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  • 1 Jan 1990— 9 Sep 2017

1966 Ford GT40 "P/1057"

345 bhp, 289 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine with four Weber 48IDA carburetors, five-speed ZF manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and Armstrong adjustable shock absorbers, independent rear suspension with trailing arms, transverse upper link with a lower wishbone, and Armstrong adjustable shock absorbers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95 in. One of 31 road-specification Mark I examples Exacting restoration of a highly original car by GT40 expert Robert Ash Original FAV-equipped engine and competition exhaust Documented history by Ronnie Spain, Franco Varani, and the GT40 Owners Registry Owned by the consignor for nearly 25 years Ideal for concours d’elegance, vintage racing events, and thrilling driving tours The ultimate American motorsports icon THE GT40 Undoubtedly the most important sports-racing prototype in Ford’s illustrious history, the GT40 began with the manufacturer’s intention to return to sports car competition. After a failed bid to acquire Ferrari, which only sweetened the allure of dethroning the vaunted Scuderia on the racetrack, Ford entered preliminary talks with three firms, including Lotus, regarding acquisition of a proprietary race car design. Aware of the increasing success of rear-engine cars, Ford sought to field a model that could match Maranello’s 250 LM and soon focused on Eric Broadley’s revolutionary Lola Mk 6 GT, which employed a Colatti transaxle to absorb the immense torque of an American V-8. When the ink had dried, Broadley was paid to consult on development of the Ford race car, which was soon named the GT40 for its 40-inch height. A new subsidiary design and engineering studio, Ford Advanced Vehicles, was created at a British plant in Slough, while Broadley’s Lolas were independently built at a site within view. Following the construction of a dozen prototypes, the GT40 entered Mark I production, with 50 examples required to meet the FIA’s homologation minimum. Many of these cars were trimmed as race cars and sold to privateers, some with substantial factory support, while others were appointed as road cars and sold through Ford’s dealer network. After the GT40 suffered a series of disappointing retirements during the 1964 racing season, Carroll Shelby was famously recruited to lead the 1965 campaign under his Shelby American team, though the factory also provided substantial support to the Holman-Moody and Alan Mann teams, among others. A variety of eventual tweaks, including a larger seven-liter engine, as well as continued chassis development from Detroit’s Kar Kraft (the new American equivalent of FAV), propelled the GT40 to a 1-2-3 finish at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans, with the Shelby American team showcasing star names like Bruce McLaren, Ken Miles, and Dennis Hulme. The GT40, of course, went on to win Le Mans for three more consecutive years, and it remains an American motoring legend, breathtaking in its performance, design, rarity, and historic cachet. CHASSIS NUMBER P/1057 P/1057 is the 16th of 31 Mark I examples configured as road cars, though given its mechanical similarities to the racing-specified examples, the distinction implies little or no drop-off in performance. This GT40 was one of 20 cars eventually allocated to Ford’s Promotion and Disposal Program (initiated in February 1967), and one of seven road cars consigned to Shelby American for retail. Constructed at Ford Advanced Vehicles’ plant in Slough, United Kingdom, P/1057 received engine number SGT/18, which was equipped with a quad-Weber induction arrangement. The car was painted Warwick Green, mounted with Borrani wire wheels, and upholstered with the model’s sparse black road trim. Interestingly, under the “trim details” section of the car’s build, it is simply noted as “Road Car Specification.” Following delivery to Shelby American, the GT40 was sold in late December 1966 to Noller Motors in Topeka, Kansas. By early 1967, the car was purchased by Nick Nero of Motorama, Inc., in Kansas City, Missouri, and he used it regularly as a daily driver for almost two years before selling it in November 1968 to William Vernon Shields of Los Angeles. Nine months later, Mr. Nero bought the GT40 back from Mr. Shields and then went on to sell the car to Ron Stafford of nearby Lee’s Summit, Missouri. After painting the Ford green and continuing to drive it in 1971, Mr. Stafford spun into a ditch and the GT40 suffered some minor damage to its driver’s-side front-end. Stored for several years, the car was purchased in November 1976 by David Jungerman of Raytown, Missouri. He, in turn, sold it to the award-winning Robert Ash, a well-known and respected GT40 restorer, then based in Des Moines, Iowa. A longtime Cobra and Corvette restorer, Mr. Ash wanted to shift his company’s restoration focus to the ultimate 1960s Ford: the GT40. At the time of purchase, P/1057 was in a state of originality unseen in most GT40s. It was the perfect example to restore and glean the information necessary to create a technical database needed to do future authentic GT40 restorations. After restoration, P/1057 debuted at the first-ever GT40 reunion (SAAC-11, July 1986 at Ford’s corporate headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan). P/1057 created a new standard for GT40 restoration and it set the stage for Mr. Ash to eventually restore and preserve more GT40s than anyone else in the world. Mr. Ash and his Racing Icons shop restored P/1057 to his very high standards. Upon disassembly of the car, Mr. Ash recalls how the fuel sponson and battery-box area were both in superb, un-corroded condition, and the tub had good overall structural integrity. The front-right corner was completely repaired, including new fiberglass, proper DZUS fasteners, original Marchal headlamp and driving lights, and Plexiglas headlight/driving light covers with original-style countersunk aluminum rivets. Various smaller components were cleaned, preserved, and refinished, or, if necessary, replaced with only genuine new old-stock items during the restoration. The result was P/1057 being one of very few GT40 road cars still equipped with concours-correct spark-plug wires, valve covers, Weber carburetors, a competition-style 180-degree crossover exhaust system, oil/water/fuel hoses and clamps, comfort weave seat upholstery, Wilton carpeting, a “Made in Great Britain” spare tire, hand-stamped body identification tags, GKN British bolts, and color-coded coil spring markings. Despite the strong thrust for factory originality, Mr. Ash chose to make several aesthetic modifications that have subtly enhanced the car’s appearance. In the style of the popular and successful Gulf-liveried racing cars, he installed wider magnesium BRM wheels, with a correspondingly wider rear clip, and finished the body in red with white side stripes. The car does include the set of four original Borrani wire wheels as well as the original spare wheel and Goodyear tire that is properly strapped in the front compartment. During Mr. Ash’s custody, the restored car was shown at several niche events, including the SAAC-11 meet at Dearborn in July 1986, where it earned a first-in-class and the popular vote. He also took it to the GT40 25th Anniversary Reunion at Watkins Glen in September 1989. After the three-year restoration was completed in 1990, Mr. Ash offered P/1057 for sale in December 1991; it had essentially been undriven since 1971, a remarkable 20-year period of hibernation. The car was soon acquired by the consignor, a Washington-based collector and vintage racer who owns one of the nation’s finest assemblages of post-war sports-racing cars. Over the past 25 years, the owner has carefully maintained the overall original character of the GT40, initially replacing only ignition wires, spark plugs, and the oil filter. He has occasionally presented it at fine events, including the 1992 Apker Affair d’Elegance (where it won Best of Show), the GT40 30th Anniversary at Elkhart Lake in July 1994, and the 2010 Kirkland Concours d’Elegance. While being interviewed about the car at the latter event, he commented, “It has a crossover exhaust so it doesn’t sound like a normal Ford V-8—it has a much different sound. It comes on strong up to about 3,000 rpm and then, as they say, all hell breaks loose. It’s a very quick car!” In 2015, the consignor commissioned a rebuild of the original engine, and the original fuel and oil hoses were replaced with braided lines (the originals have also been retained, among other spare parts). In addition, a modern fire system was installed to ensure safety during vintage events and general driving applications. The GT40 is also offered with an original set of Borrani wire wheels with correct period Goodyear tires, and an unused set of proper reproduction Halibrand wheels. The perfect acquisition for any enthusiast of Le Mans racing or the 1960s heyday of big-bore American sports cars, P/1057 is documented by noted expert Ronnie Spain in his respected book on the model, as well as by the automotive historian Franco Varani. The car is also listed in the GT40 Owners Registry, and it is depicted in a period photo with six other Mark I examples in David Hodges’ 1984 book, The Ford GT40 – An Anglo-American Competition Classic. P/1057 now awaits its next caretaker, offering awesome power and a legendary racing pedigree, sure to be the toast of concours d’elegance and private tours, as well as a shoe-in at vintage sporting events, including the Monterey Motorsports Reunion. It is a rare example of one of the paragons of American racing, and it would crown most any collection. Chassis no. P/1057 Engine no. SGT/18 Gearbox no. NR157

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB 'Tour de France' Berlinetta

250 bhp at 7,000 rpm, 2,953 cc SOHC alloy block-and-head V-12 engine, triple Weber carburettors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm • One of the most desirable competition-bred Ferraris extant • Alloy coachwork and V-12 power • Desirable covered headlamps; one of 36 “single-louver” examples • Ferrari Classiche-certified and matching numbers • Restoration by marque specialists in Italy The Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta not only has breathtaking looks, it remains arguably the greatest and most important Ferrari road/racing car ever built. Its forerunner was the 250 MM, so-named after the famous Mille Miglia race, which hard-charging Italian hillclimb champion Giovanni Bracco won for Ferrari in 1952. That achievement, plus Ferrari’s first World Driver’s Championship win with Alberto Ascari driving the Type 500 and the company’s first collaboration with Pinin Farina (the 212 Inter cabriolet) combined to make the year 1952 a particularly significant one in the marque’s history. THE 250 GT LWB BERLINETTA The last 250 MMs had been built by 1954, and work began on what would become the 250 GT Berlinetta Tour de France. A new strengthened 2,600-mm tubular chassis was equipped with a modern wishbone/coil-spring suspension and the Colombo Tipo 112 “short-block” V-12 engine. Subsequently, this engine was developed further and re-designated Tipo 128B, C and D. Three more 250 GTs similar to the 250 MM followed the prototype Pinin Farina-bodied Berlinetta, 0369 GT, between April and July 1955. That October, another car was shown at the Paris Salon and was the first design with many side louvers set within the rear sail-panels. Pinin Farina made two more prototypes, one of which was owned by the Marquis de Portago from Spain. At Nassau in December 1955, he scored the first victory for the car, a record that would reach epic proportions by the end of the decade. The Le Mans tragedy of 1955, where Peter Levegh’s Mercedes flew into a crowd of spectators, killing 80 and injuring another 200, prompted the creation of a new Gran Turismo category with an engine capacity of 3.0 litres, which would play directly into Ferrari’s hands in 1956. Not to be outdone by Pinin Farina, Scaglietti appeared at the 1956 Geneva Motor Show with their own 250 GT prototype, which became known as the limited production, Series I, “14-louvre” 250 GT Berlinetta. The first production car was built in November 1956, and production was now the responsibility of Scaglietti in Modena. There were five series of 250 GT Berlinettas in all. From mid-1957, the Series II cars were introduced, with three louvers and covered headlights. Just 15 were produced. Series III numbered 36 cars; these retained the covered headlights but had just a single vent louver. In 1959, eight single-louver cars were built with open headlights, a new Italian requirement. Zagato also made five superlight cars. The real start of the 250 GT Berlinetta’s competition career began in 1956, and the car went on to win more races than either of its legendary successors, the 250 GT SWB and the GTO. Olivier Gendebien won the GT class in the Tour of Sicily at the beginning of 1956, but that year’s Tour de France was 250 GT Berlinetta’s most important race and propelled the car into the annals of motorsport history. The Tour de France took five or six days and covered almost 5,000 gruelling kilometres around France, sometimes venturing into Italy, Belgium or Germany. The race consisted of up to six circuit races, two hillclimbs and a sprint. In 1956, in de Portago’s first attempt, with Edmund Nelson as co-driver in his Ferrari, he took the victory with Stirling Moss in a Mercedes 300SL second and Gendebien third in the first Pinin Farina ex-works development car, 0357 GT. With this win, ‘Fon’ de Portago earned the Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta its enduring sobriquet, the Tour de France. In the hands of Olivier Gendebien, the 250 GT Tour de France was victorious for the next three straight years in the race whose name the car had now unofficially taken, and the car and its enviable competition record remain the stuff of legends today. CHASSIS 1039 GT The example offered here, 1039 GT, was supplied new via US Ferrari Importer Luigi Chinetti Motors of Greenwich, Connecticut to its first owner Hastings Harcourt of Santa Barbara, California on 26 November, 1958. Mr. Harcourt was the heir and owner of Harcourt Brace, the well known book publisher. Of particular note, 1039 GT is one of the 39 competition 250 GT LWB Berlinettas originally produced by Ferrari with all-alloy bodywork, the single vent and the desirable covered-headlamp configuration. 1039 GT remained in America for most of its life, and during this phase, it changed hands amongst a number of American collectors, as documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini. Early in its life in the United States, Ford units replaced the original engine and gearbox. The original 250 series V-12 engine was later reunited with the TdF, as confirmed by the Ferrari Classiche certification. In 1974, Charles W. Betz and Fred Peters of Orange, California acquired 1039 GT and re-united the TdF with its original Ferrari 250 series V-12 engine and gearbox. The rare Ferrari remained in America for many years thereafter and was successfully campaigned a number of times at the world-famous Monterey Historic Automobile Races in Laguna Seca during the 1980s. In the early 1990s, 1039 GT was sold to Switzerland, and there, it joined an important Swiss-based private automobile collection. The prominent owner used the car sparingly in Switzerland and abroad, when it was driven on the Tour Auto in 1997 and in 1999. He retained 1039 GT for many years, and in 2005, it was certified by the Ferrari Classiche program, which confirms that the car retains its engine and all of its main components the way it was built by the factory, and therefore, it is indeed a true matching-numbers example. The car was restored in Italy by some of the finest recognised Ferrari specialists in the Modena area, the birthplace of Ferrari. The engine was entrusted to Diena, who performed a full rebuild, Bacchelli & Villa handled the coachwork, and the interior was entrusted to the respected Selleria Luppi. Upon completion of the restoration, the car was tested and featured in Octane in January 2006, marking a thoroughly enjoyable and particularly satisfying drive for the magazine’s testers. From Switzerland, the car was sold to its next and current English owner in late 2005, who is himself a fastidious collector. Upon acquisition of the car, he enrolled and was accepted to participate in that year’s edition of the Mille Miglia. Demanding perfection of all of the cars within his collection, the current owner recently commissioned UK-based Ferrari specialists GTO Engineering to perform a full, no-expense-spared service on 1039 GT at a cost of over GBP 10,000. Any mechanical part that was at all worn was changed, and as offered now, the 1039 GT runs beautifully and stands ready to be enjoyed. Of course, with its legendary pedigree, it will surely be welcomed at most any event the new owner chooses to enter. RM Auctions has recently inspected the car, and we can confirm that 1039 GT presents very well. Some of the world’s premier Ferrari experts carried out its restoration, and it still shows today. The bodywork is straight, and the doors display proper fit. The paintwork is near-perfect, and the correctly trimmed tan leather upholstery presents beautifully, a true mark of Luppi’s workmanship, with the crackle-finished dash giving 1039 GT a true competition feel when you slip behind the wheel. The outside fuel filler, covered headlamps and single louver give the car an undeniable competition-bred presence, and as offered today, 1039 GT is correct in every way—a fact confirmed not only by marque specialists but also by the all-important Ferrari Classiche certification binder that accompanies it. Truly rare, purposefully beautiful and capable of performance that remains very impressive even today, this 250 GT Tour de France Berlinetta is steeped in Ferrari’s rich competition legacy and very capably represents one of the most highly coveted Ferrari models ever built. Chassis no. 1039GT

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2011-10-26
Hammer price
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1963 Ferrari 400 Superamerica LWB Coupe Aerodinamico by Pininfarina

340 bhp, 3,967 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 40 DCZ 6 carburetors, four-speed manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.3 in. The 15th of 18 Series II long-wheelbase examples Meticulously restored in its original colors of Grigio Argento over Red leather Proven vintage rally and concours entrant; Platinum winner at the 2011 Cavallino Classic Matching-numbers example; a grand touring Ferrari par excellence THE 400 SUPERAMERICA AERODINAMICO By 1963, Ferrari had established itself not only as a world-class manufacturer of sports racing cars but also as a manufacturer of the world’s best grand touring cars for the road. Enzo Ferrari had come to fully realize that in order to continue the success of his racing program, he needed to be able to create, market, and sell equally exceptional road cars. Throughout the 1950s, the Ferrari GT car had evolved immensely into a top-shelf luxury touring car, namely the 342 America and the 410 Superamerica, which became the last word in sporting luxury. However, these cars were known as heavy and unforgiving to drive, and many believed that such a prestigious automobile should have more refined driving dynamics. To address these changes, Ferrari introduced the 400 Superamerica the 1959 Turin Motor Show. The 400 SA incorporated a number of changes from its predecessor, chief amongst which was a new Colombo short-block V-12 engine. The new powerplant was bored from its 250 GT dimensions of 3.0 liters to almost 4.0 liters, and it was fitted with the outside-plug arrangement that had proven to be so effective in the Testarossa sports racers. This new Superamerica also benefitted from Dunlop disc brakes at all four corners, which replaced the drum brakes on the 410 Superamerica, and an overdrive that increased the top end ratio by 28 percent. These changes markedly improved the car’s performance and road manners and brought its driving characteristics in line with the car’s overall level of luxury. The earliest 400 Superamericas were constructed on Ferrari’s shorter 2,420-millimeter wheelbase and clothed in open coachwork by Pininfarina. When chassis 2207 SA, dubbed the Superfast II, was introduced at Turin in November 1960, it featured coachwork that had never before been seen on a Superamerica, and it stunned the crowd. The car’s body featured a pointed open-mouth nose that led to a slippery roof and belt lines that converged into a delicately swooped fastback tail that catered towards aerodynamics, helping the Superamerica cut through the air. Two years later, at the London Motor Show in September 1962, Ferrari introduced a second-series 400 Superamerica. This car retained the distinctive Aerodinamico coachwork of its predecessors, but it now rode on the 250 GTE’s 2,600-millimeter chassis, which eventually replaced the earlier and shorter wheelbase chassis. Approximately 18 long-wheelbase Coupe Aerodinamicos were constructed when production came to a close in 1964, adding to a total of 35 Series II examples, which also included the earlier SWB Superamericas. CHASSIS NUMBER 5029 SA Chassis 5029 SA was built by Ferrari as the thirty-second of a total of thirty-five 400 Superamericas constructed. According to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, it is also the 15th of 18 long-wheelbase examples built,. The car was completed by Pininfarina on November 14, 1963. It was fitted with desirable Aerodinamico coachwork and covered headlights and finished in Grigio Argento over Red leather, with matching red carpets. In February 1964, this Superamerica was purchased new by its first owner, Autoservizi Maggiore S.r.l., which was located in Florence, Italy, and a month later, it was registered on Italian license plates, which read FI 244188. It would remain in the ownership of the company for just over a year before it was sold to its second Italian owner, Vittorio Giovanni Maggiore of Rome, and was reregistered in his name. Five years later, it is noted that 5029 SA’s Italian registration was cancelled, as the car was exported to the United States, where it was purchased by Benjamin Caskey, of Palm Beach, Florida, who repainted the car a dark blue metallic. Caskey, a commercial developer, was also an avid enthusiast of classic cars and a member of both the CCCA and AACA. He would go on to own the Superamerica until his passing in 1987, at which time the car was retitled in his widow’s name, Edna H. Caskey. Mrs. Caskey kept the car for another 10 years, until February 1997. Shortly thereafter, the Superamerica was sold to Mark Smith, of Skippack, Pennsylvania, who brought the car back to running condition, as described in an ad placed in the Ferrari Market Letter in October 1997. The car was sold shortly thereafter to Massimo Rossi, of Nyon, Switzerland, and it returned to Europe, being imported on January 7, 1998, and still wearing its dark blue paint, but now with a black interior. Over the next few years, chassis 5029 SA was fully restored by a team of specialists located in both Switzerland and Italy. Carrozzeria Zanasi in Maranello was tasked with bodywork, Tappezzeria Luppi in Modena handled the interior, and Ferrari Suisse SA was commissioned for the engine work. The car was also returned to its original color combination, and the results were truly spectacular. In March 2004, the Superamerica was driven by Rossi in the Coppa Milano San Remo rally, proving the competency of the restoration. Afterwards, the car was sold by Rossi, and in 2005, after being purchased by noted collector Lee Herrington, it travelled back to the United States. It was subsequently purchased by the Andrews’. Since then, the car has been sparingly used, although meticulously maintained, ever since, and it remains in truly remarkable condition. It received a full service by Bob Smith Coachworks in Gainesville, Texas, prior to being shown by the Andrews’ at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance in 2010. Furthermore, it was shown once again by the collection at the Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in January 2011, where it earned a Platinum award, which further asserted the quality of the car’s restoration. The car retains a proper tool kit and jack and its original manual, as well as invoices from its service by Bob Smith Coachworks. The 400 Superamerica is often considered to be the grandest of Ferrari’s grand touring automobiles, as it is utterly uncompromising in every sense. The Superamerica offered its owners nothing but the finest in terms of automotive technology, with cutting-edge design, performance, and luxury. This particular Ferrari is one of the final examples constructed, and it is truly capable of anything its next owner desires. Chassis no. 5029 SA Engine no. 5029

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1967 Ford GT40 Mark I

380 hp, High Performance Ford 289 cu in V-8 engine with Weber carburetors, ZF five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95" • One of 133 GT40s originally produced • Time capsule condition • Desirable low mileage • Extremely well-documented • Recent inspection by GT40 authority Ronnie Spain • Original, matching numbers drivetrain • Two private owners from new It is difficult to overstate the significance of Ford’s legendary GT40 to the history of American racing and sports car design. Initiated in the wake of Ford’s failed attempt to acquire Ferrari in 1963, the GT40 was devised with the intent of beating the Italian Scuderia at its own game. Built by Ford Advanced Vehicles’ (FAV) studio in Slough, England, the first-generation GT40 Mk I leapt out to a promising competition career. Not content with anything but dominance, Ford brought in Carroll Shelby to fine-tune the race program, and his input resulted in a one-two-three finish at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans. Concurrent road cars featured similar mechanical specifications but slightly less spartan cockpits, which included fully upholstered interiors. Concluding production in 1969, only approximately 133 examples of all variations of the original factory GT40 were built, and the revered model remains an aesthetic and competitive highpoint of American motorsports lore. Just 31 of the 87 GT40 P production cars were equipped as road cars; as one of those examples, 1059 is an extremely authentic Mk I example that has seen such minimal use that renowned authority Ronnie Spain recently declared it to be “one of the most original GT40s I have ever seen.” According to its Production Car Record Sheet, P/1059 was originally equipped with a High Performance Ford 289-cubic inch engine with Weber carburetors and a ZF five-speed transmission, components that continue to grace the car to this day. Otherwise trimmed to road car specifications, this Mk I example was equipped with Borrani wire wheels mounted with Goodyear tires and finished in Opalescent Maroon paint by the Slough factory. Dispatched to the United States on December 23, 1966, GT40 P/1059 was one of twenty such cars that were selected for an Mk I Promotion and Dispersal Program that was initiated on February 16, 1967. Under this program, 1059 became one of six GT40 examples that were consigned to Shelby American for promotional use by their field managers. In preparation for this purpose, GT40 P/1059 was delivered to Kar Kraft, in Brighton, Michigan, who famously partnered in the development of numerous race cars. Kar Kraft re-sprayed 1059 in Pearlescent White paint with blue stripes, typical American racing colors. As this paint scheme was authorized by Ford very early in the car’s life and implemented prior to private ownership, it can essentially be considered the car’s original color finish. During the promotion program, GT40 P/1059 was acquired by Stark Hickey Ford, a dealership in Detroit, where it remained for several years under the watch of owner Edward Schoenherr. As described in Mr. Spain’s seminal volume on the model, GT40: An Individual History and Race Record, during Stark Hickey’s custody, the car was reportedly involved in an accident that required some repairs to the roof. However, with an opportunity to personally inspect the car last October, Mr. Spain noticed that occasional chips in the white paint on the roof revealed the original maroon finish remained underneath, confirming that the car actually only suffered minor damage to the driver’s side A-pillar. Thus, it is now fair to say that the only reported blemish on 1059’s recorded history has been invalidated, making the car among the most desirable GT40 examples to become available in many years. In September 1973, GT40 P/1059 was purchased by Herb Wetanson, of Long Island, New York, a dealer and restaurateur who has campaigned in SCCA, Trans-AM, IMSA, and vintage racing for many decades. Mr. Wetanson is also well-known within GT40 circles for his prudent recognition of the investment potential of the model, having owned six different examples within the span of just a few years during the early-1970s. Roughly one year after his purchase, Mr. Wetanson sold P/1059, then displaying just 2,000 miles, to Dr. Jack Frost, of Dubuque, Iowa. Dr. Frost was a noted collector of vintage sports cars who retained possession of the GT40 for over twenty years while accruing a massive file of documentation of nearly unprecedented scope for a GT40. According to Mr. Spain, he has “only come across more complete files on a handful of occasions.” Furthermore, it should be noted that because Mr. Wetanson was a registered dealer and that Stark Hickey was technically the original selling dealer, Dr. Frost was P/1059’s first private owner of record. During Dr. Frost’s care, he undertook a few safety measures, including the installation of a fire extinguisher and the replacement of the fuel bladders with aluminum tanks, which were fabricated in 1978 by renowned GT40 developer John Horsman, the former chief engineer at FAV and the John Wyer-managed Gulf racing team that campaigned the GT40. In 1985, Dr. Frost repainted P/1059 in its Kar Kraft livery of white with blue stripes, while continuing to use the car sparingly, including attendance at the 1994 Thirtieth Anniversary GT40 Reunion in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin. GT40 P/1059 remained a centerpiece of Dr. Frost’s impressive collection until early-2002. Then displaying only 4,500 original miles, this remarkable GT40 was purchased by its current owner, who has since taken some minor steps to ensure optimal mechanical condition and continued long-term preservation. This work included disassembling, cleaning, and adjusting the original Weber carburetors and installing a newer fuel pump with improved seals to avoid fuel leaks. This work was overseen by Rick Parent, a former employee of John Collins, who was also an original GT40 technician with FAV and a crew chief with the GT40 racing teams. According to Mr. Spain, as of last October, P/1059 displayed only 4,749 miles from new, making it “without doubt, one of the lowest mileage GT40s in the world today.” During recent ownership, GT40 P/1059 has incurred only approximately 250 miles, which has essentially consisted of occasional exercise mileage intended to keep the car in fresh mechanical order. Garaged in a climate-controlled facility and regularly maintained as needed by Mr. Parent, this GT40 Mk I was presented by the consignor at the 2009 GT40 reunion. With a delicately patinated state of presentation that even includes its original Borrani wire wheels and Goodyear tires, GT40 P/1059 offers such overwhelmingly originality and sparing use that it may be regarded as a time capsule example of exceptional quality. The positive evaluation by Mr. Spain, as well as a thoroughly documented history, bolster the provenance of this strikingly authentic example of Ford’s legendary GT40 Mk I. Additionally, as the car’s first two custodians were licensed dealers, this car may essentially be regarded as a two-owner example. Offering minimal use and overwhelming originality, GT40 P/1059 is a peerless example that has never been properly exhibited on the national stage it deserves. This rare Mk I road car will doubtlessly command the attention of the most passionate sports car collectors, promising its next caretaker a warm reception at premium-level concours d’elegance and vintage touring and racing events, such as the Le Mans Classic, Tour Auto, and the Goodwood Revival. Chassis no. P/1059 Engine no. SGT/20

