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1939 Talbot-Lago T150 C SS Chassis no. 90120 Engine no. 17318-C

The ex-Pierre Boncompagni 'Pagnibon,' Ecurie Nice 1939 Talbot-Lago T150 C SS Coachwork by M. Pourtout, Design by Georges Paulin Chassis no. 90120 Engine no. 17318-C There were four Talbot-Lago T150 C SSs with Pourtout Aerocoupé bodies made. Two are in private collections and there are shadowy rumors of another in pieces, although no one has seen so much as a picture. The last is offered here, and is the perfect storm of exceptional provenance. Begun as war clouds gathered in 1939, it was not seen complete until the conflagration was over. It was built to plans drawn by a legendary designer, and assembled by one of France’s premier coachbuilders. After the war, the Talbot was owned by a wealthy gentleman driver who drove it to many victories on the road courses of France. It remains in original condition, showing the makeshift field modifications that racing sometimes demands. The story of this Talbot-Lago T150 C SS begins with the birth of Antonio Franco Lago in Venice in 1893. The family moved to Bergamo, where Lago’s father managed the municipal theatre. Lago grew up in a home full of actors, musicians and impresarios and government officials. Young Tony was bright and personable and as he grew older, he got to know a range of important people, developing friendships with both Mussolini and Pope John IV before they achieved prominence. Lago became disillusioned with fascism early and said so. Knowing he was under threat, he always carried a hand grenade with him. Three black shirts from the fascist youth corps came into a trattoria after him, but shot the owner first. Tony pulled the pin, threw the hand grenade and ran out the back door. When he heard that one of his assailants had died, Lago fled to Paris in 1919. Remarkably, he and Mussolini were still in touch, years later. Picking up engineering degrees along the way, he worked for Pratt and Whitney as far afield as Southern California, before settling in England in the 1920s. Lago’s ambition seemed boundless considering his resources, but he was always able to find investors to help realize his dreams. The fact that he had achieved the rank of Major in the French Army during the war swayed the undecided. By the early 1930s, Lago had negotiated the rights to market the Wilson pre-selector gearbox, a breakthrough invention that allowed one to select a gear with a lever in advance of its need – the gear would not engage until the clutch was operated. It was typical of Lago’s business practices that years after he was selling the gearboxes, the countries Lago had the rights to market in were still under negotiation. In the course of trying to find a factory in France, Lago entered into discussions with the Anglo-French automobile company, Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq. The Talbot factory in Paris was laboring under a huge debt after overspending on Grand Prix racing in the 1920s. It had a muddled line of cars, with few selling and an antiquated plant. Lago made a deal with the British parent of STD whereby he would be paid a salary to turn the French side of the company around and share in any profits upon sale. Armed with the transmission license and another license for a front suspension system he had designed, Lago moved to France in 1933. In 1934, he tasked his engineer, Walter Brecchia, to upgrade the existing model Talbot T120 to the T150, by designing a new hemispherical combustion chamber cylinder head for the three-liter engine. To accommodate the new engine, Lago built three new cars and entered them in Concours d’Elegance in the Bois de Boulogne in June 1934. Tony’s theatrical background was evident. The three cars, painted in the red, white and blue of the French tricolor, were accompanied by three well-known female racing drivers, all in elegantly tailored outfits the color of their cars, topped off with berets. Under the hood lurked the old T120 engine, the new head not yet being ready. The following weekend, Tony’s sideshow was presented to the elite of the French motoring industry at an affair at the Prince of Wales hotel, after which the three ladies again paraded their cars in another concours sponsored by a Paris newspaper. Lago ultimately got his revised cylinder head and continued to try and give his Talbots a performance image despite slow sales. A privateer entered an ungainly three-liter T150 sedan at Le Mans in 1935 and ran as high as 11th before retiring. The next year French authorities changed the class displacement limits for sports car racing with breaks at 2 and 4 liters. Lago responded with a 4-liter version of the T150, but 1936 was neither successful in racing nor sales, as the recession in France deepened. Lago’s flair for showmanship was not to be denied, even under the circumstances. In the fall, he arranged for a new hemi-head T150 to attempt to pack 100 miles into an hour on the banked portion of the Montlhèry course. The foray was successful and Talbot-Lago’s stature grew in the sporting community. After staving off bankruptcy, it all came right in 1937, with a new, lightweight T150 C. The lightweight and the older 4-liter both began winning and racked up successes at Marseilles, where they finished 1-2-3-5, Tunisia, Montlhèry (1-2-3) and the British Tourist Trophy. In the midst of these successes, Tony Lago introduced his masterpiece in August, at the Paris-Nice Criterium de Tourisme. It was a touring version of the open T150 Cs that he had been racing. Designated the T150 C SS, it had a 4-liter, six-cylinder overhead valve engine with triple Zenith-Stromberg carburetors, just like the sports racing car. As would be expected, power was through a version of the Wilson pre-selector gearbox. Output was 140 horsepower, allowing the car to cruise the poplar-lined autoroutes at near 100 miles per hour. The body was a stunning coupé by Paris coachbuilder, Figoni and Falaschi, nicknamed the Goutte d’Eau. The literal translation is drop of water, but in English, the design is usually referred to as a Teardrop. It was an ebullient series of repeating ovoid shapes – fenders, greenhouse, bonnet and hood, accentuated by sweeping chrome filets, ending in a magnificent fastback barely pierced by a small backlight. That the Talbot SS was elegant was unquestioned, but it could also show an impressive turn of speed. In 1938 a standard touring version placed 3rd at Le Mans and repeated that result in the Coupé de Paris at Montlhèry, a race won by a Talbot T26 sports racer with a similar engine. These two third places were akin to taking a new Ferrari 599 GTB off the showroom floor and finishing 3rd at Le Mans today. Less than thirty T150 C SSs were made, and today they are in the car collector’s pantheon. The majority were bodied by Figoni and Falaschi, but a series of just four Pourtout Aerocoupés was also completed. Marcel Pourtout began his Paris carrosserie in the mid-twenties with his wife keeping the books. He built a following of the rich and famous and used the prestige chassis of the day, including Delahaye, Delage, Bentley, Peugeot, Lancia and, ultimately, Talbot. In the early 1930s, Pourtout met Georges Paulin. Paulin came from a steveadore family and at his father’s urging, became a dentist. His father served in World War I, during which his mother was killed in a Paris street by a 2000 pound shell fired by a German artillery device called Big Bertha, which had a nine mile range and was named after a member of the Krupp armaments family. Despite an early career making dentures in Paris and Nice, Paulin’s real interest was innovative automobile design and aerodynamics. He returned to Paris where he designed and patented a retractable steel top, which was used by Peugeot on some memorable Pourtout bodies. Pourtout also did work for Paris Peugeot dealer, Emile Darl’mat. The Peugeot connection brought the three men together and Paulin became Pourtout’s designer. From the mid to late 1930s, Paulin penned some of the world’s greatest designs that were executed by Pourtout. Three that became classics of the era were the Embiricos Bentley, the Peugeot Darl’mat and the first Delage D-8 120. Paris-based Greek banker, André Embiricos, commissioned the Bentley. It was a coupé so advanced that it finished 5th at Le Mans ten years after it was built. The Darl’mats were a series of small-displacement, Peugeot-based aerodynamic coupés and roadsters, one of which won the two-liter class at Le Mans in 1938, resulting in a production run of street versions. The Delage was a one-off aero coupé ordered by Louis Delage to introduce the new model at the Paris Auto Show. It still turns heads to the point of winning the 2005 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Near the end of the run of the Talbot T150 C SS, Pourtout built four Aerocoupés to Paulin’s design. They were similar to the Figoni and Falaschi design, but more aerodynamic, with a less studied look. The war brought Talbot production to an end. Paulin became an agent of the British Secret Service, working with the Alibi network of the French Resistance. He was captured and executed by the Nazis in 1942. When his belongings were returned to his wife, she found a note. It was simple and to the point, “I love you – do not avenge me.” The war ended with Tony Lago still in control of Talbot. He persevered with his racing, always teetering on the edge of bankruptcy, occasionally winning a Grand Prix in the 1940s and 50s and finally winning Le Mans in 1950 with his T26, with an updated version of the T150 engine. The French government ultimately awarded him the Legion d’Honneur for the glory he brought France on the race course, despite having been in receivership four times. He reluctantly merged his company into Simca in 1958 and died the next year. The offered car, Talbot-Lago T150 C SS 90120, emerged as a complete car after the war and for a time was owned by the wealthy amateur sportsman Pierre Boncompagni, who used the nom de course, “Pagnibon”. In 1950 and 1951, racing the Talbot under the flag of Ecurie Nice, he won overall or in his class at such evocative venues as Nice, Orléans, the Circuit de Bressuire, Agen and the Mount Ventoux Hillclimb, a 13-mile uphill dash. After adding his pages to Talbot’s racing history, Boncompagni died behind the wheel of a Ferrari at a race in Hyères in 1953. His Talbot surfaced in the United States with James R Stannard Jr in Long Beach. Lindsey Locke of Southern California bought it in the early 1960s. Locke was a Talbot enthusiast and owned four Talbot-Lagos, two T150 C SS coupés and a postwar coupé and cabriolet. Locke’s other T150 C SS is now in the Nethercutt Museum. The subject car has not changed hands since Locke’s purchase. This Talbot T150 C SS represents an extraordinary opportunity seldom seen in today’s market. It is redolent of the golden age of French custom coachbuilding and the great later 1930s legacy of French racing sports cars when French cars won the last three Le Mans races before the war. Whereas there are over 16 Figoni and Falaschi T150s, there are only three of Georges Paulin’s streamlined coupés, as executed by Marcel Pourtout. Further, the other two are in long-term collections. The subject car is unrestored in a period that recognizes the value of such condition. Cars can be restored many times, but they are only original once. As the era of the so-called trailer queen is ending, the most prestigious Concours d’Elegance like Pebble Beach now mark cars down for over over-restoration and have classes for unrestored cars. Like all great hand-made artworks, this Talbot-Lago is unique. While it conforms to Paulin’s design, it has features that distinguish it from its brethren, such as the subtle ridgeline descending down the rear from the divided backlight, ending in a miniscule raised fin. The grille shape and the aluminum-bordered engine compartment wire mesh grilles are also singular to this car. The Talbot also shows its racing heritage in the drilling and lightening that can be found throughout. Like an archeological dig, one can discern details of the car’s life from its modifications. There are crudely welded metal pieces, obviously placed to direct airflow to the radiator, leading the historian to discern that at one point in its career, the car overheated. Such in-period appendages are almost always lost in a complete restoration. The new owner will not ride alone. This elegant warrior from another age will always be accompanied by the spirits of Tony Lago, Georges Paulin, Marcel Pourtout and Pierre Boncompagni.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-08-16
Hammer price
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1928 MERCEDES-BENZ TYP S 26/120/180 SUPERCHARGED SPORTS TOURERCoachwork by Erdmann & Rossi

1928 MERCEDES-BENZ TYP S 26/120/180 SUPERCHARGED SPORTS TOURER Coachwork by Erdmann & Rossi Chassis no. 35323 Engine no. 66540 6,740cc, OHV Inline 6-Cylinder Engine 2 Carburetors with Roots Supercharger, 120 or 180bhp at 3,000rpm 4-Speed Manual Transmission Front and Read Semi-Elliptic Leaf Spring Suspension 4-Wheel Drum Brakes *Original left hand drive example delivered new to America *Original coachwork, matching engine *Featured in numerous marque reference books *'The Car of Kings' *Former Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance multiple prize Winner THE MERCEDES-BENZ TYP 'S' "Silent streams of super-power... unbounded flexibility"..."comfort to carry you to the ends of the earth" - quoted period Mercedes-Benz advertising in America for the legendary Typ S. The British Mercedes marketing would elaborate more: "Decades of experience in the building of sports cars of superior performance, the universally known high grade workmanship of the Benz-Mercedes Works and their masterly designs have contributed harmoniously to the creation of the Mercedes-Benz Sport model 'S', which may justly be described as the acme of motor car perfection" Mercedes were right to make such bold statements on the arrival of their new model in the late 1920s, the equivalent motoring press would 'wax lyrical' about its incredible performance. The 'S' was created in a magical period for the company, shortly after the merger of Daimler and Benz, while Ferdinand Porsche was Chief Engineer. He built a powerful, yet versatile automobile - a true all rounder, at home on the race track, at hill climbs and providing exhilarating driving for the road. The signature engineering feature was its 'on demand' Roots type supercharger, that only came into operation when the accelerator was fully depressed, boosting power output from 120 to 180 brake horsepower for a few glorious seconds! Mercedes nestled the impressive 6.8 liter power unit into a low slung double dropped chassis, which was proudly adorned with a massive radiator. Contemporary photographs of the completely unclothed 'S' running gear show the model to be as beautiful, sporting and purposeful even before rakish coachwork was applied. In truly uncompromising fashion, the clearance between the engine and the hood was no more than an inch. Mercedes debuted the cars at the opening meeting of the Nurburgring in 1927, where Caracciola set the tone with a class win, it would be the first of many laurels bestowed on the model. Here in America, Ralph de Palma drove an 'S' to victory in the 15 and 30-mile races at Atlantic City, averaging 80mph. Mercedes worked hard in selling their latest definitive sports car, and despite a price tag of more than $7,000 without coachwork they found willing homes around the globe from royalty to celebrity. In America, notable owners included Al Jolson, who owned by an S and SS, the Marx brothers who famously raced their car in the Muroc Match Race, Barney Oldfield, and theater impresario Samuel Lionel "Roxy" Rathafel, of New York fame and founder of the 'Rockettes' dance troupe, today still present each holiday season at Radio City. While further afield enthusiasts included English Sportswoman Dorothy Paget, daughter of Pauline Payne Whitney, the Fifth Earl Howe, Sir Malcolm Campbell and novelist Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to name but a few. Quite simply, there wasn't anything to touch the Mercedes, but as with its competitors, it faced an uphill struggle for sales as the depression set in and only 174 of these remarkable cars were ever built between 1927 and 1930. Of the many books on the marque, one particularly detailed book on the 'S' was written by American Herbert Lozier in the 1960s, the apt title is 'The Car of Kings'... Mercedes' bold claims for the model 'S' were endorsed universally at the time and in the 90 years that have ensued since, have been held in high esteem, continually re-affirmed by generations of collectors, from Brooks Stevens to Bill Harrah, and examples reside in many of the most significant collections around the world. Some families never even parted with their cars and as recently as 2012, Bonhams sold one from the same family it had been delivered to when new. As with other coveted automobiles, from day one opportunities to purchase them rarely appear. THE MOTORCAR OFFERED This 'Car of Kings' was one of few that were delivered new to North America. It was originally commissioned on February 13, 1928 and was shipped to Berlin to be equipped with coachwork by Erdmann and Rossi, one of only a handful so bodied. Ranked among the elite of European coachbuilders, Berlin-based Erdmann & Rossi specialized in bodying prestige makes including Horch, Maybach, Packard, Cadillac, Bentley, Rolls-Royce (they were Germany's official importer) and, of course, Mercedes-Benz. Their distinguished clientele included European royalty, industrialists, actors, pilots and racing drivers. Built under Kommission order number 37831, Erdmann and Rossi would most likely also have been working on the consecutive number order 37832 a 630K (sold by Bonhams in 2013) which was also built for the American market. The completed car was photographed by the works in 1928, an image which by merit of distinguishing features and being captioned with its 'Kom' number can be seen to be repeated in countless reference works on the marque, including the aforementioned Herbert Lozier book, Werner Oswald's 'Mercedes-Benz Personenwagen 1886-1984', and Michael Frostick's 'The Mighty Mercedes'. Interestingly, as new it wore a single central Mercedes-Benz badge on the V of its radiator as was common practice for 'SS' models, as opposed to a three pointed star on either side of the 'V'. The magnificent car would then leave Europe for the next 80 years at this point, being destined for the Mercedes-Benz Company, New York, where it was received on consignment on January 23, 1929. By the end of April 1929 it had found its first custodian, as noted on the factory records. The details of who Mercedes sold the car to have always remained unknown, but we can be certain that it was well looked after, because when found by H. Edward White of Connecticut in the early 1960s, it remained in remarkably intact order as photos of the discovery confirm. White worked for Kodak Eastman and seems to have used contacts within his own industry to establish what he had found. In particular he corresponded with Ernst Richartz in Mainz in Germany in February 1964, who responded enthusiastically, 'If you find (sic) this true, you found yourself a real gem, if you do not possess (sic) it already, get to it, do it calm, let nobody not even a good friend know what you found and most important, buy it with a poker-face'. It is not certain whether White acquired the car or was simply responsible for its discovery, but within a few years it had passed to noted car sleuth Ben Moser, who advertised the Mercedes in 1968, describing it as '100% Complete and Original', its price, a mere $8,800 F.O.B.! Later the car would pass to another noted collector Ed Swearingen of San Antonio, Texas. Mr. Swearingen would be responsible for the car's comprehensive refurbishment, which culminated in its debut at the world renowned Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance in 1996. On that day, the 'S' took multiple awards: 'First in Class - Mercedes-Benz 1925-1939 and the Gwen Graham Award for Most Elegant Open Car' - high praise indeed. In his later years, Mr. Swearingen parted with the 'S' at which point the Mercedes returned to Europe for the first time in its career, where in the last couple of decades the car has been cherished in two significant European collections. Today, its 20 year old restoration stands up extremely well and has been enhanced further with an exquisite refurbishment of its upholstery in black grained hide. A full complement of accessories, including beautiful Carl Zeiss headlights, driving lights and Bosch horns adorn the front of the car, giving it incredible visual stature. The Mercedes retains original coachwork and matching engine, as well as the period photos confirming that it is very much as it was delivered new. Its owner reports the car to be driving extremely well. 2017 marks the 90th anniversary of the introduction of the S type Mercedes, the fastest car in the world in its day. Returning to the American soil on which it was delivered, this majestic 'Car of Kings' offers the rare chance to experience this legendary Porsche-designed model, truly one of the icons on which the 125 year old brand was built, harnessing the style, performance and sheer quality that we associate with the Three Pointed Star in 2017.

