension in Italy. Franco Tralli of Modena conducted all the chassis work, while the famed Luppi of Modena was retained to re-trim the interior. Bacchelli Franco and Roberto Villa’s highly regarded Carrozzeria Auto Sport in Modena was entrusted with restoring the coachwork. Meanwhile, Bäumer compiled a complete history on the car to supplement the available documentation. With the restoration completed and the documentation bolstered, a FIVA passport was applied for and granted in March 2011. In June 2012, the rare A6G was sold to the consignor, a respected collector of sports cars based in Chicago. He immediately had the car delivered to McGrath Maserati in Hertfordshire, England, for a complete assessment of work required for even greater authenticity. Hundreds of photographs were taken documenting the car’s refurbishment, including a full engine rebuild, carburetor rebuild, re-chroming of all brightwork, reupholstering of the interior, and final re-assembly. All of the work was meticulously documented in a thorough typed log of invoices, including detailed work descriptions. Documented with two binders full of information and optimally restored to factory-correct standards, chassis number 2181 was accepted and presented at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where the Maserati Centennial was being celebrated as a highlight theme. The A6G did not disappoint, winning its class (Maserati Centennial Coachwork). Believed to be the only remaining closed example of a Frua-bodied Series III A6G/54, and one of two ever built, chassis 2181 beacons marque connoisseurs and enthusiasts of hand-built post-war sports cars. Eligible for numerous driving events worldwide, the early coupe should also be warmly welcomed at major concours d’elegance and would make an important addition to any collection. Chassis no. 2181 Engine no. 2104

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-03-11
Hammer price
Show price