  • USAUSA
  • 2012-08-17
Hammer price
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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

Ferrari Classiche certified Former ownership by several well-known Ferrari collectors Recent cosmetic freshening Includes complete set of books and tools Immaculate example of the venerated “Four-Cam” According to the research of marque historian Marcel Massini, Ferrari 275 GTB/4 chassis number 10147 completed factory assembly in July 1967, finished in Rosso Chiaro and trimmed in Nero Vaumol leather. Approximately the 140th example built, the berlinetta was distributed in September 1967 to Société Anonyme pour la Vente des Automobiles Ferrari (SAVAF), the Swiss Ferrari importer in Geneva owned by the renowned racing team sponsor Georges Filipinetti. By 1970, the GTB/4 was exported to Algar Enterprises in Paoli, Pennsylvania, the famed marque importership founded by Al Garthwaite. The 275 was then sold to Kirk White in Philadelphia, as part of a deal that included a 275 GTS and a 250 GTO. In June 1973 the Ferrari passed to Nicholas Simpson of Sterling, Colorado, and by October the following year it had been acquired by Daniel and Leo Shannon of nearby Loveland. Mr. Shannon invested in some maintenance to the berlinetta, commissioning a rebuild of the engine and transaxle, an electrical overhaul, and the installation of a new clutch and Borrani wire wheels. Following this work, the car was advertised for sale in December 1975, and was then purchased by Ferrari collector Joseph Moch of Grand Rapids, Michigan, whose collection included a 375 America coupe, a 250 GT Europa, and a 250 GT California Spider. By 1984 the berlinetta was sold to Jean Banchet, a well-known French chef in Wheeling, Illinois, who owned the highly successful restaurant La Francais. In 1985 the 275 GTB/4 received a substantial refurbishment by the respected John Hajduk of Motorkraft in Indiana, after which the car was purchased around 1988 by Jake Weaver of Jackson, Mississippi. When Weaver offered the Ferrari five years later, he described it as “beautifully maintained.” In 1993, chassis number 10147 was purchased by Bill Mitchell of Colleyville, Texas, who retained possession for at least four years while commissioning a reupholstering by Bob Smith Coachworks in nearby Gainesville. James Malouin of Banning, California, acquired the 275 GTB/4 in March 1998, soon after entrusting a full engine rebuild to the renowned marque expert Patrick Ottis of Berkeley, California. Totaling $30,000, this work included significant attention to the block, cylinders, and crankshaft, as well as a rebuild of the carburetors and fuel pumps. The clutch and radiator were overhauled, the steering box and brakes were rebuilt, and the shocks were replaced, while proper rebuilt Borrani wire wheels were mounted with Michelin XWX tires. The opportunity was also taken to repaint the exterior, and a former employee of Straman Coachworks applied an exacting finish in rosso. Malouin then kept the car for five years before offering it for sale in 2003. By May 2005 the Ferrari was owned by Beth LeQuin and Bruce Miller of Santa Fe, New Mexico. Miller presented the car three months later at the Third Annual Quail Motorsports Gathering in Carmel Valley, California. At the end of the year the berlinetta was purchased by Steve Wolf and domiciled in Boca Raton, Florida. From late 2010 to 2011 the 275 GTB/4 underwent a significant cosmetic restoration, including a freshening of the paint as needed and a re-trimming of the interior. Offered at Amelia Island in March 2011, the Ferrari was purchased by the esteemed Canepa Motorsports in Paradise Valley, California. After a thorough detailing, Canepa sold the four-cam to Los Angeles resident Jeff Lotman, who presented it at the FCA National Field and Driving Concours in Palm Springs in October. Around this time the Ferrari received full factory certification of authenticity with a Classiche Red Book, which demonstrates the berlinetta retains all of its original factory-issued matching-numbers mechanical equipment (including the original tipo 213 V-12 engine). Chassis number 10147 was acquired in early 2014 by the consignor, a collector in Illinois. It continues to display the immaculate benefits of the recent cosmetic restoration and has been fastidiously maintained. Now showing 82,577 kilometers, this 275 GTB/4 is accompanied by a full set of manuals and tools and is documented with prior bills of sale, a full summary of the Ottis work, various invoices, and the Ferrari Classiche certification. Addendum We are pleased to offer this vehicle without reserve. Chassis no. 10147 Engine no. 10147 Gearbox no. 392/IR

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
Show price

1937 /40 Duesenberg Model SJ Cabriolet

The last Duesenberg built; Three owners & 10,000 miles from new; The magnificent & unrestored ex-Rudolf Bauer 320 bhp, 420 cu. in. four valves-per-cylinder; twin overhead camshaft; inline eight-cylinder engine with Schwitzer-Cummins centrifugal supercharger; three-speed transmission; beam front axle; live rear axle; vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 153.5" THE LAST DUESENBERG The tale of The Last Duesenberg is really three stories. First and foremost, it is the story of Rudolf Bauer, the brilliantly eccentric and flamboyant German abstract artist who, at the height of his meteoric career literally designed his own car. Secondly, it is the story of the incomparable Model SJ that provided the platform that inspired Bauer. And finally, it is the story of Rollson Coachbuilders and Rudy Creteur, for their role in giving form to Bauer’s vision. Rudolf Bauer Born in Lindenwald, Germany in 1889, Bauer displayed artistic aptitude at an early age. In 1915, Bauer was accepted into Der Stürm (The Storm), an avant-garde gallery which became the epicenter of the thriving Berlin art scene. There, Bauer exhibited his wildly abstract, non-objective art, while also arranging exhibitions and acquiring art for the gallery. And there he met Baroness Hilla Rebay von Ehrenweisen — the daughter of an aristocratic Prussian army officer. With a shared passion for abstract art, Bauer and Rebay became confidants and lovers, although Bauer’s brooding arrogance, and Rebay’s naked ambition, ultimately turned the relationship into an obsessive and destructive estrangement. Solomon Guggenheim By the 1920s Bauer’s paintings were gaining popularity among American connoisseurs, catching the attention of art patron and philanthropist Solomon Guggenheim. By 1929, Bauer had become Guggenheim’s favorite artist and his contact point for other European artists, helping to acquire the works of Kandinsky, Klee, and Chagall for Guggenheim’s burgeoning collection. When Hilla Rebay arranged to bring Guggenheim to Europe so he could meet Bauer, she quickly became Guggenheim’s exclusive art advisor. Thanks to Guggenheim’s generous patronage, Bauer sold everything he could paint, and enjoyed an opulent lifestyle throughout the 1930s, indulging himself with his own private museum, a staff of servants, and a succession of Europe’s most magnificent marques, including Bugatti, Isotta Fraschini and Mercedes. Rebay, meanwhile, accepted a position in New York working for Solomon Guggenheim as Head Curator of the new Guggenheim Foundation, where she continued to fuel Guggenheim’s fascination with Bauer’s works as she orchestrated the opening of the Guggenheim Museum. Nazi Prison When Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933, new laws were passed labeling abstract art as “criminal” and “degenerate”. Soon, Bauer’s were the only abstract works that could still be seen openly in Berlin. Oblivious to his precarious position, Bauer even wrote to Hitler’s Minister of Propaganda, Joseph Goebbels, suggesting himself as Minister of Culture! As well as openly defying Hitler’s ban on abstract art, Bauer made the cardinal mistake of speculating in the black market for American currency, revealing his pro-West political leanings. On a trip to America in 1937, Bauer ordered from the Duesenberg factory in Auburn, Indiana a long-wheelbase, supercharged chassis to be shipped to Berlin — where Bauer intended to have custom coachwork built by Erdmann & Rossi. Soon after placing the order and returning to Germany, however, Bauer was seized and imprisoned by the Nazis. The Duesenberg would have to wait! Freedom Back in New York, Hill Rebay prevailed upon Guggenheim to use his resources to free Bauer from Nazi prison. In the spring of 1939, Rebay traveled to Germany with a suitcase stuffed with Guggenheim’s cash, escorted by her uncle, a General in Hitler’s Army. The Baroness purchased Bauer’s release and deportation to the U.S., along with his cache of paintings from Das Geistreich, his private museum. The Contract Not long after Bauer reached the U.S. in 1939, Rebay persuaded him to sign what became the infamous contract between Bauer and The Guggenheim Foundation. In exchange for his freedom, a magnificent seaside mansion in Deal, New Jersey, and the interest income from a richly-endowed trust fund, Bauer was duped into gifting all of his future life’s work to the Foundation (Bauer neither spoke, nor could read English). Rudolf deeply resented the contract, and was so humiliated by Rebay’s treachery that he refused to paint again, ever. To spite his former paramour, Bauer summarily married Louise Barry, the housekeeper paid for by Guggenheim and personally selected by Rebay! Rebay promptly slandered Barry as a “tramp and whore” — triggering a futile libel lawsuit by Bauer. The result was that Rudolf Bauer lived out his final years in bitter isolation, and never painted again. But he did create one final piece of abstract art, his crowning achievement, a work so outrageous, imposing and flamboyant that its value today far exceeds that of any of his paintings1 – SJ-397, the Last Duesenberg – and he would treasure it until his death in 1953. THE MIGHTY DUESENBERG SJ The story of Fred and August Duesenberg and E.L. Cord is among the most fascinating in automotive history. The Duesenberg brothers were German immigrants, self-taught mechanics and racecar builders who first made their mark at the Brickyard. In 15 consecutive Indianapolis 500s starting in 1913, 70 Duesenberg race cars competed. Thirty-two—-an amazing 46 percent—finished in the top 10! Fred and Augie became masters of supercharging and of reliability; their engines were beautifully cast, and brilliantly efficient. In 1925, Errett Lobban Cord added the Duesenberg Motors Co. to his rapidly growing enterprise, the Auburn Automobile Company. Cord’s vision was to create an automobile that would surpass the grand marques of Europe and America. He presented Fred Duesenberg with a blank check, and the mandate to create the greatest car in the world. The result was the incomparable Model J, conceived to be superlative in all respects. Its short- wheelbase chassis was 142.5 inches, nearly 12 feet; the long-wheelbase car added almost a foot more! The double overhead-camshaft, straight eight engine had four valves per cylinder, displaced 420 cubic inches, and made 265 horsepower. After the Model J’s introduction, Fred Duesenberg worked on making it even more powerful, applying his race-proven centrifugal supercharger to the Model J’s giant eight. The result, christened “SJ”, was then—and remains today—the quintessence of American luxury performance automobiles. The Duesenberg SJ delivered an astonishing 320 horsepower at full throttle. Regrettably, Duesenberg built a mere 36 SJs at the factory; modifying a standard J to SJ specifications was no small job. The engine required complete disassembly to fit stronger valve springs, high-performance tubular connecting rods and numerous other upgrades. The effect of the Duesenberg Model J on America can’t be minimized, despite total production of just 474 examples. Even in the midst of the misery of the Depression, the mighty Duesenberg was a symbol of American engineering prowess. Duesenberg’s advertising featured the wealthy and privileged in opulent settings with but a single line of copy: “He Drives a Duesenberg...” The outside exhaust pipes of the SJ inspired generations of auto designers and remain, 70 years later, a symbol of power, panache, and performance. “It’s a real Duesy” still refers to something that is the very finest of its type. The new Duesenberg was tailor-made for the custom coachbuilding industry. It had the power and stance to carry imposing coachwork, and the proportions were ideal for the execution of elegant custom bodies. While most of the leading coachbuilders were commissioned to clothe the mighty J, the New York-based firm of Rollston (and its successor Rollson) best combined exceptional designs with outstanding build quality. THE COACHBUILDER: ROLLSON AND RUDY CRETEUR Coachbuilder Henry Lonschein started Rollston in 1921, after mastering his craft at Brewster. His unique, and costly, framing approach involved hand carving frames into final shape only after first assembling the individual timber frame members. To this day, restorers agree that Rollston bodies still demonstrate their precision with perfect shut lines; their strength in the way doors close; and their rigidity with an almost complete lack of squeaks and rattles, even decades later. 1927 was a pivotal year for Rollston, as it heralded the arrival of Rudy Creteur, one of the most talented designers of the Classic Era. The combination of Rollston’s proven build quality and Creteur’s design genius placed Rollston at the pinnacle of the industry. Even though Rollston built more bodies for Packards than any other marque, the firm’s best-known work was on the Duesenberg chassis—-not surprising given Rollston’s reputation for superb quality. Two of the most famous Duesenberg’s of all—the Cary Grant Roadster, and the Arlington Sedan built for the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair, and better known as “The Twenty Grand” (a reference to its nearly unthinkable cost)—were bodied by Rollston. As the Depression wore on, and demand for ostentatious coachbuilt cars waned, Rollston refused to lower its prices or compromise quality. The result was spiraling losses, and finally in 1937, bankruptcy. In 1938, Lonschein and Creteur managed to secure a contract to build town-car bodies for Packard, and hand picked a small crew of the most talented craftsmen from Rollston. They named the new company “Rollson” to circumvent the law, which prevented using the name of a bankrupt firm until its debts were paid. It was not the Packards for which Rollson will be remembered, however, but rather a single magnificent achievement that proved to be the swan song for both the company and the designer - the incomparable Bauer SJ, The Last Duesenberg built. THE BAUER SJ When Bauer placed his order for a Duesenberg chassis in 1937, the factory was in the process of closing its doors. Dedicated Duesenberg employees, under the direct supervision of Augie Duesenberg, secured the last available chassis, motor and supercharger, assembled it, and prepared SJ-397 for shipment to Berlin pending Bauer’s instructions. Arrested by the Nazis in 1938, Bauer of course was in no position to take delivery! After 8 months in prison, Bauer was liberated by Guggenheim, and arrived triumphantly in the United States, invited immediately by both Harvard and Yale to lecture on non-objective art. But Bauer’s first act was to arrange for delivery of his Duesenberg to the baronial mansion on the New Jersey shore. Bauer’s selection of Rollson and Creteur to implement his vision was an inspired choice. In Rudy Creteur he had one of the top design talents of the time; in Rollson he had the skilled craftsmen who could satisfy his Germanic demands for unique details and build quality. Bauer met with Rudy Creteur and presented him with 3 drawings and a list, in German, of quite specific features: “No running boards; slanted vee windshield; 2 rear spares; glass visors; violet leather interior; black silk top; fitted suitcases; dictograph; 21/2" wide pleats,” and so on. Bauer even specified Vogue 7.50 x 19 whitewalls, and sketched the braided leather, rear-passenger assists. But it is the coachwork drawings themselves that are truly remarkable. Bauer’s Design Other designers, faced with the almost surreal scale of the Duesenberg’s mammoth chassis, added sidemounts, smaller wheels, skirted fenders, and smaller lights — all in an effort to reduce the visual scale of the car. But clearly Bauer’s intent was to create the lowest, longest and most distinctive Duesenberg ever built. Thinking as an artist, Bauer thus chose to emphasize the dominant theme of the chassis — its sheer size — rather than hide it. Accordingly, his sketches depict an extremely narrow, elongated hood extending well beyond the standard Model J radiator shell, and reaching all the way back to the low and sinister vee windshield — with no hood seam at the firewall to interrupt the exaggerated hood length. A canted, streamlined grille conceals the stock Model J grille recessed deeply behind, and reveals the influence of the Art Deco and Streamlining movements on Bauer’s vision. The body is dropped down over the frame rails for a low, menacing stance. The extraordinary cycle-style fenders — with no running boards or sidemounts to visually interfere — emphasize the expanse between them, leaving the 4 massive chromed exhaust pipes and ostentatious Buehl air horn completely exposed. And the dual, rear mounted spares bring the overall length to an imposing 20’ 6” — the longest Duesenberg ever built. So detailed was Bauer’s design that he even specified the uniquely oversized “Duesenbird” hood ornament, the imposing grille, the vast ventilation screens on both sides of the engine compartment, and the parallel rows of 27 hood louvers — all to further accentuate the car’s great length. Bauer’s design does not apologize for its size, but celebrates it! Shocking Colors As seen in many of Bauer’s works, he was inclined towards vividly contrasting colors and exaggerated shapes, unexpected sometimes in their juxtaposition. In this way, Bauer hoped to shock the viewer, provoking strong emotions and spirited discussion. Thus it was completely in character for Bauer to order a black body, heavily laden with chrome accents, barely able to contain a shocking violet leather interior, set off by deep purple wool carpets — and crowned with a black silk top. Bauer had in fact created an impossibly long, low and provocative example of automotive art, infinitely more magnificent and decadent than any of his paintings — and significantly more valuable. Special Features Bauer took delivery from Rollson on April 25, 1940 at a completed cost, including coachwork, of over $20,000 — a staggering sum! The original Rollson invoice, hand signed by Rudolf Bauer, accompanies the car. On it, separate charges appear for the 13 custom features ordered by Bauer including: “Special Marchal Headlamps”; “Special Instrument Panel plus Additional Instruments”; “Four Blinker Direction Lamps with Violet Glass”; “Special Radiator Emblem”; “3 Special Black Leather Custom Suitcases”; and others. Each of these 13 items of original special equipment remain with the car today! Completely Unrestored Bauer’s original “A” WWII gas rationing stamp still is affixed to the side window, along with his last New Jersey registration stamp from 1943. As a result of limited availability of gasoline and failing health, Bauer put just 9,884 miles on his Duesenberg before parking it beneath the mansion at 179 Ocean Avenue. He died of lung cancer in 1953, and his widow soon advertised the car in the New York Times. Fortunately for automotive history, Bill Pettit purchased the car and stored it carefully at his Museum of Motoring Memories in Virginia for the next 45 years, preserving it in pristine, untouched condition. Today, SJ-397 of course retains its original aluminum body, motor, chassis and running gear, recognized by its ACD Category One Certificate awarded in 1989, which also formally recognized the Bauer car as the last Duesenberg built. Remarkably, its black lacquer paint is entirely original and has never been retouched in the slightest, evidenced by the stone chips still appearing on the cycle fenders. The car also retains its original violet leather interior, original deep purple carpets and rear footrests, original chrome plating, original silk top, and even its original 6 Vogue double-sided whitewall tires! One can easily imagine Bauer blasting away to the Hamptons for weekend outings with the art cognescenti, supercharger screaming and the exhaust cutouts wide open — trumpeting his arrival with a blast from SJ-397’s unique, three foot long external Buehl air horn! Provenance By any standard, the Bauer SJ is one of the top ten Duesenbergs in existence. But it is, of course, far more, as it is not only The Last Duesenberg, but also: • One of just 36 factory-supercharged Model J Duesenbergs built. • The last completely unrestored Duesenberg. • The lowest mileage Duesenberg extant (just 10,843 miles). • The longest Duesenberg built and, though subjective, certainly the most outrageous Duesenberg ever created! SJ-397 has only been owned by three automotive connoisseurs. As the last Duesenberg built, to a striking, one-off design — it is the rarest of the rare, and surely one of the most historically significant automobiles of the Classic Era. Its impeccable provenance includes important historic documents, including Bauer’s hand-signed invoice from Rollson, and period photographs. Its multitude of special features add an even greater aura of luxury and exclusivity — and all remain with the car. Its unprecedented low mileage and stunning originality cannot be duplicated anywhere, for any price. Lastly, and remarkably, SJ-397 at age 67, still retains gleaming paint, lustrous chrome and supple leather — all burnished with years of a carefully nurtured patina that imparts a character and presence that no freshly restored automobile can hope to match. There will never be another Bauer Duesenberg. And The Last Duesenberg, after this auction, is unlikely ever to be offered again in our lifetime. Chassis no. 2405

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-01-19
Hammer price
Show price