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-19
Hammer price
Show price

1934 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3

255 bhp 2,905 cc DOHC supercharged inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, front Dubonnet independent suspension, rear live-axle suspension with reversed quarter-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,642 mm The 6th of 7 second-series wide-body examples One of three examples originally fitted with Dubonnet independent front suspension and reversed quarter-elliptical leaf springs Campaigned by Scuderia Ferrari during the 1934 and 1935 Grand Prix seasons Driven by racing luminaries including Tazio Nuvolari and Rene Dreyfus Well-documented ownership history; extremely authentic example Sensational example of the first monoposto Grand Prix model One of Alfa Romeo’s most important pre-war race cars THE ALFA ROMEO MONOPOSTO In late 1931, Alfa Romeo engineer Vittorio Jano began designing a new Grand Prix car to compete with the latest models from Bugatti and Maserati. While a 2.6-litre version of Alfa’s successful inline eight-cylinder was chosen as a powerplant, Jano sought a more purpose-built chassis and body than the sports car-style Monza spiders. Using the two-seat P2 Grand Prix car as a foundation, Jano engineered an extremely light chassis, which he mounted with new centreline slipper-style single-seat coachwork that placed the driver at the car’s exact centre, for ideal weight distribution. The resulting Tipo B, or P3, was noteworthy, as it was the first Grand Prix car to feature monoposto coachwork configuration. Weighing just 701 kilograms, the Tipo B was immediately successful during the 1932 season, as the legendary Tazio Nuvolari won the Monza Grand Prix, and team cars took 1-2-3 finishes at the French and German Grand Prix. Six initial Tipo B examples were built with the original 1932 specifications. After the Great Depression forced Alfa Romeo into government receivership in 1933, the manufacturer was financially prohibited from racing expenditures and formally withdrew from competition. Management took exception, however, when the Maserati brothers’ newer monoposto car beat an older 8C Monza being run by the Scuderia Ferrari, and consequently decided to entrust the newest factory cars to its unofficial team. The Scuderia Ferrari took full advantage of the Tipo B, using it to win the Coppa Acerbo and the Italian and Spanish Grand Prix. In 1934, formula rules changed to demand wider and heavier cars, and Alfa complied by widening the bodywork on the original five P3 cars. A batch of seven additional examples was then built to the newer specifications, and these cars received larger 2.9-litre engines. Numbering sequentially from chassis number 50001, these wide-body cars were often identified by their Scuderia Ferrari number. The new cars continued to perform admirably, winning in Monaco, Alessandria, Tripoli, and Casablanca, as well as the Targa Florio. By mid-1934, however, the competition had caught up and the Tipo B’s dominance began to wane, though Louis Chiron and Achille Varzi contributed to a 1-2-3 finish at the French Grand Prix, while Varzi won the event at Nice later that year. During the off-season, Enzo Ferrari enticed Nuvolari to return to the Scuderia, and the Tipo B cars were further modified with the introduction of Dubonnet-style independent front suspension and reversed quarter-elliptical leaf springs at the rear (which Nuvolari had pioneered to great effect with the Bugatti Type 59). In this configuration, Nuvolari won the 1935 Pau and German Grand Prix, while Carlo Pintacuda won the Mille Miglia, and Chiron and Brivio finished 1-2 at the Targa Florio. Numerous other wins followed at minor events like at Bergamo, Biella, Turin, and Dieppe. SCUDERIA FERRARI NUMBER 46 Chassis number 50006 is the sixth example of the seven second-series wide-body cars, and one of three originally fitted with the Dubonnet suspension and reversed quarter-elliptical leaf springs (as opposed to being converted by the factory following initial manufacture). Stamped with Scuderia Ferrari number 46, this car interchangeably participated in the campaigns of 1935 with the other Tipo B cars. Individual chassis records were not recorded by the factory or the Scuderia, so it is nearly impossible to determine with any certainty which chassis was used in any given race. It is nevertheless strongly believed that this car was piloted and tested by vaunted drivers like Nuvolari and Varzi. However, it can be proven that this car was indeed campaigned at the 1935 Masyrk Grand Prix in Brno, Czechoslovakia, with Antonio Brivio, placing 4th overall. For the 1935 season, the Tipo B proved to be a highly competitive car and accrued a number of overall victories that year, including at the Targa Florio and Nuvolari’s highly celebrated victory at the German Grand Prix at the Nürburgring In late 1936, the Scuderia Ferrari sold this P3 to Frank Ashby, an English engineer who ran the car at the Brighton Speed Trials in October. He continued to campaign it in hill climbs and other events over the next two years at venues like Brooklands. When the original engine began to crack, Ashby built and installed a new cylinder head and undertook modifications to the radiator and exhaust. His local racing exploits were covered by the British motoring press in magazines like Motor Sport and The Light Car. Ashby later emigrated to Sydney, Australia, where he reportedly befriended a young Jack Brabham and recommended engineering modifications that helped propel the talented driver to his successful multi-championship career. The Tipo B was sold in 1946 to Ken Hutchison, a wealthy British enthusiast who wrote about his experiences with the car in an extended cover feature in the January 1948 issue of Motor Sport magazine. The Alfa’s road manners were also described in a 1947 issue of The Motor as being ‘marvellous, even, and tight . . . the whole car seemed absolutely perfectly balanced.’ The car continued to see racing use through 1950, sold to enthusiast Joe Goodhew in the winter of 1949. In 1953, he sold the car to John McMillan of New Zealand, who immediately campaigned it in the New Zealand GP in January 1954. The Tipo B saw additional time on the local circuit through the ownerships of Ernie Sprague and Bill Harris of Christchurch. Leon Witte of Lyttleton then purchased the car and undertook restoration of the bodywork. Prior to 50006 making its way to New Zealand, modifications to the bodywork were carried out to an otherwise extremely original 50006. During 50006’s life in England, a narrow body had been constructed and fitted. Leon Witte decided that the car should be put back to its original wider cockpit as campaigned by Scuderia Ferrari. At the time of restoration, Bill Clark owned 50005, and an exact copy of the original wide cockpit used during the Scuderia Ferrari era was crafted using 50005 as a guide. According to the noted Alfa Romeo historian Simon Moore’s Magnificent Monopostos text, it is believed that ‘only the centre section of the body had to be replaced, the rest being original’. Further evidence of this is noted in a photograph of both Leon Witte and Bill Clark with 50006 and 50005, respectively, with only the centre section appearing new. This is further confirmed by an inspection report on file. The Alfa was purchased around 1990 by one of Japan’s foremost collectors, Yoshiyuki Hayashi. In 2000, chassis number 50006 was purchased by noted American collector Bruce McCaw, who retained the car until 2007. At that time, the Tipo B was purchased by Umberto Rossi, and he commissioned an inspection and report from both the esteemed Hall & Hall in Lincolnshire, England, and one of the most pedigreed British motor racing authors and experts (who had previously inspected the car during Hayashi’s ownership). Today, thanks to a remarkable unbroken chain of documented ownership, chassis 50006 is confirmed to retain almost all factory-original components. It is truly remarkable that in the car’s 80-plus year history, it was never derelict nor neglected like so many other cars. It has remained intact all its life and was never rebuilt from an assemblage of parts or discarded for years on end. In addition to its original chassis, the very precious 3.2L SF-50-A motor from the famous Bimotore car is included with the sale. The crankcases of 50005 and 50006, as well as the one from the Alfa Aitken, were interchanged when all three cars were in New Zealand. Bill Clark acquired all of these engine parts when he bought 50005. Eventually, SF-50-A was paired with 50006. Taking into account the historical importance of SF-50-A, the decision was made to construct a totally authentic modern engine for racing and to put SF-50-A on a stand in an effort to preserve it. The new engine parts were supplied through the Jim Stokes Group and then assembled and tuned by Hall & Hall. With the exception to the aforementioned restored cockpit section of the bodywork, the bonnet panels are largely original. Stampings throughout the car appear to be entirely genuine upon examination. Of course, all of these cars were raced in period and parts were exchanged and replaced as necessary to keep them competitive. Thus, finding a wholly original P3 is next to impossible. Importantly, documentation on file asserts that chassis number 50006 ‘incorporates many original components from the Scuderia Ferrari/Alfa Romeo stock of the 1934–1935 period’. Finally, documentation on file further attests and confirms chassis number 50006 benefits from ‘a substantially unbroken provenance line extending from the Scuderia Ferrari to the present owner’, confirming its authenticity as a true Scuderia Ferrari-campaigned P3 and therefore, a true piece of motorsport history. The car is further documented by an FIA Heritage Certificate, issued in 2007. In conclusion, this rare and extremely authentic Tipo B offers discerning collectors an opportunity to acquire an important intersection of the history of Alfa Romeo and the Scuderia Ferrari, as well as one of the earliest monoposto Grand Prix cars ever built. Driven by some of racing’s most celebrated drivers, including the Flying Mantuan himself, this important pioneering Tipo B would crown any collection and should expect a warm welcome at exclusive events such as Villa d’Este and Pebble Beach. Many would argue that perhaps the best place for chassis number 50006 to be enjoyed would be on the track, where it would undoubtedly be a thrill to not only the driver, but to all in attendance, just as Enzo Ferrari, Tazio Nuvolari, and Achille Varzi would have wanted. Moteur huit-cylindres en ligne, 2 905 cm3, 255 ch, 2 ACT, transmission manuelle trois rapports, suspension avant indépendante Dubonnet, essieu arrière rigide avec ressorts quart-elliptiques inversés, freins à tambour à commande mécanique sur les quatre roues. Empattement 2 642 mm. • Sixième de sept exemplaires de deuxième série à carrosserie large • Un des trois exemplaires équipés à l'origine d'une suspension avant Dubonnet indépendante et de ressorts arrière quart-elliptiques inversés • Engagée en course par la Scuderia Ferrari pour les saisons de Grand Prix 1934 et 1935 • Pilotée par des champions Tazio Nuvolari et Rene Dreyfus • Historique de propriété bien documenté ; exemplaire extrêmement authentique • Sensationnel exemplaire du premier modèle monoposto de Grand Prix • Une des plus importantes Alfa Romeo de course d'avant-guerre L'ALFA ROMEO MONOPOSTO A la fin de 1931, l'ingénieur Alfa Romeo Vittorio Jano dessinait une nouvelle voiture de Grand Prix pour lutter contre les derniers modèles de Bugatti et Maserati. Alors qu'une version 2,6 litres de l'excellent huit-cylindres en ligne était retenu, Jano étudiait un châssis et une carrosserie conçus plus spécifiquement pour les Grand Prix que les spiders Monza de sport. Partant de la P2 de Grand Prix, Jano mettait au point un châssis extrêmement léger, sur lequel il installait une carrosserie monoplace effilée dans laquelle le pilote était situé exactement au centre, pour une distribution des poids idéale. La Tipo B, ou P3, qui en résultait était une voiture remarquable car c'était la première machine de Grand Prix à présenter une configuration de carrosserie "monoposto" (monoplace). Avec un poids de 701 kg, la Tipo B remportait un succès immédiat dès la saison 1932, le légendaire Tazio Nuvolari remportant le Grand Prix de Monza et les voitures de l'équipe signant les trois premières places aux Grand Prix de France et d'Allemagne. Six premiers exemplaires de Tipo B voyaient le jour aux spécifications 1932. Après que la Grande Dépression ait obligé Alfa Romeo à être placé en 1933 sous administration judiciaire, le constructeur n'était plus autorisé à effectuer des dépenses dans le domaine de la course automobile et se retirait officiellement de la compétition. Mais une exception était consentie après la victoire de la nouvelle monoplace des frères Maserati sur une 8C Monza vieillissante, gérée par la Scuderia Ferrari. La direction d'Alfa Romeo décidait alors de confier les dernières voitures d'usine à l'écurie non officielle, et la Scuderia Ferrari tirait le meilleur parti de la Tipo B, l'amenant à la victoire à la Coppa Acerbo et aux Grand Prix d'Italie et d'Espagne. En 1934, la règlementation changeait et exigeait des voitures plus larges et plus lourdes. Alfa s'y conformait en élargissant la carrosserie des cinq premières P3. Une série de sept exemplaires supplémentaires était alors produite aux nouvelles spécifications, et ces voitures recevaient un plus gros moteur 2,9 litres. Les numéros de châssis étant séquentiels à partir de 50001, ces voitures à carrosserie large sont souvent identifiées par leur numéro au sein de la Scuderia Ferrari. Les nouveaux modèles ont continué à se comporter magnifiquement, remportant la victoire à Monaco, Alexandrie, Tripoli et Casablanca ainsi qu'à la Targa Florio. Mais à partir de la mi-saison 1934, la concurrence avait rattrapé son retard et la domination de la Tipo B commençait à être menacée, même si Louis Chiron et Achille Varzi contribuaient aux trois premières places obtenues au Grand Prix de France, et si Varzi remportait la course de Nice plus tard dans l'année. Entre les deux saisons, Enzo Ferrari réussissait à convaincre Nuvolari de revenir à la Scuderia, et les Tipo B recevaient d'autres modifications avec l'introduction de la suspension avant indépendante type Dubonnet, et les ressorts quart-elliptiques à l'arrière (inaugurés avec succès par Nuvolari sur la Bugatti Type 59). Dans cette configuration, Nuvolari remportait les Grand Prix de Pau et d'Allemagne 1935, Carlo Pintacuda s'adjugeant les Mille Miglia, et Chiron et Brivio terminant premier et deuxième à la Targa Florio. De nombreuses autres victoires ont suivi lors d'évènements mineurs à Bergame, Biella, Turin et Dieppe. SCUDERIA FERRARI NUMÉRO 46 La voiture portant le n° de châssis 50006 est le sixième exemplaire de sept voitures de deuxième série à carrosserie large, et l'un des trois équipés à l'origine de la suspension Dubonnet et des ressorts quart-elliptiques (et non pas convertie par l'usine après la sortie des ateliers). Frappée du numéro 46 de la Scuderia Ferrari, cette voiture a pris part aux épreuves de 1935, au même titre que les autres Tipo B de Grand Prix. L'usine ou la Scuderia ne tenant pas d'archives répertoriées par châssis, il est presque impossible de savoir avec certitude quelle voiture était utilisée dans chaque course. Toutefois, il existe une forte présomption que cette présente voiture a été pilotée et essayée par des pilotes confirmés, comme Nuvolari et Varzi. De plus, il peut être prouvé que cette voiture a été utilisée au Grand Prix de Brno (Tchécoslovaquie) 1935, entre les mains d'Antonio Brivio, qui a décroché la quatrième place. Pour la saison 1935, la Tipo B s'est montrée extrêmement compétitive avec un grand nombre de victoires, dont la Targa Florio et la célèbre victoire de Nuvolari au Grand Prix d'Allemagne, sur le circuit du Nürburgring. A la fin de 1936, la Scuderia Ferrari vendait cette P3 à Frank Ashby, un ingénieur anglais qui utilisait la voiture aux Brighton Speed Trials, au mois d'octobre. Il continuait à participer à des courses de côte et autres évènements pendant les deux années suivantes, sur des circuits comme Brooklands. Lorsque le moteur d'origine commençait à montrer des signes de faiblesse, Ashby construisait et installait une culasse neuve et entreprenait des modifications du radiateur et de l'échappement. Ses exploits en courses locales étaient relatés dans la presse automobile britannique, par des magazines comme Motor Sport et The Light Car. Ashby émigrait par la suite à Sydney (Australie), où il se serait lié d'amitié avec un jeune Jack Brabham à qui il aurait recommandé des modifications techniques ayant ensuite contribué à propulser le pilote talentueux vers sa carrière couronnée de succès. La Tipo B était vendue en 1946 à Ken Hutchison, un passionné anglais aisé qui a écrit sur la voiture dans un grand article annoncé en couverture du numéro de janvier 1948 du magazine Motor Sport. Le comportement de l'Alfa Romeo était également décrit dans un numéro de 1947 de The Motor comme étant "merveilleux, sain et précis... La voiture semblait d'un équilibre parfait." La voiture continuait à courir jusqu'à 1950, tout en étant vendue pendant l'hiver 1949 au passionné Joe Goodhew. En 1953, il la cédait à John McMillan, un Néo-Zélandais qui l'engageait immédiatement au Grand Prix de Nouvelle-Zélande 1954. La Tipo B restait dans le pays en passant entre les mains de Ernie Sprague et Bill Harris, de Christchurch. Leon Witte, de Lyttleton, l'achetait ensuite et se lançait dans une restauration de carrosserie. Avant son départ pour la Nouvelle-Zélande, des modifications de carrosserie avaient été effectuées sur cette voiture portant le n° de châssis 50006, par ailleurs extrêmement originale. Pendant sa vie en Angleterre, une carrosserie étroite avait été construite et installée. Mais pour Leon Witte, la voiture devait revenir à sa configuration plus large d'origine, comme au temps de la Scuderia Ferrari. A l'époque de la restauration, Bill Clark possédait 50005, et une copie exacte de la carrosserie large d'origine, utilisée pendant l'ère Scuderia Ferrari, était fabriquée en utilisant 50005 comme guide. D'après le texte publié dans Magnificent Monopostos, l'ouvrage de l'historien réputé Simon Moore, il apparaîtrait que "seule la section centrale de la carrosserie devait être remplacée, le reste étant d'origine." Une autre preuve de cela apparaît sur une photo où Leon Witte et Bill Clark apparaissent avec 50006 et 50005 respectivement, où seule la section centrale apparaît neuve. Cet état de fait est confirmé également par le rapport d'inspection qui se trouve dans le dossier de la voiture. L'Alfa Romeo était acquise par un des collectionneurs les plus importants du Japon, Yoshiyuki Hayashi. En 2000, cette voiture châssis 50006 était acquise par le collectionneur américain réputé Bruce McCaw, qui la gardait jusqu'en 2007. La Tipo B était alors achetée par Umberto Rossi, qui demandait une inspection et un rapport à Hall & Hall, établissement renommé du Lincolnshire, et à un expert et auteur anglais des plus réputés dans le domaine du sport automobile (et qui avait déjà inspecté la voiture quand elle appartenait à Hayashi). Aujourd'hui, grâce à une remarquable chaîne de propriété ininterrompue et documentée, le châssis 50006 est confirmé comme comportant presque tous ses composants d'usine d'origine. Il est particulièrement remarquable que, au cours d'une histoire de plus de 80 ans, cette voiture n'ait jamais été abandonnée ou négligée comme c'est souvent la cas. Elle est restée intacte toute sa vie et n'a jamais été reconstruite à partir d'un assemblage de pièces ou mise de côté pendant des années. En plus de son châssis d'origine, le très précieux moteur 3.2L SF-50-A, provenant de la célèbre Bimotore, est inclus dans la vente. Le carter inférieur de 50005 et 50006, de même que celui de l'Alfa Aitken, ont été interchangés lorsque les trois voitures étaient en Nouvelle-Zélande. Bill Clark a acquis toutes ces pièces moteur lorsqu'il a acheté 50005. Finalement, SF-50-A a été installé dans 50006. En tenant compte de l'importance historique de 50006, la décision a été prise de construire un moteur moderne complètement authentique pour la course et de placer SF-50-A sur un socle, dans le but de le préserver. Les pièces moteur neuves ont été fournies par Jim Stokes Group, puis assemblées par Hall & Hall qui a procédé à la mise au point finale. A l'exception de la section centrale restaurée de la carrosserie, les panneaux de capot sont largement d'origine. Les marquages qui sont sur la voiture apparaissent après examen comme entièrement d'origine. Bien entendu, toutes ces voitures ont couru à l'époque et les pièces ont été échangées et remplacées lorsque c'était nécessaire, pour pouvoir continuer à les faire courir. Ainsi, trouver une P3 entièrement d'origine est pratiquement impossible. Ce qui est important, c'est que la documentation figurant au dossier affirme que la voiture portant le n° de châssis 50006 "comporte de nombreux composants d'origine provenant du stock Scuderia Ferrari/Alfa Romeo de la période 1934-1935." Enfin, la documentation qui est au dossier atteste et confirme que le châssis n°50006 bénéficie d'une "ligne de propriété pratiquement ininterrompue, depuis la Scuderia Ferrari jusqu'au propriétaire actuel", ce qui confirme son authenticité en tant que P3 ayant été engagée en course par la Scuderia Ferrari. Il s'agit donc d'une vraie pièce d'histoire du sport automobile. La documentation comporte aussi un FIA Heritage Certificate délivré en 2007. En conclusion, cette rare et extrêmement authentique Tipo B offre aux collectionneurs avertis l'opportunité d'acquérir une pièce importante qui témoigne du croisement des histoires d'Alfa Romeo et de la Scuderia Ferrari, tout en étant une des premières monoposto de Grand Prix. Pilotée par certains des pilotes les plus talentueux, dont le Mantouan Volant lui-même, cette importante Tipo B couronnerait n'importe quelle collection et devrait recevoir un accueil bienveillant lors d'évènements exclusifs comme Villa d’Este et Pebble Beach. Certains pourraient peut-être affirmer que le meilleur endroit pour profiter de 50006 serait un circuit, où elle ferait sensation non seulement sur son pilote, mais aussi sur le public, comme Enzo Ferrari, Tazio Nuvolari et Achille Varzi l'auraient souhaité. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue description, the Alfa Romeo P3 Tipo B was not the first single seater grand prix car, and there were six Tipo Bs built to 1932 specifications. Veuillez noter que, contrairement à ce qui est indiqué dans le catalogue papier, l'Alfa Romeo P3 Tipo B n'était pas la première monoplace de Grand Prix, et qu'il y a eu six Tipo B produites aux spécifications 1932. Chassis no. 50006 Scuderia Ferrari no. 46

  • FRAFrance
  • 2017-02-08
Hammer price
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From The Collection of Charles R.J. Noble,1931 Bentley 4½ Liter Supercharged Le Mans Chassis no. MS 3944 Engine no. MS 3941