1971 Ferrari 512M

Engine # 1024 Specifications: 620bhp, 4,993cc double overhead camshaft light alloy V-12 engine, Lucas fuel injection, five-speed gearbox, double wishbones coil springs front and rear suspension, four wheel hydraulic vented disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5 in.) American certificate of title Ferrari Classiche Certification Package. This lot has originated in the United States and is present at the sale under a temporary import bond, which must be cancelled either by exporting the lot outside of Italy on an approved bill of lading with supporting customs documentation or by paying the applicable VAT and import duties to land the lot in Italy. In 1968 the rules for sports car racing were changed, limiting Group 6 prototypes to a maximum engine capacity of 3.0 litres. For the 1970 season, Ferrari decided to do what Porsche had done earlier with the Porsche 917, that is, build 25 examples of a 5.0-litre car to allow homologation into the FIA’s Group 5 Sports Car category. With the financial help of Fiat that risky investment was made, and surplus cars were intended to be sold to customers. Ferrari’s 512S represented yet another attempt by a manufacturer to thwart the homologation rules laid down by the Commission Sportive Internationale. It was a practice the CSI was trying hard to avoid; manufacturers would build prototype racers, produce them in the required quantities and fit them with lights, horns and spare wheels, ostensibly to look like a road car. In reality the 512 was the fastest car that Ferrari had ever built, capable of in excess of 235mph. Assembly of the first new cars began at the end of 1969. The chassis was similar to the one used on the P4 – a semi-monocoque design. The engine was a direct development of the 612 Can-Am series unit, now fitted with twin overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder and Lucas indirect fuel injection. Initially it could produce 550bhp at 8,500rpm. A year after initial production began, changes were made to improve reliability, lessen the weight and increase the power output. The engine could now produce 620bhp at 9,000rpm. The 512S was first introduced to the public at a press conference on 6 November 1969 outside the Gatto Verde (Green Cat) restaurant near Maranello. The chassis was a tubular steel space frame with stressed-alloy panelling around the cockpit area and once the design was complete, the Vaccari workshop in Modena was assigned the task of building the 25 chassis. Over the next three months enough chassis were produced for homologation and soon after the qualifying inspection was made several of the assembled cars were taken apart to be used as spares. Giacomo Caliri was given the job of designing the body and the firm of Cigala & Bertinetti from Turin was contracted to produce them. They were made from fibreglass for the first time in Ferrari’s history and attached directly to the alloy-panelled centre section of the car. The basic design concepts of the engine were Mauro Forghieri’s, but the detail work was carried out almost entirely by engineer Franco Rocci. Giancarlo Bussi was in charge of development work. All of the completed chassis were originally built in berlinetta configuration. Almost immediately, the 512S began to undergo modification. The most noticeable change was the removal of the centre section of the bodywork or roof panel. On 1 April an addendum was accepted by the FIA and written into the homologation papers noting the availability of a spyder version of the 512S. The 512’s competition debut took place when five identical cars were lined up for the Daytona 24-Hour race on 31 January 1970. Three of the new 512s were official entries, two were entered by customers, and all had been fitted with two substantial spoilers combined with fins and two deflectors on the front wings. Mario Andretti put the 512S on pole position but in the race the Porsche 917s led throughout. Only one 512S survived the race driven by Andretti, Arturo Merzario and Jackie Ickx. The car finished a truly remarkable third. The 25 cars manufactured were given even chassis numbers from 1002 to 1050. Of those cars, 18 were raced in 1970, five of them being spyders. The Factory team used nine cars for international endurance racing. The Scuderia Filipinetti and NART raced two cars each. Ecurie Francorchamps (Belgian importer of Ferrari), Escuderia Montjuich, Gelo Racing Team, Earl Cord Racing, and Picchio Rosso raced one car each. In the second race of the 1970 season, the 12-Hour Endurance race at Sebring, Mario Andretti, Nino Vaccarella and Ignazio Giunti won the race in their Ferrari 512S. Mario Andretti, determined not to be beaten by a movie star, drove an incredible final stint, narrowly beating Steve McQueen and Peter Revson in their Porsche 908 by just 22 seconds. Later in the season, at the 24 Hours of LeMans, there was an epic duel between Ferrari and Porsche, and it was this story that was told in the legendary movie Le Mans (also known as “A French Kiss With Death”). Steve McQueen’s Solar Productions bought several 512Ss for the making of this film; one was destroyed during filming by Derek Bell. McQueen’s immortal line from the movie, “Racing is life. Anything that happens before or after is just waiting”, endures to this day. After Le Mans, the Mauro Forghieri-led development team started to work on a slimmed down and more powerful version of the 512S. Called the 512M (for modificato), the revised car produced 620bhp at 9,000rpm and weighed 815kg compared to the 512S spyder’s 856kg. Bodywork revisions included a more aerodynamic nose, and a large airbox was mounted on top of the engine to force air into the intake trumpets. Further modifications included new rear bodywork and no spyder version was made available. 15 of the 25 512Ss produced were converted to M-spec. The Ferrari 512M was competitive straight out of the box. One was entered for Ickx and Giunti at the final race of the 1970 championship in Austria in the 1000km at the Österreichring. The car suffered from fuel feed problems during qualifying but with the problem solved in time for the race, Ickx lapped faster than the Porsche 917’s pole position time with full tanks in the opening laps. He continued to destroy the lap record, finally beating his own Formula 1 lap record set two months earlier. Alternator problems eventually ended the race for the Ferrari 512M but for the first time in the 1970 season the Porsches had been outpaced by quite some margin and Ferrari had clearly proved that the development gap had finally been closed. The next stop for Ickx and Giunti was the Kyalami 1000km race in South Africa. Although it was a non-championship round, Jo Siffert, who was the 1970 champion, and Kurt Ahrens, the runner-up, were entered in a works Porsche 917K. The Ferrari completely dominated, taking pole position and winning the race by two laps. In 1971 the 512M was campaigned by customer teams while the factory concentrated on the 3.0-litre 312PB. The 5.0-litre class was abandoned in 1972. The Ferrari 512M presented here is chassis number 1024. This car remained unsold in 1970 in 512S Berlinetta configuration. The 12th car of the 25 built, 1024 was converted to 512M specifications in late 1970 and early 1971. On 15 April 1971 it was sold new to Dr Alfredo Belponer of Italy (factory invoice number 1068/71). Belponer’s team was called the Scuderia Brescia Corse and his number one driver was Marsilio Pasotti, also from Brescia. He was one of the most popular amateur drivers in Italy and raced under the pseudonym “Pam”. He began competing in hill climbs and went on to race in Formula Junior, touring cars and sports cars. Mike Colucci at the Ferrari Historic Challenge races during the 9th Annual Cavallino Classic in Moroso, Florida. In the summer of 2000 it was raced by Davies at the Ferrari Historic Challenge races at Road America, in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin. The Ferrari 512M chassis number 1024 was completely restored in Florida in 2001 and offers a very rare opportunity to acquire one of just 15 Ferrari 512Ms built. Of the total twenty-five 512s constructed some were driven beyond their useful life and written off, others were destroyed in accidents. A fortunate few remained with private collectors, ex-racers and enthusiasts. As the desirability and collectability of these cars continued to rise, so did interest in owning them, with the result that many of the 512s that were written off have now reappeared, some having been rebuilt from the remains or parts of cars destroyed whilst racing. Chassis 1024 has an impeccable provenance and remains one of the few 512s that has escaped all controversy. While 25 512s were supposed to have been constructed, only 22 actually were, and a mere 16 are believed to survive today. Just 4 remain in 512S configuration and only 12 in “M” spec. This magnificent racing car, which has seldom appeared on the open market, represents an extremely rare opportunity to invest in a truly beautiful Ferrari sports racing car from the heyday of international sports car racing. It is ready to be entered and raced in many of the most prestigious historic events and races across the globe. ITALIANTEXT Motore # 1024 Specifiche: Motore V-12 in lega leggera a doppio albero a camme in testa, 620 CV di potenza, 4.993 cm3 di cilindrata, iniezione Lucas, cambio a cinque rapporti, sospensioni anteriori e posteriori con doppio braccio a molle elicoidali, freni a disco idraulici ventilati sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2.400 mm Titolo americano Certificazione Ferrari Classiche. Questo lotto é di origine americana ed é presentato all’asta sotto importazione temporanea, la quale deve essere cancellata o pagare le tasse dovute in Italia oppure esportare il lotto effettuando i documenti necessari. Nel 1968 vennero modificate le regole nel mondo delle corse d’auto sportive, fissando il limite massimo di capacità del motore a 3,0 litri per i prototipi del Gruppo 6. Per la stagione 1970, la Ferrari decise di fare quello che la Porsche aveva fatto in precedenza con la Porsche 917, ossia costruire 25 esemplari di vetture da 5,0 litri da omologare nella categoria FIA di vetture sportive del Gruppo 5. Con l’aiuto finanziario della Fiat, si optò per questo rischioso investimento con l’intento di destinare le vetture eccedenti ai clienti. La Ferrari 512S rappresentò l’ennesimo tentativo, da parte di un costruttore, di contrastare le regole di omologazione imposte dalla Commission Sportive Internationale. Ovviamente si trattava di una pratica che la C.S.I. stava tentando di evitare in tutti modi; i costruttori realizzavano prototipi di vetture da competizione, li producevano nelle quantità richieste e li fornivano di fari, clacson e ruote di scorta perché in apparenza sembrassero vetture da strada. In realtà, la 512 era la vettura più veloce che la Ferrari avesse mai costruito, capace di superare le 395 km/h. L’assemblaggio delle nuove vetture ebbe inizio alla fine del 1969. Il telaio era simile a quello utilizzato sulla P4 – del tipo a semi-monoscocca. Il motore era stato sviluppato riadattando l’unità della serie 612 Can-Am, aggiungendo un doppio albero a camme in testa, quattro valvole per cilindro e iniezione indiretta Lucas. Inizialmente poteva sviluppare 550 CV a 8.500 giri al minuto. Un anno dopo ebbe inizio la prima produzione con alcuni cambiamenti apportati per migliorare l’affidabilità, diminuire il peso ed aumentare la potenza erogata. Il motore, dopo le modifiche, poteva sviluppare 620 CV a 9.000 giri al minuto. La 512S fu presentata per la prima volta al pubblico alla conferenza stampa del 6 novembre 1969 all’esterno del Ristorante Gatto Verde, nelle vicinanze di Maranello. Il telaio era uno Space Frame in tubolare di acciaio con pannelli in lega montati intorno all’area dell’abitacolo. Una volta completato il progetto, l’officina Vaccari di Modena fu incaricata di costruire i 25 telai. Nei tre mesi successivi fu prodotto il numero di telai necessari per l’omologazione e, subito dopo il controllo di certificazione, molte delle vetture già assemblate furono messe da parte per essere utilizzate come vetture di scorta. La progettazione della scocca fu affidata a Giacomo Caliri, mentre la ditta Cigala e Bertinetti di Torino fu incaricata della sua produzione. Per la prima volta nella storia della Ferrari, la scocca fu realizzata in vetroresina e fissata direttamente sulla sezione centrale della vettura rivestita di pannelli in lega. Per i principi di base del motore venne utilizzato il progetto di Mauro Forghieri, ma la cura dei dettagli fu affidata quasi interamente all’ingegner Franco Rocci. Giancarlo Bussi fu incaricato dello sviluppo. Originariamente, tutti i telai completati presentavano una configurazione da berlinetta. Ma quasi immediatamente, la 512S iniziò ad essere modificata. La modifica più evidente fu l’eliminazione dell tetto. Il 1 aprile la F.I.A. accettò un’aggiunta registrandola sui documenti di omologazione e annotando la possibilità di una versione spyder della 512S. Il debutto in gara della 512 ebbe luogo quando la Ferrari schierò cinque vetture identiche alla 24 Ore di Daytona del 31 gennaio 1970. Tre delle nuove 512 furono iscritte come ufficiali, mentre le altre due furono iscritte come vetture clienti, tutte dotate di due resistenti spoiler completi di alette e di due deflettori sugli alettoni anteriori. Con la sua 512S, Mario Andretti riuscì a conquistare la pole position, ma le Porsche 917 dominarono per tutta la gara. Solo una 512S, guidata da Andretti, Arturo Merzario e Jackie Ickx, riuscì a completare la gara. La vettura conquistò un importante terzo posto. I telai delle 25 vetture prodotte furono designati con i numeri pari dal 1002 al 1050. 18 di queste vetture gareggiarono nel 1970, tra questa 5 erano spyder. Il Team Ufficiale utilizzò nove vetture per gare di endurance internazionali. La Scuderia Filipinetti e la N.A.R.T. iscrissero due vetture ciascuna. Ecurie Francorchamps (importatore belga della Ferrari), Escuderia Montjuich, Gelo Racing Team, Earl Cord Racing e Picchio Rosso parteciparono con una vettura ciascuna. Nella seconda gara della stagione 1970, la 12 Ore Endurance di Sebring, Mario Andretti, Nino Vaccarella e Ignazio Giunti vinsero la gara con la loro Ferrari 512S. Mario Andretti, determinato a non farsi sconfiggere da una stella del cinema, fu protagonista di un rush finale incredibile, riuscendo a battere per soli 22 secondi Steve McQueen e Peter Revson con la loro Porsche 908. Successivamente in quella stessa stagione, la 24 Ore di Le Mans fu testimone di un duello epocale tra la Ferrari e la Porsche e fu proprio questa storia ad essere raccontata nel leggendario film Le 24 Ore di Le Mans (noto anche con il titolo “A French Kiss With Death”). La Solar Productions di Steve McQueen acquistò diverse 512S per girare il film, e una di queste fu distrutta durante le riprese da Derek Bell. La leggendaria battuta che McQueen recitò nel film, “Correre è vita. Tutto ciò che accade prima e dopo è attesa”, è ancora oggi famosa. Dopo Le Mans, il team di sviluppo guidato da Mauro Forghieri iniziò a lavorare su una versione della 512S più affusolata e potente. 512M, dove M sta per “modificato”, questa versione rivisitata della vettura poteva sviluppare 620 CV a 9.000 giri al minuto e pesava 815 kg rispetto agli 856 kg della 512S. Le modifiche apportate alla scocca comprendevano un muso più aerodinamico e una presa d’aria più grande montata nella parte superiore del motore per forzare l’entrata dell’aria nelle trombette di aspirazione. Successivamente furono apportate ulteriori modifiche, tra cui una nuova scocca posteriore, ma non fu realizzata la versione spyder. Delle 25 512S prodotte, 15 furono trasformate nella versione M. La Ferrari 512M fu competitiva da subito. Fu iscritta per Ickx e Giunti alla gara finale del campionato di Austria del 1970, la 1000 km, all’Österreichring. La vettura accusò problemi di carburazione, ma una volta risolto il problema, già nei giri di apertura, Ickx fece il giro più veloce del tempo da pole della Porsche 917 con i serbatoi pieni. Continuò a frantumare il record sul giro finendo per battere il suo stesso record stabilito appena due mesi prima. La gara della Ferrari 512M si concluse a causa di problemi all’alternatore, ma per la prima volta nella stagione 1970 le Porsche erano state superate con un margine piuttosto consistente e la Ferrari aveva inconfutabilmente dimostrato che il divario tecnico era stato finalmente colmato. La tappa successiva per Ickx e Giunti fu la 1000 km di Kyalami, in Sudafrica. Nonostante fosse una gara non valida per il campionato, Jo Siffert, difensore del titolo 1970, e Kurt Ahrens, secondo classificato, parteciparono con una Porsche 917K ufficiale. La Ferrari dominò in assoluto, aggiudicandosi la pole position e vincendo la gara con due giri di vantaggio. Nel 1971 la 512M fu scelta da alcuni team clienti, mentre i team ufficiali si concentrarono sulla 312PB da 3,0 litri. La classe da 5,0 litri fu abbandonata nel 1972. La Ferrari 512M qui presentata ha il telaio numero 1024. Questa vettura rimase invenduta nel 1970 in configurazione 512S Berlinetta. 12a vettura su 25 costruite, la 1024 fu convertita in 512M tra il 1970 e il 1971. Il 15 aprile 1971 fu venduta nuova all’italiano Dr. Alfredo Belponer (fattura numero 1068/71). Il team di Belponer si chiamava Scuderia Brescia Corse e il suo pilota numero uno era Marsilio Pasotti, anch’egli di Brescia. Fu uno dei piloti amatoriali italiani più celebri e corse con lo pseudonimo di “Pam”. Iniziò a gareggiare nelle cronoscalate e continuò fino ad arrivare alla Formula Junior e a guidare vetture touring e sportive. Ferrari Maserati Shell Challenge di Spa ed ai Ferrari Racing Days al Nürburgring. Nel 2000 fu guidata da Mike Colucci nelle gare del Ferrari Historic Challenge nel 9° Cavallino Classic annuale di Moroso, Florida. Nell’estate del 2000 fu guidata da Davies alle gare del Ferrari Historic Challenge al Road America, Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin. Questa Ferrari 512M, numero di telaio 1024, completamente restaurata in Florida nel 2001, rappresenta una rarissima opportunità di acquistare uno dei soli 15 esemplari di Ferrari 512M mai costruiti. Tra le venticinque 512 prodotte, alcune furono guidate oltre il limite di vita per cui erano state progettate e quindi abbandonate, altre furono distrutte in seguito ad incidenti. Solo un numero ristretto di esemplari ebbe la fortuna di rimanere nelle mani di collezionisti privati, ex piloti ed appassionati. Nel costante crescendo del fascino e del valore collezionistico di queste vetture, aumentó anche il desiderio di possederle e, di conseguenza, molte delle 512 che erano state abbandonate riapparvero, alcune dopo essere state ricostruite rimettendo insieme i pezzi rimasti o parti delle vetture distrutte in gara. Il telaio 1024 ha un passato impeccabile e rimane una delle poche 512 che sono riuscite a sopravvivere intatte. Nonostante si ritenga che il numero di 512 costruite fosse 25, solo 22 furono realmente completate e si suppone che appena 16 sopravvivano ancora oggi. Di queste, solo 4 conservano ancora la configurazione 512S e 12 le specifiche della versione “M”. Difficile da reperire sul mercato, questa splendida vettura da competizione rappresenta un’occasione rarissima di investire in una sportiva Ferrari di rara bellezza, un pezzo di storia strappato direttamente all’epopea delle corse sportive internazionali. È pronta per essere iscritta e guidata nella maggior parte delle gare e degli eventi storici più prestigiosi di tutto il mondo. Chassis no. 1024

  • ITAItaly
  • 2008-05-18
Hammer price
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1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta Competizione