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spyder

240 bhp, 2,953 cc overhead camshaft alloy block and head V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension via A-arms, coil springs and telescopic shocks, and rear suspension via live axle, semi-elliptic springs and hydraulic shocks, four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm (102.4") - Ex-Prince Alvise Hercolani and Wolfgang Seidel - Special features including hardtop and Superamerica side vents - Matching numbers and Ferrari Classiche certified - Extensive recent detailing work and motor and suspension rebuild - Shown at Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance - Known provenance, documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini In the pantheon of desirable open Ferraris, the 250 GT California Spyder, in both long- and short-wheelbase form, stands head and shoulders above the rest. It has all the elements Ferraristi look for: the perpetually desirable Colombo V-12, considerable rarity and a successful competition pedigree to match its sporting Pinin Farina lines. The California Spyder, in contrast to the luxurious custom-built 250 cabriolets that preceded it, was intended for the client in search of a fast, sparsely-equipped cabriolet Ferrari sports car, an open counterpart to the Tour de France berlinetta, perfect not only for spirited driving along the Pacific Coast or Cote d’Azur but also all-out racing. California Spyder production began in 1958, and some 11 examples had been built by the time it was announced as a separate model in December 1958. One California Spyder was entered by N.A.R.T. at Sebring early in 1959 and driven by Richie Ginther and Howard Hively. It finished ninth overall (behind four Testa Rossas and four Porsche RSKs) and won the GT class. Le Mans in 1959 conclusively demonstrated the performance of the California Spyder as the N.A.R.T.-entered, alloy-bodied car driven by Bob Grossman and Fernand Tavano finished fifth overall. Chassis no. 1307 GT The spectacular Ferrari offered here is the twenty-third of the total 50 long-wheelbase California Spyders built and is unique among them for several desirable and distinctive features, including the unusual Superamerica-style front fender vents and an insert air intake on the hood. Delivered on 27 March, 1959 to Prince Alvise Hercolani of Bologna, its certificate of origin was issued by Ferrari on 3 April, 1959. Hercolani retained 1307 GT for about six months, selling it to the racing driver and car dealer Wolfgang Seidel in October 1959. In fact, Seidel drove the car to the V Grand Prix de Bruxelles in Belgium, as pictured in Jean-Paul Delsaux’s book Les Grand Prix de Bruxelles. Seidel in turn sold the car in 1961 to the car’s third owner, Rolf Helm of Germany, before it was acquired by the fourth owner, William Morgan of Phoenix, Arizona. Morgan, who at the time lived in Wiesbaden, drove 1307 GT to Marseille, then put it on a boat to Corsica where he spent a two-week vacation with his wife. From there, the car boarded a boat for Genova before Morgan drove it to Modena. Mr. Morgan would own the car for several more years. It was serviced at the factory in September 1963 and shipped to Pleasant Hills, California in 1965, as Morgan had since relocated back to the United States. 1307 GT was finally sold on 22 September, 1966 to Mr. Edwin K. Niles, an attorney from California. The car then passed through two other known owners before it was acquired by the 29-year-old Jim Swartout, who would own the car for the next 30 years. In 1999, next owner Jonas Liden of Sweden commissioned a full restoration at Carrozzeria Autosport, Bacchelli & Villa in Bastiglia, Italy. Following a showing at the Ferrari Owners Club UK National Concours in 2001, the current owner acquired the car in 2003. Recent history After participating in the Texas 1000 and New England 1000, the car was stripped down to bare metal and refinished in a very attractive deep blue, the way it was during Seidel’s ownership. In fact, the owner believes the attractive silver hardtop was modified and adapted to this car during Wolfgang Seidel’s ownership. In addition to being shown at Meadow Brook in 2005, the car was also displayed at the 58th Annual Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in the special California Spyder category. As presented, it retains its original, matching-numbers type 128 D engine. Most recently, the owner invested an additional $115,000 to bring the car to the Platinum Award-level standards mandated by the Ferrari Club of America. To that end, a complete motor and suspension rebuild were carried out by noted marque specialist Greg Jones. The convertible top and bows were restored, and the entire car was detailed appropriately to Platinum standards. As such, everything from restoring the instruments to fitting the correct inside mirror and replacing the exhaust tips was necessary. Furthermore, the side vents, which at some point were replaced by California Spyder side vents, were replaced with the correct 410 Superamerica pieces. This exhaustive work has been documented with bills, receipts and photographs and, most importantly, was rewarded with certification by Ferrari Classiche, confirming the car is presented precisely the way it left the factory. 1307 GT is unique in several important respects. Most apparent is the switch box placed over the driveshaft tunnel just behind the shift lever. It contains the ignition switch and other controls which normally would be mounted on and below the dashboard and instrument panel, giving taller drivers more leg and knee room. As mentioned, 1307 GT also has distinctive Superamerica-style front fender vents formed from bright-finished aluminium. Fitted from new with the desirable and more reliable twin Marelli distributors, its three Weber carburettors breathe through factory-fitted velocity stacks and are contained within a cold air box, both highly desirable performance options fitted to only a few California Spyders. As a long-wheelbase example, the trim, low lines of its topless coachwork are elegantly balanced by the placement of its wheels and tyres. The overall effect is long, low, sleek and decidedly sporting. The California Spyder is as close as Ferrari came to building a sports car since the early Barchettas, and only it and the later 275 GTB/4 N.A.R.T. Spyders have the elemental high-speed, open-air attitude that sets these cars apart from their more common cabriolet counterparts. 1307 GT is distinctive among even these rare and highly prized automobiles, the ideal mount for a variety of tours and events, or even, in the tradition of the late Bob Grossman, a competitive entry in the many historic racing and Ferrari club events where its participation would be welcomed. ITALIANTEXT 240 cv, motore V-12 di 2.953 cc a camme in testa con monoblocco e teste in alluminio, cambio manuale a quattro marce, sospensione anteriore a ruote indipendenti con molle e ammortizzatori telescopici, sospensione posteriore con assale rigido, balestre semi-ellittiche e ammortizzatori idraulici, freni a disco idraulici sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2.600 mm (102.4") - In passato di proprietà del Principe Alvise Hercolani e di Wolfgang Seidel - Allestimenti speciali fra i quali il tettuccio rigido e gli sfoghi d'aria laterali tipo Superamerica - Stesso numero di telaio e motore; certificata da Ferrari Classiche - Numerosi recenti lavori di dettaglio e revisione del motore e delle sospensioni - Esibita al Concorso d'Eleganza di Pebble Beach - Provenienza conosciuta, documentata dallo storico delle Ferrari Marcel Massini Nel pantheon delle Ferrari aperte desiderabili, la 250 GT California Spyder, sia nella versione a passo lungo che in quella a passo corto, domina sulle altre. Ha tutti gli elementi che i Ferraristi cercano: rarità, il motore V-12 progettato da Colombo, eternamente allettante e un pedigree nelle competizioni che si unisce alle linee sportive di Pinin Farina. La California Spyder, in contrasto con le precedenti lussuose 250 cabriolet costruite su richiesta, fu pensata per il cliente alla ricerca di una veloce Ferrari sportiva aperta, spartanamente equipaggiata, l'equivalente di una berlinetta Tour de France, perfetta non solo per la guida vivace sulle coste del Pacifico o della Costa Azzurra ma anche per gareggiare al massimo livello. La produzione della California Spyder cominciò nel 1958 e ne erano stati prodotti già 11 esemplari quando fu presentata come modello a sé nel dicembre 1958. All'iniziò del 1959 una California Spyder, iscritta dalla N.A.R.T. a Sebring per i piloti Richie Ginther e Howard Hively, si classificò nona assoluta (dietro quattro Testa Rossa e quattro Porsche RSK) e prima della Classe GT. Alla 24 Ore di Le Mans nel 1959 la California Spyder mostrò in pieno le sue potenzialità, quando la vettura, iscritta dalla N.A.R.T. e guidata da Bob Grossman e Fernand Tavano, si classificò al quinto posto assoluto. Il telaio n. 1307 GT La spettacolare Ferrari offerta é la 23° delle 50 California Spyder a passo lungo costruite ed è unica, per i diversi particolari desiderabili e caratteristici, come gli inusuali sfoghi d'aria tipo Superamerica sulla fiancata anteriore e per la presa d'aria leggermente incavata sul cofano. Fu consegnata il 27 marzo 1959 al Principe Alvise Hercolani di Bologna e il suo certificato di origine fu emesso dalla Ferrari il 3 aprile 1959. Il Principe Hercolani tenne la 1307 GT per circa sei mesi, vendendola poi nell'ottobre 1959 al pilota tedesco e commerciante di automobili Wolfgang Seidel. Seidel pilotò la vettura al V Grand Prix di Bruxelles in Belgio, come illustrato nel libro Les Grand Prix de Bruxelles di Jean-Paul Delsaux. Seidel vendette a sua volta la vettura nel 1961 al terzo proprietario, il tedesco Rolf Helm, dal quale la acquistò il quarto proprietario, William Morgan di Phoenix, in Arizona. Morgan, che all'epoca viveva a Wiesbaden, guidò la 1307 GT fino a Marsiglia e la fece caricare su un traghetto per la Corsica, dove passò una vacanza di due settimane con la moglie. Da lì, la vettura fu imbarcata per Genova e quindi Morgan la guidò fino a Modena. Morgan avrebbe tenuto la vettura per diversi anni. Nel settembre 1963 passò in fabbrica per una manutenzione e nel 1965 fu inviata via mare a Pleasant Hills, in California, dove Morgan si era stabilito al ritorno negli Stati Uniti. La 1307 GT fu infine venduta il 22 settembre 1966 a Edwin K. Niles, un avvocato californiano. La vettura ebbe poi altri due proprietari conosciuti prima di essere acquistata dal ventinovenne Jim Swartout, che l'avrebbe tenuta per i successivi 30 anni. Nel 1999, il successivo proprietario, lo svedese Jonas Liden, commissionò un restauro completo alla Carrozzeria Autosport di Bacchelli & Villa, a Bastiglia (Modena). Nel 2001 la vettura fu esibita al Concorso Nazionale del Ferrari Owners Club di Gran Bretagna e nel 2003 venne acquistata dall'attuale proprietario. Storia recente Dopo aver partecipato alla Texas 1000 e alla New England 1000, la vettura fu sverniciata, portata a lamiera nuda e riverniciata in un piacevolissimo blu scuro, la livrea che aveva quando era di proprietà di Seidel. In effetti, il proprietario ritiene che l'attraente hardtop grigio-argento sia stato modificato e adattato a questa vettura durante la proprietà di Seidel. Oltre ad essere stata esibita al concorso di Meadow Brook del 2005, la vettura è stata anche esposta alla 58° edizione del Concorso d'Eleganza di Pebble Beach, nella classe speciale California Spyder. Essa è offerta con ancora il suo motore d'origine tipo 128 D, con lo stesso numero del telaio. Più di recente, il proprietario ha investito altri 115.000 dollari per portare la vettura agli standard della Targa Platino, come definiti dal Ferrari Club of America. A tal fine, il motore e le sospensioni sono stati completamente revisionati dal noto specialista della marca Greg Jones. Il telaietto della capote e la relativa tela sono stati restaurati, e l'intera vettura è stata curata nei dettagli per essere conforme ai criteri della Targa Platino. E' stato quindi necessario restaurare gli strumenti, montare un corretto specchietto retrovisore interno e sostituire i terminali di scarico. Inoltre, gli sfoghi d'aria laterali, che in un certo momento erano stati sostituiti con quelli della California Spyder, sono stati nuovamente sostituiti con pezzi corretti della 410 Superamerica. Questo esauriente lavoro è ben documentato con fatture, ricevute e fotografie e, cosa più importante, è stato premiato con la certificazione di Ferrari Classiche, che conferma che la vettura si presenta esattamente uguale a come aveva lasciato la fabbrica da nuova. La 1307 GT è unica per diverse e importanti caratteristiche. Il più evidente è la nicchia per i comandi sistemata sul tunnel della trasmissione subito dietro la leva del cambio. Essa contiene il blocchetto d'accensione e le altre leve che normalmente sono montate sopra e sotto il cruscotto e questa soluzione lascia maggiore spazio alle gambe e alle ginocchia dei guidatori più alti. Come già detto, la 1307 GT ha anche specifiche uscite d'aria sui parafanghi anteriori, in stile Superamerica e in alluminio lucidato. E' dotata fin da nuova con due affidabili e più richiesti spinterogeni Marelli, con tre carburatori Weber con i tromboncini d'aspirazione alimentati tramite un convogliatore d'aria a forma di vasca, opzioni entrambe molto desiderate e montate solo su poche California Spyder. E' un esemplare su telaio a passo lungo e le pulite, basse linee della sua carrozzeria aperta sono elegantemente bilanciate dal posizionamento di cerchi e pneumatici. In assoluto l'immagine è quella di una vettura lunga, bassa, slanciata e decisamente sportiva. La California Spyder è quanto di più vicino ci possa essere alle prime Barchette costruite dalla Ferrari, e solo lei e la successiva 275 GTB/4 N.A.R.T. Spyder danno quell'idea essenziale di guida veloce all'aria aperta che pone queste vetture in una categoria a sé rispetto alle altre più comuni cabriolet. La 1307 GT si distingue persino fra queste pur rare e costosissime automobili, è il mezzo perfetto per i più diversi tour ed eventi, ed è anche, nella tradizione del defunto Bob Grossman, un mezzo competitivo in molte corse storiche ed eventi dei Ferrari club, dove sicuramente la sua partecipazione sarà molto apprezzata. Addendum Please note that this car is eligible for import into the UK at 5% VAT. Chassis no. 1307 GT

  • CANCanada
  • 2011-05-21
Hammer price
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1952 Ferrari 225 Sport Spyder ‘Tuboscocca’ by Carrozzeria Vignale

210 bhp, 2,715 cc V-12 engine, five-speed manual gearbox, independent double wishbone, transverse lower leaf spring front suspension, live axle, double semi-elliptic longitudinal leaf spring rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm (94.5") • One of the 12 Vignale Sport Spyders produced • Matching numbers of the 1950s open 12-cylinder Ferrari • International period racing history • First OA at the Bologna Raticosa Hill Climb • 1953 Argentine Sports Car Championship winner; numerous wins in Argentina • Highly documented in print and in photographs The number of different sports-racers and variants built by Ferrari during the 1950s provides a fascinating demonstration of both the uncanny adaptability of the Ferrari organisation and its willingness to build and develop single-purpose models to meet the requirements of specific racing events. In particular, the 225S remains especially significant as the evolutionary link in Ferrari’s DNA, leading directly to its series of 3-litre V-12 racing cars, beginning with the 250 MM and progressing through to the 250 GTO of the early 1960s. Only about 20 examples of the 225S were constructed through 1952 and 19 of them, comprising of 12 Spyders and seven Berlinettas, were clothed with purposeful yet rather elegant bodies by Alfredo Vignale. This Spyder, chassis 0192ET, is the sixth of the 12 Vignale Sport Spyders built, and its bodywork artfully blends form and function with the coach builder’s characteristic triple ovoid front-wing chrome portholes and such competition-oriented features as a pair of small double air intakes on the hood, plus a pair of intake ducts for rear-brake cooling and twin rows of triple air outlets on the hood. The foundation of 0192ET was the highly specialised ‘Tuboscocca’ frame layout, with double tubular outer members joined by a truss-type configuration, providing exceptional strength, and the ‘skeleton’, supporting the body panels. The Tipo 212 gearbox was assembled on 20 March 1952, and on 20 March, the chassis was shipped to Carrozzeria Vignale in Torino to receive its bodywork. On 28 June, the engine was assembled and tested on 3 and 4 July, followed by an overhaul and further testing on 16 July. On 22 September 1952, 0192ET was sold by the Ferrari factory to first owner Giuseppe Viannini, an Alfa Romeo dealer domiciled in both Milan and Buenos Aires. The first race outing for 0192ET was on 11 October 1952, at the Bologna-Raticosa hill climb in Italy, with Pietro Palmieri, and the car raced number328, where it placed 1st overall. Next, Mr Viannini exported 0192ET from Italy to Argentina, where it was painted yellow and red and raced. In late1952, Viannini sold the car to José Maria Ibañez, a resident of Buenos Aires, who raced it extensively and quite successfully. The 1953 season started with a 3rd place finish, where the car race-numbered 3 at the Gran Premio de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, with Ibañez at the wheel. He went on to race 0192ET at the Premio Verano, CAS, at the Autodromo Eva Peron at Mar del Plata, where, this time, he took first overall. In June, he was back on the track at the Gran Premio de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, where he placed 3rd overall. The season continued at the Premio Verano, where, again, he took 1st place, followed by the Grand Prix Governador Carlos Evans at Mendosa, where he finished 2nd overall. At the final two races of the season, in Buenos Aires, Ibañez placed 2nd overall in both events. These stellar results netted Ibañez and 0192ET the Argentine Sports Car Championship. For 1954, 0192ET was refinished in two-tone red and white and campaigned in Brazil and Argentina, with both Ibañez and Rafael Sedano Acosta having driving duties. 0192ET posted several DNFs, with its best a sixth-place finish, with Acosta driving at the Premio Invierno, CAS, Autodromo de Buenos Aires. Its last known race during the ownership of Ibañez occurred on 19 December 19 1954 at Buenos Aires, with an 11th overall result. By 1956, 0192ET was owned by Juan Manuel Bordeu, also of Argentina, at the Autodromo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires. Next, 0192ET passed through Luis Tula Molina, a businessman from northeastern Argentina, under whom the car was repainted green with a black hood, and later, sold in 1958 to Luis Escoda, who had the car refinished in red with white upholstery. Interestingly, by some accounts, Escoda sold the car to the owner of a poultry farm for 450,000 pesos; however, it was raced on 18 October 18 1959 at the Parque de la Indipendenza at Rosario, Santa Fé, by past driver Rafael Sedano Acosta, who used the comical alias "El Rosarino", and then, the car was reportedly sold that year by Escoda to his friend and fellow Argentinian, Alberto Luis Depego. Depego entered 0192ET into the 31 January 1960 1,000 km of Buenos Aires, with him and Luis Escobar scheduled to co-drive, but the car did not start the race. The next known race entry for the 225S was 5 June, at the Autodrome of Buenos Aires (AAAS), where it was driven by Depego, race-numbered 5 and finished 6th overall. Engine failure forced a DNF in November 1960 at the 500 Milas Argentinas at Rafaela, Santa Fé, and the car posted a DNS that December at the Autodromo de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, a fate that befell the car again at the same venue the following September. Depego sold 0192ET in 1961 to Domingo Di Santo of Rio Cuarto, Cordoba, who damaged the engine during practice at the Cabalén racetrack, and subsequently, sold the Ferrari to another Argentinian, Humberto Evangelista. Mr Evangelista drove the car in competition through the end of 1966, with a second-place finish his best result, posted on 1 February 1963 at the Premio Ciudad de Chascomus. Thereafter, 0192ET was stored in Venado Turto near Buenos Aires, Argentina until 1980, when Hector Mendizabal acquired it. At this point, the 225S was painted red with a longitudinal yellow stripe and yellow decoration below the chrome strip on the body flanks, also sporting the script "Ferrari V12" on the sides. The next major phase in the life of 0192ET began in 1980, when it was exported from Argentina to Italy by Mendizabal, subsequently passing to Giuseppe Bianchini, who commissioned its restoration in 1983. The body was restored by Carrozzeria Casella of Torino and painted dark red, whilst the mechanical restoration was performed by Gianni Torelli of Campagnola-Reggio Emilia, Italy, who is recognised as one of the best engineers when it comes to 1950s sports cars. Once completed, 0192ET embarked on an equally active vintage racing career with Bianchini, beginning in May 1986, with entry into the Mille Miglia, followed by the AvD-Oldtimer-Grand Prix at the Nürburgring that year. Entries at the next four editions of the Mille Miglia followed with Bianchini, and then, in 1991, he sold 0192ET to one Mr Pederzoli of Modena, who raced the car at the Circuito delle Tre Province, placing 3rd. The next known race outing for 0192ET was the 1995 Mille Miglia. In 1996, Olivier Cazalières of Paris, France acquired the car, and in 1996/1997, AG Racing of Nice, France performed a mechanical restoration. Under Mr Cazalières, the car returned to the Mille Miglia in May 1998, and then, in late-June of that year, it contested the Ferrari Shell Historic Challenge at Dijon-Prenois, followed by July’s Coys International Historic Race Festival at Silverstone. In 1999, 0192ET was entered into the Tour Auto and Mille Miglia, the Shell Ferrari-Maserati Historic Challenge races during the L’Age d’Or meeting at Montlhéry and the “Tutte le Ferrari a Vallelunga” Shell Ferrari-Maserati Historic Challenge Finals. The French enthusiast magazine Auto Passion published a colour feature on 0192ET in its July/August 1999 edition, and in February 2000, he displayed the 225S in a special Ferrari exhibit at Paris’ famed Retromobile show. Subsequent race outings during 2000 included the Ferrari Days at Spa-Francorchamps, 2000 Historic Grand Prix of Monaco, and the Shell Historic Ferrari Maserati Challenge during the Ferrari Racing Days in Hockenheimring, Germany. In 2003, 0192ET was sold and became a part of a very important collection based in Brescia, Italy. Under his ownership, 0192ET was driven that year at the Le Mitiche Sport a Bassano meeting and most appropriately, the 2005 and 2007 editions of the Mille Miglia. Campaigned with few interruptions ever since new and accompanied by an extensive collection of photographs, 0192ET is very well-documented, having been pictured in the official Ferrari Yearbook 1953, issue 158 of the Prancing Horse, the Ferrari Club of America magazine, and within the definitive book Ferrari Argentina, Sports Cars, authored by Cristian Bertschi and Estanislao Iacona. Incredibly rare, steeped in history throughout its life and highly documented with remarkable provenance, 0192ET remains simply impressive as one of Ferrari’s groundbreaking early-1950s sports racers, with striking open coachwork by Vignale. Chassis no. 0192 ET Engine no. 0192 ET

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
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1966 Ferrari 206 S Dino Spyder by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

218 bhp, 1,987 cc DOHC V-6 engine, five-speed manual gearbox, independent double-wishbone, front and rear suspension with coil springs, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,280 mm (89.8") • One of only 18 examples produced • Ex-Maranello Concessionaires racing team • Ferrari Classiche certified • Raced by Richard Attwood and David Piper • Fully documented racing provenance • Just four owners from new; same ownership since 1970 • Stunning Pierre Drogo-designed body work In February 1966, Ferrari débuted a new sports-racing car formulated for the FIA’s 2-litre Group 4 class, with hopes of winning over the numerous privateer teams that campaigned in Porsches. Dubbed the Dino 206 S, the car was powered by the development of the 65 degree V-6 engine that had been conceived by Dino Ferrari, prior to his death in June 1956. Originally co-engineered by legendary Alfa Romeo designer Vittorio Jano, then working as a consultant for Ferrari, the Dino V-6 motor was badged with a hand scripted autograph based on the younger Ferrari’s signature. Though it was introduced as a Formula 2 powerplant, an enlarged version of the engine was subsequently used in the Formula 1 cars, carrying works driver Mike Hawthorn to a Driver’s World Championship in 1958. Whilst Ferrari’s Formula 1 cars of the early-1960s increasingly adopted 120 degree V-6 engines designed by Technical Director Carlo Chiti, the Jano-engineered 65 degree Dino engine was, nonetheless, consistently enlarged and developed in various experimental sports prototypes, including the 246 SP, the 206 SP, the 196 SP and the 166 P. Introduced for the 1966 racing season, the Dino 206 S appeared to be a scaled down version of the revered 330P, even wearing similarly ravishing coachwork care of Piero Drogo’s Carrozzeria Sports Cars in Modena. The visual appeal of Drogo’s aerodynamic body shell, which featured a combination of stressed alloy panels and fibreglass over a welded tubular semi-monocoque, was beautifully complemented by the Dino V-6’s fierce performance. By the end of the 1966 race season, the 206 S had proved its mettle, earning a 2nd place finish at the Targo Florio, 2nd and 3rd at the Nürburgring and a 6th place finish at Spa. Although the 206 S was originally slated for a homologation of 50 examples, labour problems prematurely interrupted production after only 18 cars had been assembled, and the model, therefore, remains a rare and important milestone in the arc of the Dino race car’s development, as well as a cornerstone of the Ferrari road cars that followed. Excluding the Factory Works prototype, this beautifully restored 206 S is just the third example produced. This car was initially purchased on 23 April 1966, by Colonel Ronnie J. Hoare of Maranello Concessionaires Racing Team of Egham, Surrey, England, an authorised Ferrari dealer and racing concern originally founded by champion driver Mike Hawthorn. Finished in Ferrari Racing Red with the recognisable Maranello Concesionairs blue stripe, 006 made its competition début at the RAC Tourist Trophy in Oulton Park, England. Renowned British driver Michael Parkes was behind the wheel, with number 42. Unfortunately, the car had to retire early with final drive issues, but it still placed 21st OA. The following June, 006 started 12th on the grid at the 1,000 Kilometres of Nürburgring, piloted by two of the most famous British drivers, Richard Attwood and David Piper. By lap 28, the car had advanced to 5th in class and 8th place overall before retiring early due to mechanical issues. These teething problems led to further refinement of 006, resulting in its best performance yet at the British Grand Prix at Brands Hatch, where Mr Parkes drove the car to 6th place overall and 1st in class. In August 1967, Maranello Concessionaires sold this Dino 206 S to Gustaf Dieden, through Tore Bjurstrom, the official Ferrari concessionaire of Sweden. The correspondence between Colonel Hoare and Thomas Bjurstrom is very well documented, with letters on file from the Maranello Concessionaire archive. Hoare noted, “I am delighted to hear that you have decided to buy my Ferrari Dino 206/s 006”. After briefly campaigning the Ferrari on the Knutstorp circuit, Dieden competed in a total of six local races, five in Sweden and one in Denmark. After an off-road excursion at Knutstorp, the car was returned to the factory to be repaired, as the left front corner had been damaged. Mr Dieden subsequently advertised the car in Road and Track, with the advert reading, “This fabulous sports racing car was built in Autumn 1966 but modified to works specification at Maranello works during the winter, 1967. Only raced five times by a novice, and it is in beautiful condition throughout. This car is absolutely race ready”. The car was bought by Hans Wangstre of Malmo, Sweden, who brought in driver Evert Christofferson as a co-owner. Under the name Team Bam-Bam, Mr Wangstre and Christofferson campaigned chassis 006 in numerous international venues over the following year, such as the Hockenheimring in Germany and the ADAC 1,000 Kilometres of Nürburgring. Highlights of this period include a 15th place finish at the Good Friday Meeting at Oulton Park on 12 April 1968 and a 22nd place finish at the Targa Florio on 5 May. In 1969, chassis 006’s legendary Dino V-6 finally succumbed to the rigors of racing, a common problem that was due to the imbalance of the crank shaft. As an identical replacement block was deemed to be too expensive for a car that was increasingly dated from a competition standpoint, an experimental Volvo B20 engine was installed, and the car’s racing career effectively ended. Together with the components of the original engine, the car was sold to the current owner in 1970, who had fallen in love with a Maranello Concessionaires Ferrari 206 S that he saw at Le Mans as a young man. There are many photos on file of when the current owner acquired the car, and he stated, “Everybody thought I was mad to spend this much money on an old car”. The car then went into storage, during which time he searched high and low to acquire a correct-type replacement engine for the car. In 1974, he contacted the factory and to his delight, found out that one engine was left over in the Maranello works. However, at the time, the asking price was two and a half times the price of the newly introduced Ferrari 246 Dino GTS. After years of additional research, he decided, in 1988, to restore the car back to its former glory. After a couple years of consultancy with the Ferrari factory and Motor Service Modena, the vendor eventually managed to obtain a set of drawings for the specialised 206 S block. The plan was to cast a new series of four blocks, as he had, by this time, also acquired Ferrari Dino 206 S 016, which also had a cracked block. The blocks were cast at the factory foundry and machined to the correct specifications before the unit intended for chassis 006 was installed in the car. A complete restoration of 006 continued for a number of years, including testing of the new engine, stripping of the original body down to bare metal and refinishing the car. It has remained in the owner’s collection ever since, rarely seen in public. After so many years of continuous ownership and research, he has become one of the world’s leading experts on the Dino 206 S model, and it is precisely this knowledge base that has ensured that every detail on 006 is correct and accurate. For the past two years, the car has been mechanically restored by Tim Samways, the world renowned specialist in sports and racing cars, who has also prepared many other sports prototypes, including the Ferrari P3. The engine has been totally rebuilt, along with the gearbox, the chassis was restored and the bodywork has been perfected and polished. Most recently, the car has been returned to its original livery, as it was campaigned by Maranello Concessionaires at the 1966 1,000 km of Nürburgring, wearing the famous number 14. Aside from this fabulous restoration, 006 benefits from a thorough file of documentation, including a full correspondence record from Colonel Hoare through the last forty years, as well as a Ferrari Classiche certification. The most remarkable thing, of course, is that the car has been in single ownership since 1970, with only four owners from new. Chassis 006 has been refitted with a freshly cast engine block, of which the specification is absolutely correct, as per Ferrari Classiche. The car’s original block stamped “006” is included with the sale of the car. Exceedingly rare and beautifully restored, this unique Dino 206 S is a highly desirable testament to the beauty and power of Ferrari’s race cars and Piero Drogo’s breathtakingly sculpted coachwork. 006 will doubtlessly attract the interest of dedicated Ferrari collectors and marque experts seeking to supplement their collections with an unusual piece of the Maranello racing legend. This particular car has to be one of the only examples in existence that has not been heavily crashed. Coming from single ownership over the last 40 years, it is a fine example for any collector and could be used in competition work. Addendum Please note that due to the engine being removed whilst receiving Ferrari Classiche certification, all fluids have been drained and there has not been enough time to run the car again prior to the auction. The vendor offers to return the car to Tim Samways Engineering to be run up at his cost on behalf of the new buyer. Chassis no. 006