From The Collection of Charles R.J. Noble 1931 Bentley 4½ Liter Supercharged Le Mans Chassis no. MS 3944 Engine no. MS 3941 4½ Liter SOHC Inline 4-Cylinder Engine - 4 Overhead Valves Per Cylinder Factory Delivered High-compression Specification Amherst Villiers Roots Type IV Supercharger (#144) 182bhp with 10lbs Boost at 3,900rpm 4-Speed 'D' Type Close-ratio Gearbox (#7255) Front and Rear Leaf Spring Suspension with Bentley and Draper Shocks *One of three Original Le Mans Specification production Supercharged cars built *Owned by the Noble family for more than 55 years *Original components and numbers as delivered new from Bentley *Documented by Bentley Expert Dr. Clare Hay *Eligible for Mille Miglia and more The Supercharged 4½ Liter Bentley The "Blower" Bentley is one of the most masculine, muscular, and sporting motorcars ever built. Where some companies hid their superchargers behind the radiator grill, the Bentley wears it right out front, and that statement alone says it all about the car and its creators. First shown at the 1929 London Motor Show, it was developed as a private venture by 'Bentley Boy' Sir Henry 'Tim' Birkin in order to extract more performance from the proven 4½-Liter model, which was becoming outclassed by its rivals on the racetracks of Europe. His aim was to produce a British car that would enable British drivers to continue to win races as spectacularly as the 4½-Liter that had won the 1928 Le Mans 24-Hour race. The supercharger installation was engineered by the brilliant Amherst Villiers, who modestly claimed that it was 'recognized in engineering circles as a definite landmark in automobile construction.' W.O. Bentley never supported the development of the supercharged car and was quoted as saying how much he 'disliked the easy short cut provided by the supercharger,' preferring to increase engine capacity, as evidenced by the 6½-Liter and 8-Liter cars. He preferred , while reducing front-end weight by using Elektron castings. Fortunately 'W.O.' did not control the purse strings at Bentley Motors, and the influence of Birkin, backed by the fabulously wealthy Honorable Dorothy Paget and Woolf Barnato, saw the Supercharged 4½-Litre Bentley come to fruition. Its potential was emphatically demonstrated when Tim Birkin took 2nd place in the French Grand Prix at Pau with his supercharged 4½-Liter tourer amid a field of monoposto GP racers. The production Blower Bentley was intrinsically linked to Le Mans, quite simply Bentley Motors built the 50 production supercharged 4½-Liter Bentleys to support the homologation of five Birkin team cars. When Birkin campaigned his Blower at Le Mans in 1930 his car retired after 138 laps and almost 20 hours of Racing. But, in an incredibly Heroic effort he passed the leading 7-Liter Supercharged Mercedes driven by Rudolf Caracciola on the Hunaudieres Straight. The pass at 125mph shocked Caracciola and caused him to overstress the Mercedes engine in efforts to keep up with the Bentleys. This effort and the continual Bentley pressure caused the Mercedes to fail and withdraw from the race with a blown gasket Birkin therefore eased the way for the Works Speed Six to win the marque's final Le Mans victory until this century. It should be noted that Birkin set the Fastest Lap in the Race and broke the Lap Record at 89.696mph in his No. 9 supercharged 4½ liter Bentley. His time of 6 min. 48 sec. was never beaten on the 10.153 mile circuit. The fifty production cars were fitted with an Amherst Villiers Supercharger Mark IV, of Roots type with twin paddle rotors, which drew mixture from twin SU carburetors and was driven off the front of the crankshaft, the latter having been substantially strengthened to accommodate the increased power. With 9½ lbs boost at 3,500rpm the blown Bentley developed 175bhp, a healthy increase over the production 4½-Liter's 110 horsepower, while with 10lbs boost at 3,900rpm, 182bhp was produced. Despite representing the epitome of 'Boys Own' motoring and providing the heart and soul of the hobby, selling the requisite fifty cars that had needed to be built in the dire economic climate of the late 1920s proved hard work for Bentley Motors. As a result of this, though it may seem improbable today, not all were sporting tourers. Some 17 were delivered as drophead coupes and even closed Saloon cars. Among the few cars that were capable of 100mph on the open road. Blowers have always been regarded as the Supercars of their era. In period the British magazine Motor Sport spoke of the Blower's 'remarkable acceleration' and 'ancestry of well-tried racers' calling it 'a car for the connoisseur of sporting cars...' - Nothing has changed today! The Motorcar Offered This fabulous original Blower embodies every ounce of the Bentley, Birkin and Le Mans spirit and does so, because it was built that way. In the words of recognized marque historian Dr. Clare Hay, MS 3944 is a "rarity among rarities", being one of only three of the 50 production supercharged Bentleys recorded by the factory as a Le Mans chassis on their build sheets (The others being SM 3918 and MS 3937). It delivered when new with a lightweight Le Mans specification two door four seater VdP body. The willing enabling party in the case of this car was a gentleman named Henry Leeson, a successful butcher, who had shops in a handful of towns on the southern coast of the UK. His business must have provided well for him as he was a serial Bentley buyer, who seemingly always had the most sporting Bentley the company could offer in his garage. That chain began with one of the best looking 3 Liters built, the Surbico 100mph Supersports, NR 516, and from there he progressed onto a 4½ Liter Vanden Plas Tourer, upgrading thereafter to a Le Mans Specification 4½ Liter with Le Mans pattern bodywork. His fourth and final Bentley, MS 3944, would eclipse them all in sporting terms. Leeson's Le Mans Blower, is clearly designated as such on the factory delivery records, as is the fact that it wore sporting Vanden Plas Le Mans coachwork. This specially designed body style was always made of lightweight fabric construction, with a supporting bar across the top of the body, providing needed rigidity ahead of the 'spare' two seats and top mechanism designated for Le Mans rules. Its technical specification from new included special order high compression 5.1:1 ratio pistons, a close ratio 'D' type gearbox with a 13/46 back axle ratio, as well as a rev counter, Pullswell silencer and 25 gallon semi-Le Mans pattern gas tank. An additional pair of Bentley & Draper hydraulic shock absorbers were fitted to the back axle, as would be standard fitment to 1930 Speed Sixes, and a non-standard clutch stop disc was fitted. The Vanden Plas coachwork records for its Le Mans bodywork note MS 3944 as having had a number of specific detail features: a one piece fold flat windshield, spare wheel mounting to the driver's side, a bar fitted across the front of the radiator to mount a third lamp, a dashboard which was to receive standard instrumentation with the addition of two dashlamps and a Jaeger clock. Further, two Aero screens were to be "supplied by Mr. Leeson" and fitted. As supplied MS 3944 was not finished in the archetypal British Racing Green. Instead it was delivered in a lighter shade of grey, as noted on the Vanden Plas records and also clearly visible in an early photograph (as illustrated) of the car. Its leather upholstery was to match the body color. As can be seen from this image, which is thought to be 'as new' the car was as stunning a sporting vision of the breed as ever existed. Another period image also believed to be of Leeson in the car, records him competing at the Lewes Speed Trials in 1931, close to his base in Eastbourne in the UK. By this stage, the Bentley has a Brooklands Automobile Racing Club badge attached to its supercharger valance, suggesting that this was not its only competitive use, although no other records of motorsport use have been found. Leeson is thought to have parted with the car in the spring of 1932, a few months before his untimely death at Brooklands in an MG. From his ownership, the car passed to Garner & Lee of London, and then onto C.B. Myers of London's Finchley Road. Service records note the cancellation of its guarantee 'Owner going to America', Myers clearly moving to the U.S.A. and bringing his Blower with him. In 1938, it became the property of Canadian William K. Johnson, of Winnepeg. As the July 1944 Autocar article 'Talking of Sports Cars' on the subject car recounts, the anglophile Johnson having heard that the Blower was in New York State, in 1937, began a search for the car. Roughly a year and a half later he actually found the car in the basement of the Packard Car Co.'s distributors in Minneapolis! After much negotiation, a figure of $500 was agreed upon, and the Blower was purchased. Rather curiously at this time the car wore a 'Miami Beach' topper to its British license plate, suggesting that it had previously spent at least a sojourn in this Florida town, most probably in Myers' hands. The Autocar article continues to describes the day that a somewhat optimistic Johnson and friend had returned to collect the car and having intended to tow the Bentley home a 500 mile journey behind a Willys automobile. But after some fettling and a tow from one of the dealership's Packards, the car had burst into life once more and they elected to drive it home. They record covering the 512 miles in some 7½ hours – showing that there was good life in the old Bentley yet. The timing of the acquisition is noted as being in the middle of 1938. In another period letter to the Bentley Drivers Club, Johnson describes his finding of the Blower as "the greatest thrill of my life" followed by the sensation of speed on his drive home: "I don't think that there will ever be a greater exhaust note than a 4½ Bentley at 100mph." By November that same year, Johnson and some local friends decided to rebuild the Bentley, which they carried out over the course of the next 18 months. In restoring the car it is clear that the bodywork must have been quite tired and perhaps not serviceable. They chose to replace it from the firewall back with a sporty two seater, metal skinned body which it has worn ever since. It seems likely from the car's external exhaust design that they were inspired by some of the 1920s and 1930s British Brooklands racers, or perhaps the Barnato Gurney Nutting 2/3 seater, SM 3909. The whole process is thoroughly detailed in print, including receiving spare pistons and other parts directly from Bentley Motors, and right through to driving the finished car, which was noted to be good for more than 110mph. From Johnson, the car stayed in Canadian ownership until 1946, when it came onto the radar of one of D. Cameron Peck's car sleuths. Former President of the Antique Automobile Club of America, the Sports Car Club of America, the Veteran Motor Car Club of America and the Cord Owners Club of Illinois, Peck had incredible influence on the hobby that we are part of today from its incubation, almost certainly saving 10s if not 100s of important motorcars from being turned to scrap. In the '40s Peck was building what would become one of the foremost pioneering collections of historic automobiles. The Bentley joined that hallowed collection from J. Gordon Edington in April 1946 and would remain there for the next six years. In 1952, citing health reasons, Peck disposed of a large part of his collection, that arguably could not be assembled today, including a Mercedes 75hp, SS, Targa Florio model, the Prince Henry Austro Daimler, Silver Ghosts, Bugatti Royale, Isotta Fraschinis, etc. MS 3944 was included in this very sale, the last time that it would be publicly offered for more than 60 years. The buyer of the Blower was Sidney Brody, of Los Angeles, in whose hands the car is once again publicly documented with a feature 'Salon' article in Road and Track in 1953. It comments "'Bentley' is a word which will excite frenzy among its enthusiasts throughout the world and Road and Track feels that this example is especially outstanding." Four years later and the car returned to the East Coast, to recognized Vintage Bentley Collector from Pennsylvania, William 'Bill' Klein, and shortly after this it was offered for sale at Inskip's dealership on East 64th Street, in New York City. Charles R.J. Noble In the pioneering era collecting fine automobiles, Charles Noble stood shoulder to shoulder with the greats of this time, specifically in the strong movement that precipitated throughout Northeast of this country. While his contemporaries and friends, such as Henry Austin Clark, Alfred Momo, and Briggs Cunningham mainly held interests in post war sports racing cars and/or brass era machinery, Noble was keenly focused on one marque – Bentley. As with many collectors, his interest was deep seated and stretched back to his youth. Fast forward to the late 1940s, when that dream become closer to reality, having emigrated to the U.S. from the U.K. His engineering expertise would see him work alongside the likes of Luigi Chinetti Sr. at Inskip Inc. in the 1940s. Following World War II and for more than a quarter of a century he would work as Elizabeth Arden's driver and personal assistant in New York City. When not behind the wheel of her car, he was indulging his passion for working on, collecting, and racing these automobiles. Noble was conveniently located close to Inskip a little further down on 64th Street, and was already friendly with former owners of MS 3944 Bill and Ann Klein. It would have been no coincidence then that he was able to snare this his first Blower Bentley, MS 3944, when it came up for sale at Inskip on October 23, 1957, more than 55 years ago. This would not be his only Blower for long though, as over the course of the next decade Noble would continue to amass and hold no fewer than 4 of the coveted Blower production run. This staggering achievement represented some 10% of the surviving cars, something that no other Bentley enthusiast has ever repeated, nor is likely to. The extent of his collecting of the marque, particularly given his means, was amazing - when he died, alongside those four Blowers, were a Speed Six that his hero Tim Birkin had owned new and a particularly 'trick' 4½ that Bentley Boy Berris Harcourt-Wood had commissioned. His passion would lead to his Presidency of the Bentley Drivers Club Northeast Region of the US, a role which he fulfilled and enjoyed as a true enthusiast of the brand. Best of all, Noble continued to exercise and enjoy MS 3944 in the true spirit with which the car had been built, being a regular habitue of the Bridgehampton Race Circuit, if not simply just to use and enjoy it. On one occasion, he paired up with journalist John Vockins to head out to an S.C.C.A. Event at Bridgehampton, and clearly gave him the thrill of his life, Vockins refers to his pilot as 'Charles Cannonball Noble' driving out to the track on the Long Island Expressway at 6am one Sunday morning in August 1960, and then winning the event! Such victories would continue for many years until around 1970, when MS 3944 and other cars were quietly stored. Within the last decade, the Le Mans Blower was recommissioned and has once again become a regular sight at a handful of important events in the Northeast. The first of these was when it was shown by invitation at the Greenwich Concours d'Elegance in 2003. It most notably competed at the inaugural VSCCA sanctioned, 'Ascent' Hill Climb event tied in with the Elegance at Hershey in 2011, where it was shown to be absolutely at the top of its game in the capable hands of one of Charles Noble's sons. It has also been exercised regularly on the quiet country roads of New England. Summary As it stands today, this supercharged Bentley with its known and well documented chain of ownership that has kept it in the public eye virtually from day one, has survived incredibly well. The car has never suffered the indignities of some of its brothers, such as being parted out and then reconfigured, or crashed and rebuilt multiple times. It looks every bit the 'war machine', but has no evidence of any battles. Importantly, MS 3944 today retains virtually every numbered mechanical component with which it was born. Renowned Vintage Bentley expert Dr. Clare Hay has recently completed a comprehensive report on the car and noted that MS 3944 'looks to be untouched since it was rebuilt by Mr. Johnson around 1938/39'. Interestingly, she notes 'the large diameter Jaeger rev counter is similar to that fitted to the Birkin Team cars', while 'the large diameter Smiths oil pressure and boost gauges are as Birkin practice' and 'the drip feed oiler for the supercharger is the same as those fitted to the Birkin cars'. The extent of its originality even shows that the radiator corresponds to its factory build record. Hay's opinion, which is endorsed by the owner and by Bonhams, is that the team car pattern seats, fold flat windshield (and Aero screens), front and rear fenders and some of the instruments were all retained in the 1938 pre-war rebuild of the car. From all of this, together with visual and physical evidence of surviving Le Mans bodies Hay suggests that it would be a relatively straightforward exercise to copy the car's original body, if so desired. In the conclusion of her report she states 'one of only three Blower chassis built to Le Mans specification MS 3944 is a rarity among rarities' – high praise indeed. By their sporting nature, 'Vintage' Bentleys were driven hard and enjoyed from day one. The factory records frequently chart repairs, and factory replaced components. Fortunately for authenticating the cars the company numbered and recorded all of their major mechanical aspects. Close inspection of MS 3944, is incredibly rewarding in that it matches its Bentley Motors order throughout. The chassis, engine, supercharger, front and back axles, and steering box, as well as its original numbered hood, firewall, radiator, and much of the original hardware, coachwork detail features and instrumentation remain on the car. Its level of originality is exceptional and very few of the surviving supercharged cars can claim such status. In a recent test drive at the time of the catalog photography, the Blower performed fully 'on song' giving the exhilarating and thrilling experience that is matched by very few cars of its era or beyond, and is highly recommended! The extra performance of this engine and chassis being a Le Mans factory spec car are quite evident. A true point and shoot Weapons Grade combination. Adding another dimension, is the fact that by definition a Blower Bentley is the only Vintage or 'W.O.' Model to be Mille Miglia eligible, and this example would be a perfect mount for this event in the future. It would also be suitable for for the Le Mans Classic or the host of other tours provided by the Bentley Drivers Club in the UK and USA and Rolls-Royce Owners Club in America. A great example of a truly iconic automobile, which is incredibly rare by the nature of its specification, to this it can now add noted history including that of famed collector, Cameron Peck and the longest unbroken chain of continuous ownership of any Blower Bentley in the collection of the greatest "Blower" owner of all - Charles R.J. Noble.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-17
Hammer price
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1950 Ferrari 166 MM/212 Export "Uovo" by Fontana

One-off coachwork by Fontana Specially designed by Franco Reggiani for Count Giannino Marzotto Highly competitive in period in both Europe and North America Offered from 30 years of single ownership; seldom exhibited in public Accompanied by a report from Ferrari historian Marcel Massini The ideal concours and historic racing entrant THE BROTHERS MARZOTTO In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the four Marzotto brothers earned themselves an enviable reputation in Italian racing circles. Vittorio, Giannino, Paolo, and Umberto were all very talented drivers in their own right. Thanks to their family fortune, earned in the textile business, they had the money to afford both the lifestyle and machinery required to firmly assert their place as some of the best gentleman racers in Italy. In Ferrari’s earliest days, the Marzotto brothers were arguably the Scuderia’s most important customers. They not only kept the company on its feet by owning multiple Ferraris between themselves, but they also earned Ferrari great fame through their success on the race track. Count Giannino won particular fame as one of the few racing drivers to win the Mille Miglia twice, a feat which immediately catapulted him among the likes of Tazio Nuvolari. Winning his first Mille Miglia in 1950 wearing a double-breasted brown suit, Giannino’s spirit captured the hearts of Italian fans everywhere. Despite owning multiple Ferraris with his brothers, Giannino’s relationship with Enzo was strained, perhaps due to both men’s naturally competitive nature. Nevertheless, Enzo himself wrote in his book Piloti, Che Gente . . . that Giannino was an excellent driver, saying he “would have been a great professional pilot and perhaps even a champion.” L’UOVO The spectacular Ferrari offered here is perhaps the Marzottos' most significant car of the twenty-some Ferraris that the brothers owned. Completed by the factory on 2 February 1950 and delivered to Umberto, chassis number 024 MB’s first outing was in the Targa Florio, where a clutch problem unfortunately sidelined the car. The car’s next outing was at the Mille Miglia with Umberto and co-driver Franco Cristaldi. It was crashed heavily and returned to Ferrari, where it was fully rebuilt. After their accident at the Mille Miglia, the Marzottos were looking for even better results in 1951. Giannino thought success could be achieved through utilizing new bodywork for 024 MB that placed an emphasis on weight reduction and improved aerodynamics. Rather than fit the car with traditional coachwork from Touring, Fontana of Padova and the soon-to-be famous sculptor Franco Reggiani were commissioned to create a streamlined body, with maximum efficiency and performance in mind. The result, lovingly nicknamed “Uovo” (“egg” in Italian), was an automotive design like no other. Heavily inspired by Reggiani’s previous aeronautical training, the Uovo took the shape of a jet, minus the wings. The bare Ferrari frame was superimposed over a tubular structure reversed and bonded with Peraluman plates, which created a light but rigid outer shell. One hundred and fifty kilos lighter than similar Ferraris of the time, it was fitted with twin shock absorbers and a regulator for its Formula 2 brakes. The car was fitted with a 156-liter gas tank with a range of over 550 kilometers. The windshield was as upright as possible and was made from crystal. Marzotto was pleasantly surprised to find that the crystal provided excellent visibility, due to not creating “annoying reflections.” Marzotto’s only wish for his excellent creation was that the hood be 15 cm lower – the raise was due to the factory not delivering the ordered monoposto radiator in time. Conceived and executed by Giannino from start to finish, the Uovo is the epitome of a car envisaged by a racing driver without limitation of imagination and financial means. Curiously, Marzotto took Enzo’s advice to place the driving position as far back as possible, allowing the driver to feel the tail movement at its height – although this did cause severe oversteer. It debuted at the Giro di Sicilia, still unpainted in bare aluminum and with an enormous aircraft headlight on the left. It led with a 20-kilometer advantage on the second but was forced to withdraw because of a broken O-ring in the differential. It is the period photographs from the start of that year’s Mille Miglia at Brescia that showcase just how groundbreaking the design was. Many photographs of the car from this event exist and in almost every photograph, the unique Ferrari appears to be at the crowd’s center of attention. Reminiscing about the race, Giannino Marzotto remarked that: “I felt very comfortable in my Uovo – led by the three carburetors with 186 bhp – whose sheer speed appeared competitive with that of the 4.1-liter Ferrari. Torque and acceleration could be lower . . . but the handling . . . was much better. As a driver, this was a privilege.” Looks aside, most notably, the Uovo held a significant portion of the lead, 30 kilometers on Ferrari’s 4.1-liter Works entry, before it was forced to retire due to tire problems. Surely the instance of a heavily modified privateer entry leading a Works car caused several heads to roll in Maranello! It can be argued that the Uovo would have emerged victorious had it not been sidelined. While the Giro di Sicilia and the Mille Miglia both resulted in DNFs for the Uovo, the car’s third race, the Giro della Toscana, proved to be much more fruitful; Giannino Marzotto and Marco Crosara crossed the finish line in 1st place overall. After a successful 1951 season, Giannino started to be much less involved in the family business and in 1952 raced only twice. He established the Scuderia Marzotto to lend his many Ferraris to his friends in order to keep racing under the family name. Returning to the Mille Miglia in 1952 with Guido Mancini and Adriano Ercolani, the Uovo once again ran consistently within the top 10 entrants before retiring. That year’s Trento-Bondone hill climb saw the Uovo finish 1st overall with Giulio Cabianca behind the wheel, with a further 4th overall and 1st in class finish at the Coppa della Toscana a few days later. The final known event in Europe for the Uovo was the Avus Grand Prix in September 1952, where it finished 4th overall. NORTH AMERICAN HISTORY For the winter of 1953, the Uovo returned to the factory, where it was fully overhauled in preparation for the 1953 Mille Miglia. It did not compete, however, as Giannino Marzotto drove a 340 MM Spider instead, in which he went on to win the event. In late 1953, the Uovo was shipped from Italy to Mexico, where the Marzotto brothers intended to enter that year’s Carrera Panamericana. Although the Ferrari was allegedly used in practice, neither the Marzotto brothers nor the Uovo would ultimately participate in the race. The Marzotto brothers returned to Italy, though the Uovo would remain in Mexico. There, the Uovo was purchased by Carlos Braniff, who resold the car to Ignacio Lozano of Newport Beach, California, who was the publisher of La Opinion, a Spanish language newspaper based in Los Angeles. Lozano was a regular in the Southern California racing scene, competing in mainly British cars, but this would be his only Ferrari. The Uovo saw action at a number of racing venues in California, including Torrey Pines, Pebble Beach, Bakersfield, and Willow Springs, in 1954. The car was eventually sold by Lozano to Pete Lovely, before passing to Dave Andrews and subsequently Harvey M. Schaub of Sun Valley, California, in 1964, who began restoring the car. Upon Harvey’s death, the Uovo was passed onto his wife Lucille, and was then purchased by noted Ferrari dealer and historian Ed Niles in 1982. Shortly thereafter, it was acquired by Jack du Gan, who picked up the car from Niles in California and took it home, across the country to Florida. THIRTY YEARS OF SINGLE OWNERSHIP In du Gan’s ownership, the car was shipped to England, where the restoration was completed just in time for the 1986 Mille Miglia, some 35 years after it raced at that event. Further sorting would follow, and the car was run there once more with du Gan in 1987, before being acquired by the consignor, who returned it to its native Italy. The Uovo would remain a regular highlight of the Mille Miglia for the next few years and was displayed at Ferrari’s 50th anniversary celebrations in the summer of 1997. Seldom seen outside of the consignor’s own collection, the Uovo is displayed only at the most prestigious events, such as the Atto Unico, the 2013 gathering of all of the Marzotto brothers cars at their historic home, Villa Trissino Marzotto. The Uovo returned back to Modena in 2014 to be shown in the Museo Enzo Ferrari. The previous owners collected an impressive assortment of period photos, documents, articles, and exchange of letters with Giannino Marzotto; they were also able to purchase the wooden model of the Uovo from Franco Reggiani. In one of his last interviews in 2011, Giannino Marzotto commented that: “I wanted to drive the Uovo more often, even in the 1953 Mille Miglia, but fate willed otherwise. A perverse apathy—or other commitments—they escaped its charm.” The opportunities that the Uovo provides its next owner with are limitless. Having competed in the Mille Miglia in period, it is of course welcome to return to that event as well as a number of other historic races. As it has never been shown at any concours event, it would surely be welcome at the most exclusive concours around the globe, where it would be a clear highlight and award contender for its unique design and incredible history. The Uovo is, without doubt, the living expression of one of the greatest personalities of the Italian early fifties racing world. Addendum Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this lot if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Please also note that the title is in transit. Chassis no. 024 MB Engine no. 117

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1934 Packard Twelve Individual Custom Stationary Coupe by Dietrich