THE EX-JO SCHLESSER, 1,000 KMS OF MONLTHERY THIRD PLACE FINISHER, ALL ALLOY EX-JO SCHLESSER, CLASSIFICATA TERZA ALLA 1,000 KM DI MONTLHERY, INTERAMENTE IN LAGA LEGGERA Specifications: 300bhp 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V-12 engine; three Weber 46DCF/3 carburetors; four-speed manual gearbox; solid rear axle with semi elliptical leaf springs; independent front suspension with parallel A-arms and coil springs; four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400mm (94.5") By the late fifties it was apparent that Ferrari had perfected the dual-purpose gran turismo automobile with his line of 250 GTs. The Colombo-designed V-12 had evolved into a powerful engine. More importantly in racing, where it is said, "To finish first, you must first finish," it was reliable. That reliability carried over to 250 GTs that never saw the race track, creating confident and satisfied owners. The 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta was introduced at the Paris Show in October 1959. Built on a shorter, 2400mm wheelbase, chassis than its predecessor, and - for the first time on a production Ferrari model - fitted with four wheel disc brakes. In the process, the Ferrari engineers together with Pinin Farina and Scaglietti created one of the most beautiful automobiles of all time, a succinct, straightforward and purposeful blending of form following function that excels in all aspects. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is unmistakably Ferrari. It is devoid of superfluous bulk, features or embellishments. It is aerodynamic. The driver’s visibility from the ample greenhouse is good. The corners of the car are tightly wrapped around the wheels. Its gently rounded masses speak unambiguously of potency and power. 165 examples were constructed from 1959-1962. Scaglietti built both steel and aluminum bodies, often mixing features according to client’s wishes and manufacturing expediency. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is the last true dual-purpose gran turismo built in quantity by Ferrari – or anyone else for that matter. It is a milestone that marks the end of a legendary age when GT cars were driven to the greatest races, luggage unloaded, race numbers applied and driven to victories. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta’s list of competition successes is so long as to be pointless to recount in detail, but it includes GT category wins at Le Mans in 1960 and 1961, Tour de France wins in 1960, 1961 and 1962 and of course Stirling Moss’s pair of Goodwood Tourist Trophy wins in 1960 and 1961. Quick, powerful, strong, lightweight, balanced, fast, responsive, reliable and, perhaps above all, indescribably beautiful, compact, purposeful and elemental, Ferrari’s 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is a high point even in Ferrari’s history of great automobiles. Jo Schlesser Jo Schlesser was a man with racing in his blood. He drove on the ragged edge, a style attested to by a litany of crashes. Each time, however, he immediately began looking for his next ride, and his persistence paid off with a wide variety of racing opportunities – from club racing and hill climbs to Grand Prix races – and eventually, Formula One. Born Joseph Schlesser on May 18, 1928 in the French territory of Madagascar, he did not begin racing until the age of 24. After a career driving a variety of sports cars, including 2209 GT, he began to break into the top levels of racing, participating in the 1966 and 1967 German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring, driving Formula 2 Spec Matra-Cosworths Unfortunately for Jo, his first Formula One opportunity came at the 1968 French Grand Prix at Rouen-Les-Essarts. Honda’s team driver, John Surtees denounced their new experimental magnesium-framed air-cooled car as a “potential deathtrap”, and declined to drive it. Schlesser, a local hero, was given the opportunity, which he accepted with characteristic enthusiasm. Unfortunately Surtees words proved prophetic, and Schlesser lost control in a fast downhill sweeper and the car hit the wall, coming to rest upside down in flames. With a full load of fuel and magnesium structure, Jo Schlesser never had a chance. Honda, for its part, withdrew from Formula One at the end of the 1968 season. 2209 GT – The Birth of a Legend 2209 GT was officially delivered October 19th, 1960 to Ardilio Tavoni of Modena, bearing Italian plate MO 60578 – although Tavoni is widely thought to have been acting for the well-known racing driver, Jo Schlesser. And indeed, the Ferrari was put to work almost immediately when it was entered in the 1000 Kms of Montlhèry just four days later, driven by Schlesser and co-driver Andrè Simon. A brand new car, by all reports 2209 GT performed flawlessly, and Schlesser and Simon finished a very respectable third overall. The next race on record was at Monza on March 12th, 1961, the Coppa St. Ambroeus, where it was driven by Alessandro (Sandro) Zafferri to 3rd in the 3 litre class. Almost certainly other races ensued, but RM Auctions was unable to verify any that could be attributed to 2209 GT with certainty. In any event, in November of 1962 Milan native Gianni Roghi became the Ferrari’s second registered owner, with Milan registration number MI 702190. Several races followed with Roghi driving: June 2, 1963 XXV Coppa Della Consuma Hill Climb 3rd in Class, 28th OA 1963 Coppa Pisa 3rd in Class 1963 Coppa Inter-Europa 6th in Class, 8th OA 1963 Coppa Città d’ Asagio N/A No records have been found of any further racing events for 2209 GT, but unfortunately in late 1966 or 1967 Roghi crashed the car. While the extent of the damage is not known, Roghi sold his beloved Ferrari to Tullio Lombardo, also from Milan, on January 23rd 1967, the car retaining the Milan registration number. On December 22nd, 1967, Lombardo sold 2209 GT to Gastone Crepaldi, the Ferrari concessionaire for the Lombardy region, and in 1968, he is believed to have commissioned Carrozzeria Sports Cars (Piero Drogo) in Modena to construct a new body following a design by Tadini. At the same time, the engine was replaced with a freshly rebuilt 250 GTE engine, 4921 GT. On May 29th 1969, 2209 GT, now wearing its smart new Drogo coachwork, was sold to Miss Maryvonne Lassus of St. Vite, France. She kept the car for just two years before selling it to Eric Russli Birchler of Paris on February 18th 1971. Eventually, Birchler sold 2209 GT to Bernard Cros-Lafage. At this point the story gets interesting, as the car was reported stolen in 1978. As it turns out, it seems most likely that Cros-Lafage had some sort of dispute with a garage over repairs or storage, and the car was sold to settle the account. Later, after a thorough investigation by the French police and the UK Fine Arts squad, the ownership of the car was confirmed, and all subsequent owners have enjoyed clear title. In any event, the next owner was a M. Marty in Toulouse, who repainted the car metallic blue. On July 9th, 1979, UK resident Stuart Passey became the ninth owner, via dealer Michael Lavers, registered on UK plates "SWB 70". At this point, Passey commissioned marque specialists DK Engineering to conduct a total restoration. This four-year project included new alloy panels in the style of a SWB ’61. The car was refinished in its original Jo Schlesser Madagascar racing colors of white with twin green stripes. Upon completion of the restoration, 2209 GT (at this point still with 250 GTE engine 4921 GT, stamped 2209 A) was shown extensively by Passey, including the 20th anniversary FOC meeting, at Oulton Park in 1987. Other outings included the Silverstone Historic Festival and the FF40 International Ferrari Concours in 1992, the Goodwood Festival of Speed and the FOC Concours at Cottesbrooke Hall in 1994, and the Tour de France Auto event in 1996. In January of 2003, 2209 GT was acquired by Frank Sytner, who resold the car in December of that year to the vendor, who repainted the car in yellow with green stripes. During 2004 and 2005 he campaigned the car successfully in the Shell Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge series. After a shunt in a historic race in Portugal while driven by a friend, the vendor elected to return the car to its original livery of white with green stripes. The vendor, a lifelong Ferrari enthusiast, then decided to embark on a program to return 2209 GT to its exact original configuration. The car was shipped to Ferrari Classiche for metal testing and dimensional tests which confirmed its originality. Some small modifications were carried out to correct repairs that had been done to the chassis during the car’s life - maintaining almost all of the original parts. The body then underwent a complete restoration bringing it back to its original drawings. Whilst at the factory the present owner had a new 250 GT SWB block made specifically to be fitted into the car. The vendor then had the engine rebuilt to competition spec. as it left the factory in 1960. Today, 2209 GT is pristine, fresh from restoration and fully sorted. It has been built as the weapon of choice for an historic racer, but will be equally at home on the Tour Auto – or the concours lawn at Villa d’ Este or on circuits in the Ferrari Historic Challenge. Summary Painstaking historical research ensured that all details, including paint and trim were returned to exactly what they were when Jo Schlesser took delivery. The quality of the restoration, the originality of the components, and the authenticity of the details all combine to allow the successful bidder to be the first to enjoy 2209 GT exactly as it was when Jo Schlesser lined up for that first race at Montlhèry – as a four day old, brand new racing Ferrari. The 250 GT SWB has it all – power, style, and razor quick handling. Even the standard steel cars led full lives on the track. Only a handful of cars were factory built for special customers as all-out competition cars, with alloy bodies, special engines, and anything else the client wanted. Jo Schlesser was one of those rare people who could have anything he wanted – and 2209GT was his idea of the perfect Ferrari. It still is. Note: The car has recently completed a comprehensive restoration during which the modifications made to the car have been reversed in order to return s/n 2209 GT to its original configuration. Upon completion of restoration photos will be available at www.rmauctions.com ITALIANTEXT specifiche: 300 CV, 2953 cc di cilindrata con albero a camme in testa, motore 12 cilindri a V; tre carburatori Weber 46DCF/3; cambio manuale a quattro rapporti; asse posteriore con molle a balestra semi ellittiche; sospensioni anteriori indipendenti con bracci ad A paralleli e molle elicoidali; freni a disco sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2400 mm (94.5") Verso la fine degli anni '50 era evidente che Ferrari avesse perfezionato la sua gran turismo seguendo la linea dei 250 GT. Il propulsore V12 progettato da Colombo era diventato un motore potente. Inoltre, aspetto ancora più importante per le gare, dove: "Per arrivare primi bisogna innanzitutto arrivare alla fine della corsa", era un motore affidabile. Questa affidabilità venne trasferita alle vetture 250 GT, le quali non entrarono mai in un autodromo, ma hanno contribuito ad incrementare la fiducia e la soddisfazione dei clienti. La 250 GT SWB (Berlinetta a passo corto) venne presentata al Salone dell'Automobile di Parigi nell'ottobre 1959. Costruita su un telaio accorciato d sino a 2400 mm e - per la prima volta su un modello di serie Ferrari - equipaggiata con freni a disco, la 250 GT SWB mise in evidenza il lavoro svolto da Carlo Chiti e Giotto Bizzarrini sull'aerodinamica. Ne scaturì la creazione di un involucro più compatto. In questa fase, gli ingegneri Ferrari in collaborazione con Pininfarina e Scaglietti crearono una delle automobili più belle di tutti i tempi, un mix concentrato e chiaro di forme funzionali ed esteticamente straordinarie sotto tutti i punti di vista. La 250 GT SWB Berlinetta è indubbiamente una Ferrari. Priva di elementi superflui, essenziale e pulita. Incarna il concetto di aerodinamica. La visibilità del guidatore garantita dalla grande superficie vetrata è ottima. Gli angoli della carrozzeria sono ben avvolti attorno alle ruote. I volumi arrotondati della carrozzeria comunicano chiaramente forza e potenza. I 165 esemplari prodotti vennero costruiti tra il 1959 e il 1962. Scaglietti costruì sia le scocche in acciaio sia quelle in alluminio, spesso mescolando le caratteristiche secondo i desideri dei clienti e delle esigenze della produzione. La 250 GT SWB Berlinetta è l'ultima vera Gran Turismo costruita in volumi elevati da Ferrari, o da qualsiasi altro costruttore. Rappresenta una pietra miliare che segna