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2012-05-11
Hammer price
Show price

1965 Ferrari 500 Superfast Series I by Pininfarina

400 bhp, 4,962 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber twin-choke carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with A-arms and coil springs, solid rear axle with parallel trailing arms and semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.3 in. The 1965 Chicago Auto Show car One of only 36 examples produced for Ferrari’s best customers Formerly owned by Dieter Holterbosch and Dr. John L. Brady Wonderful original interior, never taken apart; ideal for preservation class Matching numbers throughout Freshly meticulously refinished in the original Blu Scuro color FERRARI’S SPACE-AGE SUPERCOUPE Ferrari has a long and grand tradition of building what can justifiably be referred to as supercoupes, a style that is virtually unique to the famed Maranello automaker. Other manufacturers could produce sleek two-passenger coupes that were comfortable and fast, but Ferrari’s offerings were individually hand-built, in extraordinarily small numbers and often with numerous bespoke features. More importantly, they were more than fast: they were some of the fastest automobiles on Earth outside of a race track. The last generation of the original Ferrari supercoupes was the aptly named Superfast, produced between 1964 and 1966. Featuring updated Pininfarina coachwork with a dart-like tapered nose, gracefully rounded tail, and glassy European greenhouse, it encompassed a highly developed version of the original Ferrari Colombo V-12, now displacing five liters and producing 395 horsepower, an output that was utterly remarkable for the era. The car’s top speed was 175 mph, a figure that could be achieved quite readily and with no particular special treatment on the part of the driver. It was a remarkable performance for 1964 and a top speed that would still be worthy of special notice a decade later. Each Superfast was also super expensive, retailing for well over $14,000. Buyers were as elite as the car itself, encompassing the foremost Ferrari enthusiasts in the world (something still true of their owners today). Two family members of the Aga Khan, future Aston Martin company owner Peter Livanos, film star Peter Sellers, Woolworth’s heiress Barbara Hutton, and racing driver John von Neumann were among the 36 illustrious and very wealthy figures who acquired a 500 Superfast when new. Simply put, the 500 Superfast encompasses everything great about Ferrari in this era: incredible beauty, incredible power, and peerless exclusivity, all of it in measures that are as impressive today as they were in 1964. THE CHICAGO SUPERFAST Only two 500 Superfasts are known to have been displayed at American auto shows, the first of which was the car offered here, chassis number 5985, which was displayed by Chinetti Motors at the 57th Annual Chicago Auto Show between February 20th and 28th. This was only the second 500 Superfast to have been delivered to the United States, and as the first to be publically shown can be credited as many enthusiasts’ first-hand introduction to Ferrari’s latest and greatest supercoupe. As an early production 500 Superfast, the 6th, Pininfarina job number 99585, has several distinctive and desirable features, including 11-slot fender vents, floor-hinged pedals, and a four-speed synchromesh transmission with a mechanical clutch and electronic overdrive. Completed on 23 December 1964, following nearly nine months of craftsmanship, it was originally finished in an attractive color scheme of Blu Scuro over Arancia leather, which undoubtedly caught many an eye while being shown under the lights at McCormick Place. Following the Chicago show, Chinetti Motors dealt the 500 Superfast to its original owner, Hans Dieter Holterbosch of New York. The American importer for Löwenbräu beer, Mr. Holterbosch was a passionate collector of the world’s great performance automobiles, owning everything from a Mercedes-Benz W154 and Bugatti Type 59 to superb examples of the Duesenberg Model J and Ferraris 340 MM and 375 Indianapolis. That a collector of the world’s greatest vintage powerhouses chose to buy a 500 Superfast speaks to the cache of this model, even when it was new. Nonetheless, Mr. Holterbosch returned the car to Chinetti Motors for sale after a short time, and it was sold to its next enthusiast owner, Judge Samuel Simon Leibowitz, a successful criminal defense attorney from Long Island. Judge Leibowitz, like Mr. Holterbosch, loved fine automobiles, in particular Ferraris, and had been one of Luigi Chinetti’s earliest customers; over the years he would own a 250 GT LWB California Spider and an alloy-bodied 275 GTB, in addition to the Superfast. In 1966 the car was sold by an owner in the posh Detroit suburb of Grosse Pointe, Michigan, to Dr. John L. Brady of Goodrich, Michigan. Dr. Brady used the car intermittently until 1973, at which point it was put into storage in his climate-controlled garage. Two decades later, perhaps recognizing his good fortune to own such an exclusive automobile, he sent the car to the noted Ferrari mechanic Terry Myr of Port Huron, Michigan, for a complete engine rebuild and attention to its braking and fuel systems. In August of 2002, the car appeared at the Concours-Italian Style at the Edsel & Eleanor Ford House in Grosse Pointe, in what is believed to have been its first public display since the Chicago show of 1964! The car was acquired by its current owner, a renowned Ferrari connoisseur, after 47 years with Dr. Brady; at the time, the car showed just over 13,500 miles and was in solid original condition, with the exception of an older refinish in silver. In fact, such was the car’s incredibly well-preserved order that it still ran and drove well and strongly, as it does today. The consignor recounts that the only work deemed necessary to the excellent low-mileage original 500 Superfast was being refinished in the original color, Blu Scuro. The Arancia leather interior remains wonderfully, fully original, as is the wooden capping of the dashboard; all shows just enough wear to be warmly inviting and is in a remarkable state of preservation for being over 50 years old. Furthermore, the car performed excellently and without issue on the Quail Rally just last year. Today the car remains among the lowest-mileage extant Superfasts, having recorded 14,075 miles, and is still accompanied by a correct tool roll. Given that only three dozen examples were originally produced, surviving 500 Superfasts seldom trade hands, and usually privately. The opportunity to acquire one with such wonderful history and an exquisite restoration can safely be held among the rarest Ferrari opportunities on the market today. Offered here is one such example, the renowned, extremely original, and beautifully conserved Chicago Superfast—a Ferrari with few equals, then as now. Chassis no. 5985 Engine no. 5985

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

352 hp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber 40 DCN17 carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension by coil springs and wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Exceedingly rare; the 66th of only 121 genuine Daytona Spiders A U.S.-delivery example; fitted new with air conditioning and Borrani wire wheels Offered with a correct set of books and tools One of Ferrari’s most iconic open-top sports cars Matching numbers “And now, my friend, the first rule of Italian driving. What’s behind me is not important.” Perhaps the most memorable moment from the film The Gumball Rally was that phrase, which held quite a bit of truth in 1976. When driving a Daytona Spider at that time, there was little that could keep up with Ferrari’s fastest drop-top and few cars that would look as good as the Daytona did at speed. When the film first hit the silver screen, the Daytona had been out of production for nearly three years, but there were still few automobiles that could deliver the requisite amount of performance, as well as visual and aural theater, that a Daytona Spider could. For representing the Italians in The Gumball Rally, there was truly no better car. CHASSIS NUMBER 16223: AN AMERICAN SPIDER This car, the 66th of 121 Daytona Spiders constructed by the factory, was ordered new by James Lewis Meador, of Roanoke, Virginia, through Algar Enterprises, the famous official Ferrari distributor based in Rosemont, Pennsylvania, on September 7, 1972. According to the car’s order form from Algar, Meador specified factory delivery and that it was to be outfitted with a Blaupunkt radio and air conditioning and trimmed in a unique color combination of Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) over a Bianca leather with Blu inserts and carpeting, which was a fitting and patriotic color combination for a U.S.-delivery Daytona Spider. The order form specified that the car was to be delivered on or around December 1972. However, shipping records and documentation from Algar and Ferrari, which are supplied with the car, support the fact that the car was not delivered to Meador until mid-1973 and that it was instead fitted with a Becker Mexico radio. The Daytona Spider had made its way to Florida in 1975, in the ownership of Richard Katz of Coconut Grove, Florida, who had purchased the car from Joe Marchetti. Katz owned the car for just a year before selling it to Alan R. Patterson, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At the same time, Patterson also owned a 250 LM, chassis number 6025, the one-off Pininfarina-bodied LM that was shown by Pininfarina at the 1965 Geneva Motor Show. After Patterson’s ownership, chassis number 16223 was purchased by Jean Banchet, the owner of Le Français, a highly acclaimed restaurant in Chicago, Illinois, and perhaps this Daytona Spider’s most well-known owner. Banchet retained the car until 1988, and it was eventually sold to Stuart Hayim, of Los Angeles, California. Upon receiving the car, Hayim decided to have his new Daytona restored. The body was stripped and repainted Red by Mike McCluskey. The famed Tony Nancy was commissioned to complete work on the interior, which was refinished in black leather, and the car was fully detailed by Bill Lazelere. At the same time, the engine was removed and serviced by Bruno Borri, of Modena Sports Cars. Following its $75,000 restoration (a substantial figure in 1988), chassis number 16223 was purchased by Dennis Farey in January 1992. Farey displayed the car at the 30th annual Ferrari Club of America International Concours d’Elegance at Monterey, where it won a Gold award. The car was also shown in his ownership at the Palo Alto Concours d’Elegance, and it would later be featured in articles in Forza and Millionaire magazines in 1998. Bill Kling, of Malibu, California, would be the next owner, purchasing this car, with 27,375 miles on its odometer, in July 2000. He entrusted the Daytona Spider to GT Motors of Glendale, California, for a complete mechanical overhaul, which included rebuilding the half-shafts, the drive box, and the steering box, as well as rebuilding the transmission with new synchros. The engine received new gaskets and a valve job, and the suspension was restored, with parts being replaced and refinished where necessary. After the work was completed, Kling decided to show his Daytona Spider at concours events, memorably choosing to drive, rather than trailer, the car wherever it went. It was driven from Los Angeles to Monterey in August 2001 for Concorso Italiano and was specially selected to celebrate 50 years of collaboration between Pininfarina and Ferrari. The car also garnered two Platinum awards in FCA judging at the FCA Nationals in Los Angeles in 2002 and once again in 2004. Chassis 16223 was acquired by its current custodian in 2011 and it has been properly maintained ever since. The car was last serviced by Ferrari of Central Florida in December 2014; at that time, the engine and gearbox oil and coolant were replaced and the brakes were bled, after which the car was released with a clean bill of health. At the time of cataloguing, the car’s odometer showed just over 33,500 miles, showing the frequency of which Kling drove and enjoyed his Daytona Spider over his 10+ years of ownership. The car is accompanied by a complete tool kit, a full set of manuals, and a substantial file of documentation from throughout its life. It has completed the necessary tests required for its Ferrari Classiche application. Please speak with an RM representative for further details. If ever there was a car that encapsulated the image and character of its entire marque, this Daytona Spider is it. The classic red finish, swathed over a 4.4-liter V-12 and finished with Borrani wire wheels—all of which the car wore when new—is, in and of itself, nothing short of iconic. That said, it is also unbelievably difficult to acquire. With only 121 examples built, not all Daytona Spiders are superbly presented as this example, while only a handful define so perfectly what it means to be a “Ferrari,” and fewer yet are available to the discerning enthusiast. Chassis no. 16223 Engine no. B2136 Gearbox no. 1066

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1984 Ferrari 288 GTO

400 bhp, 2,855 cc DOHC mid-mounted V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers, Behr intercoolers, and Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.4 in. The first 288 GTO officially delivered to Japan Bought new by Yoshiho Matsuda; remained in his collection until 2010 Under 11,000 original kilometers THE SECOND GTO By 1984, the words Grand Turismo Omologoto already carried an enormous amount of weight in the Ferrari world. For years, the 250 GTO had been considered the finest sports racer that Ferrari had ever produced. With an incredible racing record, which was only rivaled by its sensational driving dynamics, the 250 GTO had already been cemented into sports car lore as nothing short of a legend. For Ferrari to revive that legendary moniker, the new GTO would be expected to match or surpass the 250 GTO’s record in motorsport. Looking to contend in the FIA Group B rally circuit, Ferrari produced and designed the 288 GTO in order to homologate it for competition within that series, calling for a production run of 200 cars. Group B was incredibly popular following its introduction in the early ’80s, especially in Europe, and Ferrari was eager to jump into the fray, as they were certain that their car would be unmatched in competition. However, Group B was cancelled shortly thereafter, leaving a fully developed and homologated car but no series to compete in. It was clear that the public was highly anticipating Ferrari’s newest no-compromises supercar, and the 288 GTO was certainly not going to disappoint the brand’s fans or customers, even without a place to race. While it shared visual cues with the 308 and 328, there was no denying that the 288 GTO was much more special. It was visually much more aggressive, with GRP and carbon compound utilized for the majority of the bodywork, and while the doors, decklid, and bonnet were formed from lightweight aluminum, its imposing shape hinted at what lay under the hood. The race-bred, 2.8-liter V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers pumped out a monstrous 400 horsepower with 366 foot-pounds of torque. The 288 GTO could rocket to a top speed of 189 mph, making it the fastest road car ever produced at the time of its unveiling. Its acceleration was equally impressive, and the car could reach 60 mph from a standstill in 4.8 seconds and 100 mph in 10.2, which was fast enough to keep everything short of a fighter jet in its rearview mirror. Performance aside, the 288 GTO’s interior was graced with a host of modern amenities. The Kevlar-framed bucket seats were lined in leather, and buyers could request air conditioning, electric windows, and an AM/FM radio/cassette stereo as optional extras. Other than those few extras, the 288 GTO sacrificed nothing to distract the driver from the task at hand. The new GTO clearly resonated with Ferrari’s clientele, as 272 examples were built by the time production ceased, which was over 25 percent more than the amount required for homologation. The 288 GTO was the first in the lineage of modern Ferrari supercars, and it remains incredibly rare, as very few are seldom seen out and about or even offered for public sale. CHASSIS 55237: FORMERLY OF THE MATSUDA COLLECTION The example offered here, chassis 55237, was the 137th Ferrari 288 GTO produced, and it was fitted with air conditioning, power windows, red seat inserts to match the exterior paintwork, and the optional Ansa sport exhaust, according to Joe Sackey’s definitive work The Book of the 288 GTO. The new GTO was destined for a very special customer in the Ferrari world, Yoshiho Matsuda. Mr. Matsuda was one of the world’s foremost collectors of classic cars, Ferraris in particular, and he had an incredible collection, one that housed some of the marque’s most valuable and significant automobiles, including several 250 GTOs. It was only natural that Mr. Matsuda ordered himself a 288 GTO. This car was imported into Japan on April 10, 1985, as the very first example officially imported into the country by Cornes & Company, the official Ferrari importer for Japan. Immediately thereafter, the car was registered for road use by Matsuda and was used regularly by him on the streets of Japan, where it surely garnered plenty of attention. Chassis 55237 remained in his collection for an impressive 25 years. By the time it left his ownership in 2010, he had accumulated 9,500 kilometers on its odometer, which is a testament to the car’s incredible driving dynamics. Just prior to leaving his collection, the 288 GTO received a major service, which included a replacement of the timing belts, at a cost of over ¥2,000,000, which ensured that it was ready for its new owner. Following the Matsuda Collection, chassis 55237 remained in Japan until it was imported into the United States. The car has travelled less than 1,000 kilometers since 2010, and it remains in exemplary condition. It should be noted that the car includes numerous documents from Matsuda’s ownership, such as the original Japanese importation forms, registration documents, and service receipts, as well as the car’s original tool set, jack, and spare keys. The 288 GTO, now heralded as the first of Ferrari’s incredible series of supercars, was robbed of its chance to earn its fabled name through the crucible of motorsport, but it more than lived up to its predecessor’s reputation as a fabulous driving machine. As one of Ferrari’s all-time greats, the 288 GTO is a staple in many of the world’s greatest collections of Ferraris, just as this fine example was for Yoshiho Matsuda. Chassis 55237, which has been very well maintained under his tenure, has already proven itself worthy of one of the finest Ferrari collections on the planet, and it will undoubtedly continue to do so for its next caretaker. Chassis no. ZFFPA16B000055237

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB by Scaglietti

280 hp, 3,286 cc V-12 engine with triple Weber dual-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs, and tubular shocks, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of approximately 58 long-nose, torque-tube, triple-carburetor, steel-bodied examples Finished in its correct Rosso Rubino over Nero Offered from long-term ownership Incredibly well maintained restoration FERRARI’S 275 GTB The 275 GTB was considered the last of the classic Ferraris, as it brought welcome updates to the brilliant but aging 250 series, yet it also managed to retain wonderful character and sense of occasion. The GTB was unveiled at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, alongside the drop-top 275 GTS, and it was clearly a worthy successor to the 250 series of cars that it replaced. It was designed and developed under the watchful eye of Enzo Ferrari himself. It featured gorgeous bodywork, which was arguably more attractive than the stunning 250 GT/L Lusso that it replaced, and incorporated a number of mechanical improvements that led to increased performance, making for Ferrari’s best grand tourer yet. The car was fitted with a 3.3-liter version of Ferrari’s Colombo V-12, and to give it a lower center of gravity, the engine’s overall height was reduced. Additionally, this was the first Ferrari to be fitted with four-wheel independent suspension and a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle gearbox, which helped to improve its handling. It goes without saying that the 275 GTB’s performance figures were astonishing. A sprint from 0 to 60 mph would take just over six seconds, and the car would go on to achieve a top speed of 160 mph, leaving it capable of dispatching most modern cars on the freeway today. The design of the 275 GTB, which was penned by Pininfarina and handcrafted by Scaglietti, is truly timeless and just as striking as the car’s performance. As is the case with many cars from Maranello, Ferrari adapted the 275 GTB over the course of its production run, and it received a handful of changes throughout its lifespan. The two most important changes were the introduction of the “long-nose” body style and the installation of a torque tube. The nose was lengthened on later cars in an effort to eliminate the undesirable high-speed lift characteristics of the earlier short-nose models. Additionally, a torque tube was added in early 1966 to improve the stability and durability of the drivetrain. By the time the 275 GTB/4 was introduced, all 275 GTBs were leaving the factory in long-nose configuration with torque tubes, making them the most desirable of the model series. CHASSIS NUMBER 08603 The car offered here, bearing chassis number 08603, is a wonderful example of a late-production 275 GTB. It was fitted with a long-nose, torque tube, and triple Weber carburetors, and it was originally finished in Rosso Rubino (106-R-12) over a Nero (VM 8500) interior that had full leather seats. According to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, chassis number 08603 was originally destined for the United States and was acquired by its first private owner, a Mr. Cochran of Los Angeles, California, after passing through Luigi Chinetti’s East Coast distributorship. By 1974, the car was in the ownership of Don Blenderman, of Enid, Oklahoma, who was an individual that was familiar with Ferraris, as he was also the owner of a 250 LM. Following his ownership, the car travelled back to the Golden State after being acquired by Michael McCafferty, of San Diego. Following McCafferty’s ownership, the car moved back east, to Houston, Texas, where it was owned by Charles H. Reid. At this time, the car was noted as being finished in Giallo Fly and fitted with Borrani wire wheels, and in the late 1970s, it received an engine, transaxle, and clutch rebuild by Bobileff Motorcars, of San Diego. After leaving the state of Texas in the mid-1980s, chassis 08603 was advertised for sale in the April 1991 issue of Ferrari Market Letter by Dr. Robert Bordin, of Minneapolis, Missouri. At that time, it was still wearing its fly yellow paint, black leather interior, and Borrani wire wheels. It was then purchased by Rodolfo Junca de la Vega II, of California, in 1992. While in Junca de la Vega’s ownership, chassis 08603 was showed at the second annual Vintage Ferrari Concours in Carmel Valley, California, where it placed Third in Class. It was shown once more by Junca de la Vega, at the Ferrari Club of America International Concours d’Elegance in Monterey, California, in August 1994, where it earned an impressive First in Class award. By that time, the car had been refinished in its current and correct red over black color combination, and later that year, it left the United States for the first time since it arrived at Chinetti’s distributorship almost 30 years earlier. This matching-numbers 275 GTB, which has only just recently returned stateside, sports the same red over black color scheme and Borrani wire wheels that it did when it left the United States, and this is a livery that will never go out of style. Its older restoration has been very nicely preserved, and the car still shows beautifully. The paintwork shines bright, the engine bay is beautifully detailed, and the interior shows nary a flaw. It is important to note that the car is also accompanied by its correct books and tools. The long-nose, torque-tube examples are considered the ultimate derivative of the 275 GTB, and they are said to be excellent drivers, ones that are ideal for either long jaunts across continental Europe or high-speed runs through California canyon roads. The long-nose 275 GTB, wearing what is undoubtedly one of the most stunning designs ever penned by Pininfarina and crafted by Scaglietti, is an icon of Italian design and craftsmanship, and it features a timeless shape that looks just as incredible stationary as it does at speed. Chassis number 08603 has been lovingly preserved for the last two decades and is in wonderful condition. It would be an excellent acquisition for any Ferrari collection. Chassis no. 08603 Engine no. 08603

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
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1953 Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Pinin Farina