Series 1108. Body Style 4068. 160 bhp, 445.5 cu. in. modified L-head V-12 engine, three-speed selective synchromesh manual transmission, vacuum-assisted clutch, shaft drive with a hypoid rear axle, front and rear leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 147 in. A sumptuous, beautiful Dietrich design on the Eleventh Series chassis One of five known survivors; long-term enthusiast ownership Well-known history, with fascinating original ownership Exquisite Pebble Beach Best in Class-winning restoration Simply put, the epitome of CCCA Full Classic design Packard management, while conservative, was always on the lookout for new talent. When Raymond Dietrich set up Dietrich Inc. in Detroit as the design arm of Murray Body Corporation, his smart and elegant designs attracted the attention of East Grand Boulevard. As a result, Packard soon became one of Dietrich’s best customers, to the point where they incorporated his styling cues in later production cars. After 1933, all open Packards carried Dietrich body tags, as they recognized the influence of Dietrich’s work. However, as all true Packard aficionados know, Dietrich does not necessarily mean “Dietrich.” True Dietrichs are the so-called Individual Custom cars that were built and offered on a limited-production basis, with only a few of each style being produced per year between 1931 and 1934. These Individual Customs were offered only on Packard’s Senior Eight and Twelve chassis, and their lines were simply exquisite, beginning with its graceful vee’d windshield, continuing on to the Dietrich’s trademark beltline, and finishing with a superb and elegantly tailored roofline and tail. One of the most impressive Dietrich bodies was the two-passenger stationary coupe, so-named to set it apart from the coupe roadster. This body was the ultimate in Classic Era logic, and it rode the same 147-inch-wheelbase 1108 chassis as other Eleventh Series Individual Custom Dietrichs, but it could hold only a comfortable pair of adults and their luggage. It was a stunning machine that looked as powerful as, indeed, it was. Five surviving 1934 Eleventh Series Twelve Individual Custom Stationary Coupes are known, of which all but the car offered here are held in long-term, private museum collections, from which they are unlikely to soon emerge. MRS. EKEN’S PACKARD The Stationary Coupe offered here is vehicle number 1108-32, and it was delivered on November 1, 1933, to Morristown Packard, of New Jersey, as is indisputably proven by the original vehicle number plaque still attached to the firewall. While the original Dietrich brass tag is no longer mounted to the wood below the driver’s seat, it was fortunately photographed on the car by a previous owner, identifying it as being body style number 4068 (the stationary coupe) and body number 8232. Most impressively, we know the name of the original owner, thanks to a properly filled-out service booklet for Packard Lubrication Service, which accompanies the car. The booklet notes that model 1108, with engine number 901979, was sold new on November 2, 1933, to Mrs. A.J. Eken, who had addresses in both Morristown and Madison. Given that the date of sale is so near to that of the car’s delivery, it is likely that rather than being built as a showroom display model, this car was specifically crafted for Mrs. Eken. Mrs. Eken is believed to have been the spouse of Andrew Jackson Eken, one of the contractors who built the Empire State Building. The next owner of record for vehicle number 1108-32 was Charles Earle Theall, who purchased it on August 27, 1957, from Valerie Motors, of Mamaroneck, New York. Mr. Theall’s ownership of the car was no secret, and it was definitely known to enthusiasts, as he is listed with the car in Edward J. Blend’s The Magnificent Packard Twelve of Nineteen Thirty-Four. He worked on its restoration for over 40 years, in a garage that had been built specifically for this purpose, as it was completely walled-in and without a garage door, to keep prying eyes away and to make theft considerably more difficult. The car was acquired from the Theall Estate by Ralph Marano, the first of several important modern-day Packard enthusiasts to have since owned this Stationary Coupe. Its restoration, which was performed by well-known Stone Barn Restorations, of Alpha, New Jersey, was begun for Carmine Zeccardi, but it was completed for J. Frank Ricciardelli, who had fallen in love with the car’s elegant lines and masterful detailing. Reportedly, the car’s long, careful storage in the Theall garage had preserved it well, and the panels and paint surfaces were able to be fit laser-tight, with only minor repairs. Considerable research was required to determine the correct colors for the car, which ended up being a lovely, very subtle two-tone mint green arrangement that had been taken from the original sales manual for the Individual Customs. A small square of the original upholstery provided proof of the original materials and weave, while a period photograph reportedly determined the colors. The result is a truly wonderful car with an undeniably authentic look. The completed car debuted at the 2005 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where, in a virtually unprecedented performance, it was recognized with a First in Class, the CCCA Award of Excellence, and the Most Elegant Closed Car. Given that historical factory documentation simply does not exist for Packards, it is rare indeed to find a Dietrich Individual Custom with proof of its origins, but in this case, not only does this car have its original firewall-mounted data tag, it also has the service booklet, which confirms its original engine number, original owner, and delivery details. This confirmed history, coupled with the best modern, authentic restoration, which has been recognized as superlative by the most finicky of judges, has resulted in a truly superb Packard Twelve, one that has lines that are anything but stationary! Chassis no. 901968 Engine no. 901979 Vehicle no. 1108-32

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1955 Jaguar D-Type

Approx. 300 bhp, 3,781 cc dual overhead-camshaft inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber 36 DCO3 carburettors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension, live rear axle with trailing links and transverse torsion bar, four-wheel disc brakes, and steel-tube sub-frames bolted to a monocoque body. Wheelbase: 2,300 mm Highly original example with period race history The seventh customer D-Type produced Delivered new and raced by four-time Australian Drivers’ Champion Bib Stillwell Owned by 1970 Le Mans winner Richard Attwood Decades of care by marque expert Chris Keith-Lucas Jaguar’s most iconic sports racing model The mighty D-Type succeeded Jaguar’s C-Type with a smashing debut at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans, where it roared to a 2nd overall finish. Although the model was powered by a further developed version of the C-Type’s long-running 3.4-litre XK competition engine, the D-Type varied from its predecessor with completely different construction, which featured two chassis sub-frames bolted to a monocoque. The coachwork was a beautiful study of aerodynamics that was penned by Malcolm Sayer, and it had the unmistakable suggestions of the forthcoming E-Type, including the introduction of the iconic oval-mouth grille. Just 54 customer cars and 6 factory team cars were built over a three-year period. On the endurance circuits of the period, few cars could match the D-Type, with multiple dominating performances at Nürburgring, Reims, Sebring, and, most importantly, three consecutive victories at Le Mans between 1955 and 1957. The D-Type is an aesthetic masterpiece that sealed Jaguar’s position in post-war racing lore, and it will forever be considered one of the era’s most important and beguiling sports cars. Chassis number XKD 520 is the seventh customer D-Type built, and it was ordered new in June 1955, through Australian importer Jack Bryson, on behalf of its first owner, Bib Stillwell, a local sports car racer and future four-time consecutive winner of the open-wheel Australian Drivers’ Championship. After arriving in Melbourne in January 1956, this car was used extensively by Stillwell, setting numerous sports car records at local circuits, including the Bathurst 500 and the Rob Roy Hill Climb, and it took an outright victory at the South Australia Trophy in Port Wakefield. After briefly being prepared for a run at a landspeed record, XKD 520 returned to sports car class competition, winning the Bathurst Road Racing Championship in 1956. The slate of triumphs continued with the D-Type’s performance at the Moomba Tourist Trophy at Albert Park in Melbourne, where the car roared to a 2nd place finish in March 1956, as well as the Australian Tourist Trophy at the same location in November, where the car finished 5th. Mr Stillwell’s career in XKD 520 essentially concluded the following spring on 24 March 1957, when he took 3rd place at Albert Park. A short time later, this beautiful D-Type was purchased by AMPOL (the Australian Motorists Petrol Company), on behalf of Jack Davey, who was a wartime radio personality of great regional renown. It was entrusted to Bill Murray, of Surfer’s Paradise, and was prepared for the AMPOL-sponsored speed trials, but unfortunately, an accident during transport prevented the car’s participation in the race. The D-Type was then sold to enthusiast Frank Gardner, who rebuilt the still-capable race car and undertook a competition campaign of his own, taking 2nd place at Bathurst in 1958, 1st place at the Mount Druitt Hill Climb, and 3rd place at both of the Orange Racing Car Scratch Races (where he notably only lost to grand prix cars). In November 1958, XKD 520 was sold to David Finch, who soon fitted the car with a factory-supplied 3.8-litre engine, which was a more powerful motor that was equipped on later D-Types and sometimes sold as a replacement engine. The new engine prolonged the car’s competitive ability, allowing it to gamely participate in the Longford event of 1960 and to take 1st overall at the Queensland Tourist Trophy of 1961. Around this time, a minor incident necessitated work to the front end, and Mr Finch took the opportunity to replace the nose with a long-nose bonnet crafted by Sydney body-man Ian Standfield, in the style of the Le Mans-winning long-nose D-Types. In May 1962, this outstanding Jaguar was purchased by Ash Marshall and treated to a thorough freshening, which included chroming multiple components. Over the next few years, the car passed through ownership by Peter Bradley and Richard Parkinson, before being acquired in 1967 by racing great Richard Attwood, the future Le Mans winner. Attwood would keep the car for some 10 years, before selling it to Sir Angus Spencer Nairn. In 1977, Chris Keith-Lucas picked the car up from Mr Attwood’s residence on behalf of the new owner. In a letter, of which a copy is included on file, Keith-Lucas recalls the car fondly: “It was generally quite well-presented, but [it] needed a straight forward recomissioning before being sent to the new owner”. Few businesses could be better prepared to treat XKD 520 to a light freshening. Whilst under Lynx’s care, the car was tended by managing director Chris Keith-Lucas—a recognised marque expert who would later go on to found the well-known and highly regarded CKL Developments—commencing nearly 30 years of attention by Mr Keith-Lucas. Angus used his D-Type lightly, taking part on several track days and competing in the Mille Miglia retrospective, although the car was never seriously raced during that time. In 2004, XKD 520 was acquired by Clive Jarman. It was sent back for maintenance work by Keith-Lucas, who, by this time, had founded his own company, CKL Developments. Jarman decided to correct one feature of XKD 520 that had remained unsatisfactory to him for many years. As mentioned, the original short-nose bonnet had been replaced in 1961 with a long-nose version. As it was not entirely correct, CKL managed to source an original short-nose bonnet that had been discarded decades ago during the restoration of an XKSS. It should be noted that the Australian crafted long-nose bonnet is supplied with the car, as it remains a part of its notable history. Now with a correct-type bonnet, Mr Keith-Lucas states: “In my opinion, [this] car remains one of the best production D-Types in existence today. To the very best of my knowledge, [it] has retained its principle components since the end of the 1950s. It is one of my favourite D-Types”. XKD 520 has been recently serviced, once again, by CKL, and it is accompanied by extensive documentation, including a FIA Historical Technical Passport. It is one of the earliest and most original examples of a customer-specification D-Type, and it is eligible for the most desirable events in the world. The Jaguar D-Type will always have its place in history as one of the all-time greats. At the pinnacle of the Jaguar spectrum, the D-Type is delicate yet aggressive, mixing style with performance and proving itself in race results. XKD 520 is one of very few cars that boast a great provenance, making it a great addition to any stable of collector cars. Moteur six-cylindres en ligne, 3 781 cm3, 300 ch, deux ACT, trois carburateurs Weber 36 DCO3, boîte manuelle quatre rapports, roues avant indépendantes, avec bras tirés et barre de torsion transversale, freins à disques sur les quatre roues, berceaux tubulaires boulonnés sur structure monocoque. Empattement: 2 300 mm. Exemplaire extrêmement original, avec palmarès d'époque Septième Type D "client" produite Livrée neuve au Champion australien Bib Stillwell A appartenu à Richard Attwood, vainqueur des 24 Heures du Mans 1970 Entretenue pendant des années par le spécialiste de la marque Chris Keith-Lucas La plus emblématique des Jaguar de competition La spectaculaire Type D a succédé avec panache à la Type C en signant dès 1954 la deuxième place au classement général des 24 Heures du Mans. Même si elle était équipé d'un moteur dérivé du 3,4 litres compétition de la Type C, la Type D bénéficiait d'une architecture complètement différente, comportant une structure monocoque sur laquelle venaient se greffer deux berceaux tubulaires. La carrosserie résultait d'une splendide étude aérodynamique de Malcolm Sayer, et offrait des traits de style caractéristiques que l'on allait retrouver plus tard sur la Type E, dont la fameuse bouche ovale de calandre. Sur une période de trois ans, 54 exemplaires Clients et six versions Usine ont été produits. Dans les épreuves d'endurance, rares étaient les voitures capables à l'époque d'égaler la Type D, qui s'est distinguée au Nürburgring, à Reims, à Sebring, sans oublier évidemment ses trois victoires consécutives aux 24 Heures du Mans, de 1955 à 1957. La Type D est un chef-d'œuvre esthétique qui a établi la réputation de Jaguar dans le monde de la course automobile d'après-guerre ; elle sera toujours considérée comme une des machines de course les plus importantes et les plus brillantes de son époque. La voiture portant le n° de châssis XKD 520 est le septième exemplaire Client produit. Elle a été commandée neuve par l'intermédiaire de l'importateur australien Jack Bryson pour son premier propriétaire, Bib Stillwell, pilote privé local et futur quadruple vainqueur de l'Australian Drivers' Championship. Après son arrivée à Melbourne en janvier 1956, la voiture a été abondamment utilisée par Stillwell, établissant de très nombreux records dans les épreuves locales comme le Bathurst 500 et la course de côte Rob Roy, tout en décrochant une victoire au classement général du South Australia Trophy, à Port Wakefield. Après avoir été brièvement préparée pour un record de vitesse sur terre, XKD 520 revenait à la compétition sur circuit, remportant le Bathurst Road Racing Championship en 1956. La série de succès se poursuivait avec la deuxième place de la Type D au Moomba Tourist Trophy, à Albert Park (Melbourne), en mars 1956, ainsi qu'avec une cinquième position à l'Australian Tourist Trophy, sur le même circuit, au mois de novembre. La carrière de M. Stillwell avec XKD 520 arrivait à son terme au printemps suivant, le 24 mars 1957, lorsqu'il s'adjugeait la troisième place à Albert Park. Peu de temps après, la voiture était achetée par AMPOL (Australian Motorists Petrol Company) pour le compte de Jack Davey, une personnalité des ondes radiophoniques de l'époque de la guerre, très célèbre dans la région. Elle était confiée à Bill Murray, de Surfer’s Paradise, et préparée pour les épreuves de vitesse sponsorisées par AMPOL. Malheureusement, un accident pendant le transport empêchait la voiture de prendre part à la compétition. La Type D était alors vendue au pilote Frank Gardner, qui remettait cette voiture encore très compétitive en état et se lançait dans une campagne de compétitions, signant la deuxième place à Bathurst en 1958, la victoire à la course de côte de Mount Druitt et la troisième place aux deux Orange Racing Car Scratch Races (où il ne s'inclinait que derrière des monoplaces de Grand Prix). Au mois de novembre 1958, XKD 520 était vendue à David Finch, qui l'équipait sans tarder d'un moteur 3,8 litres fourni par l'usine. Ce moteur plus puissant équipait les Type D plus récentes et il était parfois vendu comme moteur de remplacement. Il permettait à cette Type D de rester dans la course, de participer au meeting de Longford en 1960 et de s'emparer de la victoire au Queensland Tourist Trophy de 1961. A peu près à cette époque, un incident mineur impliquait des travaux sur la partie avant, ce dont profitait M. Finch pour remplacer le capot par une version "nez long", réalisée par Ian Standfield, carrossier de Sydney, dans le style des Type D victorieuses aux 24 Heures du Mans. En mai 1962, cette splendide Jaguar était achetée par Ash Marshall qui lui faisait bénéficier d'une remise en état incluant le chromage de nombreux composants. Au cours des années suivantes, elle passait entre les mains de Peter Bradley et Richard Parkinson, avant que Richard Attwood, futur vainqueur des 24 Heures du Mans, n'en fasse l'acquisition en 1967. Après l'avoir gardée une dizaine d'années, il la cédait à Sir Angus Spencer Nairn. En 1977, Chris Keith-Lucas prenait livraison de la voiture pour le compte du nouveau propriétaire en allant la chercher à la résidence de Richard Attwood. Dans une lettre dont une copie fait partie du dossier, Keith-Lucas s'en souvient avec plaisir : "Dans l'ensemble, elle se présentait plutôt bien mais avait besoin d'une révision complète avant d'être remise au nouveau propriétaire." Rares étaient les ateliers aussi bien préparés pour s'occuper correctement de XKD 520. Chez Lynx, elle était sous la responsabilité du directeur général, Chris Keith-Lucas—un spécialiste reconnu de la marque, qui allait plus tard créer CKL Developments, entreprise d'excellente réputation. C'était le début de 30 ans d'un suivi attentif par M. Keith-Lucas. Angus utilisait alors sa Type D de temps en temps, prenant part à des séances sur circuit et participant à la rétrospective des Mille Miglia, mais sans l'engager pour de véritables compétitions. En 2004, XKD 520 passait entre les mains de Clive Jarman. Il la renvoyait chez Keith-Lucas qui, entretemps, avait fondé sa propre entreprise, CKL Developments. Jarman décidait alors de corriger un aspect de la voiture qui ne le satisfaisait pas. Comme nous l'avons mentionné plus haut, l'avant avait été remplacé en 1961 par une version "nez long". Comme elle n'était pas parfaitement correcte, CKL réussissait à trouver un capot "nez court" original, mis de côté plusieurs années auparavant lors de la restauration d'une XKSS. Il faut toutefois préciser que le capot "nez long" australien sera livré avec la voiture, car il fait partie intégrante de son histoire. Maintenant que cette Type D est équipée d'un capot correct, M. Keith-Lucas précise : « A mon avis, cette voiture représente une des meilleures Type D client encore en existence. A ma connaissance, elle a gardé ses principaux composants depuis la fin des années 1950. C'est une des mes Type D préférées ». XKD 520 a bénéficié récemment d'une opération d'entretien par CKL. Elle est accompagnée d'une documentation fournie, dont un Passeport Technique Historique FIA. Il s'agit d'un des exemplaires les plus anciens et les plus originaux de Type D aux spécifications client, et elle est éligible à la plupart des plus beaux événements historiques du monde. La Jaguar Type D aura toujours sa place dans l'histoire des plus belles machines de course. Au panthéon des productions Jaguar, la Type D est à la fois élégante et virile, mêlant style et performances, et elle s'est forgée de brillants résultats en compétition. XKD 520 est une des très rares voitures affichant un belle provenance, ce qui en fait une pièce de grande qualité pour toute écurie de machines historiques. Chassis no. XKD 520 Engine no. E2021-9

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-02-05
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1955 Ferrari 750 Monza Spider by Scaglietti

260 hp, 2,999 cc DOHC four-cylinder engine with two Weber 58 mm DCOA/3 carburetors, dry-sump lubrication, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front suspension with unequal length A-arms and coil springs, de Dion rear axle with transverse leaf springs and trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 88.6 in. Successful period racing history Known, continuous ownership Matching-numbers original engine Ten consecutive years of participation in the Mille Miglia Storica One of the most rewarding sports racers of the era From the start of post-war competition, Enzo Ferrari quickly established his young company’s position at the very top of international competition. Whether in open wheel grand prix or sports car racing, the cars carrying the yellow shield became the weapon of choice for both professional and talented amateurs who wanted to see themselves at the front of the grid and in the winner’s circle. Alberto Ascari led the way for Ferrari by winning the Formula One World Championship title two years in a row, in 1952 and 1953. Ascari’s winning car was the Ferrari 500, powered by a Lampredi-designed four-cylinder twin overhead camshaft engine. The benefits of the strong low-rev torque on tight and twisty tracks led the factory to fit this engine into their next sports racing cars, the Ferrari 625 and the larger displacement 725. As was often the case, a choice of displacements was offered to best suit the competitive situation, so the next development was a two-liter 500 and a three-liter 750. The chassis that they were fitted to became the 500 Mondial and 750 Monza. Boasting simple, lightweight frames and bodies, and weighing approximately 1,700 pounds, they provided impressive and winning performance. Notably, the Monza has become known for innovation in engineering. The model boasted a five-speed transaxle paired with a de Dion independent rear axle assembly. This design delivered more advantageous weight distribution and better traction, both of which were key to extracting maximum performance on rough road surfaces, as encountered on many of the leading long-distance and hill climb events. It is particularly unusual to find an example of such an important sports car that has outstanding period competition history and more recent vintage event history while still retaining its original engine and body. This 750 Monza is one such rara avis. Chassis 0530 was the 18th Monza built, and it was sold new in March 1955 to Count Luigi “Lulu” Chiaramonte Bordonaro, of Palermo, Italy. Interestingly, the extensive history prepared by noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini indicates that the Count actually purchased the car on a credit of 2,200,000 Lira from Ferrari, with an agreement it would be paid back no later than August 1960. Obviously Ferrari considered the Count to be a worthwhile driver to showcase their new car. Bordonaro got to work right away, and on April 4th, he entered the XV Giro di Sicilia. The Count fulfilled the promise soon afterwards with an overall victory at the Corsa al Monte Pellegrino on April 11, 1955, and a 2nd overall finish at the Trapani-Monte Erice Hill Climb on May 22, 1955. He then ran the Monza in the Targa Mugello on June 5, 1955, finishing 2nd overall. More racing followed in 1955, with seven recorded entries in all. Bordonaro continued to campaign the car during 1956, once again winning overall at the Corsa al Monte Pellegrino and racing at other events, including the 1956 Targa Florio. Chassis 0530M ran again at the Targa Florio in 1960, this time driven by Baron Bernardo Cammarota-Domenico Tramontana, who was obviously impressed enough with his “test drive” that he bought the car in April of 1961. The next year, “Nembo,” as Autofficina Giorgio Neri & Luciano Bonacini was known, sold the Monza to its third owner, well-known gentleman racer Carlo Eduardo Leto di Priolo. He placed the car in the museum at the Autodromo di Monza on loan, rather fitting for a car that took its name from that track in celebration of its first victory. This car remained on display in the museum for a decade, and in 1973, it was sold to the UK into the hands of Alastair Walker, of London. Mr. A.J.M. “Dries” Van der Lof, of the Netherlands, purchased the Ferrari in 1975 and entered it in vintage events, including the International Historic Races at Zandvoort in 1978. Next, it was sold to José Segimon, of Spain, in 1979, who kept the car in the UK, where it found its next owners in the early 1980s, who ran the Monza in the 1982 Mille Miglia Storica. In 1984, John Graham Foulston, owner of the Brands Hatch, Oulton Park, Cadwell Park, and Snetterton racing circuits, bought the Ferrari. He ran the Monza in a host of international events, including bringing 0530M back to Sicily for the historic Targa Florio, as well as the Nürburgring Oldtimer Grand Prix. His daughter, Mary, retained the car following his death in 1987 and drove it in the 1988 historic Targa Florio in October of that year. She later sold the car in 1994, after 10 years of family ownership. By 1996, chassis 0530M was owned by Mr. Stan Zagorski, of New York, who sold it in 2000 to Giuseppe Scalvenzi, of Brescia, Italy. Scalvenzi made the Monza a regular feature of the Mille Miglia Storica, running every year from 2001 to 2010. Scalvenzi used the car in other major events, including Le Mitiche Sport a Bassano and the Coppa d’Oro delle Dolomiti. It was then sold to the vendor in 2012. The 750 Monza represents an important piece of Ferrari competition history, and this particular example is to be especially prized for its continuous history, matching-numbers engine, original body, and superb level of presentation and preparation. Chassis 0530M is pictured in La Cronoscalata del Monte Erice by Benedetto and Giuseppe Lo Duca (Trapani-Monte Erice) and Bolidi di Notte, Storia della Dieci ore di Messina by Nino Minutoli. Historical documents include copies of early Italian registrations (Automobile Club d’Italia) from Palermo and Milan, as well as numerous period photographs. It is those who have been fortunate enough to drive a 750 Monza who enthusiastically praise its balance, handling, and forgiving nature. It is a car that flatters good drivers and greatly rewards excellent ones. The fact that the next owner can also take this Ferrari back to the very roads on which it triumphed when new is even more exciting. Addendum Please note there is an aluminum tonneau cover included in the sale of the Monza. Chassis no. 0530M Engine no. 0530M