la fine di un'epoca leggendaria quando le automobili GT partecipavano alle corse più belle, senza bagagli, con i numeri applicati sulla carrozzeria e conquistavano la vittoria. L'elenco dei successi conquistati dalla 250 GT SWB Berlinetta è lungo e non avrebbe senso citarli tutti. Basta ricordare le vittorie nella categoria GT a Le Mans nel 1960 e nel 1961, la vittoria al Tour de France nel 1960, 1961 e 1962 e naturalmente la doppietta di Stirling Moss nel trofeo Goodwood Tourist Trophy nel 1960 e nel 1961. Scattante, potente, forte, leggera, bilanciata, veloce, reattiva, affidabile e, aspetto forse più importante, incredibilmente bella, compatta, decisa e semplice, la Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta rappresenta uno dei momenti più importanti nella storia Ferrari di grandi automobili. Jo Schlesser Jo Schlesser era un uomo che aveva le corse nel sangue. Guidava al limite, come dimostrano gli innumerevoli incidenti. Ogni volta, tuttavia, pensava subito alla gara successiva e la sua persistenza lo ripagò offrendogli innumerevoli opportunità – dalle corse di club a quelle in salita, ai Gran Premi – e anche, la Formula Uno. Joseph Schlesser nacque il 18 maggio, 1928 nel territorio francese d'oltremare del Madagascar e cominciò a correre in macchina solo all'età di 24 anni. Dopo una carriera trascorsa a guidare diverse vetture sportive, compresa 2209 GT, cominciò a farsi strada nel mondo delle corse di alto livello, partecipando nel 1966 e nel 1967 al Gran Premio di Germania sul circuito del Nürburgring, al volante di una vettura di Formula 2 Speciale Matra-Cosworths Sfortunatamente per Jo, la sua prima occasione di correre in Formula Uno si presentò nel 1968 al Gran Premio di Francia a Rouen-Les-Essarts. Il pilota del team Honda, John Surtees, dichiarò che la nuova vettura raffreddata ad aria con telaio sperimentale in magnesio era una “potenziale trappola mortale” e si rifiutò di guidarla. A Schlesser, un eroe locale, venne offerta questa opportunità ed egli accettò con il suo solito entusiasmo. Purtroppo le parole di Surtees si rivelarono profetiche, e Schlesser perse il controllo della macchina in un tratto in discesa schiantandosi contro un muro, capovolgendosi con la vettura in fiamme. Con il serbatoio del carburante pieno e la struttura in magnesio, Jo Schlesser non ebbe alcuna possibilità di salvarsi. La Honda, da parte sua, si ritirò dalla Formula Uno alla fine della stagione 1968. 2209 GT – La nascita di una leggenda La 2209 GT venne ufficialmente consegnata nuova il 19 ottobre 1960 a Ardilio Tavoni di Modena, con la targa italiana MO 60578, sebbene si sia sempre pensato che Tavoni avesse agito per conto del famoso pilota Jo Schlesser. Questa Ferrari venne, infatti, messa all'opera quasi immediatamente con l'iscrizione alla 1000 Km di Montlhèry solo quattro giorni più tardi; al volante sedeva Schlesser e il co-pilota Andrè Simon. Nuova di fabbrica, la 2209 GT si comportò in modo ineccepibile e Schlesser e Simon tagliarono il traguardo conquistando una rispettabilissima terza posizione. La successiva gara fu quella di Monza, il 12 marzo 1961, in occasione della Coppa St. Ambroeus dove fu guidata da Sandro Zafferi, per attestarsi 3° all'interno della categoria da 3 litri. Sicuramente vi furono altre corse, ma RM Auctions non è riuscita a rintracciare riscontri positivi attribuibili con certezza alla 2209 GT. In ogni caso, nel novembre 1962 il pilota milanese Gianni Roghi divenne il secondo proprietario di questa Ferrari. Seguirono numerose corse con Roghi al volante: 2 Giugno 1963 XXV Coppa della Consuma, 3° della Categoria, Gara in salita 28° nella Classifica Finale 1963 Coppa Pisa 3° della Categoria 1963 Coppa Inter-Europa 6° della Categoria, 8° della Classifica Finale 1963 Coppa Città di Asiago Risultati non disponibili Non è stata ritrovata alcuna documentazione attestante la partecipazione della 2209 GT ad altre gare, ma purtroppo verso la fine del 1966 o nel 1967 Roghi ebbe un incidente. Sebbene non si conosca la portata dei danni subiti dalla vettura, Roghi vendette la sua amata Ferrari a Tullio Lombardo, anch'egli di Milano, il 23 gennaio 1967. Il 22 dicembre 1967 Lombardo vendette la 2209 GT a Gastone Crepaldi, il concessionario Ferrari per la Lombardia, e si ritiene che quest'ultimo abbia chiesto alla Carrozzeria Sports Cars (Piero Drogo) di Modena di costruire una nuova carrozzeria sul progetto di Tadini. Nel contempo, il motore venne sostituito con uno nuovo 250 GTE, 4921 GT. Il 29 maggio 1969 la 2209 GT, ora vestita con una nuovissima carrozzeria Drogo, venne venduta a Maryvonne Lassus di St. Vite, Francia. La nuova proprietaria tenne l'automobile solo per due anni e poi la vendette a Eric Russli Birchler di Parigi il 18 febbraio 1971. Infine, Birchler vendette la 2209 GT a Bernard Cros-Lafage. A questo punto la storia diventa interessante, infatti nel 1978 viene denunciato il furto dell'automobile. Come si scoprì poi in seguito, Cros-Lafage aveva probabilmente avuto un diverbio con l'officina in merito alle riparazioni o al deposito e l'automobile sarebbe stata pertanto venduta per saldare il conto. Successivamente, dopo approfondite indagini da parte della polizia francese e della squadra inglese delle Belle Arti, la proprietà dell'auto venne confermata e tutti i successivi proprietari hanno quindi potuto ottenere un regolare certificato di proprietà. In ogni caso, il successivo proprietario fu il Sig. Marty di Toulouse, il quale verniciò l'auto in blu metallizzato e la immatricolò con la targa francese "6661VP 75". Il 9 luglio 1979, l'inglese Stuart Passey divenne il nono proprietario, tramite il concessionario Michael Lavers e immatricolò l'auto con la targa inglese "SWB 70". A questo punto Passey incaricò gli specialisti della DK Engineering di effettuare un restauro totale dell'auto. Il progetto durò quattro anni e incluse il montaggio di nuovi pannelli in lega realizzati secondo lo stile di una SWB ’61. L'auto venne rifinita con i colori originali da gara che Jo Schlesser utilizzò in Madagascar, ovvero con una striscia verde. A restauro ultimato, la 2209 GT (a questo punto ancora con il motore 250 GTE 4921 GT, con stampigliatura 2209 A) venne esibita per lungo tempo da Passey, anche in occasione della conferenza tenuta per celebrare il 20° anniversario dell'FOC, all'Oulton Park nel 1987. Altre uscite inclusero il Silverstone Historic Festival e l'FF40 International Ferrari Concours nel 1992, il Goodwood Festival di Speed, l'FOC Concours a Cottesbrooke Hall nel 1994 e il Tour de France automobilistico nel 1996. Nel gennaio 2003, la 2209 GT venne acquistata da Frank Sytner, il quale la rivendette nel dicembre dello stesso anno al venditore, il quale, a sua volta, la riverniciò in giallo con strisce verdi. Nel 2004 e nel 2005 egli presentò con successo l'automobile alla Shell Ferrari Maserati Historic Challenge. Dopo un tamponamento durante una gara in Portogallo, mentre al volante sedeva un amico, il venditore decise di riportare l'auto al suo colore originale, ossia il bianco con strisce verdi. Il venditore, un appassionato Ferrari sta, decise d'iniziare un progetto per ripristinare la configurazione originale della 2209 GT. Ha inviato il telaio è la carrozzeria a Ferrari Classiche per un ispezione dettagliata. Il telaio e stato analizzato sia a livello dimensionale che metallografico e i riscontri tecnici ne hanno confermato l'originalità. Inoltre si è proceduto al ripristino delle riparazioni mal eseguite durante la vita di questa automobile mantenendo quasi la totalità dei componenti originali. Si e inoltre proceduto al restauro completo della carrozzeria riportandola fedelmente alle forme originali. Il proprietario attuale ha poi richiesto a Ferrari Classiche di fabbricare un nuovo blocco motore 250GT SWB che è stato rimontato sulla vettura sempre in configurazione competizione del '60. Oggi, la 2209 GT è in condizioni perfette, fresca di restauro e pronta ad affrontare qualsiasi prova. È la vettura ideale per un pilota di auto storiche, ma si troverebbe ugualmente a suo agio presso un Tour Auto o ppure ad un concorso sui prati immacolati di Villa d'Este o sulle piste del Ferrari Historic Challenge. Riepilogo Le scrupolose ricerche storiche garantiscono che tutti i dettagli relativi a vernice e sellerie interne sono stati fedelmente ripristinati rispettando la configurazione originale della vettura ritirata da Jo Schleser. La qualità dell'opera di restauro, la provenienza originale dei componenti e l'autenticità dei dettagli permetteranno al futuro acquirente di utilizzare con piacere una 2209 GT originale, con la stessa configurazione a disposizione di Jo Schlesser nel momento in cui si schierò sulla griglia di partenza per partecipare alla prima corsa a Montlhèry con una Ferrari da corsa nuova fiammante, con quattro giorni di vita. La 250 GT SWB ha tutto ciò che serve: potenza, stile e maneggevolezza straordinaria. Anche le auto di serie in acciaio hanno vissuto appieno le loro esperienze sulla pista. Solo un numero ridotto di automobili vennero costruite da Ferrari per alcuni clienti speciali in versioni totalmente da corsa, con scocche in lega, propulsori speciali e qualsiasi altro particolare richiesto dal cliente. Jo Schlesser fu una delle poche persone che riuscì ad avere tutto ciò che desiderava – e la 2209GT incarnava il suo concetto di Ferrari perfetta. E lo incarna tutt'ora. Nota: Sì é proceduto ad un restauro completo della carrozzeria ripristinando fedelmente le forme originali. Le modifiche comprendono l'abolizione dei finestrini in plexiglas, lo spostamento del bocchettone della benzina e la modifica delle prese d’aria anteriori. Addendum 1. Please note that due to circumstances beyond the vendor’s control this vehicle is presented in its constituent parts, prior to its completion by Ferrari Classiche. This will provide prospective bidders the opportunity to inspect all components prior to assembly, thereby assuring the purchaser complete transparency regarding authenticity. 2. The vendor, a prominent Ferrari afficionado, will ensure that the most exacting standards are applied throughout the restoration process, and thereby assure the purchaser that the vehicle receives the most precise and thoroughly researched restoration by Ferrari Classiche to return it to its original glory. 3. The successful bidder will receive the car between 120 and 150 days following the auction, completed and in pristine condition. This restoration will also include the exchange and installation of a newly rebuilt and fully certified competition engine made by and stamped by Ferrari, with only testing mileage. 4. It is important to note that the status of the car is actually fully duty and tax paid in the EEC, rather than taxes due as noted in the catalog. 5. In addition the car is be offered with a Ferrari Passport, as well as Racing and FIA Documentation. 6. Given the circumstances of this offering, the vendor has agreed to accept a non-refundable deposit by the successful bidder equal to one half of the total purchase price, under RM’s Catalogue terms. The balance will be due within ten business days of notification that the car is completed, or upon delivery if the successful bidder (or his agent) takes possession of the vehicle before completion. ITALIANTEXT 1. Nota : purtroppo, date le circostanze non dipendenti dal venditore, la vettura viene presentata così come si trova, attualmente in corso di restauro presso Ferrari Classiche. In questo modo offriamo ai compratori la possibilità di visionare tutti i componenti prima del loro assemblaggio, a dimostrazione della completa trasparenza e dell’alta qualità del restauro. 2. Il venditore, un affezionato cliente Ferrari, vuole assicurare che i più alti standard sono e saranno applicati al restauro, e che il compratore acquisterà una vettura riportata al massimo del suo antico splendore. 3. L’acquirente riceverà la vettura in 120/150 giorni dalla fine dell’asta, finita e in perfette condizioni. Questo restauro includerà la sostituzione del motore con uno nuovo di tipo competizione completamente revisionato e numerato dalla Ferrari, e con solamente i km di prova. 4. ci teniamo a sottolineare che allo stato attuale tutte le tasse e i dazi sono stati pagati nella comunità europea, come descritto sul catalogo. 5. In più questa vettura è offerta con il Passaporto Ferrari, così come quello Fia e la documentazione sportiva. 6. Date le circostanze di questa offerta, il venditore ha accettato un deposito non rimborsabile, a garanzia del compratore pari alla metà del prezzo di aggiudicazione, secondo i termini descritti nel catalogo RM. Il saldo dovrà avvenire in dieci giorni dopo la comunicazione del termine dei lavori di restauro, o prima del ritiro se il compratore decidesse di ritirala prima della fine di essi. Chassis no. 2209 GT