200 bhp, 2,963 cc 60-degree single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with double wishbones and double leaf springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptic springs and Houdaille shocks, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102 in. The fourth of twenty-one 250 Europas constructed Interesting early history, including period Italian concours events Recently completed five-year, concours-level restoration by Ferrari specialists Featured on the cover of Cavallino issue 198 First in Class at the 2014 Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este Unquestionably one of the finest 250 Europas in existence As the first Ferrari to carry the now legendary 250 series nomenclature, the 250 Europa marked the beginning of a wonderful time in Ferrari’s history. It was revealed to the public, alongside the 375 America, at the 1953 Paris Auto Salon, and it would be Ferrari’s first true grand touring automobile, showing that the company was willing to produce cars for well-heeled customers who were looking to drive their Ferraris on the road rather than on the track. In addition to being the first car of the 250 series, the Europa is unique amongst other members of its family for being the only one to carry the Aurelio Lampredi-designed V-12. This engine, which was used in previous racing Ferraris, could produce over 200 horsepower and was capable of propelling its chassis and coachbuilt bodywork at speeds in excess of 135 mph. Its coachwork was just as striking as the performance of the Europa itself, as it was designed and fabricated by Pinin Farina. The company was finally coming into its own in the early 1950s, and it was beginning to establish both a look and feel for the Ferrari bodies they were manufacturing. Pinin Farina’s design for the Europa proved to be a perfect blend of sportiness and elegance, which wonderfully represented the car’s personality. BUILT FOR A FRIEND OF THE HOUSE Chassis 0305 EU was the fourth Europa of a total of twenty-one units constructed. It arrived at Pinin Farina’s premises on September 29, 1953, according to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, and it was finished in Rosso Marrone, with a beige chiaro roof and beige sills. The interior was finished in Marrone leather and had a matching beige cloth. The exterior, which was shod with whitewall tires, featured one unusual feature, the gas tank lid was placed on the driver’s side rear three-quarter panel, whereas in other Europas it could only be accessed through the trunk. The day before Christmas Eve 1953, the bodywork was invoiced by Pinin Farina, and the chassis was sold new to its first owner, Magnolfi Latino of Florence, the son of Italian industrialist Giovanni Latino, on March 15, 1954. Magnolfi was friends with Pinin Farina himself and must have seen ownership of this Europa as an excellent opportunity to showcase his friend’s craftsmanship, as evidenced by the unusual placement of the Pinin Farina logo, just above the Ferrari emblem, on the Europa’s nose. Magnolfi showed the car at two separate Italian concours events in his first year of ownership, at the Concorso Satorie Romana in Rome and at the Primo Raduno Mondiale della Carrozzeria at Villa Ormond in San Remo. Additionally, he drove the car on the 1954 Rallye du Cinéma in San Remo. It can be argued that the appearances of this car at period concours events helped to establish Pinin Farina’s “Ferrari look” not with Enzo but with the general public, as well as with those that would be lucky enough to become a Ferrari customer in the near future. Sadly, once 0305 EU made its way across the Atlantic, its history becomes murky. Its original engine was replaced with a Chevrolet V-8, the fate of many early U.S.-bound Ferraris, as replacement parts for Italian motors were often difficult to find or too expensive to source. After leaving its chassis, the engine was reported to be with Basil Shadlun in Howell, New Jersey, while the Europa itself was making its way across the lower 48, residing with an owner in Kansas and then moving to sunny California. By the 1990s, the Europa made its way back to its native Italy and passed through a pair of subsequent European owners before being purchased by an individual residing in the Netherlands, who completely dismantled the car in order to take inventory of the parts present for a future restoration. That specific restoration never began, and the car was passed to its current Belgian collector in 2006. With all parts largely accounted for, with the exception of an engine, gearbox, and rear axle, its new owner decided it was time to bring 0305 EU back to its former glory after so many years out of the limelight. Obviously, the first order of business would be to source a correct and original Lampredi V-12 to serve as the car’s new powerplant. REDISCOVERING ENGINE 0305 EU, AGAINST ALL ODDS The search for an acceptable engine began in 2007, and it was not successful until 2009, when an engine, numbered 0337 AL, was found in largely neglected condition. The engine was missing its carburetors and had clearly not been run for some time, but it was largely intact. After some deliberation, it was finally determined that this unit would be acceptable for chassis 0305 EU. Upon further inspection, an incredible discovery was made! Underneath the engine stamping on the block, another engine number was visible, and it appeared to be 0305 EU! To confirm the true identity of this engine, it was sent to Ferrari Classiche for further inspection of the engine itself and its internal numbers. Ferrari noted the internal number as 076, which, against all odds, matched the number listed in Ferrari’s own archives as indeed belonging to the chassis from which it was sourced! Ferrari restamped the correct number into the block and sent the engine back to the Belgium, where it would be reunited with its original chassis after a long absence. Once the engine and chassis were reunited, the car was entrusted to the Schouwenburg brothers at Strada e Corsa, who coordinated the restoration of the body, electrical components, and the interior and worked on the suspension, engine, and transmission in Italy. All of the requisite receipts from its exquisite restoration will remain with the car. TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO THE SHOW FIELD Following its five-year restoration, which resulted in nearly 4,000 hours of work, its owner decided that 0305 EU would embark on its second tour of Europe’s most prestigious concours events. It premiered at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in July 2013 as part of the Cartier Style et Luxe Concours, and then, in October of that year, it was shown once more in Knokke-le-Zoute, Belgium, at the Zoute Concours d’Elegance, where it earned First in Class. Perhaps the biggest piece of publicity for this fantastic Europa was when it was featured on the cover of Cavallino issue 198 in December 2013/January 2014 and was given a 10-page article written by Hugo Garritsen within. Earlier this summer, 0305 EU was invited to the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este, where it definitely made a strong impression on the judges, as it took home First in Class honors. Chassis 0305 EU is undoubtedly one of the finest 250 Europas in existence, and it will now finally be able to relive its youth, as it has been reunited with its original engine. It would be welcome at any concours event around the globe, and it has already proven that it is capable of earning trophies to its name. As the 250 Europa is Ferrari and Pinin Farina’s original expression of the grand touring automobile, any Ferrari collection would be incomplete without a one. It goes without saying that the example offered here would stand proud amongst the finest examples of automobiles wearing the Cavallino Rampante in any show or collection. Addendum This title is in transit. Chassis no. 0305 EU Engine no. 0305 EU

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Coupe Aerodinamico by Pininfarina

340 bhp, 3,967 cc single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine with triple Solex carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, coil-spring independent front suspension with live rear axle, four-wheel telescopic Koni shock absorbers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95 in. The 1961 Paris Motor Show Car One of only 17 SWB Pininfarina 400SA Aerodinamico Coupes ever built Complete with books, tools, build sheet copies, and extensive documentation Very likely the finest restored 400SA in existence; Platinum Awards at Cavallino and FCA meets and 99 points at Pebble Beach Ex-Count Somsky, Greg Garrison, and Skeets Dunn The high performance luxury gran turismo was a new automotive idiom in the prosperous years following World War II. The genre had its roots with great pre-war touring cars like Rolls-Royce’s Phantom II Continental and Mercedes-Benz’s supercharged 500K and 540K Sports Coupes. Post-war luxury gran turismos included the Bentley Continental R-Type and, later, the Mercedes-Benz 300SCs. Moving into the 1960s, these fast, luxurious cars continued to be the car of choice for the rich and famous. Most combined powerful engines with a highly competent chassis and were clothed in unique or limited production coachwork from inspired designers, equipped to the highest standards, and trimmed in the finest materials. Ferrari had offered such cars to its very best clients for years. Crafted in tiny quantities, they were superbly fitted and offered sparkling performance. One of the best known of these was the Superamerica and Superfast series—superb cars with price tags that exceeded even Rolls-Royce. The Aurelio Lampredi-designed V-12 engine, which was originally developed for the four-liter GP cars, supplied power for the first-series examples. The 410 Superamerica appeared at the Brussels Motor Show in January 1956 with a 4,962-cubic centimeter “long block” engine that delivered 340 horsepower. Pininfarina’s coachwork was masterful, minimizing the car’s apparent size and conveying the car’s performance potential. The second-series 400 Superamerica was introduced at the Brussells Motor Show in 1960, when chassis 1611SA, a two-place cabriolet was first exhibited. Later, at the Turin Show in November, the Superfast II debuted, providing the inspiration for the Coupe Aerodinamico. Introduced in 1962 as the Superfast III, the new car would be built between September 1962 and January 1964. A total of 17 examples were built. Unlike the earlier 410 Superamericas, these cars were fitted with the latest version of Ferrari’s legendary Colombo-designed V-12. The lovely design, penned by Pininfarina, featured a tapered nose and tail, creating an elegant, streamlined look. It was this design that earned the model its name: Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico. It is considered to be one of Pininfarina’s great designs—an artful expression of Ferrari performance with stylistic elegance. Once again, their dizzying price tags ensured that the client base would be restricted to heads of state and captains of industry. These cars represented the pinnacle of Ferrari production to be sure: fantastic 1960s styling, extremely low production numbers, and world-class performance. One must also consider that, given the era, these cars were even rarer than other concurrent Ferrari models, the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB later on, and the 250 GT SWB included. Chassis 2841SA was one of these seventeen 400 SA Aerodinamico SWB Coupes produced. It was completed in September 1961 and finished in Grigio Fumo, or Smoke Grey, with the interior finished in Pelle Rosso, or red Connolly, leather. The history of 2841SA is well-known, having been first seen in public in October 1961 at the Paris Motor Show. Later, in November of that year, the car was delivered to its first owner, Count Fritz Herbert Somsky, of Geneva, Switzerland. It remained with him for some time, but, by the 1970s, the car had been imported into the U.S., where it was owned by Barry Le Fave, of Santa Ana, California, who sold it to W. B. LeFace. Fellow California resident Walter Harris then purchased the car; it was advertised by him in 1980, stating that the car had “all original, numbers match, highly tuned engine, rebuilt brakes and rear end.” Presumably, as a result of that advertisement, Harris sold the car to the late Greg Garrison, a renowned Ferrari collector and the producer of the Dean Martin Show in Hollywood. In May of 1999, after almost 20 years of ownership, 2841SA was sold by Garrison to C. A. “Skeets” Dunn, of Rancho Santa Fé, California. In May 2001, the car was shown at the Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance by Mr. Dunn, and it placed First in Class and won the Meguiar’s Award for best paint. Despite its obviously lovely condition, Dunn eventually elected to undertake a complete restoration of the car, beginning in August 2003. The mechanicals were performed by specialist Bill Pound, with the body and paint done by Symbolic Restoration, in Sorrento Valley, California. The car went through an exhaustive and comprehensive Ferrari restoration, where it was disassembled down to every nut and bolt. The body was stripped to bare metal, and every panel and piece of chrome was carefully fitted before repainting or replating. Finally, the body was meticulously refinished in Blu Sera, while the interior was carefully retrimmed in natural saddle leather. The entire restoration, costing in excess of $400,000, is documented by an accompanying file of restoration receipts and several dozen photographs. Most importantly, the car is also accompanied by copies of its original Ferrari build sheets. Upon completion of the restoration in mid-2006, Skeets Dunn elected to show 2841SA at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elégance, where it scored 99 points in the class for Ferrari GT cars, a remarkable result for a first-time showing, particularly when one considers that the judges included none other than Paul Russell, David Seilstad, and Parker Hall. Later, in January 2007, the car was shown once again at the XVI Palm Beach Cavallino Classic Concours d'Elegance at The Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida, where it won a coveted Platinum Award. It has since been shown many times, accumulating a string of Platinum and First in Class awards. As a testament to the preservation of this extraordinary car, 2841SA was awarded a Platinum Award, scoring 99.5 points at the 2013 Ferrari Club of America Concours in Pasadena. A recent inspection by marque specialists has confirmed what a superior motor car it truly is. “Today, the car looks as amazing as it looked on the Pebble Beach lawn in 2006. The quality of the paint is pristine, showing no sign of aging. All the body panels fit precisely and effortlessly. The chrome doesn't have any sign of wear and tear. The undercarriage is spotless, and it shows the care and the lengthy work that made this car one of the best Superamericas ever restored. No corners were ever cut on the restoration, which can be admired by looking at the undercarriage. The interior still remains in excellent condition, and it gives the car the extra touch of originality and elegance that makes it so amazing all the way around. However, one can only appreciate the full extent of this restoration's execution when one closes the door and turns the ignition key. The even sound of the engine, the effortless clutch, the responsive throttle, and the precise gearing make the driving experience beyond divine.” Adding to the car’s extraordinary presentation, it comes complete with books, tools, a jack, and an extensive history file. Please note, however, that while the inspection is complete, the binder remains in transit at the time of printing. With just 17 built, it is certainly true that any 400 SA Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico is extremely rare. This example is all the more unique for its well-known ownership history and its high-point, professional restoration, making it arguably one of the best available examples of the 400 Superamerica and, very likely, the finest restored example on the planet. Furthermore, when one considers its supreme rarity, particularly in relation to its brethren in the Ferrari stable, be it a 275 GTB, 250 GT SWB, or perhaps even a GTO, it becomes readily apparent that the opportunity to acquire such a car will not come again soon, and perhaps never again. It is a motor car of supreme scarcity, exclusivity, power, and elegance, the likes of which the motoring community may never see again. Titled as 1962. Chassis no. 2841SA Engine no. 2841SA

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
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1961 Porsche 718 RS 61 Spyder

178 bhp, 1,600 cc flat four-cylinder engine with dual Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with torsion bar, coil springs, and tubular shock absorbers, and front and rear disc brakes. Wheelbase: 86.6 in. Formerly owned and raced by Bob Donner and Don Wester Finished 7th overall and 2nd in class at the 1961 12 Hours of Sebring Numerous podium finishes at SCCA and USRRC events One of just fourteen RS 61s ever constructed Brilliantly restored and ready for track action To many manufacturers, motorsport victories are essential to commercial success. The adage of “race on Sunday, sell on Monday,” was never more true for Porsche during the late 1950s and early 1960s. The mid-engined Porsche Spyders were still attempting to establish a foothold in the United States, and it took to the track in the hands of factory-supported racers and privateers alike, dicing with the likes of Ferrari, Aston Martin, Jaguar, and Maserati for the vaunted spot at the top of the podium. Victory was the goal for many a weekend, and victory on the weekend would only grow the allure of the brand to spectators, leading to further sales and overall awareness of the Porsche brand. Victory was what Porsche needed to gain a foothold in the United States. Unlike other builders of highly tuned racing cars, Porsche’s engineers relied on constructing a lightweight chassis and powertrain with a streamlined alloy body in order to provide fantastic handling, braking, fuel efficiency, and tire wear, as well as more lightning-quick acceleration. This formula proved to be very effective, and the 550 quickly notched up overall wins at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Mille Miglia, and the Nürburgring 1000. The 550A, 550/1500 RS, and RSK of 1957 would follow, which would only increase Porsche’s domination on race tracks around the world. The RS 61, and the RS 60 before it, proved to be the ultimate development of the Spyder platform. These cars, which were still known as the Type 718, had a tubular space frame that was similar to the 1959 RSK, but they utilized a wheelbase that was four inches longer. However, these cars were noticeably different from previous Porsche Spyders due to tightening FIA regulations, with the most visible of these requirements being the installation of a larger windscreen, an increase in cockpit size, and space for the FIA-required suitcase. Nevertheless, Porsche’s Spyders and those who campaigned them were able to make the best of the FIA’s regulations, and they achieved overall victories at the 1960 12 Hours of Sebring and at that year’s Targa Florio. It was clear that the top brass at Porsche saw little reason to change what worked, and they continued production of the Type 718 cars into 1961, but they renamed them RS 61. Like the RS 60, RS 61s were offered to privateers in almost identical format to the cars campaigned by Porsche themselves, and the RS 61 available today is one of those privateer-campaigned Spyders. Chassis 718-066 is one of the earliest RS 61 chassis constructed, and it is graced with a fantastic U.S. racing history under the names of two very well-known privateers, Bob Donner and Don Wester. When asked about the car, Donner’s wife remarked that “it was one of his very favorite cars” and that the family had many fond memories of the car with Bob behind the wheel. There is no doubt that some of those memories come from the 1961 12 Hours of Sebring, which was quite far from Donner’s home state of Colorado. At Sebring, Bob Donner, Don Sesslar, and Ernie Erickson drove 718-066 to an incredible 7th place overall finish and 2nd in their class. Later that year, the car was entered in the USAC Sports Car race at Pikes Peak, where it proved to revel off the mountain air and finish in 1st place. Don Wester, owner of Wester Motors, a Monterey, California, area Porsche and Volkswagen dealer, purchased this RS 61 from Bob Donner in 1963. Under Wester’s ownership, the car was repainted in a distinct two-tone yellow and black paint job, one which was adorned by many of Wester’s cars, making it easy for fans and competitors alike to identify his Spyder on the track. Wester also replaced the Porsche’s original 1,600-cubic centimeter engine with a 1,700 Homer Worth engine for added power and torque; this was something that he did with many of his racing cars. Just like Bob Donner, Wester soon found success in campaigning his Porsche, accumulating eight podium finishes in 1963 alone in SCCA and USRRC races on the west coast of the United States, with two overall wins at SCCA races at Stockton and Cotati. The RS 61 was then purchased by Eldon Beagle, who continued to race the RS 61 in California in 1964. After leaving Eldon Beagle’s ownership, the RS 61 passed through several different owners, including John Grove and G. Grandell, before landing with its current owner in the 1990s. Shortly after this RS 61 was purchased by its current owner, it was fully restored by a specialist that was familiar with this era of Porsches and racing cars in general. Any non-RS 61 items that found their way into the car were stripped and replaced with factory-correct components in order to make the car as original as possible. At this time, a correct 1,600-cubic centimeter engine was fitted to the car, and it was also refinished in its original color combination of silver with red leather bucket seats. After the completion of its restoration in the United States, the car returned with its new owner to Japan, where it resided in a collection of other significant racing cars. Only a handful of RS 61s were produced, meaning that they very seldom come available for sale. This is a splendid example of the breed, as it is still in remarkable condition from its comprehensive restoration and it boasts a significant racing history from two well-known privateers that owned and raced many Porsche racing cars. Chassis number 718-066 has been expertly prepared for either historic racing or rally events, and it would be just as at home on the Colorado 1000 as it would at the Le Mans Classic. Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this car if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Addendum Please note the title is in transit. Chassis no. 718-066 Engine no. P90316

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-01-16
Hammer price
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1934 Duesenberg J Walker LaGrande C.C. Convertible Coupe

Formerly the Property of Mr. William Goodwin 265hp 420 cu. in. inline eight-cylinder engine, dual overhead camshafts, four valves per cylinder, three-speed manual transmission, front beam axle with live rear axle and four-wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 142" The Duesenbergs were self-taught mechanics and car builders whose careers started in the Midwest at the beginning of the twentieth century with the manufacture of cars bearing the Mason and Maytag names. Fred, the older brother by five years, was the tinkerer and designer of the pair. Augie made Fred’s ingenious and creative things work. Their skill and creativity affected many other early American auto manufacturers. Their four-cylinder engine produced by Rochester powered half a dozen marques. Eddie ickenbacker, Rex Mays, Peter DePaolo, Tommy Milton, Albert Guyot, Ralph DePalma, Fred Frame, Deacon Litz, Joe Russo, Stubby Stubblefield, Jimmy Murphy, Ralph Mulford and Ab Jenkins drove their racing cars. In 15 consecutive Indianapolis 500s, starting with their first appearance in 1913, 70 Duesenbergs competed. Thirty-two – an amazing 46 percent of them – finished in the top 10. Fred and Augie became masters of supercharging and of reliability. Their engines, as engines were Fred’s specialty, were beautiful and performed on a par with the best of Miller, Peugeot and Ballot. In 1921, Jimmy Murphy’s Duesenberg won the most important race on the international calendar, the French GP at Le Mans. It was the first car with hydraulic brakes to start a Grand Prix. Duesenberg backed up this performance at Indianapolis in 1922. Eight of the top 10 cars were Duesenberg powered, including Jimmy Murphy’s winner. The Model J was a major departure from Fred Duesenberg's familiar pursuits. He had been designing and building successful racing cars to ever smaller displacement limitations. The racing regulations’ strictures rewarded extremely high specific outputs from small engines and artful compromises between weight and durability. Suddenly Fred was faced with the opposite problem, designing an engine that emphasized torque and smoothness over output, and a chassis and drivetrain that would accept without stress the largest and most elaborate coachwork. His natural talent quickly took the measure of the problem. The Model J that resulted was a completely original concept, created without reliance on pre-conceived notions, not developed from a prior design philosophy, and not limited by established production machinery, methods, tooling or components. A brilliant talent, at the height of his powers, alert and experienced, was turned loose on a new and fresh problem and in fulfilling his charge created a landmark. Such serendipity rarely happens. Did the Duesenbergs succeed in building “the world’s finest motor car”? Many believe they did, including no less an authority than Ken Purdy who penned an extended treatment of the debate for the very first issue of Automobile Quarterly in 1962. Purdy concluded with these words: “…They were honest men and they honestly tried to make the best fast luxury automobile that the world had known to that time. It can be argued that they succeeded, or did not. I think they succeeded.” When introduced in 1929, the Model J Duesenberg more than doubled the horsepower of the then ranking power champions among American motor cars, the Packard 645 and Stutz M. Its "short" wheelbase model was essentially the same as its competitors’ long wheelbase offerings. Duesenbergs received the most opulent and expensive coachwork from the best coachbuilders in America and Europe. Yet rarely was a Duesenberg’s body extravagant in style, reflecting instead the same notions of quality so eloquently expressed by Fred Duesenberg’s chassis and drivetrain. Murphy, Judkins, Holbrook, LeBaron, Willoughby, Rollston and Derham all contributed attractive but practical coachwork to the early Duesenberg Model Js, imposing automobiles that merged elegance, flamboyance and good taste as effectively as the Duesenbergs’ talent merged with E.L. Cord’s money and vision. While most Duesenbergs were coachbuilt to clients’ orders, often with intimate client involvement during design, construction and trimming, Duesenberg also developed an in-house line of bodies from the A-C-D design department. As has been proven repeatedly, there was no shortage of talent within the A-C-D Body & Art Studio, including Gordon Buehrig and Al Leamy. Styled La Grande, Duesenberg’s proprietary designs were built by several coachbuilders and supplied to the Duesenberg factory in Indianapolis where they were mounted and trimmed either to clients’ order or for stock. Although most were built by the Union City Body Company, a few were built by other houses, including Brunn, Weymann, and A.H. Walker (formed by its eponymous founder to succeed the Weymann American Co. in 1934.) Duesenberg’s La Grande bodies have stood the test of time, their classic elegance and tasteful embellishment distinguishing them among the most coveted coachwork on these great chassis. In an era of great designers and coachbuilders, this is an exceptional recognition. Among La Grande designs the spectacular convertible coupes built by A. H. Walker Company are considered among the most attractive bodies ever installed on the mighty Duesenberg chassis. Just three were built (the others were J530 and J531). The Walker convertible coupes are distinguished by the graceful beltline molding that sweeps down from the cowl to a point partway down the rear fender’s leading edge and the long hood that extends across the cowl area to the base of the windshield. These features combine to integrate the hood, cowl, and body into a seamless single entity, while emphasizing the length of the car’s hood. The Walker La Grande convertible coupes also feature an innovative and unique crank operated top mechanism. However, the rake and low height of the windshield, as well as the sweeping tail is what distinguishes the Walker La Grande as one of the prettiest roadsters of the classic era. In appearance, style, craftsmanship and performance there is more than small similarity between the Duesenberg Model J Walker La Grande convertible coupes and the Special Roadsters built by Mercedes-Benz’s in-house coachworks at Sindelfingen, as the Duesenberg’s only real competition in quality and performance was the 500K and 540K. To put these two magnificent automobiles in perspective, however, the 500K was not introduced until some four years after the Duesenberg Model J entered production. The example offered here was sold new to Dr. Frederick Gruneck of Chicago, Illinois, who traded a Murphy bodied Duesenberg convertible coupe for it. It was featured when new in Automobile Topics on January 5, 1935. The second owner of the car was Col. J. W. Dessette of Chicago. In May of 1941, Dessette sold the car to Verne L. Stone of LaGrange, Illinois. Stone kept the car until 1950 when he sold it to Fred Gifford of Chicago, who commenced a comprehensive restoration of the car, completed almost 10 years later, in 1959. Following what would come to be the Duesenberg’s first restoration, Gifford sold the car to David Stewart of Chicago and Florida, who kept it until September of 1971, when he sold it to William Goodwin of Frankfort, Indiana. Goodwin restored the car a second time, and it has been featured in many publications, including Griffith Borgeson’s seminal work Errett Lobban Cord (p. 240) and the Duesenberg issue of Automobile Quarterly in 1972. The car remained with Mr. Goodwin until his death in the late 1990s, when the car was acquired by Dr. Joseph Murphy of Dovestown, Pennsylvania. In 2001 RM Auctions had the honor of being chosen by Dr. Murphy to offer J534 at the Meadow Brook Hall auction where it was the featured cover car and star of the sale. At that time, the Duesenberg was finished in a striking two-tone red color combination and was in very presentable and correct overall condition. After spirited bidding, J534 was purchased by Judge Joseph Cassini III, a prominent New Jersey based collector. Subsequently, Judge Cassini opted to trade J534 to the current vendor as part of a deal to acquire another particularly rare automobile. With the mission of success on the show field, the new gentleman owner sought to the have the car restored to concours standards. He enlisted the assistance of none other than the renowned and multiple Best of Show winning restorer, Mr. Fran Roxas. After further research and thought it was decided that a comprehensive restoration would be undertaken with the goal of one day competing on the 18th green of Pebble Beach. After nearly three years, that dream was fully realized in 2004 when the outstanding Walker La Grande was deservedly and rightfully awarded a Best in Class award and was included within the winner’s circle and Best of Show candidates line. Having realized his goal for the Walker LaGrande, the current owner has decided to allow the next privileged owner to continue the Duesenberg’s undoubted concours success in the years to come. We are truly honored to be able to offer this important motor car here at the Arizona Biltmore on behalf of its distinguished owner. Once again, the Walker La Grande is featured as one of our cover cars, and from the photos presented on these pages one can see how beautiful the lines of J534 truly are. Now resplendent in a handsome midnight blue with red leather interior, it is a sight to see. Even these remarkable photos do not do the car, its restoration or its original design justice. Its condition is simply flawless. Without question, a Roxas restoration stands among the finest in the world today, and this Duesenberg is a perfect example of that standard. The paint is mirror like, the extensive brightwork displays not a blemish and most impressively the engine and bay remain in remarkable condition. The massive Duesenberg engine appears almost illuminated, like a perfect diamond. It is a breathtaking sight to behold and is a testament to the exacting quality of the restoration in itself. Included in the sale of J534 is a dossier of information including photos of the recent restoration as well as several invoices and perhaps most importantly, a good selection of original photographs of J534 that the current owner has acquired over the last several years. It is worth noting that in all the photographs, spanning several decades, J534 has remained consistently impressive in both its appearance and presence. Regardless of color, angle or whether the top is up or down, J534 is one of the best looking and perfectly proportioned Duesenbergs ever built – period. Some 470 Model J Duesenbergs were built and while a good number of them have survived, few have the provenance and style of J534. The new owner will join a select group of prior owners. Even during the period after World War II when Duesenbergs were frequently traded for a fraction of the price of a new Ford or Chevrolet, J534’s first three owners kept it for nine years, eleven years and a quarter-century respectively. Their extended possession of J534 attests to the way J534 has merged with its owners, and will with its fortunate new owner, much in the way E.L. Cord’s aspirations merged with the talents of Fred and Augie Duesenberg to create the world’s finest motor car. The sweeping lines of J534 are perfectly illustrated here in this rare period photograph highlighting the car's fantastic original condition over 40 years ago. Addendum Please note that this car is titled by the engine number. Chassis no. J534