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
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1931 Bentley 4½-Litre Supercharged Two-Seater Sports in the style of Vanden Plas

182 bhp, 4,382 cc SOHC inline four-cylinder engine with four valves per cylinder, Roots-type supercharger, four-speed close-ratio transmission, semi-elliptical leaf-spring front suspension with Hartford shocks, coil-spring rear suspension, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 130 in. One of the 50 original supercharged “Blower” Bentleys Original chassis, engine, D-type gearbox, and supercharger The last “W.O.” Bentley bodied in period by Vanden Plas; offered with its original coachwork Available after nearly 30 years of continuous family ownership Documented and authenticated by Bentley historian Dr. Clare Hay A veteran of the Mille Miglia Storica; complete with FIA paperwork Exceptional purity; one of the finest ever offered The story of W.O. Bentley’s company in the 1920s is the story of a group of passionate and extraordinarily wealthy young men, collectively known as the “Bentley Boys” (though not all, as will be seen, were boys), whose money and enthusiasm kept Bentley Motors alive and made its reputation on road and track. One of them, Sir Henry Birkin, had the idea to improve the already powerful 4½-Litre model using the relatively new technique of supercharging. W.O. Bentley himself rejected the idea, but his company’s then chairman, Woolf Barnato, held the purse strings and opened the doors to developing a supercharged model. The so-called “Blower Bentley” would be built on a specially shortened chassis, reinforced to cope with the additional power. That power was supplied by a supercharger, completely purpose-designed by Amherst-Villiers, with the considerable funding supplied by Dorothy Paget, a wealthy sportswoman who had previously financed the Schneider Trophy-winning Supermarine seaplanes. Developing the supercharger was its own small drama, with Bentley and Amherst-Villiers becoming involved in an argument over patent rights and whose name the device would carry. Making the Blower reliable took a great deal of time and, with it, a great deal of Paget’s money. In the end, the Blower was something of a financial disaster for Bentley; only 50 customer chassis were built, and the company had trouble selling that many! History has been much more kind to the model, which is now recognized as a powerhouse of its era. Modern restorers and mechanics have proved that the supercharged engine’s power was a very good idea, and accordingly, the model has become probably the most desirable of all vintage Bentleys, especially with lightweight Vanden Plas bodywork. While pieced-together “specials” with major reproduction components are common, actual survivors of the original 50 are as priceless as the diamonds that made Woolf Barnato’s fortune, and just as valuable. They seldom ever change hands, and when they do, it is often quietly among enthusiasts. The opportunity to purchase one at public auction is rare indeed. CHASSIS NUMBER MS3929: AN ORIGINAL “BLOWER” BENTLEY Bentley historian Dr. Clare Hay’s report on this car, chassis number MS3929, notes that it was indeed originally built as a supercharged car from new. Upon completion in 1931, however, it apparently remained unsold for two full years, due to Bentley Motors’ receivership, before being finally bodied with a new four-passenger tourer body, number 1829, by Vanden Plas in 1933. Delivered in this form to A. Ansell and registered as JB 1850, it was the last W.O. Bentley to have been fitted with the iconic Vanden Plas coachwork. Bentley Motors service records indicate that the car was acquired as early as 1933 by famous Maidenhead dealer R.S. Mead, and then, by April 1934, it was acquired by C.E. Robinson, who purchased the car through the showroom of W.O. Bentley’s brother, H.M. The car was sold back to H.M. Bentley by Mr. Robinson; next passing in 1936 to J.M. Campbell before being shipped out of the UK to Cape Town, South Africa, in late 1937 by the next owner, Dr. T.W. Stephens. While in Cape Town, it was driven by Oscar Heim, whose report on enjoying the car was published in the April 27, 1939, issue of the Cape Times and later reprinted in the Bentley Drivers Club Review in May 1984. The car remained in South Africa through World War II, being returned to the UK by a friend of Dr. Stephens, believed to have been M.C.C. Haycraft, reportedly a Royal Air Force Squadron leader. In 1957, the Bentley was exported to the United States by J.D. Clark, passing in 1962 to C.M. Crowhurst, then to E.S. Nisbet, and then in February 1969 to John Webb de Campi, the late, respected Rolls-Royce and Bentley historian. During his 10-year tenure of ownership, Mr. de Campi restored the Bentley with its original Vanden Plas bodywork. The Bentley returned to the UK in 1979 and was acquired in 1987 by its present owner. In 1990, a fresh restoration was undertaken. As part of this work, Ulf Smith, of Sweden, built the present body and fenders for the car, marking its only modification from new; the body is a copy of the lightweight fabric two-seater sports body built by Vanden Plas for the famous #1 Blower, chassis number HB3402, for the 1929 500 Miles Race at Brooklands. Fortunately, the owner, sensitive to the preservation of history, retained the original Vanden Plas body, which has been crated and is being sold with the car today, should the successful bidder wish to take the Bentley back to its original form. VERIFICATION OF ORIGINALITY Critical to the acquisition of any Blower Bentley is determining how much of the car is still original, as many were raced as intended, with the common accompanying results of engine, body, and gearbox changes. Fortunately, surviving original factory records and the work of Bentley historian Dr. Clare Hay have allowed the originality of surviving cars to be determined with very little doubt. As Dr. Hay notes of this Bentley: The supercharger number isn’t listed in the service records; the blower units are numbered 101-150, with the last two numbers of the supercharger number usually the same as, or very close to, the last two digits of the chassis number. MS3929 is, I gather, fitted with supercharger number 129 and this is, I am sure, the original unit for the chassis. The original engine isn’t listed; by interpolation from the records, it is number MS3932…The gearbox as new would have been the standard close-ratio D-type box, but no number is listed in the service record. Interpolation from the service records suggests that the original box was number 7241, which is now confirmed as the gearbox in the car. The conclusion is that, aside from details such as the switchgear, Bosch magnetos, and the use of improved Hartford shock absorbers, this is today much the same vehicle mechanically that it was when built, with its original chassis frame, engine, gearbox, and supercharger. Few W.O. Bentleys can make such a claim—and even fewer Blowers. The owner has had the car properly accepted and documented by the FIA and has proceeded to compete with it in such major events as the Mille Miglia. He notes that it has recently received a full examination, with all necessary servicing carried out, including a complete restoration and overhauling of the engine between 2011 and 2012 and new brakes. During the complete engine overhauling, the inner cylinders were replaced, with the original cylinders saved and accompanying the car today, at a reported cost of $150,000. A more recent major service was completed at a reported cost of $25,000. Records for the services undertaken in the present ownership are on file, along with a collection of copies of mentions of this car in various Bentley books, correspondence with the W.O. Bentley Foundation, and, of course, Dr. Hay’s detailed and fascinating report, quoted in part above, which is recommended reading for prospective bidders. The opportunity is rare, indeed, to acquire such a well-preserved Blower Bentley that retains all of its original major components, is offered with its original coachwork, and has such a long and proud record of ownership by enthusiasts. This marks one of the most significant W.O. Bentleys to come to market lately and the priceless opportunity to acquire a genuine Blower with so much of its authenticity, history, and brawny original soul intact. Chassis no. MS3929 Engine no. MS3932 Gearbox no. 7241 Supercharger no. 129

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Alloy by Scaglietti

305 bhp, 3,286 cc V-12 engine with six Weber dual-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs, and tubular shocks, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of just nine long-nose, torque-tube, alloy-bodied examples fitted with six Weber carburetors; factory-fitted with an outside filler cap Recent cosmetic restoration by Kevin Kay Restorations, with the engine rebuilt by Patrick Ottis Just four Californian owners from new; includes original books, tools, and jack Matching numbers example; submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification THE 275 GT BERLINETTA The 275 GTB was formally introduced as the replacement for the aging 250 series of Ferraris in September 1964 at the Paris Auto Show, alongside its drop-top sibling, the 275 GTS. The 275 GTB was developed under the watchful eye of Enzo Ferrari and was inarguably more purposeful than the gorgeous 250 GT/L Berlinetta Lusso it replaced. "Il Commendatore" undoubtedly wanted to ensure that his next Grand Touring Berlinetta was more captivating in every way than his last. With its iconic design by Pininfarina and coachwork by Scaglietti, the new GTB incorporated a number of improvements over its predecessors, making it by far the best Ferrari grand tourer yet. At its heart was a 3.3-liter Colombo V-12 with a lower overall height than the earlier 3.0-liter V-12, in an effort to give it a lower center of gravity. The 275 GTB also boasted four-wheel independent suspension and a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle gearbox, resulting in near-perfect 50/50 weight distribution front to rear. The greatly improved power and handling was nothing short of incredible for its time, with a sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just over six seconds, leading the car to a top speed of 160 mph—impressive figures even by today’s standards—while the advanced driving dynamics delighted the senses. Customers could upgrade the standard specification when ordering their 275 GTB, as was common with specialist manufacturers such as Ferrari. The performance option was the replacement of the car’s standard triple Weber carburetors with six Weber carburetors. A few very dedicated customers ordered theirs with the substitution of the standard steel coachwork with a competition-developed lightweight aluminum body. Like other Ferrari production cars, the 275 GTB was adapted and updated over the course of its production run in an effort to improve the overall drivability and reliability. The two most important changes to the 275 GTB during its lifespan were the introduction of the “long-nose” bodywork and the installation of a torque tube. First, the 275 GTB’s front was lengthened in an effort to eliminate the high-speed lift characteristics of the initial style. In early 1966, a torque tube was added to further improve the stability and durability of the drivetrain. When the 275 GTB/4 was introduced, all 275 GTBs leaving the factory were fitted with both the long-nose and torque-tube updates, validating the successful execution of these important upgrades for drivability. CHASSIS NUMBER 08517 Make no mistake; chassis 08517 was born as the cream of the crop of 275 GTB production and remains so to this day. It is a late-production, long-nose, torque-tube example originally finished in Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) over a Nero interior (VM 8500). Additionally, chassis 08517 was fitted with the two most desirable options made available by the factory, the six Weber carburetors and the exotic alloy bodywork, as well as an evocative outside fuel filler cap. In 1966, chassis 08517 was shipped from Maranello to Luigi Chinetti Motors, of New York City, and was then transported to the official Ferrari dealership in San Francisco, Charles Rezzaghi Motors. Rezzaghi sold the 275 GTB to its first owner, a Mr. Stewart, who was a resident of San Francisco. Stewart would keep the car for five years before it was sold to Jack Gordon, also of California, in 1971. Gordon owned the car for the next 23 years, eventually selling it to trucking magnate Robert Panella, of Stockton, California. Panella traded Gordon a nearly new Ferrari F40 for this car, but this was not Panella’s first 275. At the time, he also owned chassis 10621, the ex-Steve McQueen 275 GTB/4, which had been converted to NART Spider configuration under his ownership. Luckily, 08517 was spared from a similar fate, and it remained in Panella’s stable for the next five years. Subsequently, chassis 08517 was purchased by its current Northern California-based collectors. In their ownership, the engine was fully rebuilt by Ferrari specialist Patrick Ottis in 2013, and at the same time, the car’s aluminum bodywork was stripped of its paint and refinished in the very attractive and factory-correct shade of Celeste Chiaro Metallizzato by Kevin Kay Restorations (KKR). KKR was also tasked with refinishing the interior in black over grey carpeting. Additionally, the chrome was refreshed where needed, and the engine bay was fully detailed before the engine was refitted in the bay. The superb result was awarded Best in Class at the 2014 Forest Grove Concours d’Elegance in Oregon, the first and only time it has been shown since its restoration. It is important to note that chassis 08517 includes all of its original books in their proper pouch, the original tool roll and tools, and the original jack. The Ferrari is currently sitting on correct 10-hole alloy wheels but is also offered with a set of handsome Borrani wire wheels. An RM Sotheby’s specialist recently had the opportunity to drive the car and noted that it was truly a joy to drive and that the reduction in weight from the aluminum bodywork and extra power from the six-carburetor setup were instantly noticeable at speed. He added that it is “wonderfully presented and totally dialed-in.” Considered by many to be one of the most spectacular Ferraris ever built, both in terms of design and mechanical prowess, the 275 GTB is a brilliant automobile in every respect. The long-nose, torque-tube examples are understandably sought after, and the very few examples of those outfitted with six carburetors and aluminum coachwork rarely become available for sale. Chassis 08517 is truly exceptional in originality and condition, and with its ultra-desirable specification, it must be considered one of the optimum examples of any 275 GTB in existence. It could easily be the centerpiece of any collection of important Ferrari road cars and would be an ideal concours entrant, as well as a very exciting grand touring entrant for top-level road rallies. Chassis no. 08517 Engine no. 08517 Body no. 0388 Gearbox no. 625

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1955 Jaguar D-Type

Est. 300 bhp, 3,781 cc dual overhead-camshaft inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber 45DCO3 carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, independent front suspension, live rear axle trailing links and transverse torsion bar, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90.5 in. Extensively documented; multiple in-period 1st place finishes Comprehensive restoration in 2003 by noted D-Type expert Subject of a five-part feature series in Jaguar World Monthly Exhibited at Pebble Beach, Villa d’Este, and Amelia Island Vintage racing participation, including the Mille Miglia and Goodwood Revival FIVA Passport, FIA papers, and JDHT Certificate Perhaps no Jaguar model boasts more esteem or respect than the legendary D-Type, which was engineered specifically to win Le Mans. Significantly departing from the prior C-Type’s architecture, the D-Type was notable as one of the first monocoque sports racers, as it featured a fabulous aerodynamic body designed by Malcolm Sayer. The model was powered by a development of the C-Type’s 3.4-liter inline six-cylinder engine, which was increased to 3.8 liters in later cars. Debuting at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans, the D-Type finished a narrow 2nd to a 4.9-liter Ferrari V-12, and a year later, it won the race outright with a long-nosed factory body equipped with a revised motor. Jaguar retired from racing after the 1956 season, but the D-Type continued to flourish in private hands, winning Le Mans in 1956 and 1957 for the Ecurie Ecosse. Although not necessarily well-suited to every type of course, the D-Type proved to be extremely effective on properly surfaced endurance circuits, and it remains one of the most important Le Mans race cars ever built, holding a special place in Coventry lore. Chassis number XKD 530 offers a tale that is surely as intricate and fascinating as any surviving D-Type. One of the 54 examples produced for privateer customers, this car was dispatched from the factory on February 13, 1956, finished in British Racing Green, as confirmed by its Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate. Retailed through Finnish Jaguar dealer S.M.K., the car was delivered in April 1956 to Curt Lincoln, of Helsinki, a tennis player on Finland’s Davis Cup team who was known to the racing world for his exploits in F3 midget cars and a Jaguar C-Type. As factory documentation reportedly demonstrates, Mr. Lincoln sought to avoid excessive duty on the import; therefore, he instructed Coventry to make the car appear used, so that it would not be subject to new vehicle tariffs. To this end, the factory brushed the pedals to make them appear worn, replaced the steering wheel with a used one, and adjusted the odometer to misleadingly reflect accrued mileage, among other measures. Mr. Lincoln primarily campaigned the D-Type at the Elaintarhanajo, Finland’s best-known race of the period, which was run annually between 1932 and 1963 on a two-kilometer track at the heart of Helsinki. With the final drive ratio increased to 3.54:1, XKD 530 was driven by Mr. Lincoln under the banner of his Scuderia Askolin (named for partial owner and timber magnate Carl-Johan Askolin) to a 1st in class finish on May 10, 1956. Later that season, Lincoln again took 1st in class while racing side-by-side with his C-Type, which he had lent to Vaino Miettinen for the contest. Other than the 1957 Elaintarhanajo, XKD 530 was used primarily for ice racing following the 1956 season, and team Askolin fitted the tires with 1¾-inch spikes for this purpose. Mr. Lincoln drove the car to 1st place finishes in this fashion on February 24, 1957, and, again, on March 10, after which the car was repainted in Scuderia Askolin’s white and dark blue team livery. From this point forward, Mr. Lincoln focused on driving his other cars, while XKD 530 was piloted for Askolin by various team drivers. This development was probably largely prompted by the FIA’s cancellation of the Production Sports Car class in 1957. Correspondence suggests that around this time, Mr. Lincoln contacted the factory with interest in modifying the car to GT class specifications by converting it into an XK-SS road car. Eventually, the decision was made to conduct further race modifications domestically. Coachbuilders Wiima, of Helsinki, were retained to install a full-width windscreen, a new nearside door, and a custom tail fin. The year 1958 saw continued competitive outings, with numerous 1st and 2nd place finishes. On May 26, 1959, Mr. Lincoln wrote to Jaguar’s racing chief, F.R.W. “Lofty” England, that the rigors of ice racing had taken a toll on the car, and an overhaul was in order. The D-Type arrived at the Works competition department in Coventry in December 1959, and the engine block was replaced with a factory 3.8-liter example. The 40-millimeter Weber carburetors were replaced with 45-millimeter units, the gearbox and brakes were reconditioned, and the car was repainted in white. XKD 530 then returned to Scuderia Askolin with a written tag stating “+100 hp,” and Mr. Lincoln resumed racing it, taking the checkered flag twice more in February of 1960. In late 1960, Mr. Lincoln sold XKD 530 to magazine publisher Olli Lyytikainen, who continued to race the car, usually with future international rally driver Timo Makinen at the wheel. The following year, the car experienced one of its most publicized races, when Heimo Hietarinta finished 1st in the Formula Libre Class at the Leningrad Grand Prix on August 27, 1961. XKD530 is believed to be the only D-Type to have ever raced in the Soviet Union, and the occasion was reported in the September 1961 issue of Finnish magazine Tekniikan Maailma, forever documenting the car’s momentous participation. In November 1966, no longer competitive on Finland’s ice courses, XKD 530 was sold to English collector Nigel Moores, a historic racing enthusiast who owned a number of D-Types during his life. When the car arrived to him, it showed the symptoms of wear expected from such hard use, and the body had been modified to an open two-seater cockpit with a truncated tail. As rebuilding the original body was deemed to be too prohibitively expensive for a car of such value at that time, it was decided that the later D-Type construction manner, which involved separately bolting a front and rear chassis sub-frame to the monocoque body, afforded the opportunity to remove the damaged body and salvage as many original chassis components as possible. Mr. Moores’ staff separated the chassis tub, mounted all-new bodywork in the factory long-nose style, and fitted the car with the wide-angle headed D-Type engine that had originally been used by the Cunningham team. The separated monocoque body, the original engine, and the gearbox were put aside and eventually sold, around 1984, to historic racer John Harper, who repaired the coachwork and mounted it on an all-new chassis that mostly consisted of various original Jaguar factory components. As both resulting cars were stamped with the XKD 530 chassis number, a controversy gradually emerged as to the proper identity of each car, and which was, in fact, the authentic original car. “Ole Sommer,” a D-Type owner and the proprietor of Sommer’s Veteranbil Museum in Denmark, eloquently summarized the situation in a 1995 letter to Arthur Urciuoli (who acquired the original monocoque car in 1993) when he wrote, “It seems difficult to rectify the situation, unless some benevolent person should decide to purchase both cars, exchange the front subframes and the legal documents, resulting in only one single car claiming to be XKD 530.” This is essentially the path that the consignor followed after acquiring one car in 1998 and the other in June 2002. As detailed by an extensive five-part feature series written by Paul Skilleter and Jim Patten for Jaguar World Monthly magazine between December 2002 and September 2003, the consignor delivered both cars in late 2002 to Chris Keith-Lucas’s well-regarded CKL Developments in East Sussex. Disassembling both cars, CKL carefully noted the individual part numbers and, comparing them to original factory parts numbering supplied by long-time D-Type expert, separated and color-coded the parts that were original to XKD 530 and those used as replacements in either of the two vehicles. Of course, some doubt had emerged regarding the legitimacy of various claims of the two cars’ individual histories and to which extent each possessed original components. These doubts were put to rest when CKL finally remounted the repaired original monocoque onto the original chassis frame, finding that the original factory bolt holes, which were fortuitously not uniformly drilled, matched precisely, for a form-fitting join. Following the mid-2003 completion of CKL’s amazing restoration, which reunited XKD 530’s separated components for the first time in 35 years, the car was taken to Goodwood for some initial laps, and veteran Le Mans driver Mike Salman (who drove several D-Types in period) was asked to join the session and share his thoughts for the JWM feature. XKD 530 has run the Mille Miglia Storica four times since the restoration, and it has been invited to the 2009 Villa d’Este Concorso d’Eleganza, the 2009 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, and the 2011 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. Additional vintage race participation included the 2011 Silverstone Classic’s Stirling Moss Trophy, the 2011 Goodwood Revival Sussex Trophy, and the 2012 Goodwood Revival Sussex Trophy, where the car finished 8th overall and 1st among all D-Type entrants. In 2008, the Jaguar was returned to CKL for a sympathetic rebuild of the engine, clutch, differential, and brakes, among other components, further ensuring strong future performance. Accompanied by a FIVA Passport and FIA papers, and featuring its original engine, transmission, chassis frame, monocoque body, and brake calipers, XKD 530 is believed to be one of the most original examples extant, and it has been carefully scrutinized by some of the niche’s leading experts, resulting in a very complete car of utmost authenticity. Chris Keith-Lucas, in particular, stated, “Of my 40 years in the business of restoring, repairing, and researching racing Jaguars, XKD 530 has been one of the most rewarding, and certainly most interesting, projects. During the restoration, we were able to confirm and document this car using numerous resources, including Jaguar’s own build records, that almost every mechanical component of XKD530 is original to this D-Type as when it left the factory. This even includes the Works engine that was upgraded to a 3.8-litre block in 1959 by the factory competition department. I believe the bonnet may not be original to the car, but, otherwise, very few panels required replacement, although some had been modified during the years that XKD530 was used as an ice racer in Finland. With the many years of documented early race history, as well as extensive correspondence between the first owner and Jaguar, it is truly an important part of period D-Type competition history.” This is an exceptional example of the legendary Le Mans-winning D-Type, and it would be the crown jewel of most any collection. Chassis no. XKD 530