  • ITAItaly
  • 2007-05-20
Hammer price
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2012 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport "300"

1,200 bhp, 7,993 cc DOHC 64-valve intercooled W-16 engine with four turbochargers, seven-speed, dual-clutch, semi-automatic sequential transmission, front and rear double-wishbone suspension, and four-wheel carbon-ceramic disc brakes with rear airbrake. Wheelbase: 106.7 in. Chassis 300 of only 300 Veyron coupes built; the purest iteration of an engineering masterpiece and the last chassis number of Veyron coupes. One of just eight U.S.-specification Veyron 16.4 Super Sports built Produces 1,200 horsepower and a top speed of 258 mph Displayed by Bugatti at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show Offered by its original owner; showing only 308 miles from new Fully serviced by Braman Bugatti of Miami in May 2015 Offered with a unique pre-owned warranty from Bugatti Certified, including two years of service and a set of complimentary tires While the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport’s performance credentials are truly otherworldly, perhaps what is more interesting are the realities associated with traveling at 258 mph and what the Veyron needs to do in order to achieve such an incredible top speed: • At its electronically limited top speed of 258 mph, the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport consumes fuel at a rate of 1.7 gallons a minute. At that rate, the 26.4-gallon tank will run out of fuel in 10 minutes. • At its top speed of 258 mph, the Super Sport’s 10 radiators will breathe in over 8,000 pounds of air in an hour. • While the Super Sport’s special Michelin tires are designed to last 10,000 miles in normal driving conditions, the tires will only last 15 minutes at the car’s 258-mph top speed. These mind-boggling statistics only tell a snippet of the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport’s story. It is a cost-no-object genius piece that boasts absurd figures; it was developed more closely with the aerospace industry than with the automotive industry; and on paper it reads like a car designer’s most fevered and thrilling dreams. It pushed all the boundaries of what was thought to be possible with an automobile, and it shattered numerous records. This Bugatti was purchased new by its current collector and delivered in August 2012 as one of forty-eight Super Sports constructed and only eight examples built to U.S.-specifications. As a "Super Sport," it has 200 more horsepower, larger turbos, and two additional fuel pumps, and it is 100 pounds lighter and slightly re-styled, with larger, re-shaped intakes. The Super Sport also boasts distinctive NACA ducts on the roof, replacing the more traditional air intakes fitted to its roof. It retains chassis number 300 and would thus be the last of the coupes, which were limited to 300 units. It was born as one of forty-eight 1,200-horsepower Veyron 16.4 Super Sports and was one of eight delivered new to the United States, perhaps being the only example in this color combination. As evidenced by documentation accompanying the car, 269 of the 308 miles on the odometer were accumulated by Bugatti at Molsheim during Bugatti’s standard and extensive pre-delivery testing. As a result, it is presented in virtually as-new condition. Since its delivery, it has been very well preserved and regularly maintained. Braman Bugatti in Miami carried out its annual service in November 2013 and it received another annual service by them in May 2015. Just this past March, this Super Sport traveled to Geneva, where it was displayed by Bugatti at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show, alongside the very first Veyron (this Super Sport’s stablemate, also offered here), in a celebration of the Veyron’s 10-year production run. Additionally, RM Sotheby’s is proud to announce that Bugatti Automobiles S.A.S., through their Bugatti Certified program, has offered a unique pre-owned warranty for this very special Veyron. Due to its flawless service history, the purchaser shall receive a two-year warranty plus two additional years of service free of charge. Additionally, Bugatti shall provide a set of new tires free of charge when necessary. Needless to say, such an offer is utterly unprecedented and its value alone comfortably exceeds $100,000. Should you have any questions regarding this very special gesture from Bugatti, please contact an RM Sotheby’s representative, and be sure to inquire about the extensive list of accessories that accompany the car. To call the Veyron the most important sports car of this generation or any other is, quite simply, an understatement. With utter disregard to cost, it was built to be superlative in all respects and prove the brand’s relentless pursuit of superiority. No other car could ever carry this mantle because no other car will ever logically benefit from the same production budget that the Veyron had. Bugatti went to great lengths to ensure that even the most minute detail, which will never been seen by even the most astute buyer, was made of the finest materials on earth and finessed to the most razor-sharp tolerances, regardless of cost. The Veyron is, therefore, the benchmark against which all other 200-mph, ultra-high horsepower supercars will be measured. This car represents a moment in time that today’s enthusiasts will look back upon for years to come: the unrepeatable opportunity to purchase “300” alongside "001" at the very same auction event. Together, they represent Bugatti’s debate-ending knock-out punch in a decade-long domination of sports car supremacy. Addendum Automobiles Ettore Bugatti has generously extended an invitation to the next owner of this Veyron to tour their facilities in Molsheim, Alsace, France. The visit will also include an opportunity to test drive a Veyron. Furthermore, the next owner will be invited to the viewing of the Veyron’s successor in September, for which the specific date and location will be provided after purchase. This invitation is in addition to any accompaniments made available in the catalogue description. Chassis no. VF9SG2C27DM795300

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1963 FERRARI 250 GT/L LUSSO BERLINETTA