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-01-28
Hammer price
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1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Alloy Berlinetta Comp

The Ex-Vittorio de Micheli and Prince of Lichtenstein Est. 300bhp 2,953cc single overhead camshaft V-12 engine, four-speed manual gearbox, solid rear axle with semi-elliptic longitudinal leaf springs on four trailing arms, coil springs to the independent wish bone front suspension with telescopic tubular shock absorbers all around and four-wheel Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2400mm (94.5") GRAND TURISMO FERRARIS OF THE 1950s Once Enzo Ferrari realized that the marques wealthy racing followers would purchase all the Grand Touring road cars that he could produce, this became the preferred method of financing his beloved racing team. In the past, sales of used racing cars and commercial sponsorships had generated funds, but not in a consistent, nor meaningfully voluminous manner. In the 1949 to 1954 period only about 200 road cars left the factory while sales for the first “Series-Produced” GTs, the Boano and Ellena 250 GT models totaled some 150 units in their two and a half years of manufacture. After that, production more than doubled annually with as many as 670 cars sold in the 1964 calendar year. The mechanical specifications GT Ferraris in this glorious era were always based on the company’s current racing cars, a fact which was not lost on sporting motorists who coveted these thoroughbreds – even at the $10,975 US port-of-entry price. This concept also made GT Ferraris an excellent customer racing car because of their dual-purpose personality. Seeing a niche market opportunity the factory built some 94 long wheelbase berlinettas – “The Tour de France” model was based on the Boano/Ellena chassis but with lightweight alloy bodies and slightly improved engine output. “Gentlemen drivers” loved them and virtually dominated European GT racing in the famed TdFs from 1957 to 1959; however, the TdF was only a precursor to the mighty Ferrari that was to follow – the ultimate and even more competitive dual purpose machine – the 250 GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta. THE FERRARI 250 GT SWB By the late fifties it was apparent that Ferrari had perfected the dual-purpose grand turismo automobile with his line of 250 GTs. The Colombo-designed V-12 had evolved into a powerful engine. More important in racing, where it is said, “To finish first, you must first finish,” and in keeping with that all but too true statement the SWB was nothing short of reliable. That reliability also carried over to 250 GTs that never saw the race track, creating very satisfied owners. Ferrari, as astute at catering to clients varied desires as he was at creating winning race cars, was always willing to provide specialized variations on his series-produced cars to satisfy a whim – when the whim was backed by a heavy checkbook. These unique Ferraris are among the most prized by collectors and this particular example, chassis number 1757 GT, is one such model, being a rare alloy “competezione” version. Introduced in 1959, the 250 GT Berlinetta was designed with three objectives: first, to be more aerodynamically efficient; second, to be as compact as possible; and third, to provide appropriate accommodations and luggage space for a true grand turismo automobile. In the process, Pininfarina and Scaglietti created one of the most beautiful automobiles of all time, a succinct, straightforward and purposeful blending of form following function that is pleasing from all aspects. Seven cars, known today as “Interim Berlinettas” were built on the 2600mm long wheelbase chassis before construction was shifted to the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis, a change deemed desirable to improve the cars’ responsiveness in cornering. Still called the 250 GT Berlinetta by Ferrari, its wheelbase has subsequently been firmly attached to the factories model designation to distinguish it from numerous other 250 GT models and the 2600mm chassis “Interim Berlinettas.” As the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta it has established a reputation and following, second only to its successor, the illustrious 250 GTO. Pininfarina’s body design as executed by Scaglietti on the 2400mm short wheelbase chassis excels in all aspects. It is unmistakably Ferrari. It is devoid of superfluous bulk, features or embellishments. Essentially, it redefined the concept of aerodynamic. The driver’s visibility from the ample greenhouse is also excellent while the corners of the car are tightly wrapped around the wheels and its gently rounded masses speak unambiguously of potency and power. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta was immediately successful in racing and remained so until its place at the head of the GT pack was gradually assumed by the GTO. The list of competition successes is so long as to be pointless to recount in detail but included GT category wins at LeMans in 1960 and 1961, Tour de France wins in 1960, 1961 and 1962 and of course Stirling Moss’s pair of Goodwood Tourist Trophy wins in 1960 and 1961. Built in both steel and aluminum, only about 200 were made from 1959 to 1962. The 250 GT SWB Berlinetta is the last true dual purpose grand turismo built in quantity by Ferrari – or anyone else for that matter – and is in all respects a fitting milestone to mark the end of a legendary age. FERRARI SHORT WHEELBASE BERLINETTA – CHASSIS NO. 1757 GT The 250 GT SWB was homologated by the F.I.A. on June 16, 1960, just in time for that year’s LeMans race which accounts for the fact that in races prior to this date, these Berlinettas were entered in the sports car category. In fact, the LeMans SWB attack began in 1960 as Tavano/Loustel’s Berlinetta won the GT class and finished 4th overall – 5th, 6th and 7th overall also being claimed by the SWB brigade! Certainly these drivers – Tavano, Loustel, Arents, Connell, Dernier, Noblet and Americans Ed Hugus and Augie Pabst (who finished 7th O/A in NART’s GT no. 1759) personified Enzo Ferrari’s “gentleman driver” demographic. Meanwhile in Italy, skilled amateur driver and faithful Ferrari customer Vittorio de Micheli took delivery of GT no. 1757, an alloy Competizione version, on May 11, 1960. It was painted in Rosso Corsa, as it is today as well, and featured rare early SWB series body details. Only 29 cars in this early series were built – all in aluminum and all configured in left hand drive. Number 1757, the SWB GT that RM Auctions is privileged to present here, was the 5th car in this early series. Vittorio de Micheli was by all accounts a very skilled driver since he managed to win over half of the hillclimbs and circuit races he contested in the 1960 to 1962 period. (Please see included competition record for specifics.) After two years of racing and spirited road use, de Micheli sold 1757 to the Prince of Lichtenstein who repainted the car in silver. Five years later Grand Garage Eskert in Windischbrugg, Switzerland passed the SWB to Larry Dent of Auburn, Indiana (1967). By 1969 it was with Ervin Williams of Hickory, North Carolina before going to Carl Reinhardt of Marietta, Georgia in 1971. Reinhardt retained 1757 for some15 years during which it was subjected to extensive restoration work, including a new alloy front body section fabricated by Robbie Robinson of Woodstock, Georgia. In the fall of 1986 an agent for European Auto Sales of Costa Mesa, California inspected this car prior to purchase and reported that the original engine was stamped correctly and many trim pieces were also marked with the number 1757 and was fitted with the original riveted alloy gas tank and outside fuel filler. The transmission, it should be noted, had “gone missing” but a correct ribbed cage alloy gearbox from another car would be included in the sale to European Auto Sales. The car was subsequently sold to Kenji Sasamoto of Kawasaki, Japan in December, 1986. However, it remained in California for a full restoration by EAS before finally being air freighted to Japan one year later. Sasamoto, a true motoring buff, surely Enzo Ferrari’s version of a Japanese “Gentleman Driver”, kept 1757 for more than 18 years before passing it through a California dealer to the present owner. An account of Kenji Sasamoto’s enthusiastic use of 1757 perhaps illustrates best the oft-used “dual-purpose” phrase in connection with these Ferrari SWB cars. It shows participation in many concours in Japan, racing at Monterey in 1995 during the Ferrari feature marque year, the 1996 Tour de France and the Monterey Historics again as well as the 1997 Palm Beach Cavallino Classic Track-Day and Saturday Concours. Certainly no “garage queen” this Short Wheelbase Berlinetta was also raced and shown by its current owner at the 2006 Cavallino Classic. Additionally, the Ferrari is complete with the original quick-change jack as well as a brand new custom made fuel cell currently awaiting installation. The owner reports a comprehensive dossier will accompany the car in its sale and includes photos of the restoration and original FIA papers. Most recently, a full mechanical inspection was executed and included a compression check and leak-down test and the results displaying nothing short of perfection. The SWB is eligible for every important motoring event on the planet, will never be denied entry into any Ferrari club event and will out perform nearly everything in its class with ease at the hands of a skilled driver. Sensational looks coupled with an unsurpassed driving dynamic as well as a definite blue-chip investment for future appreciation, this rare Ferrari auction offering is most worthy of a purchase consideration. Chassis no. 1757GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-03-11
Hammer price
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1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

Extremely low-mileage example; 4,156 actual miles Remarkable condition throughout; an immaculate reference piece One of only two Daytona Spiders originally delivered in Rosso Bordeaux Authentic, unmolested and thoroughly superb Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche This superb Daytona Spider, the 85th of only 121 original Spiders, was built to U.S. specifications, with both Borletti air conditioning and a Voxson radio, as well as instruments in miles, left-hand drive and finished in Rosso Bordeaux over Beige seats with black inserts. Completed by the factory in February 1973, it was stored for three years by the famed Chinetti-Garthwaite Imports of Paoli, Pennsylvania. Its official ‘delivery’ date was 8 July 1976, via the famous Algar Enterprises. In late 1976, this car was offered via Brian Motor Cars, Inc. of Flourtown, Pennsylvania. The ad in the New York Times described the car as unregistered and showing 829 miles. Larry Farrell of New York next advertised the car for sale in 1981, describing it as an original spider with under 1,000 original miles. In November of that year it was sold to Dr Laurence W. Wolf of Houston, who covered most of the car’s present mileage, selling it in 1993, with 4,120 miles recorded, to the present owner. This owner, only the third since new, has stored the car now amongst his large collection for nearly a quarter of a century, during which time it has never been shown in public. The Daytona Spider is offered today with 4,156 actual miles, at the time of cataloguing, and in impressively well-preserved, largely original condition. Its top is the original, as is the remarkable tan and black interior, with upholstery that shows only the faintest patina and appears only a few years old, a virtually unmarked steering wheel and an excellent dashboard with fine ‘mouse hair’ and crisp, clear gauges. The only apparent alteration from original specifications has been the installation of a Sony radio, which replaced the original Voxson unit many years ago. Inspection of stampings and finishes throughout the chassis and engine compartment also show superb originality and authenticity. The original top boot and spare wheel are both in the trunk. This is a unique opportunity to purchase one of the lowest mileage Daytona Spiders on the planet, in true ‘time warp’ condition. Few, if any, examples have been as immaculately preserved as this automobile, which carries its wonderful honesty proudly, on every panel, nut and bolt. It is only fitting to offer it here at Maranello, as it wears the same finishes applied by this factory’s artisans 44 years ago. • Chilometraggio molto basso, solo 6.688 chilometri effettivi • In condizioni perfette, un esemplare da prendere come riferimento • Una delle due sole Daytona Spider uscite di fabbrica in Rosso Bordeaux • Autentica, conservata e in una condizione impeccabile • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche Questa straordinaria Daytona Spider, l'ottava di sole 121 Spider prodotte a Maranello, è stata costruita secondo le specifiche statunitensi. Con aria condizionata Borletti e radio Voxson, ha la strumentazione in miglia, la guida a sinistra, la carrozzeria Rosso Bordeaux e i sedili beige con inserti neri. Ultimata nel febbraio del '73, è stata conservata per tre anni dalla famosa Chinetti-Garthwaite Imports di Paoli, in Pennsylvania. La data ufficiale di consegna è l'8 luglio 1976, attraverso la nota Algar Enterprises. Alla fine dell'anno viene messa in vendita dalla Brian Motor Cars, Inc. di Flourtown, Pennsylvania. L'annuncio del New York Times descrive l'auto come non immatricolata e con meno di 1.400 km. Successivamente Larry Farrell, sempre di New York, la rimette in vendita nel 1981, dicendo che questa spider, tutta originale, ha meno di 1.600 km effettivi. Nel novembre dello stesso anno viene comprata dal dottor Laurence W. Wolf di Houston, che è poi il proprietario che le ha fatto fare la maggior parte della strada, rivendendola quindi nel '93 con 6.630 km (registrati nell'atto di vendita), all'attuale proprietario. Appena il terzo in vent'anni di vita della Dayona. Conservata in una nutrita collezione per quasi un quarto di secolo, non è mai stata mostrata in pubblico. Questa Daytona Spider, in gran parte originale e in condizioni incredibilmente ben conservate, al momento della stesura di questo catalogo ha solo 6.688 chilometri effettivi. La capote è la sua originale, come lo sono gli straordinari interni beige e neri, con rivestimenti che mostrano solo una leggerissima patina. Il volante è praticamente intonso, cruscotto e plancia sono eccellenti con il loro bel vellutino e una strumentazione pulita e brillante. L'unico pezzo non originale è la radio Sony con cui è stata rimpiazzata la Voxson già molti anni fa. Guardando con attenzione al resto dell'auto, le stampigliature di telaio e motore testimoniano una straordinaria originalità e autenticità. Capote e ruota di scorta sono entrambe nel baule. È davvero un'occasione più unica che rara di acquistare una Daytona Spider con così pochi chilometri, in un pacchetto incredibilmente ben conservato. Sono davvero pochissimi gli esemplari così immacolati, se davvero ne esistono. Autenticità e conservazione riscontrabili su ogni singolo pannello, dado e bullone. È giusto che un'auto così venga offerta a Maranello, dove gli operai del tempo l'hanno vista uscire dagli stabilimenti pressoché nelle stesse condizioni, ma 44 anni fa. Chassis no. 16783 Engine no. B 2552 Body no. 1230

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
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1957 Maserati 250S by Fantuzzi

235 bhp, 2,489 cc twin cam, dry-sump four-cylinder engine with two 45 DCO3 Weber carburettors, five-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension with coil springs, de Dion rear axle with transverse leaf spring, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes, and steel tube frame. Wheelbase: 2,150 mm One of four examples built Believed to be the only example originally equipped with a 2.5-litre engine Retailed through Jim Hall and Carroll Shelby’s distributorship Raced in period by Hall, Shelby, and Alan Connell Highly original and well documented, with factory build sheets and FIA-HTP papers Some of the most brilliant and revered thoroughbreds to emerge from Maserati’s stable during the 1950s were the company’s four-cylinder sports racers, which debuted in 1955. Like Porsche, Maserati took note that the 1.5-litre sports car class lacked significant competition from any manufacturers other than OSCA, so the Tipo 53 project was commissioned utilising the 4CF2 engine, which displaced just under 1,500 cubic centimetres. In due course, the motor was enlarged to displace two litres for the succeeding 200S and 200SI models, and though both cars showed much promise in their duels with Ferrari’s TRCs, Maserati was increasingly preoccupied with its 300S six-cylinder sports racer. Nevertheless, at the Buenos Aires 1000 km on 20 January 1957, a new development of the four-cylinder car appeared during practice. Featuring a version of the 200SI’s engine that was further bored to 2,489 cubic centimetres, the so-called 250S caused quite a stir when Juan Manual Fangio drove it in practice to some of the day’s best lap times, even besting Ferrari’s 3.5-litre V-12 cars. Despite the strong showing, the 250S was deemed to still require further development before properly entering a race. Unfortunately, that plan increasingly fell by the wayside as the 300S dominated the year’s agenda, and Maserati eventually cancelled their race programme altogether following the 1957 season. As a result, only four examples of the sensational 250S were ever built, with three of the four cars featuring enlarged versions of engines that originally displaced two-litres. Chassis number 2432 is believed to be unique among the four 250S examples, as it is the only car originally built with a displacement of 2,489 cubic centimetres. As such, it is, in essence, the only true 250S ever produced, as the others were fitted with engines that began life as 200SI-specification motors. Original Maserati build sheets indicate that 2432 was constructed on 31 December 1957. Like many cars that Maserati retailed to the burgeoning American privateer racing market during this period, two of the 250S examples (chassis numbers 2431 and 2432) were sold in early 1958 to Hall-Shelby Distributors, in Dallas, Texas. Few destinations in American sports car racing could have been more significant, as both Jim Hall and Carroll Shelby would soon forge immense legacies in racing history. As is well known to automotive enthusiasts, within years Hall went on to create his famous big-bore Chaparral sports prototypes, whilst Shelby quickly graduated to driving for John Edgar’s Southern California Scuderia before continuing on to his now-legendary pursuits with Aston Martin and Ford. Hall and Shelby campaigned both 250S cars during the 1958 season’s early events, sometimes using one car solely for practice. Hall finished 3rd overall and a 2nd in class at the SCCA Regional at Mansfield, Louisiana, on 9 March; it also finished 6th overall at the Galveston event on 20 April and took the chequered flag at Eagle Mountain, Texas, on 8 June. As both 2431 and 2432 attended these races, it is not entirely clear which of the two cars enjoyed the aforementioned results; though, it is certain that both were raced by each of the legendary drivers, and most likely, 2432 was responsible for some of these racing triumphs. According to an original letter written by Jim Hall to the Maserati factory on 8 June 1959, the exploits of 2431 and 2432 inspired one of their customers to order engine number 2433 for his 200SI, chassis number 2418. Hall and Shelby experienced some challenges with the proper fit of the pistons to the new motor, eventually discovering that 2433 was of a significantly different design than the engines of 2431 and 2432. The letter (a copy of which is included in this car’s documentation) is particularly telling, not only in its dating of the early history of chassis number 2432, but also as a personally typed letter from the great Jim Hall, which is a valuable piece of documentation in itself. Following their progression to other racing cars, most immediately a Chevy-powered Lister, Hall and Shelby sold both Maseratis, though 2432 may have remained in their possession as late as 21 March 1959, when they entered a 250S in the 12 Hours of Sebring. This was very likely 2432, as 2431 had already been sold to privateer Bobby Aylward at that point. Passing briefly to Gary Laughlin, 2432 was next sold to well-known Maserati racer Alan Connell, and it may have been the exact 250S he used to capture 3rd at the Gran Premio d'Avandaro on 26 April, before retiring early at Lime Rock on 4 July (Connell was also racing chassis number 2430 around this time). Subsequently sold to John Price, 2432 was imported to the United Kingdom around 1973 by Colin Crabbe, who found the car stripped of paint but “running very well”. The car passed through two further British owners prior to being acquired in 1989 by Peter Hannen, who commissioned a sympathetic restoration, needing only to replace the rear differential casing that had cracked at Nürburgring. In 1992, the car was purchased by Robin Lodge and full FIA papers were obtained, whilst Tony Merrick was retained to look after mechanical considerations. Acquired by James Lindsay in 1999, chassis 2432 participated in several events that year, including the Mille Miglia, the V-12 Telecom support race for the French Grand Prix at Magny-Cours, and the Goodwood Revival. In 2001, following a full inspection, the highly original 2432 was deemed to be an appropriately superlative addition to the Laidlaw Collection. Over the ensuing years, it has been impeccably maintained and prepared for racing, with Maserati specialist Sean Danaher rebuilding many of the car’s mechanical components and completely refinishing the exterior. Accompanying the car is a truly immense file of documentation that includes numerous invoices from Mr Danaher, Simon Hadfield Motorsport, Brazell Engineering, and Steve Hart. This file details the next 12 years of 2432’s competitive life at some of Europe’s greatest circuits, including Goodwood, Nürburgring, Monza, Silverstone, Spa, Donington, Hockenheim, and Le Mans. From the first race at Brands Hatch in 2001, and through to the Monaco Historic Grand Prix and all destinations of the Maserati/Ferrari Historic Challenge, podium finishes have been the usual result. In 2010, the engine suffered a catastrophic piston failure. A new replacement block, crankshaft, connecting rods, and all relevant bearings were supplied by Steve Hart to Sean Danaher, who carefully built the new engine, which retained the original numbered cylinder head. This engine, and of course the rest of the car, is in excellent race ready condition, having run for very few hours since the dyno testing that followed the build. In addition to its extreme rarity, as it is perhaps the only example originally built by the factory to 250S specifications rather than upgraded from 200SI specs (and more unequivocally, one of just four ever constructed), 2432 features a large file of documentation, including FIA and VSCC papers, an MSA Historic Technical Passport, factory build sheets, the 1959 correspondence from Jim Hall to the Maserati factory, recent letters from Adolfo Orsi, copious on-going race-preparation invoices, and correspondence from various owners and experts that illustrate the car’s rich history. This 250S is furthermore accompanied by numerous spare parts and original components, including two engine blocks, exhaust manifolds, a flywheel, clutch, rear hub, and gearbox casing, aluminium brake-drum covers, the original driver’s seat and the original headrest fairing (which was replaced with a taller piece to disguise a suitable roll-hoop for improved modern safety), and some interior body panels that were replaced for the sake of aesthetics. Chassis 2432 is a remarkably original example of the powerful 250S, which has been noted by many vintage competitors to deliver far stronger performance than the prior versions of the four-cylinder Maserati. Connoisseurs often agree that, other than the mighty eight-cylinder 450S, the 250S is the best overall performing car that Maserati fielded during this era. Chassis 2432’s rarity, beauty, and history qualify it for the finest of collections. Eminently worthy of presentation at the most discerning international concours d’elegance, participating in the Mille Miglia, or contesting a fresh campaign of vintage competition, this outstanding Maserati sports racing car is highly eligible and most welcome on any of the great historic events. Road registered and highly competitive on the race track, the 250S is one of those rare competition cars in which one can genuinely drive to the circuit, race, potentially win, and enjoy the drive home again. It is truly exceptional and versatile. Chassis no. 2432 Engine no. 2432-1

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-09-08
Hammer price
Show price