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
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The Ex-Earl Howe, Hon. Brian Lewis, Piero Taruffi, Tazio Nuvolari, Arthur Dobson, and Bill Serri Jr.1931 BUGATTI TYPE 51 GRAND PRIX RACING TWO SEATER

The Ex-Earl Howe, Hon. Brian Lewis, Piero Taruffi, Tazio Nuvolari, Arthur Dobson, and Bill Serri Jr. 1931 BUGATTI TYPE 51 GRAND PRIX RACING TWO SEATER Chassis no. 51121 Engine no. 2 2,262cc, DOHC Inline 8-Cylinder Engine Single Zenith carburetor with Roots-Type Supercharger 160-180hp at 5,000rpm 4-Speed Manual Transmission Front, Semi-Elliptic Leaf Spring, Rear, Quarter-Elliptic Leaf Spring Suspension 4-Wheel Cable-Operated Drum Brakes *Four times Monaco Entrant, outstanding racing provenance *Known history from new *Current ownership for more than 3 decades *Miller-influenced Twin Cam Bugatti Watch video of this Bugatti Type 51 in motion! (Special thanks to Dr. Frederick Simeone and the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum) EARL HOWE While the immortal Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix car design requires little introduction, neither should the contemporary stature of this particularly mouth-watering example's original owner ex-works – and the man who campaigned the car Internationally during the first four years of its long active life – the aristocratic British owner/driver, the Earl Howe. Francis Richard Henry Penn Curzon CBE, held the titles Viscount Curzon and the 5th Earl Howe. He had been born in Mayfair, London, on May 1, 1884, into an illustrious Royal Navy family. In 1918 he won the Battersea South parliamentary seat for the Conservative Party, and he served as Member of Parliament for the constituency for the next ten years, until 1929. Although an extremely enthusiastic motorist for the greater part of his life he did not begin racing seriously until he was already 44 years old. Earl Howe then became not only one of Great Britain's best-known racing drivers, he also became one of its most successful and high-profile motor sportsmen. He was President of the British Racing Drivers' Club, and after World War 2 would assume a wonderfully effective and popular role as the great elder statesman of British motor sport. His driving career began in 1928 when he drove his first major motor race in the 1928 Irish TT. By 1930 he had bought Rudolf Caracciola's ageing Mercedes-Benz SSK and in 1931 he campaigned an Alfa Romeo 8C-2300 in partnership with his celebrated friend Sir Henry 'Tim' Birkin, and in partnership they won the Le Mans 24-Hour race...no less. It was in that same year that the Earl bought Bugatti Type 51 chassis serial '51121' as now offered here, and he would continue racing during the early to mid-1930s with this Type 51, together with a 1.5 litre supercharged straight-eight Delage, assorted MGs and Alfa Romeos before buying an ERA single-seater voiturette (the contemporary equivalent of a 'GP2' category car) for the 1936 season, subsequently becoming part of the ERA works team. An ugly accident which he was fortunate to survive during the Campbell Trophy race at Brooklands in 1937 sidelined him for much of that year, and postwar he would assume his elder-statesman role within British motor sport, prominent in racing organisation and a leading member of the British RAC Competition Committee. All of Earl Howe's racing cars were meticulously prepared – largely by his long-faithful personal mechanic Percy Thomas - and the Earl was habitually immaculate in his polo-style hard-shelled blue crash helmet and BRDC-badged silk overalls. Thus it was that Earl Howe went racing with immense style, and great Royal Navy-imbued efficiency. Contemporary British motor racing authority, Rivers Fletcher described Howe as being "...certainly strict. In his pit everything had to be 'ship-shape and Bristol fashion' and he and his car were ready right on time for scrutineering and practice: he abhorred last-minute rushes to get things ready for an event...". His cars were impeccably presented, and he adopted for them his late father's former horse-racing colors of royal-blue and silver. Howe always regretted the fact that so few British-made cars were competitive within International racing during his career, with the ERA the shining exception. But from 1931-1933 the British industry's loss had certainly been Bugatti's gain, as Earl Howe became one of the most active and enthusiastic of British owner-drivers. He had wisely learned the arts of race driving largely in sports cars through 1928-30 before aspiring to International Grand Prix racing in 1931. There were then two rival GP-eligible car models available for sporting-minded private owners – the Italian 8C-2300 Alfa Romeo 'Monza' and the French Type 51 Bugatti. The latter looked externally very similar to the Molsheim factory's preceding Type 35 Grand Prix model which had achieved such great success since its emergence in 1924. But the Type 51's major innovation was its new twin-overhead camshaft supercharged straight-8 cylinder engine. BUGATTI AND MILLER The Bugatti Type 50 road car and Type 51 Grand Prix car introduced twin-overhead camshafts to Bugatti's brand of purebred bloodstream. Famously, Ettore Bugatti based this new design upon the finest of contemporary American track-racing engine technology - which was the highly-supercharged straight-8 Miller 91... In 1915, Los Angeles-based carburetor and engine specialist Harry Amenius Miller, together with his shop foreman Fred Offenhauser, developed an engine design derived from the best elements of an already successful 1913 Peugeot racing engine. In particular, their 181-cubic-inch straight-eight Miller engine boasted a valve-train featuring twin overhead camshafts which would come to characterize a pure-bloodline of American track racing engines culminating in the long-dominant Offenhauser in-line four-cylinder design. The great racing Millers of the 1920s absolutely dominated American speedway racing, and the exploits of such great racing drivers as the youthful genius Frank Lockhart built the marque's legendary fame. Regulation changes saw Miller engine displacement slashed, first to 121 cu. in. and, for 1926-29, to 91 cu. in., producing the definitive Miller 91 model which appeared in both front- and rear-drive form. In 1929, the Packard Cable Company sponsored a trio of new Miller 91s for American National Championship racing; two front-drive versions driven by 'Leon Duray' (real name George Stewart) and Ralph Hepburn and a rear-drive variant for Tony Gulotta. Duray took the two gleaming front-drive cars on a European tour, setting records at Montlhéry near Paris, France, and then at Monza Autodrome in Italy. But the strain of road racing broke both cars, and 'Leon Duray' ran out of money. Spectator Ettore Bugatti was sufficiently impressed by the Packard Cable Special Millers to offer Duray a deal: swap the pair of them for three Type 43 Bugattis. Did Bugatti need a couple of broken American speedy special cars? Hardly. But what Ettore Bugatti obtained from Duray was a perfect pattern to reproduce the outstanding twin-overhead camshaft engine top-end of the period. When the Bugatti Type 50 introduced twin-overhead camshaft design to the Molsheim marque, the Miller match was self-evident. In the Bugatti Type 51 - as offered here in '51121' - such twin-cam majesty made its successful return to French Grand Prix racing-car design. At the 1931 Monaco Grand Prix the doyen of British motor racing reporters, W.F. Bradley, wrote for 'The Autocar' that the new Bugatti was "...one of the most beautiful and carefully-prepared racing cars it has been my privilege to examine in a very long experience". He described how the engine developed approximately 20 per cent more power than the Type 35 and "...is marvelously rapid in acceleration". THE MOTORCAR OFFERED The example offered here is one of the best known and most distinctive of all Grand Prix Bugattis. As a good customer of Le Patron it should not be surprising that Lord Howe was able to get hold of one of the first Type 51s, which by chassis number is actually the first in the series of the 40 cars built, '51121'. He had ordered it through Colonel Sorel, the British concessionaire and actually took delivery of it ex-works on April 14, 1931. One of the benefits as a prominently owned privateer car and domiciled in the UK is that its racing history is so easily chartable and undisputed, an aspect which is much harder to establish with as opposed to Works cars which were invariably rebuilt between races. Its career began a few days later, when Earl Howe was present at that 1931 Monaco Grand Prix with his then brand-new car, the individual machine now offered here, freshly liveried in dark green paintwork. An inauspicious start, which saw him retire when a cam-box stud pulled out, did not deter him, the occasion heralding more than 3 years of racing in his custody. Next, he shared the driving with the Hon. Brian Lewis – later to become Lord Essendon – in the French GP at Montlhéry, finishing 12th. In the German GP at the Nurburgring Howe finished, but too far off the pace to be classified. Co-driving with Clifton Penn-Hughes – another British Bugatti specialist – Howe then contested the BRDC '500' race at Brooklands, but again was forced to retire. By now the Type 51 had gained Howe's racing colors of blue and silver along its sides and distinctive larger filler caps, ensuring that it stands out from a frequently Bugatti dominated grid in all contemporary photographs. Earl Howe retained '51121' for 1932, initially taking it back to Monte Carlo where this time he finished a fine fourth overall behind the works Bugattis and Alfa Romeo 8C. Howe was really improving as a racing driver, as he then won the Mountain Handicap race at Brooklands after starting from scratch, and averaging 73.64mph on the famous short circuit around the Member's Hill. He then hill-climbed the Bugatti at Shelsley Walsh, returning Fastest Time of the Day at 44 seconds, and then deep into Europe – at the Klausenpass mountain climb, Howe set third FTD on the dauntingly long and arduous course. He then tackled a second BRDC '500' with the Bugatti, this time lapping the Brooklands Outer Circuit at an average speed of 126mph – demonstrating the Type 51's startling performance potential – before being forced to retire as the pounding from the bumpy high bankings split the fuel tank. The British Earl then tackled his third consecutive Monaco Grand Prix with the car in 1933, being sidelined this time by rear axle failure. In the French GP he was hit in the eye by a flying stone and had to retire as he would from the Nice GP (engine trouble) before placing tenth in that year's Italian GP at Monza. Four British home events completed his 1933 season with the Bugatti – setting 2nd FTD in both the Brighton Speed Trials and at Shelsley Walsh, before winning an Invitation race at Donington Park. Finally, back at Brooklands, he loaned the car to guest Italian driver Piero Taruffi, who promptly finished 2nd with it in the Mountain Championship race...while the towering Italian Champion Tazio Nuvolari – none other, absolutely racing royalty at that time – also sampled the car during practice there... Howe must really have enjoyed this Bugatti Type 51 since he retained it despite its advancing obsolescence for the 1934 competition season. His outings in the car that year were highlighted by fifth place in the Marne GP at Reims-Gueux and 7th in the Nice GP. Back home he finished 5th in the JCC International Trophy race at Brooklands, before winning the Gold Star Handicap race at the Whit-Monday Brooklands Meeting. Third places at Shelsley Walsh and in the Donington Trophy race completed his programme, in which Howe also competed in a more modern 3-litre Maserati. At last the Type 51 had become surplus to the Earl's requirements, and he sold it to a most capable fellow British driver, Arthur Dobson – later to make his name as ERA works driver. He fitted a pre-selector gearbox in place of the Type 51's conventional original and third in class at Shelsley Walsh was his best result through 1935 before he sold the car to enthusiastic garage proprietor C. Mervyn White, of Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire. Mervyn White then finished 2nd with the car in a 1936 Brooklands Long Handicap race, and also contested the Leinster Trophy in Eire, the JCC International Trophy at Donington Park and the Donington Grand Prix, but unreliability intruded each time. Early in 1937, Mervyn White then won the Brooklands Easter meeting Long Handicap race at 121.4mph and took a 3rd place in the Broadcast Trophy race there. He ran in the Brooklands Campbell Trophy and at Donington Park but – returning to race in Eire - during practice for the Cork GP he crashed badly at the Carrigrohane circuit's Gravel Pit Bend, the Bugatti overturned and Mervyn White suffered severe head injuries, to which he succumbed four days later in Cork's Mercy Hospital. The Bugatti – its damage largely confined to front and rear axles and the tail bodywork - was later acquired jointly by Arthur Baron, owner of a Bugatti garage in Dorking, Surrey (who also owned a Bugatti Type 59) and his business partner Norman Lewis. They rebuilt the car, and competed with it during 1938. In 1939 it returned to Shelsley Walsh, winning its class there driven by Norman Lewis, and it won again at Wetherby in Yorkshire while also competing at Prescott hill-climb. From Baron and Lewis, the car then passed to one D.M. Jenkinson – not to be confused with Denis Jenkinson of 'Motor Sport' magazine fame, whose initials were D.S.J. – whose family owned the Mount Pleasant Hotel on the Great North Road, just outside Doncaster. In 1954 the car was acquired by one A.M. Mackay of Symonds Hyde, Hatfield, Hertfordshire. It was little seen in Mr. Mackay's ownership – so far as the Bugatti Owners' Club would record – but was rebuilt by noted Bugatti specialist Geoffrey St. John. In 1983 the current owner, a passionate Bugattiste decided to acquire a great Grand Prix Bugatti, and to do so enlisted the help of renowned Bugatti aficionado Bill Serri. Serri advised of a particularly good car that was available in Switzerland and he was promptly sent off to inspect it. However, while on his travels he took the opportunity to traverse back through the U.K. and to visit Mackay, as a courtesy and to compare notes with the other car he had inspected as he knew Mackay's car to be one of the best of all. Serri's dialogue with Mackay was incredibly timely as when he arrived, he found Mackay to be fixated on trying to acquire a neighboring farm to his property. 'Why buy the car in Switzerland?' he said, knowing that if he could sell the Bugatti, the farm would be his! Calls and Telexes were quickly made back to New York and a deal was struck within hours... A few days later the Bugatti was flown to the States and into the stable where it has resided for the last 30 years. Initially in this ownership the car was exercised, with occasional appearances at Bridgehampton. One particularly fond memory of its owner was when he got to drive the car in front of famed Bugatti driver and later New York restauranteur, Rene Dreyfus. Latterly, like a true thoroughbred it was laid up in its stable and has not been seen publicly for many years. Arriving on the market for the first time at public auction, this remarkable Bugatti has recently been entrusted to renowned engineering experts Leydon Restorations of Lahaska, Pennsylvania who have systematically and sympathetically checked through its engine and the car has been made to run again. At a recent 'firing-up' the awesome Twin Cam was shown to be in rude health and sounding particularly strong, although naturally the restorers advise that a thorough re-commissioning be made before it be used or campaigned properly. On that day, it provided the opportunity for the cataloguer to sample the incredible performance of this iconic pure bred Bugatti, to appreciate just how drivable and tractable these cars are, and to understand why a number of people elect to use them for fast road touring as well as competition. Viewed today, the Howe Type 51 has as impressive a presence as it does sound, its older refurbished paintwork and general aesthetics have gained a charming patina matching the majority of its pigskin upholstery which may well date back to the war and is in remarkably good order. On the technical side, despite such an active early career it retains its original chassis, matched stamped engine crankcase and rear axle, while the aforementioned gearbox was later returned to a period correct unit. Along the way, given its racing career it is thought that inevitably some of the metal skin would have been replaced, although major items such as its hood and accompanying undertrays are clearly original. All of this has been verified in June 2016 by respected marque historian Mark Morris who has completed a report on it which accompanies the car. During this inspection, some elements such as the presence of harnessing points for dual spare tires came to light which intriguingly allude to potential use in the Targa Florio race in Sicily which Bugatti so dominated through the 1920s, pre-Howe, if true this could only enhance the spectacular racing heritage of his steed. The finest and most compelling of all connoisseur collector's cars are those that are not only enduring examples of the original manufacturer's work. They are also those cars whose surviving fabric in essence bears the fingerprints of bygone owners of the most sublime International repute and renown. In Bugatti Type 51 chassis '51121' offered here, its long-term ownership and association with the great British motor sporting personality of Francis, Earl Howe, Viscount Curzon, adds particular savor. Add the fact that at the Brooklands Autumn Meeting of October 1933 – on his way back home to Italy after winning the RAC Tourist Trophy race at Ards in Ulster for MG – none other than the legendary Tazio Nuvolari also drove Earl Howe's '51121' as offered here. So here one has the added 'finger print' of association with arguably the greatest race car driver of all time, a claim frequently attributed in the histories of Grand Prix cars, but rarely substantiated factually. With its fascinating connection to the Miller dynasty, in technical and historical terms there can be few cars of such stature as this Franco-American Bugatti. We heartily recommend '51121' offered here for the most careful connoisseurial consideration, this is indeed a most important Type 51.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-20
Hammer price
Show price

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Alloy

305 bhp, 3,286 cc V-12 engine with six Weber dual-choke carburettors, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs, and tubular shocks, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,400 mm The first of seven long-nose, six-carburettor, alloy body, torque tube 275 GTBs Single-family ownership for 36 years Matching numbers throughout Recently serviced by marque specialists An exceptional example in every regard Although Ferrari’s 275 GTB was an incredible automobile by any regard, there was much that could be done to make it even more potent. With rolling changes during the model’s lifecycle, customers could select a number of options to enhance the performance of their new car, as was expected from high-end marques like Ferrari. In the hierarchy of 275 GTBs, chassis number 08311 sits very near to the top of the totem pole. Graced with long-nose aluminium bodywork, six Weber carburettors, and in torque-tube specification, not only is this the very first example equipped as such, but it is the second 275 GTB to be fitted with a torque tube. Originally finished in Nero over Beige, it was delivered new to its native Italy to Carlo Bini of Florence on license plates FI 315850. The car passed through a handful of subsequent owners in Naples before it was acquired by an owner in Pero, Italy, before being sold to Barry Le Fave of Los Angeles, California, in 1973. When it arrived in California, the car was still finished in its original combination, and as of 1975, was noted as having travelled just 31,000 kilometres. Later that year, it was refinished in red over black. Shortly thereafter, the car was sold back to Italy and registered in Padua on plates PD 622443. In 1980, the car was sold to its most recent owner and had remained in his custodianship ever since. Most recently, chassis number 08311 was sent to the Ferrari specialists at Toni Auto in Maranello. Within sight of the Ferrari factory, the 275 GTB/6C Alloy was serviced and returned to running condition. It remains ready to be enjoyed by its lucky new owner. Following a tenure of 36 years in single ownership, the opportunity to acquire chassis 08311 simply cannot be understated. As one of only seven long-nose, alloy body, torque tube-equipped 275 GTBs, it provides noticeable and significant upgrades over the “standard” 275 GTB, already an exciting car to drive and enjoy. As the very first example to be equipped as such, just the second car fitted with a torque tube, and fully numbers matching, it is the clear highlight of the Duemila Ruote collection and would be a highlight of any Ferrari collection worldwide. Motore V-12, 3286 cc, 305 Cv, con 6 carburatori Weber doppio corpo, cambio con sistema transaxle, manuale a 5 rapporti. Sospensioni indipendenti sulle 4 ruote, con doppio quadrilatero deformabile, molle elicoidali ed ammortizzatori idraulici telescopici, 4 freni a disco. Passo: 2400 mm • La prima delle sette 275 GTB “muso lungo”, 6 carburatori, carrozzeria in alluminio e sistema transaxle prodotte • Da 36 anni nella proprietà della stessa famiglia • Tutti i numeri di riferimento assolutamente corretti Sebbene già la Ferrari 275 GTB di serie fosse una vettura straordinaria sotto molti aspetti, si poteva fare ancora tanto per renderla ulteriormente più prestazionale. Con una serie continua di modifiche durante tutta il perido di produzione, i clienti potevano scegliere tra svariate opzioni per migliorare le prestazioni della loro nuova auto, come doveroso aspettarsi da un costruttore di alto livello come Ferrari. In un’ipotetica classifica tra tutte le 275 GTB prodotte, quella con il numero di telaio 08311 è sicuramente da considerarsi al vertice. Beneficia, infatti, della carrozzeria a muso lungo in alluminio, dei sei carburatori Weber e della trasmissione con sistema transaxle; non solo, è stata la prima 275 GTB prodotta in questo allestimento e la sola seconda ad essere dotata del sistema transaxle. Originariamente verniciata in Nero con interni Beige, è stata consegnata a Firenze, a Carlo Bini, dove ha ricevuto la targa FI 315850. Dopo una serie di passaggi di proprietà nella zona di Napoli, è stata acquistata da un nuovo proprietario residente a Pero (Mi), prima di essere venduta, nel 1973, a Barry La Fave di Los Angeles, in California. Al suo arrivo in California la macchina era ancora verniciata nella sua colorazione originale e ci sono prove che, nel 1975 avesse percorso in totale solo 31.000 chilometri. Alla fine di quell’anno, riverniciata in Rosso con interni Neri, è stata rivenduta in Italia, a Padova, e targata PD 622443. Nel 1980 la macchina viene acquistata dall’attuale proprietario. Recentemente la vettura con telaio 08311 è stata mandata dallo specialista Ferrari “Tony Auto” di Maranello. E’ proprio lì, vicino alla fabbrica che l’ha originariamente prodotta, che la 275 GTB/6C Alluminio è stata riportata in condizioni di perfetta efficienza. Rimane, ancora oggi, pronta a far divertire il suo fortunato, nuovo proprietario. Proveniente da una singola proprietà durata 36 anni, l’opportunità di acquistare la vettura 08311 non può essere sottovalutata. Come una delle sole sette 275 GTB muso lungo prodotte con carrozzeria in alluminio e sistema transaxle, la macchina offre notevoli e significativi miglioramenti rispetto alla 275 GTB “di serie”, già di per sè una fantastica vettura da guidare e da possedere. Come prima vettura prodotta con questo allestimento, la seconda dotata del sistema transaxle, con tutti i numeri di riferimento perfettamente corrispondenti, la macchina è la sicura stella della collezione Duemila Ruote, pronta a diventare il pezzo più pregiato di qualsiasi collezione Ferrari a livello mondiale. Addendum Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue, this lot will now be offered with Italian Libretto. Please note this lot is currently under an order of seizure, which will be removed following the sale. Upon receipt of payment from the buyer, RM Sotheby’s will liaise with the appointed administrator for release of the seizure, which is expected to take approximately 10 days. During this time, lots will remain onsite at the Fiera Milano and collection can be arranged after confirmation from RM that the seizure order has been lifted. For lots with a current Italian libretto, please be aware that the PRA must remove the seizure order from its records before re-registration can take place in any country. This process is expected to take 6-8 weeks, during which lots may be transported to an EU destination but may not be exported. Chassis no. 08311 Engine no. 08311