The ex-Steve McQueen 1963 FERRARI 250 GT/L LUSSO BERLINETTA DESIGN BY PININFARINA; COACHWORK BY SCAGLIETTI Chassis No. 4891 Engine No. 4891 Marrone Metallizzato, Beige leather interior Engine: V-12, 2,953cc, three Weber dual throat carburetors, 250bhp at 7,000 rpm; Gearbox: 4-speed manual; Suspension: front, independent with coil springs and tubular shock absorbers; rear, live axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and tubular shock absorbers; Brakes: four-wheel discs. Left hand drive. Perfection is approached progressively, in stages and steps. For Steve McQueen the pursuit of perfection began in 1955 when he, along with some 200 others, auditioned for one of two openings in Lee Strasberg's Actors' Studio. He and Martin Landau where selected for those exclusive positions. The following years saw McQueen appear in several New York-based television productions before continuing his television career in Hollywood with roles like Josh Randall in "Trackdown". Creating characters, an acting style and a persona which would become legendary, Steve McQueen was on his way. McQueen landed his first starring movie role in 1958 in the science fiction milestone "The Blob" while building his television reputation with the series "Wanted: Dead or Alive" which developed the John Randall character into a five-year series, from 1958 through 1961, totaling 73 episodes. With this role Steve McQueen became an instantly recognized acting celebrity, but the best was yet to come. From the late 50's on McQueen managed parallel careers in television with "Wanted: Dead or Alive" and in film with movies and roles of steadily increasing significance. He achieved breakout success in "The Magnificent Seven" in 1960, an environment of unusual complexity, featuring a strong group of charismatic actors. Steve McQueen's presence on camera, although overmatched on paper by the accomplishments, reputations, billing and experience of established stars like Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Charles Bronson, Robert Vaughn and James Coburn, always drew the eyes and attention of theatergoers. The McQueen legend was anchored in bedrock in 1963 with his role as Captain Hilts in "The Great Escape." Once again surrounded by a stellar cast including James Garner, (Sir) Richard Attenborough, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasance, James Coburn and David McCallum, Steve McQueen's portrayal of Hilts, the baseball-playing loner American escape artist, combined dedication, bravery, determination and bravado with a motorcycle chase that set the stage for later McQueen driving/riding roles in "Bullitt" and "Le Mans". McQueen was the king of cool, with a self-deprecating casualness that only enhanced his charm, capability and charisma. His fondness for automobiles, motorcycles, toys and generally anything mechanical permeated his life, both on-screen and off. His career was on a roll in early 1963 when Steve McQueen and his wife Neile Adams walked into Otto Zipper's Wilshire Boulevard showroom in Santa Monica and left behind a check that made Steve's years at California's Boys Republic seem a distant memory. It was the deposit on a new Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso Berlinetta, the car offered here. The Ferrari 250 GT Enzo Ferrari had begun his company's own quest for the perfect gran turismo in 1954, in a fitting parallel with Steve McQueen's 1955 acceptance into The Actors' Studio. Ferrari's vehicle was the 250 GT Europa. Powered by a development of the original Ferrari V-12 engine designed by Gioacchino Colombo, the first 3-liter 250 GT Europa with three Weber carburetors gave some 250bhp. Its chassis was Ferrari's first road car with coil spring independent front suspension. For Ferrari the creation of the 250 GT Europa spelled commercial success. Although only thirty-six examples were built, it led directly to Ferrari's next series-produced gran turismo, the 250 GT bodied by Boano and its successor Ellena to a design by Pinin Farina. Built from 1956 through 1958, production of the 250 GT Boano/Ellena berlinettas amounted to some 130 cars. They established a pattern for future 250 GTs: voluptuous yet practical coachwork from the pen of Pinin Farina with Ferrari's race-developed and proven V-12 engine and refined parallel tube chassis with independent front and live axle rear suspension. As Steve McQueen managed parallel television and movie careers in Hollywood in the late Fifties, Ferrari launched the parallel development paths for the 250 GT with the 250 GT Berlinetta Tour de France, the 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta, California Spyder and the 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupé and Cabriolet. The reputation of the Ferrari 250 was also to take a leap in the next few years with the introduction and development of the 250 Testa Rossa sports-racers, automobiles that would become ubiquitous in the hands of the factory and numerous private entrants and would dominate the podium results of every major international and national race and series for the next five years and elevate the designation "250" into the top ranks of automobile history. Ferrari piled success upon success for the 250 GT, particularly with the 250 GT SWB and its successor the brilliant 250 GTO. Over 1,500 250 GT Pininfarina Coupes, Cabriolets and GTEs satisfied the market's demand for handsome, comfortable and satisfying to drive pure road-going gran turismos. Ferrari and Pininfarina, however, recognized that something more - more distinctive, more exclusive, more desirable - was needed to crown the 250 GT's history. Thus, late in 1962 at the Paris Show, Ferrari brought out the last of the 250 GT series, the 250 GT/L Lusso berlinetta. The Lusso combined the best features of the 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta and the 250 GTO in one beautiful, refined, quick, responsive, luxurious package, wrapped in one of Pininfarina's most successful designs. Built on the short 2,400mm wheelbase chassis modified to place the 250hp 3-liter Colombo-derived engine and engine-mounted 4-speed gearbox between the front wheels for more cockpit room, the Lusso drew from the GTO its precisely located rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and Watts linkage. Production bodies were executed in steel by Scaglietti following Pininfarina's design. And what a design it was. Instantly recognizable as a Pininfarina-designed Ferrari, the Lusso was at once slim, svelte and sexy, a masterpiece of design which was matched by its aerodynamic refinement, the direct result of Ferrari's and Pininfarina's experience with the round-tailed SWB and the cutoff Kamm tail of the GTO. Slim, light pillars supported a thin roof and left abundant glass area. The sloping back window flowed gracefully to the short rear deck and small but effective spoiler above the Kamm-back cutoff tail. "Lusso" means luxury and this elegantly designed Pininfarina creation was appropriately trimmed and appointed with thick carpets and soft leather. Its unusual instrument grouped the tachometer and speedometer in large pods at the dashboard's center and placed the engine instruments in a panel directly in front of the driver, giving the Lusso's interior its own hint of advanced design. Like all Ferraris the Lusso was a driver's car, with excellent visibility and a seriously driver-centric grouping of instruments and controls that said, no matter how "lusso" the interior and seductively sculpted the Pininfarina/Scaglietti body, that the 250 GT/L Lusso was intended to cover large amounts of ground quickly. In production for barely eighteen months, 350 would be built and they are today one of the most appreciated and sought of all Ferrari's front-engined V-12 powered gran turismos. This Car The history of this car, particularly during its initial ownership by Steve McQueen, is particularly well documented in the memories and photographs of William Claxton, McQueen's close friend and a professional photographer who was at one time the Art Director of Motor Trend magazine. Its current owner, Michael Regalia, has connected with many people who knew Steve McQueen when he owned the Lusso or worked on it for him. It therefore has a particularly rich and variegated history to enhance its appeal to serious collectors. McQueen took delivery in mid-1963 and he, Claxton and their wives immediately set out on a long road trip familiar to many attendees at the Monterey Historics and Pebble Beach Concours weekend. Starting from Los Angeles, the McQueens in their new Lusso and William and Peggy Claxton in their Porsche 356 SC took off up the California coast through Big Sur and Carmel to Monterey. From there they headed to San Francisco, then over the Sierras to Reno/Lake Tahoe, down through Death Valley and back to Southern California. Claxton has related in a recent Motor Trend article how McQueen would set up a rendezvous point then take off in the Lusso to arrive early "pretending to be bored waiting for us to arrive. It was a great time. He really loved that car." McQueen and the Lusso got some track time at Riverside in 1965 when he was doing an ad shoot for TAG watches in a Lola. In between shots McQueen, no doubt loath to see an empty track with nothing on it, went out in the Lusso. Richard Freshman recalls seeing it with Steve and Neile at the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. Steve's love of the Lusso was famous. Famed Porsche restorer Joe Cavagliere, recalls working as a valet parker at the time and vividly remembers that McQueen always parked it himself, the only celebrity who wouldn't let Joe park his (or her) car. It is featured in a number of photo shoots by William Claxton, including several with his wife Peggy, a professional model, and particularly a shoot with Steve McQueen and Peggy for Cosmopolitan. Serviced initially at Zipper's, McQueen later took it to Hollywood Sports Cars. It was repainted for McQueen by Lee Brown - who in recent years remembered the car and even retrieved a small can of carefully preserved (but now dry as a bone) touchup paint marked "McQueen Lusso." McQueen owned it for many years but eventually parted with the Lusso, perhaps in late 1967 when he acquired his Ferrari NART Spyder after experiencing one during the filming of "The Thomas Crown Affair." In 1973 it was with Charlie Hayes at Salon Ferrari in Santa Ana and it was there that Tom Sherwood purchased it in July 1973. Sherwood drove it to San Francisco where it was, to all intents and purposes, stored and unused for the next 24 years until it was spotted by Michael Regalia, past president of the Nethercutt Collection and the guiding light behind many of J.B. Nethercutt's concours-winning restorations, in 1995. Regalia calls it, at the time "the nicest, unmolested Lusso that needed a restoration in the world. Cosmetically it was not great, but it ran very well." It took him two years, until November 1997, to convince Sherwood to let it go. The Lusso's Steve McQueen history was undocumented at the time but shortly thereafter Mike Sheehan obtained and sent to Michael Regalia a copy of Luigi Chinetti's order from Otto Zipper showing the original color, Marrone, and the ultimate purchaser as Steve McQueen. Subsequent research throughout Southern California, aided by Steve McQueen's and Neile Adams' son Chad McQueen, introduced the owner to William Claxton, painter Lee Brown, and others who remembered the Lusso from Steve McQueen's ownership. Restoration was begun in late 2000. Mike Regalia disassembled the Lusso himself and stripped the body to bare metal which revealed completely rust-free and undamaged sheet metal and chassis. The engine and drivetrain were disassembled, found to be in excellent condition internally, then carefully rebuilt and reassembled by Mike Regalia. Doing all the metal work, disassembly, reassembly, chrome trim metalwork, suspension, mechanical work and detailing himself, he took his time and proceeding slowly until late 2004 when a call from Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance co-chairman Glen Mounger inviting the McQueen Lusso to the 2005 Concours accelerated the project. Tom Ryan and Prestige assisted with the paint and upholstery during the push to complete but with those exceptions - and of course specialized subcontracting like plating and machining - the entire restoration was done personally by Michael Regalia. Completed in time for the concours, additional work followed which resulted in earning Platinum Awards at the January 2006 Cavallino Classic and 2006 Concours on Rodeo and Best in Class at Amelia Island in March. It has subsequently been displayed at the Petersen Museum in Los Angeles and was invited by Ferrari to be displayed at the recent 60th Anniversary Concours in Maranello. In addition to the classic feature article in Motor Trend, the McQueen 250 GT/L Lusso is the subject of a feature article in the August 2007 issue of Robb Report and will be the subject of an in-production segment on television where it is driven by Chad McQueen. Its show awards, including standing up to the intense scrutiny of the expert judges at Cavallino Classic, demonstrate the high quality of its restoration and preparation by Michael Regalia. Presented in all respects in as-new condition, it comes with extensive documentation including a copy of the original order from Otto Zipper to Luigi Chinetti for Steve McQueen, Lee Brown's pint of touchup paint, various documentation and copies of photographs from William Claxton and even Steve McQueen's original California license plates. The rear plate is restored while the front plate - which the owner does not use because it detracts from the beauty of the Lusso's Pininfarina/Scaglietti lines - is still original and unrestored. Even when called "Marrone Metallizzato", Brown does not convey the particular appeal, attraction and distinctiveness of Steve McQueen's choice of color for his 250 GT/L Lusso. The rare chosen color beautifully complements the coachwork. It is instantly apparent that this is a very special Lusso, and instantly recognizable as the distinctive, appreciated, beloved possession of Steve McQueen, the king of cool. It is an example of the highest, best and most refined development of Ferrari's 250 GT series, the closest to perfection which the combined talents of Ferrari, Pininfarina and Scaglietti could bring this singularly important series of automobiles from Maranello. It will be an enthusiastically welcomed participant at any of the many exclusive events for which it is eligible. Now carefully restored, thoroughly and unquestionably documented and thoughtfully presented in impeccable cosmetic and mechanical condition which would have made the ex-mechanic in Steve McQueen proud, the McQueen Lusso's history is just beginning to unfold.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-08-16
Hammer price
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2011 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Bleu Nuit