1960 Maserati Tipo 61 "Birdcage"

Est. 250 hp, 2,890 cc overhead cam inline four-cylinder engine, two Weber 45 DC03 carburettors, five-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension, rigid de Dion rear axle, four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2200 mm (86.6") Although Maserati had enjoyed competition success with its championship-winning 250F grand prix car, the Modenese company soon found itself in dire financial straits. With the introduction and sales success of the road-going 3500 GT, however, the company’s health improved drastically, prompting a renewed interest in creating a sports car that could be raced, not by the factory, but by privateers. Credit for the resulting Tipo 60/61 goes to engineer extraordinaire Giulio Alfieri who during 1958 created this stunning sports racing car. Its “Birdcage” nickname comes from its unique and very innovative trellis chassis construction, made of a plethora of small tubes between 10 and 15 mm thick. Once welded together (all 200 of them!), they created a structure as rigid as it was light, weighing just 36 kgs, clothed in svelte wheel-hugging aluminium body – a true work of art and testimony to Maserati craftsmanship! Into this structure was fitted the Tipo 60’s 1,990 cc inline two-cam four-cylinder engine, very far back towards the cockpit. Independent front suspension provided superb turn-in while the de Dion rear axle with transverse leaf spring and coil over telescopic shock absorbers made the car easily controllable. In what would become Maserati’s last factory entry in decades, a Tipo 60 was entered at Rouen Les Essarts in July 1959, winning the race outright. Naturally, the phones started ringing off the hook in Modena! Six Tipo 60s were sold before the 1961 upgrade to Tipo 61, which benefited from an increased capacity of 2,890 cc and delivered 250 hp – more than enough horsepower for a 600 kg heavy car. In all, 17 were built, including one Tipo 60 that had been upgraded. The car’s notable wins were the Camoradi team victories at the Nürburgring 1000 kms in 1960 and again in 1961, against the might of rival factory teams. From the beginning, Birdcages were very popular with American competitors. The car offered here, chassis 2470, was no exception. The third-to-last Birdcage built, it was sold new in December 1960 to Jack Hinkle who was not just the proverbial wealthy amateur racer. A laid back, unassuming and popular Texas banker, oilman and then-president of the SCCA, he was described by historian Joe Scalzo as “one of the fastest men in competition today…He is in fact something all new – a wealthy sportsman driver who races as hard as the pros.” Scalzo went on to note that Hinkle was also a bit of an eccentric, having his lawn mower modified so it would run 50 mph…and promptly losing control and flattening his wife’s rose bushes! The results he achieved with 2470 were stellar. In 1961 he entered seven races, of which he won three – La Junta, Colorado and two races in Oklahoma at Ponta City and Norman. He also had two second places finished, one third and just one DNF. The following year, he participated in nine more races, winning three (Nebraska, Oklahoma and Kansas), finishing second in three more, third in two races and again one DNF. Thus, he always finished on the podium, with the exception of the two races he did not finish. Hinkle eventually sold 2470 to a friend, Tracy Bird, who later became one of the founders of the Can Am series. Bird raced it in Castle Rock, near Tucson, on 5th April 1964, finishing fifth. A fire in Bird’s garage did some damage to the front of the car, and to repair it properly, he bought the ex-Roger Penske Birdcage (chassis 2471) from its then-owner Enus Wilson. 2471’s rear end had suffered in an accident, but it had an intact front end. Bird thus repaired 2470 using the factory correct parts from 2471, after which its wreck was scrapped. As a result, 2470 is the second to last Birdcage extant, as 2472, the ex-Camoradi factory car now in the Panini Museum, is the only car with a higher chassis number. Bird’s Maserati then crossed the Atlantic after its acquisition by F1 team owner and bon vivant Lord Alexander Hesketh. In his ownership, it competed with Charles Lucas (aka “Charlie Luke”) behind the wheel, who had previously raced a 250F. This was an era when vintage races were much more casual, cars arrived on flatbeds and starting grids were a patchwork of “run what ya brung.” On 20th May 1974, Lucas started on pole at the Silverstone Open Aston Martin Historic Race and was third for most of the event before retiring on the last lap. He and Lord Hesketh recently shared some of their typically colourful memories with this writer: Charles Lucas: “It was a great car to drive. I don't think there were any old sports racing cars around that were quicker at the time – it even beat Robs Lamplough in his CanAm McLaren at Castle Combe. The best win was probably at the Historic support race for the Austrian GP at the Osterreichring in '75. We had such a good lead, Alexander hung out a pit sign that said 'Cocktails', so we came in to the pits for a quick one!” Needless to say this would not go down well nowadays! Lord Hesketh recalled the same event: “I’d been advised by a friend who had a Tipo 61 to buy one as well so I did. It went to the Osterreichring in 1975. It was then a proper race track. We were disappointed in the GP – rather teed off, actually – and the only other race of the day was the vintage race but the trouble with that one is that it wasn’t really a race, it was meant to be a sort of 70 mph parade. Charles put in a lap at 130 mph. I mean at Zeltweg you’d expect to have a Type 61 unrestricted. This was going to get us into trouble, so we put out a pitboard that said “cocktails” in order to bring him in and slow him down. So he came in we gave him one, we let the whole of the field go by. Then he went out, overtook them all again and won the race. I think that is the only time we took it to a GP and raced it the same weekend.” Later owners included Dieter Holterbosch of Oyster Bay, New York who had it restored and in 1998 sold it to Tony Smith in the U.K. The current owner acquired 2470 from Smith in 2004 and has used it in several Ferrari Historic Challenge Series events. The last Race entered was the 2009 Nürburgring Oldtimer Grand Prix, which the car won. One of the most original Birdcages in existence, it is fitted with a spare race prepared engine. The original engine comes with the car, however. The body is mostly original. Maserati’s racing cars have steadily appreciated in value over the last 20 years as the marque’s rich and successful history gets more and more of the recognition it deserves. The Birdcage is one of the most iconic racers ever to come out of the hallowed Modenese factory. It is a tremendously competitive and enjoyable car to drive and a jewel of engineering. FRENCHTEXT Moteur: quatre cylindres en ligne arbre à cames en tête, env. 250 ch., 2,890 ccm, deux carburateurs Weber 45 DC03, boîte manuelle à cinq rapports, suspension avant indépendante, pont arrière rigide de Dion, freins à disques aux quatre roues. Empattement: 2200 mm (86.6") Bien que Maserati ait eu beaucoup de succès en course avec ses 250F qui remportèrent les deux titres en 1957, la firme Modènaise se trouva soudain en difficultés financières. L’arrivée sur le marché de la nouvelle 3500 GT routière et son grand succès commercial améliorèrent dramatiquement la donne et firent naître l’idée de créer une voiture de compétition en catégorie sport destinée à courir non pas aux mains de l’usine mais dans celles de pilotes privés. Ainsi naquit en1958 la sublime Tipo 60/61 que l’on doit à l’extraordinaire ingénieur Giulio Alfieri. Son surnom de “Birdcage” (cage à oiseaux) est dû à son unique et très innovant châssis à treillis tubulaire constitué d’une pléthore de petits tubes de 10 à 15mm de diamètre. Une fois tous soudés ensemble (il y en avait 200 !), ils devenaient une structure aussi rigide que légère, ne pesant que 36 kg, vêtue dans une svelte carrosserie apparaissant comme moulée sur le châssis et les roues –une vraie œuvre d’art et une grande démonstration de la qualité de l’artisanat de Maserati! Dans cette structure fut monté le moteur quatre cylindres en ligne deux arbres à cames en tête 1,990 ccm, positionné très en arrière vers le cockpit. Sa suspension indépendante permettait une réactivité instantanée du train avant alors que le pont arrière rigide de Dion avec ses ressorts à lames et amortisseurs téléscopiques la rendaient facilement contrôlable. Pour démontrer ses capacités une Tipo 60 fut engagée en course par l’usine à Rouen Les Essarts en Juillet 1959, la dernière participation d’une Maserati officielle en course avant plusieurs décennies d’absence. Elle remporta d’emblée la course et les téléphones se mirent tout de suite a sonner sans interruption à l’usine de Modéne! Six Tipo 60s furent vendues avant l’introduction de la version améliorée, la Tipo 61, en1961. Celle ci bénéficiait d’une augmentation de cylindrée à 2,890 ccm produisant 250 ch. – bien plus qu’il n’en fallait pour une auto ne pesant que 600 kg. Un total de 17 Tipo 61 furent construites, dont une sur une base de Tipo 60. Les plus grandes victoires de la «Birdcage » furent celles de l’écurie Camoradi au 1000 km du Nürburgring en 1960 et à nouveau en 1961, devant une armada d’écuries officielles de constructeurs rivaux. Dés leur naissance les Birdcage furent très appréciées par les pilotes Americains. L’auto présentée ici, le châssis 2470, l’illustre bien. La 14éme des 17 construites, elle fut vendue neuve en Décembre 1960 à Jack Hinkle qui était bien plus qu’un typique pilote amateur fortuné. Ce banquier et prospecteur de pétrole Texan, décontracté et modeste –et président du SCCA (Sports car Club of America)- était décrit par l’ historien Joe Scalzo comme étant “l’un des hommes les plus rapides en course de nos jours….Il est en fait quelque chose de tout nouveau – un pilote dilettante qui attaque aussi fort en piste que les pros.” Scalzo relatait aussi que Hinkle était un peu excentrique, faisant modifier sa tondeuse à gazon pour qu’elle atteigne 80km/h…en perdant tout de suite le contrôle et écrasant les rosiers de son épouse ! Les résultats qu’il obtint avec 2470 furent impressionnants. En 1961 il participa à sept courses, en remporta trois – à La Junta au Colorado et deux en Oklahoma à Ponta City et Norman. Il finit deuxième deux fois, troisième une fois et dut abandonner une seule fois. L’année suivante il prit part à neuf courses, en gagna trois (au Nebraska, en Oklahoma et au Kansas), finit deuxième trois fois, troisième deux fois et, à nouveau, subit juste un abandon. Il avait donc atteint le podium chaque fois exceptées les deux course qu’il ne termina pas. Hinkle vendit par la suite 2470 à un ami, Tracy Bird, qui devint plus tard l’un des fondateurs de la série Can Am. Bird courut avec dans la course de Castle Rock, prés de Tucson dans l’Arizona, le 5 Avril 1964, finissant cinquième. Un incendie dans son garage causa quelques dégâts à l’avant de la voiture, et pour la réparer correctement, il acheta la Birdcage ex-Roger Penske (châssis 2471) a son propriétaire d’alors, Enus Wilson. L’arrière de 2471 avait été endommagé dans un accident mais son avant était intact. Bird répara ainsi 2470 en utilisant les éléments originaux et corrects de 2471, après quoi son épave fut mise à la ferraille. En conséquence de cela 2470 est l’avant dernière Birdcage construite en existence puisque 2472, l’ex auto d’usine Camoradi actuellement dans le musée Panini Museum, est la seule ayant un numéro de châssis plus élevé. 2470 traversa alors l’Atlantique, étant acquise par le Lord Alexander Hesketh propriétaire d’écurie et bon vivant. Il la fit courir aux mains de Charles Lucas (surnommé “Charlie Luke”) qui avait avant cela piloté une 250F. C’était une époque où les courses historiques étaient beaucoup plus humbles et détendues, les autos arrivaient sur des remorques ouvertes et les grilles de départ étaient un allègre et très hétéroclite mélange, toute auto de course présente joignait le bal! Le 20 Mai 1973, Lucas partit en pole position lors d’une course Open Aston Martin Historique à Silverstone et occupa la troisième place avant d’abandonner au dernier tour. Lucas et Lord Hesketh racontèrent récemment certains de leurs souvenirs, typiquement hauts en couleurs, à l’auteur: Charles Lucas: “c’était une auto merveilleusement efficace. Je ne crois pas qu’il y avait à l’époque d’autres anciennes voitures de courses d’endurance plus rapides qu’elle – elle a même battu Robs Lamplough dans sa McLaren Can Am à Castle Combe. La victoire la plus spéciale avec elle fut sans doute celle dans la course historique le weekend du Grand Prix d’Autriche à l’Osterreichring en '75. J’avait un telle avance qu’Alexander me montra le panneau de signalisation avec le mot 'Cocktails', alors je me suis arrêté au stand pour en boire un avant de repartir !” Il va sans dire que cela ne serait pas bien vu du tout de nos jours! Lord Hesketh se souvient de la même course: “J’avais été conseillé par un ami qui avait lui même une Tipo 61d’en acheter une alors je l’ai fait. Elle nous accompagna à l’Osterreichring en 1975. C’était alors un vrai et grand circuit. Le GP fut décevant pour notre écurie - très frustrant en fait- et la seule autre course ce jour là était la course historique mais le problème c’est que ce n’était pas vraiment une course, c’était supposé être une espèce de parade à 100km/h. Charles fit un tour à plus de 200km/h de moyenne. Comprenez qu’à Zeltweg on s’attend tout de même à ce qu’une Type 61 puisse courir sans “muselière.” Nous allions au devant d’ennuis alors nous lui avons montré le panneau de signalisation avec le mot “cocktails” pour le convaincre de s’arrêter et le faire ralentir. Alors il s’est arête au stand, on lui en a donné un, on a laissé passer tous les concurrents. Puis il est ressorti, les a tous re-dépassés et a gagné la course. Je crois que ce fut la seule fois où nous l’avons amenée à un GP et fait courir le même weekend.” Par la suite la voiture appartint à Dieter Holterbosch de Oyster Bay, New York qui la fit restaurer et la vendit en 1998 à Tony Smith au Royaume Uni. Le propriétaire actuel acheta 2470 à Smith en 2004 et l’a utilisée dans plusieurs épreuves du Challenge Historique Ferrari. Sa dernière participation en course eut lieu à l’Oldtimer Grand Prix au Nürburgring en 2009, et se solda par la victoire. Une des Birdcage les plus originales en existence, son moteur actuel est un moteur de rechange, preparé pour la compétition. Par contre le moteur original est vendu en lot avec l’auto. La carrosserie est en majorité originale. Les Maserati de course ont vu leur valeur augmenter de manière continue ces dernières 20 années, conséquence du fait que l’histoire aussi glorieuse que victorieuse de Maserati est de plus en plus appréciée telle qu’elle le mérite par les collectionneurs. La Birdcage est, parmi toutes les autos provenant de la vénérable usine Modénaise, une veritable icône. Elle est extrêmement compétitive et amusante à conduire et un bijou technologique. Chassis no. 2470

  • MCOMonaco
  • 2010-05-01
Hammer price
Show price

1962 Aston Martin DB4 GT "Zagato"

305bhp at 6000 rpm, 3,679 cc twin overhead camshaft alloy block, twin plug heads, three dual choke 45 DCOE Weber carburetors with twin distributors, four-speed all-synchromesh aluminum-cased David Brown gearbox, independent front suspension with wishbones and coaxial coil springs, Armstrong telescopic dampers, anti-roll bar, rear suspension has a live axle with coil springs and lever action dampers, located by four parallel trailing links and a transverse Watt’s linkage, Girling disc brakes front and rear on separate master cylinders and Borrani center-lock wire wheels with light alloy rims. Wheelbase: 93" (7'9") BEAUTY AND BEAST In the late fifties, the climate in which builders of limited edition sports cars lived and worked could be described as a tropical paradise for creation. Those were the days before blizzards of regulations and mountains of bureaucracy made the atmosphere surrounding low-volume manufacturers seem more like that of an Arctic nightmare. Out of these flourishing conditions could spring the most imaginative of designs. Often, it seems, these creations – with only a decade or two of patina descending on their sensuous aluminum surfaces – rose to be regarded with reverence bestowed only on the classics. In those days, all it often took to get the fancy machinery rolling was a meeting and a handshake. Such a meeting took place at London’s Earls Court in 1959. Aston Martin’s fortune was at its peak, with the DBR dominating sports car racing, and a new grand tourer off to an impressive start. And present right there on the Aston Martin stand, was further indication of the confident posture of the Newport Pagnell firm – the short-wheelbase DB4GT. Thus it was an opportune time for John Wyer, the Aston Martin team manager turned general manager, and Gianni Zagato, to meet. Gianni Zagato was the youngest son of Ugo Zagato, and one of the two brothers who had taken over the Carrozzeria after their father’s death. Ugo Zagato had founded the business back in 1919. His friendship with legendary Fiat engineer Vittorio Jano had led to the design of special bodies for this manufacturer. When Jano moved to Alfa Romeo, Zagato created the look that made him famous – the immortal series of Alfa Romeo sports and racing machines, beginning with the 1500. The arrival of World War II marked the end of this first period of the Zagato chronology. The second period, spanning the era from the mid forties to the late fifties, produced a further collection of memorable sports car creations. These designs expressed the styling philosophy of Elio Zagato, Ugo’s oldest son, who had developed his own unique brand of aerodynamic language, based on experience gained as a part-time race driver. The third period began when Gianni Zagato joined the company after Elio was injured in a road accident. Gianni Zagato modernized the operation and invited a brilliant young stylist, Ercole Spada to come aboard. This association brought about another series of outstanding designs that continued to keep Zagato in the spotlight. The Earls Court encounter did indeed produce a meeting of the minds – Wyer and Zagato shook hands on a limited lightweight edition of Aston’s new DB4 GT, bodied by the Milanese coach builder with the first chassis arriving in Italy in early 1960. The Aston Martin assignment was one of the first tackled by Spada. Only 23 years old at the time, his youthful creation displayed an obvious kinship to Pinin Farina’s short wheelbase Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta. Still, the Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato made a bolder, more rousing statement. Spada accomplished this by forcing all his lines and surfaces to converge on the roof, which was conspicuously minimal and smoothly rounded. Particularly illustrative of this conscious effort on the part of the designer, were the side panels, with their strong incline. The effect was further enhanced by the shape of the grille’s aggressively down-turned corners. The result placed the viewer in the presence of a beautiful beast. This Grand Tourer did not only look the part, it also performed the part. While most of the DB4 GT Zagatos had essentially the same chassis and drivetrain specifications as the DB4 GT, and as such were mainly intended for road use, a few were indeed set up for serious work on the racetrack. These machines had their weight reduced further, and while the engine in the standard Zagato already sported cams with a more radical profile, the racing versions, among other tuning measures, were given a higher 9.7:1 compression ratio, resulting in power rising to 314bhp. When the factory decided to concentrate its racing efforts on Formula One in the early sixties, it was left to a few privateers to defend the Aston Martin tradition on the sports car circuit. While DB GTs run by private UK based teams like Equipe Endeavour and Essex Racing and the French Pozzoli/Kerguen/Franc team scored wins and podium finishes, the lightweight Ferrari 250 SWBs proved to be more than a match for the heavier DB4 GTs in international racing. This, despite a star-studded cast of Aston Martin drivers that included Stirling Moss, Innes Ireland, Roy Salvadori, Jim Clark and a young Bruce McLaren. In city traffic, the Zagato, with its heavy controls, was quite a handful. However, once out on the open road with the machinery working vigorously, Aston Martin’s wild beast was in its natural habitat. The steering became light and responsive, and combined with the ample supply of power, invited the type of driving where the negotiations of turns became an intriguing interplay between steering wheel and throttle. Today, the DB4 GT Zagato is appreciated as one of the most outstanding sports racers of its era – a period when the battles of the racing scene were still fought with cars that could be run on the road. CREDIT: RM Auctions wishes to thank author Henry Rasmussen and Motorbooks International for permission to publish the previous general history and overview of the DB4 GT Zagato. (Aston Martin – The Postwar Road Cars) PROVENANCE OF DB4 GT 0190/L DB4GT/0190/L was originally sold to Commander James Murray, a naval attache residing in Paris, France. Ordered through Garage Mirabeau, 0190/L was successfully raced by Roy Salvadori at the May 1962 BRSCC Brands Hatch event, finishing first in class and second overall, outpaced only by the Ferrari GTO driven by Innes Ireland. The car was delivered to its first owner, Commander Murray in June of 1962. Murray took advantage of the “bespoke tailoring” aspect of ordering a new Aston Martin, a concept that survives to this day. He specified that the body should be of a slightly heavier gauge of aluminum in order to minimize stone chips and make it less prone to Parisian parking problems. Special brake covers were fabricated to prevent brake dust from contaminating the shiny finish of the Borrani wheels and a locking glove box lid was ordered – an item not normally included by the factory on these lightweight cars. Since the Perspex of the side and quarter windows tended to deteriorate quickly, proper glass replacements, as on the standard DB4 GT were also factory supplied. A one-off and very attractive grille with vertical bars, designed by Commander Murray himself helped to widen and somewhat soften the normally brutish frontal appearance. Other custom touches, all listed on the original factory buildsheet which accompanies this sale, included DB4 GT seats, dual circuit brakes and special Italiansourced gauges for the instrument panel. Today, the DB4 GT Zagato is appreciated as one of the most outstanding sports racers of its era – a period when the battles of the racing scene were still fought with cars that could be run on the road. The second and third owners, Ude Hansen and Lars Wendal, both of Sweden, are believed to have used the car for local club events. In 1972 Englishman Tom Leake (who had owned 0193) acquired the car and had Robin Hamilton fit two Scintilla magnetos for racing. These magnetos remain on the car today. Photographer Julian Cottrell of London became owner number four after Leake successfully raced for four seasons, including many races at Silverstone. Cottrell then campaigned the car successfully for two years, including a six hour event at Donington. With the car’s value now becoming more evident, Cottrell sold the car to the late Richard Forshaw of Wimbourne, Dorset. In the 1970s the Forshaw family had been appointed service agents for all pre 1963 postwar Aston Martins. Their collection included three DB3Ss and a DB4 GT; the Zagato would stay in this collection for some time. It is interesting to note that the Zagato was used in a photograph on the Forshaw’s stationary. Essentially, anyone who ever ordered parts or a build sheet from the Forshaws received a photo of 0190/L. The car was rarely used or seen while in the hands of the Forshaws but was extensively restored through 1995 to 1997. The body and chassis were refurbished by the well-known restorerAlan Pointer of Bodylines and painted by John Windsor at GTC, both ex-Aston factory craftsmen. At this time 0190/L was resprayed in its original color of Shell Grey, a conservative shade, but one that perfectly showcases designer Ercole Spada’s beautiful body contours. Interestingly, there is no recorded evidence, photograph or mention of 0190/L ever having been crash damaged or rust repaired – remarkable for a car that was raced year after year. Upon close inspection, the chassis may very well be one of the best original examples in existence. The underside of the bonnet shows the original Zagato hammer marks and the boot and bonnet frame retain all the Zagato rudimentary build quality from that period, designating again that the car is a great survivor. The beauty of these original cars is that you truly get a feel for their asymmetrical and hand built nature. As such, they are not perfect by modern massproduction standards and like most Ferrari GTs, (a good example being the GTO) one is struck by the inherent beauty of their lightweight and almost flimsy construction details. With the untimely death of Richard Forshaw, the Zagato was sold at an auction during the Goodwood Festival of Speed to Les Edgar who maintained the Zagato at the Aston factory Works Service Department while in his ownership. Shortly after the current owner acquired the car in the summer of 2002, Aston Martin Ltd. added an interesting bit of history to this example. 0190/L was used extensively in the marketing and promotion of the renewed relationship between Aston Martin and Zagato as they launched the DB7 Zagato Coupe. Aston Martin certainly felt this chassis was one of the ultimate design examples as it was included in the brochure of their new Zagato. 0190/L features its original 3,670 cc engine and David Brown built gearbox and has recently benefited from a $30,000 plus detailing and mechanical refurbishment of its brakes, suspension, transmission, clutch, rear axle and road wheels after which it successfully completed a 500 mile Arizona road rally. Aston Martin specialist Kevin Kay of Redding, California carried out this work and also fitted a new stainless steel exhaust. He confirms that the engine compression and leakdown tests were excellent and meet all normal standards. 0190/L was featured on the cover of the November 2000, issue of Thoroughbred & Classic Car and the May 2003, issue of the Robb Report. An extensive bit of photography and history can also be found in the 1992 book, Aston Martin DB4, DB5, DB6 The Complete Story by Jonathon Wood. If an Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato had to be described in 50 words or less, the April 13, 1962 Autocar road test article probably says it best; “In sheer performance there are not more than a half-dozen road cars in the world which can match the agility of this special-bodied Aston Martin. Obviously its market is limited by its high price. For those to whom this is no barrier, but who are prepared to pay for an uncommonly well engineered vehicle which has the ability to perform credibly on a racing track, and behave with decorum on the public roads with equal facility, it has few rivals.” Chassis no. DB4GT0190L

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-01-28
Hammer price
Show price