  • ITAItaly
  • 2016-11-25
Hammer price
Show price

1935 Mercedes-Benz 500 K Roadster by Sindelfingen

5,018 cc inline eight-cylinder supercharged overhead valve engine, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 129.5" - Offered from the Lyon Family Collection - 1935 Berlin Motor Show Car - Rare coachwork on desirable supercharged eight-cylinder Mercedes - Recent inspection by experts from Mercedes-Benz Classic Germany At the beginning of the Thirties it became apparent that Mercedes-Benz needed a new model at the top of its product offering. The company took that step at the 1933 Berlin Auto Show with the W 22 model, the 380. Its eight-cylinder engine capitalized on Mercedes-Benz’s successful experience with the S series with a driver-controlled supercharger for short bursts of power for acceleration. It shared its visual lineage with the S also, with a massive vee radiator set back at or behind the front axle centerline and huge Bosch headlights. Four-wheel independent suspension and hydraulic brakes gave unprecedented ride, handling and braking, not only on rough roads but also on the quickly expanding network of improved roads, highways and Autobahns then being constructed throughout Germany. Reflecting the changing social and political dynamics of the times, Mercedes-Benz designed its newest luxury chassis primarily as an owner-driven automobile. Some, with long wheelbase limousine and enclosed sedan (Innenlenker) bodies, would be chauffeur-driven, but that was now the exception, not the norm. A number of refinements were incorporated in the design and developed through the Thirties on later models, to make owner-driver use easier, simpler and smoother. Manuals were explicit and extensive. Owners’ mechanical knowledge was assumed, but it was not expected to be extensive. Women drivers were not uncommon, and Mercedes-Benz recognized its prestige models were going to driven by owners with a wide range of skills. Mercedes-Benz’s pride in the 380 was apparent at its introduction. The centerpiece of the display was a meticulously finished show chassis revealing its robust construction and intricacy to full effect. Aluminum surfaces, and there were many of them, were fastidiously engine turned. Every surface and detail was highly polished, painted and detailed to perfection. It was a jewel. As impressive as it was, however, the 380’s output was at best marginal for the task of powering the ample, luxuriously appointed multi-passenger Tourenwagens and Innenlenkers favored by many of Mercedes-Benz’s wealthy clientele and built to the high, and massive, standards of the Sindelfingen coachworks. Mercedes-Benz quickly recognized its error in judgment and began development of its successor in January 1933, even before the 380 was introduced. The Mercedes-Benz 500 K This was the Mercedes-Benz 500 K (W 29, 100/160 hp) destined to be one of the greatest performance automobiles of the Thirties. It was introduced in March 1934 at the Berlin Auto Show, just 13 months after the debut of the 380. Both were built in parallel in 1934, but by the end of the year the 500 K stood alone at the top of Mercedes-Benz’s catalog. The 500 K had a generously-braced chassis frame boxed within the axle centerlines with fully independent suspension with coil springs using dual A-arms at the front and swing axles at the rear, both fitted with hydraulic lever shock absorbers. Concentric coil springs were added to the rear suspension to pick up higher loads, and later in the 500 K series, horizontal camber compensator springs added another level of control to the swing axles. The engine was enlarged from that of the 380 with increased bore and stroke. It had inline overhead valves operated by pushrods and rocker arms from a camshaft mounted above the crankshaft on the left side of the cylinder block. The Rootes-style positive displacement supercharger mounted at the front of the engine was activated by the driver when the accelerator pedal was pressed fully to the floor, engaging a multi-disc clutch pack on the engine and forcing air through the carburetor into the cylinders. The unit cylinder block and crankcase were cast in steel with a cast iron cylinder head and an 8-10 liter capacity aluminum oil sump. Output was 100 hp in normal operation and 160 hp at 3,400 rpm with the supercharger engaged. Later 500 K engines adopted a marvelous rotary-type “Jumo” fuel pump built by aircraft engine manufacturer Junkers, an intricate mechanical gem that ensured adequate fuel flow when the blower cut in and fuel requirements soared. For the 500 K, Mercedes-Benz retained the four-speed gearbox with direct (1:1) third-speed and a pre-selector type overdrive fourth (Schnellgang, loosely translated as “speed gear”) with a 0.6:1 ratio engaged without using the clutch. The top three speeds were synchronized. The standard rear axle ratio of 5.11:1 of the 380 was raised to 4.9:1 or greater for the 500 K. Even in standard form the 500 K was lavishly equipped with two spare wheels and tires, safety glass, electric windshield wipers, hydraulic brakes with vacuum booster and 370-mm diameter drums, central lubrication, 12-volt electrical system and a centrally mounted fog light. 500 K production continued for three years, through 1936. 342 examples were built. Of them just 29 were bodied with Roadster and Special Roadster coachwork. Creating a sporting shape on the 500 K’s 129½-inch wheelbase with a hood line high enough to clear the 500 K’s long stroke straight engine topped by its valve gear is a daunting task. Only the most accomplished and sensitive designers have succeeded with similar challenges, and their creations, whether on Mercedes-Benz, Duesenberg, Alfa Romeo or Rolls-Royce chassis, are masterpieces of the artful combination of engineering and design in the integration of disparate masses. Offered in two successive versions, the first series Spezial Roadster is a true roadster, without rollup windows, with a fully disappearing top and a short tapered tail topped by twin spares set off by stalk-mounted taillights. The Spezial Roadsters’ remarkable coachwork begins with the long hood needed to accommodate the length of the straight-eight engine. Further extending the front of the 500 K, the wheels’ centerline is well forward of the radiator and classic Mercedes-Benz grille, giving an expanse of sweeping fender that introduces and accentuates the hood’s length and severity. The cowl is topped by a steeply swept vee windscreen usually accented by one or two small spotlights. The top of the doors is sculptured in a pleasing curve that emulates the fender’s sweep, the “low door” that accents the 500 K Spezial Roadster’s sporting presence and appeal. The door sweep is accented by a bright molding along its edge which continues from the doors down the sweeping tail. The fender margin is accented by a complementary bright accent that continues over the rear wheel arch and down the fender edge to the tail’s margin. It creates a harmonious design that blends the car’s mass into an integrated whole that belies its size when seen without familiar objects to give scale. Chassis no. 105380 The car offered here was completed February 6, 1935 at Sindelfingen with the beautiful and highly desirable Roadster coachwork and immediately shipped to Berlin where it was the centerpiece of the Mercedes-Benz display from February 14 through 24 at the Berlin Motor Show. At the time, it was finished in an intriguing early form of metallic green. It is pictured on page 182 of Jan Melin’s authoritative book Mercedes-Benz 8, The Supercharged 8-Cylinder Cars of the 1930s and has been identified by Mr. Melin as this chassis. Following the Motor Show it remained in Berlin until March 22 when it was shipped to the Mercedes-Benz agency in Aachen, Germany. The Kommission paper identifies it as sold a month later, on April 25, 1935, to Hans Friedrich Prym of Stolberg. Prym’s family company had developed the press fastener, i.e. “snap,” for clothing and apparel in 1903, establishing a leading position in that field that continues to the present day. Its interim history is unknown at this time, but when it turned up in the collection of pioneer collector Russell Strauch in the 1970s, it was still in excellent original condition. By the time of Strauch’s death in 1976 it had been acquired by Don Dickson, and it remained in his collection until sold in 1988 to Richie Clyne for the Imperial Palace Collection which commissioned a cosmetic restoration in 1991 from Mike Fennell Enterprises in Saugus, California. Richie Clyne recalls the Roadster well as it was the IP’s signature car for many years, featured in the collection’s publicity and posters, and remembers that, “It ran like a top. All we did was a cosmetic restoration of a wonderful, original, low miles car.” Specifically, Richie Clyne recalls that no accessories were added to the Roadster during its cosmetic freshening. It is beautifully presented, from the radiator stone-guard to the lovely mother of pearl instrument panel and white steering wheel. It has been for many years one of the core elements of the Lyon Family Collection, where it represented the very finest of the W 29 500 K series in both performance and, particularly, in the deftly shaped, balanced and superbly constructed coachwork of Sindelfingen in the rare and beautiful Roadster style. Finished in rich red highlighted by chrome wire wheels, whitewall tires, dual rear spares, a pair of windshield post-mounted spotlights, chrome outside exhaust headpipes and chrome body accent moldings, its dramatically raked vee windshield accents the sweeping fenders with integrated running boards. Both front and rear fenders are slightly skirted, reinforcing the effect of their sweep but also presenting a glimpse of the rugged and purposeful chassis frame and suspension – and even a chance to highlight the chrome exhaust collector pipe under the right front fender. The interior is upholstered in supple tan leather with a matching tan single layer cloth top. The top ingeniously folds nearly flush with the rear deck under a matching top boot cover, an important distinguishing feature from the bulky double layer tops of the corresponding cabriolet coachwork. Inspection In preparation for the car’s offering in Monterey this August, it was personally inspected in California by two seasoned experts from Mercedes-Benz Classic Germany. In their expert opinion, they concluded that the car has a correct 500 K replacement motor of the same series. The frame number could not be immediately located, but this is of little consequence as a large-scale dismantling of the front end would have to be conducted and would disrupt the integrity of the complete restoration. The transmission, in particular, is of another series but is nevertheless a correct 500 K transmission. The correct, original body number was also located. Nevertheless, it has clearly benefited from a full restoration and continues to present extremely well. One Mercedes-Benz expert described the 500 K Roadster by saying, “these cars have never been ‘un-valuable’…new generations swoon at the sight of them” – as has every generation since 1933. Mercedes-Benz 500 K Roadsters, particularly the harmoniously designed and executed 1st series offered here, give their owners special satisfaction from their combination of style and performance. Magnificently designed, fastidiously constructed and assiduously maintained by a succession of owners, most recently by the Lyon family in their wonderful collection with fulltime professional maintenance and constant attention to any need, 500 K Roadster 105380’s effect, whether on the road or in a concours, is arresting. It presents a rare opportunity for other collectors to experience its allure and satisfaction. Chassis no. 105380 Engine no. 105380 Body no. 200199

  • USAUSA
  • 2011-08-19
Hammer price
Show price

1964 Aston Martin DB5

Please note that this lot includes, in addition to the Aston Martin DB5 Bond car, the following items, generously donated by sponsors: • A stay for you and 10 friends at the GoldenEye Hotel & Resort in Jamaica, the original Caribbean estate of Ian Fleming and the birthplace of James Bond where all 14 novels were created! Estimated value: £40,000 • Commemorative Dormeiul ‘Vanquish II’ fabric to be utilized in the creation of a custom-tailored suit by famous British tailoring house Gieves & Hawkes of No.1 Savile Row, London, who assisted in dressing Sean Connery with bespoke tailoring for all six of his appearances as James Bond, including in the classics Goldfinger and Thunderball. Sartorially regarded as one of the world’s finest fabrics, it has been woven with solid gold thread in keeping with the Goldfinger theme. Estimated value: £30,000 282 bhp, 4.0-litre DOHC “Vantage” inline six-cylinder engine, triple SU HD8 carburettors, ZF five-speed manual gearbox, rack-and-pinion steering, four-wheel twin-servo Girling disc brakes, independent front suspension, with double wishbones, coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, rear suspension by live hypoid axle mounted on parallel trailing links, transversely located by Watt's linkage. Wheelbase: 104" - The only known remaining of the two DB5s which appeared on-screen in Goldfinger and Thunderball - Offered to the public for the first time from its original ex-factory owner - Impressive original condition with all movie gadgets intact - The ultimate icon of the Media Age In its fifth year of continuous development, the celebrated DB4 had become slightly longer and taller, evolving into an exciting long distance grand touring machine. Aston Martin then upped the ante late in 1963 with the introduction of the ultra-desirable DB5 model. Upgrades involved a larger, 4.0-litre engine and triple SU carburettors as standard equipment, resulting in a nearly 20 percent increase in horsepower (factory rated at 282 bhp). Therefore, it was no surprise when Eon Productions, the producers of the legendary James Bond film series, chose the new DB5 as the 007 conveyance, as it represented the epitome of British style and performance. The car had recently been displayed to great acclaim at the Earl’s Court Motor Show in London, and although other marques were briefly considered, the producers eventually returned to their first choice. The celebrated Silver Birch DB5, and the purposefulness with which it was deployed, embodied perfectly the virtues of the Bond character first launched with the Ian Fleming novels from 1953: stunning elegance, international intrigue and the fluid command of visceral power. Two DB5s were in fact used on-screen for the production of the timeless James Bond classics Goldfinger and Thunderball. One of those two cars has since disappeared without a trace; it was reported stolen in 1997 and is believed to have been destroyed. RM Auctions is proud to represent the other – and only known remaining – original 007 DB5 movie car. This will be the first time the car has ever been offered for sale, and it can indeed stake its claim as The Real James Bond Car. THE MOST FAMOUS CAR IN THE WORLD Such is the title of the book (by Dave Worrall, Solo Publishing, 1993) that chronicles the electrifying Aston Martin DB5 which roared into the popular consciousness with the release of the James Bond epic Goldfinger in 1964, the third instalment from the 007 series. Eon retained the services of set designer Ken Adam (reprising his modernist/fantastical approach made famous in Dr. No) and special effects guru John Stears to conceptualise and realise the ultimate transportation weapon from the already formidable DB5; in the process, they made a star out of the car. So from sketches from Ken Adam, John Stears (whose FX credits include flying cars from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang to Star Wars) went to work, re-engineering the DB5 to accommodate the plethora of hidden gadgetry for which the Bond DB5 has become so well-known. Revolving number plates, Browning machine guns, extending bumper overriders for ramming baddies, a smoke screen, an oil slick and nail spreaders, plus the infamous Martin-Baker fighter jet ejector seat, triggered by the little red button under the gear lever knob, are but some of the special features provided to the superspy by Q-Branch. Notably, Stears received two Oscars for Special Effects, one for his involvement in Thunderball and the second for his expertise on the blockbuster original Star Wars. The result created a worldwide sensation, for the 007 character, for the film series and for Aston Martin. The cultural impact of these early Bond films cannot be overstated, as the franchise became the most successful in history, with the character very effectively revived now, well into the 21st century. Indelibly ingrained into the minds of countless 14-year-old boys, the Bond DB5 image was memorialised on innumerable posters and in successive iterations of Corgi toy versions – their most successful car model ever, which remains in production today. Many of those boys grew up dreaming about owning the real thing… FMP 7B (DB5/1486/R) - THE REAL JAMES BOND CAR As seen on screen wearing the UK registration BMT 216A, the DB5 on offer here was the “stand-in” car used in Goldfinger and retrospectively became identified as the Road Car, as the first Effects Car proved to be cumbersome to handle, laden with its heavy gadgets. Interestingly, FMP 7B was fitted with the more powerful Vantage engine (400/1469/V, although running on the standard triple SU-carburettor setup, same as the Effects Car). This is logical as the Road Car was to figure prominently in the fast driving sequences. Indeed, FMP 7B was given substantial screen time in Goldfinger, notably from the scenes at the Stoke Park Golf Club and, even more recognisably, when Bond is spying on Mr. Goldfinger from the picturesque Furka Pass in Switzerland. As the Road Car in Goldfinger, FMP 7B was also fitted with a special exhaust system which eliminated the rear resonators, giving the car a distinctive throaty roar. This more dramatic sound was dubbed in for all scenes involving movement of the Effects Car as well. After sharing the well-known opening scene of Thunderball with FMP 7B, Eon asked Aston Martin to fit the full complement of effects to the Road Car as well, which it carries to this day. According to Roger Stowers, the official Archivist of Aston Martin Lagonda, the gadgets in the factory-built car (FMP 7B) were designed for dependability, anticipating an afterlife as a promotional vehicle. He said that the car had to reliably repeat all the special film stunts over and over again. “In the film, the gadgets only had to work once!” It is also important to note that the Effects Car, after its useful life as a film prop, was completely decommissioned of its gadgets, the items discarded, and the car subsequently sold by the Factory as a standard street automobile. Thus, FMP 7B is not just the only remaining example but also remarkably original, in that its specification had not changed since its appearance in Thunderball and virtually all its distinctive gadgets remain remarkably intact. With the release of Goldfinger, it soon became apparent that the DB5 had created a sensation, and the movie cars were sent out on promotional duty, with FMP 7B making a display appearance at the New York World's Fair in 1965. By the time Thunderball was released and screening continuously in virtually every town in 1966, Eon Productions commissioned the production of two additional replica Bond DB5s from Aston Martin, to be used for promotion. Now known as the Press Cars, they, along with the factory-owned film cars, were kept very busy with international appearances at theatrical openings and exhibitions. By the end of the promotional tour, ticket sales for Thunderball had exceeded those of any other Bond film to date and still remain the high water mark for global ticket sales for the 007 series. Of the two Press Cars produced for Eon Productions (neither of which appeared on screen), one was sold by RM Auctions at our Arizona sale in January 2006 for nearly $2.1M. The other resides in the Dutch National Motor Museum. Today, FMP 7B remains in the possession of its first and only ex-factory owner, Jerry Lee of Philadelphia. Mr. Lee has enjoyed the car for over 40 years, treated it appropriately as a work of fine art, and stored it faithfully in a special, climate-controlled James Bond room of his home. An unabashed enthusiast of new technologies and the latest gadgetry, Mr. Lee was of course captivated by the Bond films. Upon hearing of the sale in 1969 of the replica Press Cars, he contacted Aston Martin Lagonda to inquire as to the whereabouts of the real car. Informed that it too had retired from the promo circuit, indeed it was still owned by Aston Martin. With the assistance of AML North America general manager Rex Woodgate, Mr. Lee eventually acquired FMP 7B from the Factory, for the then-princely sum of $12,000 US. Mr. Lee travelled to London personally to collect FMP 7B, where he orchestrated one final promotional event in the UK, centred around an appearance at the Playboy Club in Curzon Street, surrounded by Playboy Bunnies and the blinding light of popping flashbulbs, followed by a party in the penthouse suite, which was renamed the “007 Room” just for the occasion. Back in the USA, and after a brief series of promotional appearances for Rex Woodgate, Mr. Lee withdrew the car from further public exhibition. The car was subsequently shown publicly exactly three times over the ensuing 30+ years: once at the New York Motor Show in 1981 (making its second appearance there), secondly at The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia in February 1986, along with an appearance by Lois Maxwell, the original Miss Moneypenny, and lastly at the Meadow Brook Concours d'Elegance circa 1992. Otherwise, and until 2010, the car has remained completely out of public view and is therefore the least exposed of the original or replica film cars. FMP 7B TODAY The Bond DB5 was found just where legend had it, safe and secure in the special, purpose-built room in Jerry Lee's home. Clean but unrestored, the car had seen virtually zero road use during Mr. Lee's custodianship. The odometer shows around 30,000 miles, mostly, one presumes, from its tour usage. It was repainted at some stage, while the original dark grey interior (never black, as many assume) remains in generally good condition, displaying a remarkably authentic and appealing original patina to match the mileage. Since extraction from Mr. Lee's home, a careful recommissioning programme was performed by top technicians at the award-winning RM Auto Restoration shop. Mechanically, this included a head-off engine service, clutch work, a fully rebuilt braking system and finally new exhaust piping to the original configuration designed for its exciting exhaust note. The systems running the modified devices have been repaired and serviced as well, for more reliable and robust demonstration. So today, we are happy to report, the car is once again in roadworthy condition with its factory-installed movie gadgets returned to working order. Driving the James Bond Aston Martin is both exhilarating and awe-inspiring – if only the Mona Lisa had wheels! After more than 40 years as the original, first ex-factory owner of this important icon, Mr. Lee is selling the car to further the charitable work of The Jerry Lee Foundation, a multi-national initiative dedicated to solving social problems associated with poverty, with an emphasis on crime prevention. The Foundation supports programmes at the University of Pennsylvania and Cambridge University (UK), as well as in Australia, Norway and Washington, DC, and has established the Stockholm Prize in Criminology for which Mr. Lee received a Swedish knighthood in 2008. Various items of memorabilia, including several collectible and autographed items, will be included with the sale of FMP 7B, as well as historical documents including a copy of the original Bill of Sale from Aston Martin, its authentication certificate from the British Motor Industry Heritage Trust and period photographs. The offer of FMP 7B presents a unique opportunity to acquire what is unquestionably one of the most desirable products of our popular culture, one whose image is indelibly stamped on our psyches and with an allure that continues to this day. There may in fact be no object of greater fascination produced in the Media Age. The astute buyer of FMP 7B will not only attain The Most Famous Car In The World but also a singular piece of history that cannot be duplicated at any price. Full details of the operating systems are available in the supplemental catalogue or online at www.rmauctions.com/bond. Special thanks to Dave Worrall and Mike Ashley. DOCUMENTS: Bill of Sale Addendum The original registration number ‘FMP 7B’ for the Aston Martin DB5 Bond car is available from DVLA in the UK. We are informed that if the car is taxes paid in the UK, then the potential buyer of the car could apply for this license plate to be registered to the car at the point of registration, although the new buyer will have to satisfy himself of the procedure. Please note that should this vehicle remain in the UK, HMRC has verbally confirmed that this vehicle is eligible for the reduced Import Tax Rate of just of 5% collected on the full purchase price of the vehicle. Chassis no. DB5/1486/R