The most important performance car of modern times A one-off “Blue Night” iteration Stunning blue carbon fiber and complementing polished aluminum Single ownership and very limited mileage In 1998, Volkswagen Group Chairman Ferdinand Piëch orchestrated the acquisition of the fabled Bugatti name and set about doing it justice. Issues went out to Piëch’s best engineers to design a car that could achieve a top speed of 400 km/h and an output over 1,000 horsepower. Most critics felt that the demands were ludicrous, but as T.E. Lawrence said, “The dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes to make it possible.” When the production Bugatti Veyron 16.4 made its debut at the Tokyo Motor Show in October 2005, a team of engineers and designers, the dreamers of the day, had made the impossible possible. They had produced an automobile of such otherworldly performance, value, sophistication, and engineering that it would shatter virtually every record with which the motoring community challenged it. To achieve Piëch’s goal of bringing a road-legal car to 250 mph, the engineers had married two V-8 engines together, to create a W-16 of nearly eight liters, and then, for good measure, they added four turbochargers. The result was, to say the least, powerful. An engineer recalled to National Geographic the first time that the Veyron’s engine was run at full throttle at Volkswagen’s Salzgitter, Germany, facility in 2001: the engine produced so much power, over 1,000 horsepower, that the heat of it completely overwhelmed the building’s exhaust system on the roof. No car had ever achieved such speeds before, and no one knew how the car’s components would react under such conditions; months would be spent engineering the cooling and exhaust systems on the Veyron. It was a process best compared to the early days of the international space race, except that engineers were in uncharted territory on the road, not in the sky. Almost every component on the Veyron was hand-built, with hundreds of hours devoted to such components as the 10 radiators, the carbon-ceramic disc brakes, and the tires that were produced especially for the model by Michelin. Eight specialists were specifically employed to build 16 massive cylinders by hand; this was a job that took a week from start to finish. Even though Bugatti stated 1,001 horsepower as the car’s standard output, most examples wound up producing around 1,030 to 1,040 horsepower in optimum conditions. This allowed the Veyron to reach its ultimate goal, smashing Andy Wallace’s speed in a McLaren F1 to set a Guinness Book of Records recognized top speed of 253.19 mph at Volkswagen’s top secret test facility, Ehra-Lessien, in Germany. The Veyron could even decelerate faster than it could accelerate, achieving a 100–0 km/h time of 2.2 seconds; it could come to a halt from its top speed in less than 10 seconds, if so required. All of this was shrouded in bodywork that was designed with “an uncompromising combination of the highest elegance and state-of-the-art technology.” Adorned with Bugatti’s trademark horseshoe grille, and designed with two-tone color schemes in mind, the design honors Bugatti’s fabled heritage while also speaking a very futuristic language. Attempting to top such excellence, Bugatti eventually developed a convertible version of the Veyron 16.4, the Grand Sport, which premiered three years later at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2008. The Grand Sport boasted a reinforced chassis, to compensate for the loss of the roof, and was equipped with a marginally taller windshield and modified rear bulkhead to fit a removable top. Other new features, including an integrated rearview camera embedded in the rearview mirror, daytime running lights, an upgraded sound system, and new wheels, would eventually find their way into future Veyron Coupes. While the Grand Sport retained the same world-beating top speed as the original Veyron, its top speed was electronically limited to 220 mph with the roof off. A total of 150 Grand Sports were made, of which this car is a one-off, fully custom commission by its original and present owner, who took delivery in late 2010. Dubbed Bleu Nuit, or “Blue Night,” by the factory, this car (chassis 4.010, identification number VF9SK2C24BM795010) was inspired by another factory one-off, the Sang Bleu, which featured blue-tinted carbon fiber bodywork. Bleu Nuit combines dark blue carbon fiber with polished aluminum inner inserts and upper front bumpers, with the lower front bumper painted silver metallic and unique “Bleu Nuit” script on the doors. A plethora of factory options includes blue brake calipers, fuel and oil caps painted a matching deep blue with “EB” logos and aluminum screws, aluminum polished roof rails, deep blue air intakes, and deep blue “Pur Sang” wheels, which were not available for purchase on the standard Grand Sport. Designed with elegant simplicity in mind, the interior is adorned in pleated leather over optional Sport Comfort seats, with quilted leather on the center tunnel that flows into a pleated design, mimicking that of the seats. Since its owner took delivery, Bleu Nuit has been exceptionally well-maintained in his respected private collection, and it remains virtually as-new, with less than 350 miles, which is proven by its accompaniment of recent service records. It is offered here, for the first time since it was built, as a one-of-a-kind commission from the company that made the supercar an art form; it is the pinnacle of automotive engineering and the very best in record-breaking performance, stunning design, and cost-no-object excellence. Chassis no. VF9SK2C24BM795010 Production no. 4.010

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
Hammer price
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1956 Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk II ‘Supersonic’ by Carrozzeria Ghia