1966 Ferrari Dino 206 SP

THE EX-SEFAC FERRARI, PEDRO RODRIQUEZ AND RICHIE GINTHER, NORTH AMERICAN RACING TEAM, CHARLIE KOLB, GEROGE FOLLMER, JO SCHLESSER, MASTEN GREGORY AND PETER GREGG LA FERRARI EX-SEFAC PEDRO RODRIGUEZ E RICHIE GINTHER, NORTH AMERICAN RACING TEAM, CHARLIE KOLB, GEORGE FOLLMER, JO SCHLESSER, MASTEN GREGORY E PATER GREGG Specifications: 218 bhp 1,986 cc dual overhead camshaft V-6 engine, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,280mm (89.75") Lightweight. Aerodynamic. Powerful. The Ferrari 206 SP is the lithe, sinuous, brilliant V-6 son of the V-12 father. It is similar in many respects, but accomplished with conscious differences. The Origins of the Dino Legend When Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien went to Le Mans in 1962 and were assigned the 330 TRI/LM, the last front-engined car to win at la Sarthe, they felt a little cheated. There were better Ferraris in Ferrari’s entry. There were V-8 and V-6 Dinos. Hill and Gendebien knew the mid-engined Dinos were Ferrari’s future. They drove a dinosaur, and their victory was a tribute to their skill and maturity as drivers as much as it was to the durability, stability, reliability and speed of the four-litre 330 TRI/LM, the ultimate Testa Rossa. The V-6 Dinos were introduced in 1957 for the 1.5-litre Formula 2 series. Enzo Ferrari’s son Alfredo – known as “Dino” - had championed the engines’ layout, and Enzo gave the cars Dino’s name after his son’s untimely death in 1956. The detailed design was done by the old master, Vittorio Jano. With twin overhead camshafts, the inherently balanced conventional cylinder bank angle of 60° left no room for carburetors and inlet manifolding, so Jano increased the included angle to 65°, then compensated for the timing problem with crank throws placed 65° and 185° apart. It was ingenious, and it worked. The first Dino sports racing cars were front-engined; mid-engined cars appeared in 1962, the models Hill and Gendebien hoped to drive at Le Mans. Ferrari then dealt with the problems of slipping a V-12 between the driver and the rear wheels, and development of the compact V-6 powered Dinos languished. The Sports Prototypes Ferrari was challenged by Ford in the mid 60s and responded with a series of Sports Prototypes that have earned their position as the most seductively beautiful sports racing cars ever built. The first 330 P was introduced in 1964 and its design clearly showed its evolution from the 250 LM. The 1965 season’s 330 P2, however, was something completely different and it evolved into the Drogo-built 330 P3 the following year, surely the most voluptuous sports racing automobiles ever seen. At the same time Ferrari introduced the 206 S, an even more tightly wrapped, reduced scale rendition of the 330 P3 with the same voluptuous, sensuous shape on a shorter wheelbase that took full advantage of its compact V-6 powerplant. Franco Rocchi designed this third generation twin-cam V-6, returning to Jano’s original 65° vee angle. It would power not only the 206 S but also the street cars needed to meet the FIA’s requirement that Formula 2 engines be based upon a production engine with at least 500 units built – which Ferrari met in cooperation with Fiat in the Dino sports cars. In addition to the Ferrari sports prototypes and Formula 2 cars, the engine would later power the Ferrari Dino road cars and even the Lancia Stratos rally car. Like the 330 P3, the Dino 206 S was bodied by Drogo’s Carrozzeria Sports Cars. It used a multi-tube frame with alloy panels riveted to it for additional stiffness, in essence a semi-monocoque structure. Ferrari’s intention was that 50 of the cars would be built, qualifying it as an FIA Group 4 sports car, but the financial difficulties that would lead to Ferrari’s merger with Fiat three years later prevented that optimistic goal from being met and in the end only some 18 of these wonderful, quick, beautiful sports racers were built. What started out as a Dino 206 S (for Sport) became known as the Dino 206 SP (for Sports Prototype) when there were not enough built to qualify for Group 4. Chassis No. 008 The meticulously and accurately restored example offered here, chassis 008, is the fourth of the series production 206 SPs built, (The first 206 S was built on Ferrari chassis 0842) and the third of the standard alloy spider bodied 206 SPs. It was delivered to the SEFAC Ferrari team and used for testing and evaluation. Some sources indicate it was entered by the factory to be run by Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team in the 1000 km race at Monza April 25, 1966 where it was driven by NART driver Bob Bondurant and SEFAC driver Nino Vaccarella, but was damaged in practice and withdrawn before starting the race. Six weeks later on June 5, Dino 206 SP 008 was again entered for NART in the ADAC 1000 km of the Nürburgring, one of the season’s most demanding races. Driven by the brilliant pairing of Pedro Rogriguez and Richie Ginther, both SEFAC team drivers in 1966, the 206 SP started ninth on the grid and drove to an outstanding third overall and second in class behind another 206 SP, the fuel injected chassis 004 driven by Scarfiotti and Bandini, and the winning Chaparral 2D of Phil Hill and Jo Bonnier which thundered to the overall victory. Remarkably, all three podium finishers were on the same lap of the daunting 22.81 km Nürburgring Nordschleife. On June 18, 1966, still fresh from its podium finish at the Nürburgring, chassis 008, using a SEFAC Ferrari entry, was on hand at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. The car, however, was now owned by Chinetti, having been sold by SEFAC Ferrari on June 10. Chinetti put Charlie Kolb and George Follmer in the 206 SP and they started in 32nd position. After an excellent start, oil seeped onto the clutch, rendering it useless, and on just the 9th lap the team withdrew, a fate eventually shared by 40 of the 55 entrants - 73 percent of the starting grid. Kolb’s seat at Le Mans foreshadowed the next stage in 008’s career. After returning to Maranello for servicing and race prep, it was shipped to the U.S. and its next owner, M. Schroeder, who immediately entered it in the August 28 USRRC-Buckeye Cup race in Lexington, Ohio where it was driven by Charlie Kolb. Kolb brought the 206 SP home second in class and sixth overall. Entries at The Road America 500 at Elkhart Lake and the USRRC race at Bridgehampton followed before 008 was purchased by Fred Baker, who arranged to use a Chinetti entry in the 1967 Daytona 24 Hours. A fresh engine rebuild and gearbox overhaul were not completed in time to qualify, and 008 started from the back of the grid as a result. The driving team was strong – Jo Schlesser, Masten Gregory and Peter Gregg. At just over half distance, after moving within sight of a top 10 placing, Gregory made a routine pit stop only to have the engine develop a misfire when it restarted, which turned out to be a stripped distributor drive. Baker again used a Chinetti entry for his Dino 206 SP at the Sebring 12 Hours on April 1. Charlie Kolb and Ed Crawford started from 20th on the grid, where they remained when the green flag fell, sidelined by a broken half shaft. For the remainder of 1967, the 206 SP contested SCCA and USRRC races driven by Lee Cutler and occasionally Charlie Kolb. It was back at Daytona for the 24 hours in 1968 after being rebuilt by Chinetti’s NART mechanics. Now consigned or loaned to Chinetti, he put Kolb and Pedro Rodriguez in Dino 206 SP 008 and Rodriguez qualified an excellent 10th among the three litre Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/2s. Kolb and Rodriguez kept the little Dino among the top 10 until another misfire brought them into the pits and early retirement. Baker decided to sell the car, although Lee Cutler apparently worked out a deal to drive it in later races. Before the end of the year he bought the Dino from Baker, marking the end of its front line racing career. Harley Cluxton bought it from Cutler in 1971, selling it later that year to noted Ferrari collector and enthusiast, Walter Medlin in Kissimmee, Florida. Medlin did nothing with the beautiful little 206 SP except store it among his other cars where it stayed for more than 20 years. In 1995 it was acquired by Symbolic Motor Car Company and given a complete two-year restoration by Rob Shanahan. After completion, it became part of several important Ferrari collections and was proudly displayed at such diverse and important events as Rosso Ferrari at Rodeo Drive and the Goodwood Festival of Speed (both in 1997) and Cavallino Classic in 2004. It was featured in the Japanese magazine CAR in 1998. In 2003 it was returned to Symbolic’s restoration shop where it received a comprehensive refurbishment. It was acquired by the present owner after completion of the work and was displayed at Cavallino Classic in 2004. The vendor reports the Dino is on the button and is in excellent overall mechanical condition. It is a personal favorite of his and while he has not competitively raced it regularly, he is drawn to its character and uniqueness just as Medlin was so many years ago. Most recently, the 206 SP has been returned to its glorious NART livery as it appeared at the 1000 kms of Nürburgring when, it finished 2nd in class behind another Dino and 3rd overall. 1966 Ferrari Dino 206 SP 008 retains its original engine, gearbox and bodywork. Its restoration is of the highest quality and is fresh and sharp. Its history includes ownership and entries by both SEFAC Ferrari and NART. It has been driven by some of the greats in the greatest age of sports car and sports prototype racing: Bondurant, Vaccarella, Pedro Rodriguez, Ginther, Kolb, Follmer, Schlesser, Gregory and even Peter Gregg. Its ownership history is clear. It is fast, responsive and, best of all, a beautiful gem of a car. ITALIANTEXT specifiche: 218 bhp, 1986 cc di cilindrata, motore 6 cilindri a V con due alberi a camme in testa, transaxle con cambio manuale a cinque rapporti, sospensioni indipendenti con molle elicoidali e freni a disco sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2280 mm (89,75") Leggera. Aerodinamica. Potente. La Ferrari 206 SP con motore 6 cilindri è la figlia agile, snella e brillante della versione a 12 cilindri. In molti aspetti è simile, ma tra le due esistono anche consapevoli differenze. Le origini della Leggenda Dino Quando Phil Hill e Olivier Gendebien andarono a Le Mans nel 1962 e furono assegnati alla 330 TRI/LM, l’ultima auto con motore anteriore a vincere a la Sarthe, si sentirono leggermente presi in giro. C’erano infatti Ferrari migliori. C’erano le Dino V8 e V6. Hill e Gendebien sapevano bene che le Dino con motore centrale rappresentavano il futuro della Ferrari. Si ritrovarono tuttavia alla guida di un dinosauro, e la vittoria di cui furono artefici costituì un tributo alla loro capacità e maturità, nonché alla durabilità, alla stabilità, all’affidabilità e alla velocità della 330 TRI/LM, la migliore Testa Rossa. Le Dino V6 vennero introdotte nel 1957 per la Formula 2 a 1,500 cc. Il figlio di Enzo Ferrari, Alfredo – noto come “Dino” - aveva difeso le qualita di quei motori, ed Enzo diede alle auto il nome Dino in seguito alla morte prematura del figlio nel 1956. Il progetto dettagliato fu eseguito dall’anziano maestro Vittorio Jano. Con doppio albero a camme in testa, l’angolo dei cilindri convenzionale ed intrinsecamente equilibrato di 60° non lasciava lo spazio per i carburatori e l’alimentazione, per cui Jano incrementò l’angolo interno fino a 65°, compensando il problema della fasatura con le manovelle poste a 65° e 185°. Era una trovata ingegnosa, e funzionò. Le prime auto da competizione Dino avevano motore anteriore; quelle con motore centrale fecero la loro comparsa nel 1962 ed erano i modelli che Hill e Gendebien speravano di guidare a Le Mans. Poi Ferrari tentò di risolvere i problemi legati a come inserire un motore V12 tra il pilota e le ruote posteriori, e lo sviluppo delle Dino potenziate con il compatto V6 perse di importanza. Prototipi Sport Ferrari venne sfidato da Ford verso la metà degli anni ‘60 e reagì con una serie di prototipi sportivi che divennero famosi per essere le auto sportive da competizione più accattivanti mai state costruite. La prima 330 P venne introdotta nel 1964 e il suo design mostrava un’evidente evoluzione rispetto al modello 250 LM. La 330 P2 della stagione 1965, però, era qualcosa di completamente diverso, e l’anno seguente si evolse nella 330 P3 costruita da Drogo, di certo la più voluttuosa tra le auto sportive da competizione che si siano mai viste. Contemporaneamente Ferrari presentò la 206 S, una variante in scala ancora più ridotta della 330 P3, con le stesse linee sinuose su un passo più corto che sfruttava al massimo il suo compatto propulsore V6. Franco Rocchi progettò questo motore V6 con doppio albero a camme di terza generazione, ispirandosi all’originale angolo a V di 65° ideato da Jano. Questo motore avrebbe equipaggiato non solo la 206 S, ma anche le vetture da strada, per soddisfare i requisiti FIA che imponevano che i motori da Formula 2 avrebbero dovuto contare una produzione di almeno 500 unità, requisiti che Ferrari riuscì a soddisfare in cooperazione con Fiat con le automobili Dino. Oltre ai sport prototipi e alle auto Formula 2 di Ferrari, più tardi questo motore sarebbe stato introdotto sulle Ferrari Dino da strada e persino sull’auto da rally Lancia Stratos. Come la 330 P3, la Dino 206 S era stata carrozzata dalla Carrozzeria Drogo Sports Cars. Utilizzava un telaio multi-tubolare con pannelli in lega fissati ad esso per ottenere una rigidezza maggiore, creando in sostanza una struttura semintegrale. L’intenzione di Ferrari era di costruire 50 di queste automobili e qualificarle nel Gruppo 4 della FIA, ma le difficoltà finanziarie che tre anni più tardi avrebbero spinto Ferrari a fondersi con Fiat, impedirono di raggiungere questo ottimistico traguardo, e alla fine solo 18 di queste bellissime e veloci automobili sportive vennero costruite. Quella che all’inizio doveva essere una Dino 206 S (S sta per Sport) divenne nota con il nome Dino 206 SP (per Sport Prototype) quando non ne erano state costruite abbastanza per potersi qualificare nel Gruppo 4. Telaio N. 008 L’esemplare qui offerto, telaio 008, meticolosamente e accuratamente restaurato, è il quarto prodotto della serie 206 SP, (La prima 206 S fu costruita sul telaio Ferrari 0842) e il terzo della spider con carrozzeria 206 SP. Questo venne consegnato alla squadra SEFAC Ferrari e utilizzato per test e valutazioni. Secondo alcune fonti, lo stabilimento l’aveva iscritta affinché potesse essere pilotata dalla North American Racing Team di Luigi Chinetti alla 1000 km di Monza il 25 aprile 1966, e in quell’occasione a guidarla fu Bob Bondurant della NART e Nino Vaccarella della SEFAC, ma subì danni durante le prove e fu costretta a ritirarsi prima dell’inizio della gara. Sei settimane più tardi, il 5 giugno, la Dino 206 SP 008 venne iscritta per la NART all’ADAC 1000 km di Nürburgring, una delle gare più impegnative di tutta la stagione. Guidata dalla brillante coppia Pedro Rogriguez e Richie Ginther, entrambi piloti del team SEFAC nel 1966, la 206 SP partì nona in griglia e ottenne uno straordinario terzo posto in classifica generale e secondo nella categoria dietro un’altra 206 SP, il telaio 004 guidato da Scarfiotti e Bandini, e la trionfante Chaparral 2D di Phil Hill e Jo Bonnier che tagliò il traguardo finale aggiudicandosi la vittoria. In maniera abbastanza eccezionale, tutti e tre i finalisti che salirono sul podio si trovavano allo stesso giro dei 22.81 km scoraggianti del Nürburgring Nordschleife. Il 18 giugno 1966, poco dopo aver conquistato il podio al Nürburgring, il telaio 008, sfruttando la partecipazione di SEFAC Ferrari, si rese disponibile per la 24 ore di Le Mans. L’automobile era ora di proprietà di Chinetti, essendo stata venduta da SEFAC Ferrari il 10 giugno. Chinetti mise alla guida della 206 SP Charlie Kolb e George Follmer, che partirono dalla 32a posizione. Dopo un’ottima partenza, l’olio iniziò a colare sulla frizione rendendola inutilizzabile, e al nono giro la squadra si ritirò, seguita poi da 40 dei 55 partecipanti: il 73% della griglia di partenza. Il posto di Kolb a Le Mans lasciò presagire i futuri sviluppi della carriera della 008. Dopo che tornò a Maranello per essere riparata e preparata gara, venne imbarcata per gli Stati Uniti e consegnata al suo successivo proprietario, M. Schroeder, il quale lo iscrisse immediatamente alla USRRC-Buckeye Cup del 28 agosto a Lexington, Ohio, dove a guidarla fu Charlie Kolb. Kolb ottenne con la 206 SP un secondo posto di categoria e un sesto in classifica generale. Le partecipazione alla Road America 500 di Elkhart Lake e alla USRRC di Bridgehampton si svolsero prima dell’acquisto della 008 da parte di Fred Baker, il quale organizzò le cose in modo da utilizzare una partecipazione di Chinetti alla 24 Ore di Daytona nel 1967. Non si ebbe modo di eseguire una ricostruzione del motore e un esame accurato del cambio in tempo per le qualifiche, e di conseguenza la 008 partì in fondo alla griglia. Il team di piloti era forte: Jo Schlesser, Masten Gregory e Peter Gregg. A metà gara, dopo essere arrivato quasi a raggiungere un piazzamento tra i primi 10, Gregory fece un normale pit-stop, ma il motore mancò di riaccendersi per un problema allo spinterogeno. Baker sfruttò nuovamente una partecipazione di Chinetti per la sua Dino 206 SP alla 12 Ore di Sebring, il 1° aprile Charlie Kolb e Ed Crawford partirono in 20a posizione, e rimasero sulla griglia quando veniva data la bandiera verde, messi fuori causa dalla rottura di un semiasse. Per il resto del 1967, la 206 SP partecipò alla SCCA e alla USRRC con Lee Cutler e occasionalmente Charlie Kolb alla guida. Fece ritorno alla 24 Ore di Daytona solo nel 1968 dopo essere stata ricostruita dai meccanici della NART di Chinetti. Chinetti, cui ora era stata affidata, mise Kolb e Pedro Rodriguez nella Dino 206 SP 008 e Rodriguez ottenne in qualifica un ottimo 10° posto tra le Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/2s da tre litri. Kolb e Rodriguez riuscirono con la loro piccola Dino a restare tra i primi 10, fino a che un altro guasto al motore li costrinse ai box e ad un ritiro anticipato. Baker decise di vendere l’auto, anche se Lee Cutler sembrò essere riuscito a strappare un contratto per guidarla nelle gare seguenti. Prima della fine dell’anno, egli comprò la Dino da Baker, segnando la fine della sua carriera sportiva da protagonista. Harley Cluxton la comprò da Cutler nel 1971, per poi rivenderla in quello stesso anno al noto appassionato e collezionista di Ferrari, Walter Medlin di Kissimmee, Florida. Medlin non fece altro che conservare la piccola 206 SP in mezzo alle altre sue auto, dove rimase per più 20 anni. Nel 1995, venne acquistata dalla Symbolic Motor Car Company e sottoposta ad un restauro di due anni da parte di Rob Shanahan. Dopo le competizioni, entrò a far parte di importanti collezioni Ferrari, venendo orgogliosamente esibita in diversi e prestigiosi eventi come al Rosso Ferrari a Rodeo Drive e al Goodwood Festival of Speed (entrambi nel 1997) e al Cavallino Classic nel 2004. Nel 1998 apparve nella rivista giapponese CAR. Nel 2003 fece ritorno nell’officina della Symbolic, dove venne sottoposta ad restauro. Fu acquistata dall’attuale proprietario dopo la fine dei lavori ed esposta al Cavallino Classic nel 2004. Il venditore riferisce che la Dino è perfetta e le sue condizioni meccaniche generali ottime. È la sua preferita, e sebbene non sia riuscito a farla partecipare regolarmente a competizioni sportive, è affascinato dal suo carattere e dalla sua unicità proprio come lo era stato a suo tempo Medlin. Di recente la 206 SP è stata restituita coloridella scuderia della NART, dove fece la sua apparizione alla 1000 Km di Nürburgring dove ha ottenuto un 2° posto di categoria dietro un’altra Dino e un 3° posto in classifica generale. La Ferrari Dino 206 SP 008 del 1966 conserva motore, cambio e carrozzeria originali. Il suo è stato un restauro di altissima qualità, e ora appare in tutta la sua bellezza ed eleganza. La sua storia include proprietà e partecipazioni sia da parte di SEFAC Ferrari che di NART. Al suo volante si sono seduti alcuni tra i più grandi piloti di auto e prototipi sportivi da competizione di tutti i tempi: Bondurant, Vaccarella, Pedro Rodriguez, Ginther, Kolb, Follmer, Schlesser, Gregory e persino Peter Gregg. La storia dei suoi passaggi di proprietà è cristallina. È un’auto veloce, reattiva, ma soprattutto un piccolo e affascinante gioiello. Chassis no. 008

  • ITAItaly
  • 2007-05-20
Hammer price
Show price
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2003 Ferrari Enzo

651 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic ME7 fuel management, six-speed manual paddle-shift F1 transmission, front and rear independent wishbone suspension with coil springs, electronically controlled shock absorbers and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel Brembo vented carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.4 in. Purchased new and offered by the renowned designer Tommy Hilfiger Driven just 3,620 miles and fastidiously maintained by one owner Garaged among his preeminent collection Offered with manuals and tools If one manufacturer can claim to have created the definitive mold for a modern evolution of consistently amazing hypercars, it must be Ferrari. From the competition-bred 288 GTO and F40 of the late 1980s, through the voluptuous F50 of the 1990s, Ferrari combined unparalleled performance and breathtaking designs to build small batches of impeccable road machines for ultra-exclusive buyers. These were undeniably the most formidable production sports cars of their days. After F50 production concluded in 1998, tifosi dreamt of what exotic machine Maranello would devise next—and what form it would take. Speculation was rampant over whether the next model would employ a rear-mounted V-8 or V-12, and if the packaging would be spartan and purposeful like the F40, or luxurious and evocative of vintage designs like the F50. In mid-2002, Ferrari president Luca di Montezemolo ended the wait with the introduction of the forthcoming Ferrari Enzo. Though the model’s name required no explanation, he reasoned that after Ferrari had named cars for historically important locales like Maranello and Modena, the time had finally come to honor the company’s founder. He also clarified that the new model would have a strong connection to Formula 1 racing, as the manufacturer had just won the 1999 and 2000 Manufacturers’ Championship, and the 2000 Drivers’ Championship. Michael Schumacher was, in fact, just getting started on his historic dominance of F1, a still unequaled feat of five consecutive championships. Formally debuting at the 2002 Paris Motor Show, the Ferrari Enzo certainly delivered on the premise of its design brief. Like a Formula 1 car, the Enzo utilized futuristic materials to achieve maximum weight savings, with a foundational chassis tub made of carbon fiber and Nomex honeycomb weighing just 200 pounds. Aluminum sub-frames were then mounted on the tub, and these laid the groundwork for the mounting of Pininfarina’s unique coachwork. Penned by designer Ken Okuyama during a lunch break, the Enzo’s external design mimicked the shape of an open-wheel race car, though as if wrapped in a skin extending over the fenders and cockpit. Aerodynamically perfected in Pininfarina’s wind tunnel, the body was comprised of panels woven from carbon fiber and Kevlar. Nineteen-inch alloy wheels, anchored by 15-inch Brembo carbon-ceramic disc brakes, and unique scissor doors, respectively, completed the Enzo’s chassis and cabin, finishing a car that was highly technological and endlessly fascinating. Into this phenomenal marriage of chassis and body, a new purpose-built engine was placed behind the driver, continuing the manufacturer’s long-running configuration for sports prototypes and hypercars. The concurrent 90-degree V-8 was essentially extended by two cylinders on each side and altered in angle, creating the 65-degree Tipo F140B V-12 engine. Displacing almost six liters, the F140 was the largest engine built by Maranello since the 712 Can-Am race car of the 1970s. It was packed with racing components such as Nikasil-lined cylinder walls, titanium connecting rods, and a telescoping intake manifold designed to boost torque, ultimately developing 651 horsepower and 485 foot-pounds of torque, earth-shattering numbers even by today’s standards. The F140’s evolutions would go on to power the 599 series, the F12 Berlinetta, and LaFerrari. With power transmitted via a six-speed dual-clutch transaxle that was actuated with column-mounted paddle-shifters, the Enzo reached 60 mph from standstill in just 3.3 seconds and a top speed of 218 mph. Production was eventually capped at 400 units, so this was a car whose engineering was also matched by its rarity. As unique and captivating today as it was in 2002, the Ferrari Enzo continues to hold sway with collectors, unmistakably carrying the mantle of Maranello’s defining millennial hypercar, the genetic link between the sensuous F50 and the hybrid LaFerrari. Claiming low mileage and the consistent care of just one owner since it was purchased new, chassis number 133026 is a particularly desirable example of the vaunted Ferrari hypercar. It may be superfluous to say that many Enzos were purchased new by celebrities and luminaries of great influence, but this car is a particularly notable example, having been acquired new by the famed designer Tommy Hilfiger. Best known for his eponymous clothing line and its myriad accessories, Mr. Hilfiger has been one of the leading designers in fashion for over 30 years. Like many of his contemporaries, he is also a passionate automotive enthusiast and the owner of a pedigreed collection of classics and modern exotics. Hitting his professional stride just as the Schumacher years approached, Hilfiger eventually became a sponsor of the Scuderia Ferrari during the early 2000s, and he even designed the drivers’ uniforms. It is little surprise that his name was prioritized by the factory for ownership of one of the 399 customer cars (the 400th car was famously earmarked for the Pope). Taking delivery of his Enzo from Miller Motorcars in Greenwich, Connecticut, Mr. Hilfiger garaged the car at his Greenwich home, where he used it for occasional drives around town. About five years ago, the Ferrari was relocated to Hilfiger’s home in Florida, where the car continued to be dutifully maintained and rarely driven. Serviced by The Collection in Coral Gables, Florida, in early 2015, the Enzo also received a new set of Scuderia Potenza tires. When an annual service was performed in September 2016, the odometer displayed just 3,620 miles. Accompanied by tools and manuals, chassis number 133026 is one of very few Enzos that have been retained by the original owner, and it claims no extreme use as well as consistent maintenance among a carefully curated collection of some of the world’s finest automobiles. “I love Ferraris,” Hilfiger asserts with passion. “Tommy Hilfiger [the brand] sponsored the [Scuderia Ferrari] team and I designed the F1 uniforms during the Schumacher years. When the Enzo launched, Jean Todt and Luca De Montezemolo made sure I got one. I’ve bought and sold cars for many years. I love the 458 Speciale, the California, the older Daytonas, and LaFerrari. I also have Bentleys, Rolls-Royces, Range Rovers, and vintage American cars. Some are works of art! My lifestyle is changing so I don’t drive fast sports cars as I used to, but prefer driving my Rolls Dawn these days, or my Maybach. Cars are similar to fashion, always evolving in style!” This sensational time-capsule Enzo offers enthusiasts an opportunity to acquire a unique example with unparalleled celebrity provenance. Tommy Hilfiger is undeniably one of the biggest names in modern fashion, and while his tastes may have evolved beyond the need for a 200 mph hypercar, the Enzo will forever stand as a timeless accomplishment of sports car engineering and design. This outstanding example is among the finest offered in many years and would make a crowning addition to any collection. Chassis no. ZFFCW56A330133026 Engine no. 76029

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
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