The gentleman’s rocket ship A Space Age icon of the 1950s The only Supersonic built on an Aston Martin chassis Ex-Harry Schell, Robert M. Lee, and Richard Cowell Pebble Beach award-winning restoration In 1984, Ghia’s president, D.F. Kopka, wrote of Turin that “it is a magic place. There is absolutely no other place like it on the face of the earth. Imagine having a group of descendants of Lautrec, Giotto, da Vinci, and others of that ilk all painting canvases just for you and your friends to admire in the privacy of your own home. Having Ghia SpA report to me is not that different as an analogy.” Ghia’s creative designs evoked an era of sky-soaring rockets and unlimited dreams, and they put those fantasies on the road. Here is presented the Supersonic. It was the 15th and last of a series of unique motor cars that have been individually created by Ghia to variations on a race-bred Giovanni Savonuzzi design, and it is the only example on an Aston Martin chassis. It has been a fascinating part of fascinating lives, residing in Manhattan, in Michigan, and on a golf green by the sea. Harry Schell was an American expatriate living in Paris who was born into the world of racing and premium sports cars. His parents, French driver Laurie Schell and American privateer Lucy O’Reilly, had founded the Ecurie Bleue team for which Rene Dreyfus famously campaigned Delahayes against the finest Bugattis and Mercedes-Benz of the late 1930s. Despite the death of his father behind the wheel during a road outing, the younger Schell was bitten by the racing bug, and through the 1950s, he competed in grand prix racing with a variety of makes, including Talbot-Lago, Maserati, Gordini, and Vanwal. Schell was a regular on the grand prix circuit of the 1950s, but he was also known to keep a variety of exceptional personal cars. Coachbuilt sports cars of this period were, of course, not entirely uncommon, but there were relatively few Aston Martins of the period that were constructed with non-factory bodywork. Unfortunately, very little reliable documentation exists regarding the finer details of the Supersonic production run, as recordkeeping at Aston Martin and Ghia was lamentably vague. The first known photograph of this extraordinary Aston Martin Supersonic was taken at the car’s show debut at the Turin Auto Salon on April 21, 1956. The car was displayed there alongside one of the first examples of the Dual-Ghia, the exclusive American luxury car that was just entering production. It is believed that Harry Schell was subsequently presented with the car on loan directly from Aston Martin, with the intention of engendering additional publicity, particularly since he was a racing driver of some renown. In execution, it is interesting to note how successfully the Supersonic coachwork was grafted to Aston’s powerful but roomier DB2/4, which substituted a 2+2 seating arrangement for the prior DB2’s smaller two-seat interior. Provided with a slightly longer chassis than the Otto Vu Fiats with which Ghia had surely grown comfortable, the coachbuilders were able to endow Savonuzzi’s design with a slightly taller profile in the characteristic lightweight aluminum. (Early press descriptions of the Aston being bodied in fiberglass are actually incorrect.) Furthermore, the Aston Supersonic’s body is distinguished from its siblings by the presence of a unique front bumper—a delicately curved piece that seems to serve as a more sculptural form than safety function. The next known photograph of this Supersonic was taken at Spa, during the week of the Belgian Grand Prix, which took place on June 3, 1956. Harry Schell took 4th place while competing for Vanwal that weekend, but it would appear that his personal transport to the race was the new Aston Martin. As detailed in the June 15, 1956, issue of Autosport magazine, Schell’s car was parked on the streets of Spa, with a second close-up photo and caption focusing on the unusual front bumper. The following October, the Supersonic was depicted in the October 1956 issue of Quattroruote, the Italian motoring magazine. In an article regarding the personal cars of Formula One drivers, including Juan Manual Fangio and Peter Collins, Harry Schell is seen stepping out of the Aston Supersonic with the door open, further demonstrating his early connection with the car. By 1957, it is known that the car had been acquired by Robert M. Lee, the decorated sportsman, conservationist, and collector who has since won Best of Show at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. The young Lee was pictured outside the popular Harwyn Club in Manhattan with the car. Mr. Lee, however, did not own the car for very long, as he sold it to a friend of his, Richard Cowell, also of New York, in late 1957 or 1958. Mr. Cowell, heir to an oil fortune, was about 30 years old at the time, and he would be featured in February of the following year in a four-page article in LIFE magazine that regarded his highly publicized and newsworthy marriage to Gail Vanderbilt Whitney, daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney, whom Cowell had met in her father’s opera box. Quite amazingly, the article not only pictures the happy young couple, but also the Aston Martin, which Cowell gifted to his lovely bride, along with an eight-carat engagement ring and a Fifth Avenue mansion. The couple, but Gail specifically, drove the car around New York for some time, and the car was photographed while in their ownership. In fact, although Aston Martin records are very limited, as might be expected of such a one-off project, the factory does retain service records of the car in period, clearly confirming Mr. Cowell’s ownership of the car and his Fifth Avenue address. Mr. Cowell went on to lead an extraordinary life. He was a fixture in Southern France in the 1950s, following his U.S. national water skiing team debut in 1949 at the first world water skiing competition in France. He held a long-distance waterskiing record along the French Riviera, and after a divorce from Whitney in 1959, he later dated such extraordinary women as Ava Gardner and Jayne Mansfield. Quite fittingly, Cowell, who bought himself a small hotel on the Riviera, befriended David Brown, of Aston Martin, who entertained many friends and colleagues on his yacht in France, and whom Cowell would frequently entertain by waterskiing around the vessel. The list of luminaries of this exceptional Aston Martin continued. Following Cowell’s divorce from Whitney in 1959, the Supersonic was acquired by Bob Grossman, the well-known Ferrari sports car driver who carved a reputation in Maranello’s Spider California. The Aston Martin successively passed to owners Fred Benson and then Arnie O’Brien, remaining in the Detroit region, where it eventually was parked at an abandoned gas station. In 1974, the car was discovered at the old filling station around Detroit’s Nine Mile Road by 21-year-old Brian Joseph, an enthusiast who would soon enjoy a budding restoration career. As unfamiliar with the car as most people at that time were, Mr. Joseph giddily recognized the Aston Martin badge and knew that the car he had found was certainly something quite special. Mr. Joseph took photographs of the Supersonic and returned occasionally to admire it, until, on one such occasion, the car had vanished. By late 2003, Mr. Joseph was informed of the car’s whereabouts, as it resided with one Bill Mains, of Toledo, Ohio, from whom he acquired the car after re-discovering it some 30 years after he first laid eyes on it. The restoration of such a unique, one-off car was carried out with no expense spared and while in the ownership of the consignor, a highly respected collector and former Pebble Beach Best of Show winner. The car was gradually disassembled, the parts were catalogued, and the utmost was done to research every available photo or article about it. Mr. Joseph’s work war conducted with absolute attention to detail, down to the last nut and bolt. The powerful Mk II chassis and drivetrain were completely restored to Aston Martin factory specifications, while the unique nuances of the rare Ghia coachwork were carefully refurbished, with all moldings and components restored or fabricated to optimal authenticity. The only notable deviation from the car’s original appearance was the choice of the color scheme; the car now had a green top over an ivory body, replacing the original all-white livery, and it was trimmed with a color-matched green leather interior. Completed in early 2011, the sensational restoration debuted at that year’s Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, taking Second Place in the Postwar Touring Class. The following January, the Supersonic earned the Most Unique Award at the Classic Sports Sunday at Mar-a-Lago, held in conjunction with the Cavallino Classic in West Palm Beach, Florida. The car’s overwhelming authenticity and rarity were further recognized in July 2012 at the Concours d’Elegance of America, which took place at St. Johns in Michigan. Now publicly offered in pristine condition for the first time in many decades, this breathtaking, one-off Aston Martin offers serious cachet for collectors of coachbuilt post-war sports cars, Aston Martin enthusiasts, or Ghia devotees. The car is the only example built on an Aston Martin chassis, endowing it with completely unique physical dimensions and design characteristics. Certain to continue to command respect on the world’s finest show fields, and worthy of exhibit in museums, this remarkable car will forever hold fascination as the final chapter of the Supersonic legend, and it claims connections to such iconic figures as Harry Schell and the Vanderbilt family. It is one of but a handful of one-off DB2/4 Mk II examples, and it promises to comfortably join the most pedigreed collections of first-class coachbuilt European sports cars. Chassis no. AM300/1/1132

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
Hammer price
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1938 Talbot-Lago T23 Teardrop Coupé by Figoni et Falaschi

115 bhp (rated), 3,996 cc inline six-cylinder engine with hemispherical combustion chambers and twin carburettors, Wilson four-speed pre-selector gearbox, independent front suspension with transverse leaf spring, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 116.14" - From the Estate of John M. O’Quinn - One of five Jeancart-style cars built and four remaining - The sole Jeancart-style, four-litre T23 Teardrop built - A former Pebble Beach “Elegance in Motion” winner - Not seen since full concours-standard restoration Without doubt, the Talbot-Lago Teardrop Coupés by Figoni et Falaschi represent the crowing achievement of French design and engineering during the 1930s. It is believed that just 16 Teardrops were built in total, along two slightly different body styles. The first car, in the “Jeancart” design after the name of its first owner, was a beautiful aerodynamic coupé with a long, streamlined rear. Only five such cars were built and, of those, just four remain today; this car, chassis 93064, was the sole Jeancart-style Teardrop originally built upon a four-litre, T23 “Baby” chassis. The other 11 Teardrop coupés were built in the “New York” style, named after the car exhibited at the 1937 New York Auto Salon. Except for one car on a T23 chassis, these “New York” cars were all based upon the shorter T150-C chassis. While hardly a long-wheelbase chassis by the standards of the Coachbuilt Era, the effect of the 2.95-metre wheelbase of the T23 chassis, combined with the Figoni teardrop coachwork, is simply breathtaking. Blessed with a physical presence unlike many of its counterparts, the slightly wider track of 93064 gives it a very balanced and sporting stance. While the identity of its first owner has been lost, records indicate that 93064 was ordered as a “Baby 4L” chassis with Style 9221 Model Jeancart coachwork, built by Figoni et Falaschi as job number FF685. Following completion, it was delivered on 21 February, 1938 to a French resident, registered as 199 ADY 75. Predictably, its exceptional beauty made it prominent at concours events in period, with contemporary magazines showing it in the company of a striking woman at its first showing in June 1938 at the Concours d’Elegance de l’Auto. Chassis 93064 made its way to Southern California during the late 1940s, having likely been imported by a returning member of the American armed services. At this time, David Radinsky, a Denver, Colorado native, acquired the Teardrop. He later sold the car to machinist Paul Major, and for many years, Major was seen driving the car in the Denver area. At this point, the headlights had been recessed into the front wings, and the taillights were now flush with the rear wings. Sometime in the mid-1950s, the trafficators ceased to work, prompting Major to add turn signals at the tops of the head and taillight housings. Bumpers from a pre-war Cadillac were also fitted to the car. Under Major’s ownership, 93064 was featured and photographed for an article in Rocky Mountain Autolife, written by Ronald C. Hill, a friend of Major’s. According to Hill, Major offered the car at auction in September 1966 at Arthur Rippey’s Veteran Car Museum, although it appears to have remained unsold. It was again offered at the same venue in November 1967, this time selling to a buyer in Atlanta, Georgia, believed to have been named Millbank. In the early 1970s, Mr. Millbank shipped 93064 to Paris for restoration by French coachbuilder Henri Chapron, and once complete in 1974, the car made its post-restoration debut in Paris. During the restoration, the car was returned to its original colours, and several small touches were added. The headlights were modified slightly, the rear turn signals were removed, and the bumpers were changed to the more appropriate single-blade style. At some point in the late 1980s, 93064 was purchased by a Japanese collector and remained there until its next owner, Mr. Charles Morse, returned it to America. Soon after Mr. Morse received the car, the engine and mechanicals were restored. While a body-off-frame restoration was deemed unnecessary, 93064 was nonetheless cosmetically freshened with a new paint finish and interior. In 2000, the Teardrop received the Elegance in Motion Award at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Prior to selling the 93064 to the present owner in early 2006, Mr. Morse reported to RM Auctions that the race-bred Talbot-Lago chassis, combined with the lightweight Figoni et Falaschi Teardrop Coupé coachwork, resulted in an exquisite driving experience. He also noted that the unassisted steering was surprisingly quick and light, and that the Wilson preselector gearbox was smoother than a conventional manual gearbox, with positive coupling and quick gear changes. In Mr. Morse’s ownership, the four-litre engine was adapted to Winfield carburettors for improved throttle response and a broader power band. Mr. Morse extensively toured the Talbot, just as it was originally intended. Following its second running on the Colorado Grand, the noted mechanic and restorer, Mr. Jim Stranberg, rebuilt the steering mechanism and the front suspension. Shortly before its early-2006 sale, where it joined the O’Quinn Collection, a road test revealed the Talbot to have been in excellent operating order. Recently, the Teardrop was shipped to expert restorers in France, where it has received a complete, body-off-frame restoration with no expense spared. The body’s wooden sub-structure was carefully examined and repaired, with an estimated 80 percent of the original woodwork saved and preserved. The flowing sheet metal was extensively repaired as well, with 90 per cent of the original metalwork remaining. New front and rear bumpers were installed, as the prior units had become separated from the car at some point in time. New front lights were installed as well. The chassis and mechanical components have been fully restored, and the engine has been overhauled, retaining all original engine parts with the exception of a new set of pistons. The interior upholstery has been completely restored to original specifications, and the stunning exterior was refinished in Lago Blue, the same colour as when it was displayed at the Concours d’Elegance de l’Auto in 1938. This 1938 Talbot-Lago T23 Teardrop Coupé is a masterpiece of French artistry, with its proportions and gently sweeping curves representative of France’s pre-war design themes. Freshly restored and listed in the Registre Talbot, Chassis 93064 remains the sole Jeancart-style Teardrop Coupé built by Figoni et Falaschi on the race-bred Talbot-Lago T23 chassis. This historic automobile is without exaggeration a piece of rolling artwork the likes of which the dedicated collector is unlikely to see again. DOCUMENTS: US Title Chassis no. 93064

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2010-10-27
Hammer price
Show price