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2010-10-27
Hammer price
Show price

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

300 bhp, 3,286 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual rear-mounted transaxle, tubular steel frame, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of only two originally finished in Nero on Nero Under 25,000 documented original miles Well-known long-term history Fresh, exacting ground-up restoration Ferrari Classiche certification application submitted Please note, internet bidding will not be offered on this lot. Interested parties wishing to bid remotely are encouraged to bid via telephone or absentee. Please click here to register. In late 1966, Ferrari used the Paris Motor Show to debut the latest development of its 275 GTB, the V-12 berlinetta that had been introduced to replace the long-running 250 series just two years earlier. With the addition of a second overhead camshaft to each cylinder bank, Ferrari squeezed one final iteration out of the venerable 60-degree, short-block Colombo motor that had powered the 250 and early 275 models, and in the process, they created the first dual overhead-cam engine ever used in a Ferrari road car. The engine was equipped standard with six Weber carburetors, which were previously just an option on the single-cam powerplant, and this new engine configuration distinguished itself by developing an additional 20 horsepower. The newly christened 275 GTB/4, aptly named for its four-cam-valve actuation, did not visually compromise any aspects of the prior 275 GTB’s beautiful Pininfarina body design, even with the addition of a sporty raised hood bulge to accommodate the additional hardware. The 275 GTB/4 is deemed by many Ferrari collectors to be the best looking and performing variant of the late 1960s V-12 berlinetta, and it was produced in a sparing quantity of approximately just 330 examples. The model’s rarity, ever-rewarding performance characteristics, and classic good looks have made it one of the most celebrated grand touring Ferraris of all time. The stunning “four cam” offered here is documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini, who notes that factory records state the car as having been delivered in Nero (20-B-50) with matching Nero (VM 8500) Connolly leather interior. As the current owner recounts, the factory further records this as one of only two 275 GTB/4s finished in this menacing, impressive color scheme. The factory completed the car in June 1967, and the following month, it was delivered to its original owner through Motor S.a.s., the official Roman dealer. Today, the 275 GTB/4 is loved by a who’s who of Ferrari-admiring entertainers. That was also true in period, as the original owner of this car was “Little Tony,” the award-winning and incredibly popular Italian vocalist of the 1960s. Drawing inspiration from Little Richard and Elvis Presley, his recordings regularly sold in excess of a million copies in their home market, and he performed to sold-out crowds worldwide for 40 years. He was an enthusiast of Maranello’s finest automobiles and used this 275 GTB/4 to replace a 250 GT Cabriolet. Little Tony, born Antonio Ciaccia, was a resident since birth of San Marino, and he registered the Ferrari there as RSM 4597. On January 9, 1968, the car passed to its second Italian owner, Erminio Merlo, of Milan, where it was registered as MI E 96317 and continued to be serviced in Modena. Merlo passed the car later in 1968 to the Società Manutenzione Industriale Generali M.I.G. S.r.l., of Livorno, presumably for one of its directors. The car was re-registered on Livorno plates LI 113481, and it remained in the Società’s care until March 1971, when the registration was canceled due to the 275 GTB’s export to the United States. The Berlinetta’s first known American owner was Jake Weaver, who took possession of the car in 1979. It had been repainted red by that time, but it still showed only 17,000 miles. Weaver sold the car in 1981 to well-known Ferrari collector and enthusiast Neal Shevin, of Evanston, Illinois. Mr. Shevin was the 275 GTB/4’s longest-term owner, as he cared for it for a remarkable 26 years. In 2007, chassis number 10063 was then acquired by Alex Bize, a prominent businessman, in continuation of its tradition of prominent caretakers. The car was most recently acquired by a well-known Southern California Ferrari dealer, who intended to drive it every day, as he does his 250 GT Cabriolet. Upon learning that it was one of only two four-cams finished in black, he decided to refinish the car in its original colors. As restoration progressed, it was realized that the rest of the car, including its engine compartment and suspension, would be overshadowed by the new show-quality paint, interior, and chrome. As a result, it was decided to restore those elements to “factory new” status as well. A partial tool kit and owner’s manuals were also acquired for the car. Most recently, the owner has applied for Ferrari Classiche certification, which remains in progress. In every respect, this stunning 275 GTB/4 has been returned to exceptional condition and appearance. It is still equipped with its original matching-numbers engine and has now covered under 25,000 miles in its pampered lifetime, as documented by Marcel Massini. It is the ideal four-cam for any illustrious collection, especially for the enthusiast who appreciates the lean, mean character that only a black over black Ferrari provides. Chassis no. 10063 Engine no. 10063 Body no. A0172

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
Show price
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1933 Pierce-Arrow Silver Arrow

160 bhp, 429 cu. in. side-vale L-head V-12 engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle with semi-elliptical leaf-spring suspension and ball bearing shackles, and four-wheel Stewart-Warner power-assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 139 in. The car that inaugurated the streamlined automotive age Recognized as the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair show car Formerly owned by D. Cameron Peck and Henry Austin Clark Jr. One of three known survivors of five originally built An impossibly rare and desirable CCCA Full Classic A CENTURY OF PROGRESS On May 27, 1933, 427 sparkling acres of the best technology that man could produce opened to the world in Burnham Park on the Lake Michigan shoreline of Chicago. Dubbed “A Century of Progress,” the 1933 World’s Fair brought the world’s achievements to the Windy City. The Graf Zeppelin drifted in from Germany, the first Major League Baseball All-Star Game played at Comiskey Park, and the streamlined Zephyr train made a record-breaking dash into town for display. Most dazzling for car enthusiasts was undoubtedly the Travel and Transport Building, which showcased the best and, frequently, most expensive automobiles that America had to offer. There was the one-off Duesenberg Model SJ Torpedo Sedan, nicknamed “Twenty Grand” for its cost in 1933 dollars, and Packard’s advanced V-12-powered Sport Sedan, known as the “Car of the Dome” for its central position in the building. Cadillac presented a sleek fastback Aero-Dynamic Coupe with no fewer than 16 cylinders. Even among this rarefied company, Pierce-Arrow’s Silver Arrow stood out. Its creation was a meeting of the minds of youthful stylist Phillip O. Wright and new Pierce-Arrow President Roy Faulkner. Based upon a 139-inch-wheelbase, 12-cylinder chassis, it had an automatic clutch and power-assisted brakes, among other advances. But these advancements all paled in comparison to the gleaming silver coachwork, a streamlined design with a roof that covered, in one smooth plane, all of the way to the rear of the car; flush-fitting doors with door handles inset out of the airstream; and a “step-down” interior that predicted Cord by three years and Hudson by 15. According to Paul J. Auman, the superintendent of Studebaker’s experimental body department, as quoted in the December 1999 issue of Collectible Automobile, the first Silver Arrow was sent to New York in time for the Automobile Show held there earlier in the year. The second, fourth, and fifth cars were sent to the Pierce-Arrow factory in Buffalo, New York, for various promotional uses. Meanwhile, this example, car number 3, was the one sent to Chicago for viewing at the “A Century of Progress” exhibition. SILVER ARROW NUMBER 3 The car offered here is strongly believed to have been the number 3 Silver Arrow that was shown at A Century of Progress, and it has been recognized as such from very early on in its life. The World's Fair car is said to have been sold, following the festivities, to an artist living in nearby Lake Forest, Illinois. Lake Forest is roughly two miles from Lake Bluff, the town where, in the late 1930s, the car offered here was owned by Charles Overall, who was an illustrator known for his depictions of Abraham Lincoln and Charles Lindbergh. Records held by the National Automotive History Collection of the Detroit Public Library confirm that the car offered here, serial number 2575029, is that which belonged to Mr. Overall and that he eventually sold it for $250 to D. Cameron Peck, heir to the Bowman Dairy fortune in Chicago and a prominent early car collector. The car’s early Chicago provenance lends further credence to its having been the World’s Fair car, as neither of the other two surviving Silver Arrows are known to have spent time in the Windy City. Peck’s handwritten notes on the inventory form for this car also indicate it as the “A Century of Progress” car. In the late 1940s, Peck began to move out of the hobby, and in 1949, he sold the Silver Arrow, still in unrestored condition, to Henry Austin Clark Jr., as is documented by paperwork on file. Best remembered as the personable and colorful proprietor of the Long Island Automotive Museum near Southampton, Clark was a Peck contemporary among early enthusiasts. Clark’s interest focused on Brass Era automobiles, which he gathered extensively and, in the process, saved from certain destruction at the hands of scrappers. He was interested in Classics as well and was a longtime CCCA member. His interest in the Silver Arrow was likely provoked by its rarity and unique styling, as well as by its story. Always one to enjoy a good tale, “Austie” liked to muse that the car had probably been part of the Capone mob fleet. The Silver Arrow was brought by train to New York State and was restored completely by the renowned Gustav Reuter’s Reuter Coach Works in the Bronx. Photographs on file from the Reuter Coach Works Archive dated June 18, 1950, show how well preserved the car’s bodywork was after two decades and that it remained solid, intact, and complete, making it an easy basis for restoration. Documents from Austin Clark’s files, copies of which are included in the file, note that the Pierce was refinished at Reuter’s suggestion in French Grey lacquer. Following completion of the restoration, the Silver Arrow remained a favorite part of the Clark collection on Long Island for over a decade. It was, during that time, a favorite of enthusiasts and magazine editors alike, appearing in the pages of Mechanix Illustrated and in a beautiful color drawing in their competitor Popular Mechanics’ book How to Restore Antique & Classic Cars in 1954. In 1962, Automobile Quarterly, which would become one of the most famous automotive periodicals in the country, published its inaugural issue, Volume 1, Number 1, which included Henry Austin Clark Jr.’s selection of 10 great automobiles illustrated with paintings by the legendary Leslie Saalburg. Naturally, Austie’s own Silver Arrow was included, depicted by Saalburg in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. In 1963, the car was sold at the first of three landmark auctions of Clark’s automobile collection. It eventually made its way into the collection of its present owner, where it has remained for over two decades. In the early 1990s, it was refinished, with the body painted a lightly metallic pewter with a dark charcoal molding, striped in red. The interior is finished in correct striped broadcloth, surrounded by beautiful tiger and birdseye maple. The Silver Arrow has been maintained over the years and presents nicely, retaining so much of the original character that has been stripped away from many cars during well-intentioned restorations. Among the numerous legendary show cars that made a massive impression at A Century of Progress, the Packard “Car of the Dome” and Duesenberg “Twenty Grand” remain in long-term private collections from which they will not soon emerge, and Cadillac’s Aero-Dynamic Coupe no longer survives. That leaves the World’s Fair Silver Arrow—now offered publically for the first time in at least three decades—as the only present opportunity to acquire one of these dramatic visions of the future. Chassis no. 2575029 Engine no. 360005

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
Hammer price
Show price

1933 Delage D8S Coupe Roadster by deVillars

The 1934 Salon Paris Show Car, described by L’Auto Carrosserie and VU magazines as “Triumphant in all Concours” events and the "masterwork of Carrosserie deVillars", is without question one of the most beautiful prewar open Delages ever built. With its one-off custom two-place coachwork by deVillars, exceptional provenance and ownership, the Delage represents the very best of French design in every respect. Specifications: 120 bhp 4,050cc overhead valve inline eight cylinder engine with four speed gearbox, solid axle and semi-elliptic leaf spring front suspension, live axle and semi-elliptic leaf spring rear axle, front and rear Andre Hartford Tele-Hydraulic shock absorbers, four wheel hydraulically actuated drum brakes and 18” Rudge-Whitworth center lock wire wheels. Wheelbase: 130" D8 - La Belle Voiture Française The D8 was Louis Delage’s ultimate statement of the luxury, sophistication and refinement of the marque that bore his name. Racing cars bearing the Delage name were among the most successful in Europe. Innovative and streamlined, they challenged the best from Bugatti, Mercedes-Benz, Alfa Romeo, Sunbeam and Maserati. The D8 would bring Delage’s standing among road automobile builders into line with its vaunted reputation in racing and its expensive victory in the 1927 European world championship with the jewel-like 1500cc dual overhead camshaft eight-cylinder Grand Prix. The Delage D8 was designed by Maurice Gaultier, who had come to Delage in 1910 to run the drive train department, left to work for Georges Irat, then returned in 1925 as chief engineer. Its 4-liter pushrod overhead valve straight eight with five main bearings made 105 bhp and was possessed of a smoothness and silence that put it in Hispano territory. The D8 made its debut at the October 1929 Paris Salon. Its reception was ecstatic. It was a car designed and intended to be the ideal basis for bespoke coachwork and D8s became very popular on the European concours circuit, bearing bodies from all the renowned coachbuilders. Delage proudly boasted “At the Concours d’Elegance held during 1930 in the principal cities of Europe, Delage Straight Eights received more awards than any other car.” It was, to quote another company mantra, “La Belle Voiture Française” – the beautiful French automobile. D8S – The True Achievement In 1930, Delage added a sports version to its D8 range. Available only on the short 130-inch wheelbase chassis, the new car was not just a shortened D8 but quite a different car. In fact, about the same time the Delage engineering team was designing a new engine to be installed in a military aircraft. Louis Delage, always keen to produce impeccable motor cars, decided to link the two, and asked his staff to produce a brand new head with specially-made short springs located next to the valve to avoid any breakage. The carburetor, too, made especially by Delage for the D8S, was of aviation type. The sump, a piece of artistry by itself, was cast with six longitudinal tubes through it to let for air-cooling. Altogether, the engine produced no less than 120 bhp and a great deal of torque. The chassis was lowered, the suspension revised and even the back axle and differential were particular to the S series. Externally, to make the S more aerodynamic, a new type of radiator shell was employed, which required a special hood and firewall that made the D8S even more visually distinctive. The Autocar tested one to 99 mph, then demonstrated a zero-to-sixty time of 15 seconds, a remarkable feat and better than a supercharged Bentley. A lightweight roadster model set a record average speed of 109.619 mph over 24 hours at Montlhéry, a mark bettered by Britons George Eyston and Kaye Don in a similar car in 1932. Alas, the Depression was reaching Europe, and only 99 D8Ss were sold. As seen in a period advertisement of “A.J. Miranda, Sole USA concessionaires for Delage Automobiles, Park Avenue NY,” the price of a standard-bodied D8S was about $8,000 in 1931, delivered in New York City - surely not a price many could afford at a time when the world’s financial markets had dropped by more than fifty percent in two years’ time. Carrosserie de Villars Few coachbuilding companies have been created from scratch just for the purpose of working on both the owner’s and his friends’ cars but that is exactly the motivation behind “la Carrosserie de Villars.” Like many rich Americans, Frank Jay Gould, son of the railroad magnate Jay Gould, left America in his youth to enjoy “la grande vie a Paris.” Unlike most of them, he had no intentions of becoming a gentleman of leisure. Starting in 1910, he built a business enterprise including four casinos, palatial hotels like the Provençal in Juan les Pins and Le Palais de la Mediterranée in Nice, a chocolate factory and a paper mill. He and his wife Florence surrounded themselves with beauty and luxury, amassing one of the world’s most celebrated collections of oil paintings and fine furniture. They were true patrons of the arts for more than fifty years, associating with personalities ranging from Douglas Fairbanks to Mistinguett, from Picasso to Paul Klee. Among his other enterprises Gould maintained a workshop to repair the coachwork of his and his friends’ automobiles. At some point Frank Jay Gould decided not only to repair, but also to create his own style of coachwork. When his daughter, Dorothy, married a Swiss gentleman named Baron Roland de Graffenried de Villars, an expert polo player and playboy well-placed in the French aristocracy, Gould named his newly created company with the patronyme of his son-in-law, “De Villars.” Success followed swiftly. Thanks to a very strict boss –Gould himself – who said “there was no friendship in business,” the company gained a solid reputation and was acclaimed by l’Auto Carrosserie in 1932 as a place where perfectionism reigned. Standards were high and precision and craftsmanship were part of every step in the building process. With no more than 25 bodies produced a year, the company was focused on style and perfection and had the time to achieve it. To cite the well-known French historian Alain Dollfus, “some people said that de Villars did Figoni [style] with the seriousness of Franay.” Of course, since Frank Jay and Florence Gould were well established among the most renowned personalities of France and Europe, their clients came from the same mold. From the Princess de Faucigny-Lucinges to Prince Ali Khan, and from the Duchess of Montesquiou to Mrs. Louis Arpels of the jewelry firm Van Cleef and Arpels, all were members of high society. Although most of the prestigious chassis found their way to the suburban Parisian premises of Carrosserie de Villars, their associations with Hispano-Suiza and Delage are best remembered. The company’s low annual production enabled it to remain profitable until WWII. The price for exclusivity was paid right at de Villars, with limited production each coachbuilt design was expensive and allowed them to remain independent until it was sold in 1945 to Jean Daninos, founder of Facel. Time hasn’t erased the magnificence of de Villars’ most impressive creations, with Pebble Beach awarding the collaboration of the pair of de Villars and Delage at least once in 1996. Chassis no. 38021 This lovely sporting Delage D8S with de Villars Coupe Roadster coachwork graced the 1933 Salon de Paris at the Grand Palais. Built to showcase both the superlative engineering of the Delage chassis and the lovely lines of de Villars coachwork, the car succeeded on both accounts. By itself it was enough for any car lover to make the pilgrimage to the Salon. The press was equally impressed, with laudatory commentaries published with two photographs in L’Auto-Carrosserie and a coachbuilder’s sketch in the equally important revue La Carrosserie. In the fall of 1934, the D8S car was honored in Vu, one of France’s most prestigious magazines, with a beautiful image of the Delage depicting it as “triumphant in any concours d’elegance” which tells much about its successes during the summer season. To perfect the scoring board it was also featured in the Delage catalog for the year. Chassis no. 38021 was truly a tour de force for de Villars. With its very long, low hood that stretched unbroken from the grille almost to the base of the low, raked windshield, its frame rendered in body color for maximum effect, sweeping skirted fenders and the beautiful contours make the de Villars Coupe Roadster looks like it is going a hundred miles an hour even while aiming down the promenade. Pleasing, subtle shapes and details reward the contemplative onlooker. Originally finished in white, the lovely Delage’s chassis is also white – and the contrast between the sparkle of the wire wheels against the soft glowing white of the brake drums and chassis gives a crisp and clean appearance to the car. The compact and sleek white top looks as good erected as it does stowed away – flush with the tops of the body sides. The interior is as refined as the exterior, particularly the large white steering wheel, matching the exterior, and a lavish and intricate display of instruments. Following the Salon de Paris, the de Villars was sent to the main Delage showrooms on the exclusive Champs Elysees. Priced at well over 100,000 French francs, it was nothing more than a fantasy for most of the people who saw it there. While there were many enthusiasts for the car, its first owner would have to be someone of exceptional taste and wealth. That would be Sr. Aurelio Lerroux, the son of Sr. Alejandro Lerroux, who was, at the time, the Prime Minister of Spain. Lerroux kept the car registered in France as he most likely spent the 1934 season in one of the fashionable spots of the Riviera. The next owner of record, Sr. Rico, a friend of Aurelio Lerroux and the brother of the mayor of Madrid, had the car delivered to Spain in April 1935. Beginning in the early 1940s, the lovely Delage – her lines still both graceful and contemporary – was often seen with Rosalia Gullon as its driver, a lovely woman whose film career had made her a star even as she prepared to launch what would become one of the most successful fashion companies of the period. She may well have bought the car, but it may also have been a gift from a gentleman admirer. After all, as Peter Ustinov once said, “One drives, of course, an Alfa Romeo; one is driven in a Rolls-Royce, but one gives only a Delage to one’s favorite mistress.” In 1950, records show that 38021 had a most unusual owner – the “Gran Hotel Velasquez”, Madrid. The Delage was a most unlikely choice for a hotel shuttle; it seems more likely to have been engaged providing elegant personal transportation for an important hotel guest. It was in vogue at the time for the wealthy to take up residence in a personal suite within an elegant hotel – and there is no doubt that the de Villars Delage would have been utterly perfect to be placed at the disposal of a discreet, valued client. By the late 1950s, the de Villars Delage had entered a graceful retirement, (as pictured here in the layout) but, like an aging screen or stage star, more accustomed to the limelight than the wings, she awaited the chance to resume her career on the concours d’elegance circuit. Stored like a time capsule, it was forgotten by most – but still known by a few – for some 40 years until the aged de Villars Coupe Roadster, now painted red, emerged from retirement to hit the road again. All of it was there; not a single piece was missing. With only three owners over the last 40 years, it had largely remained stored, untouched and never driven for the bulk of its life. Today, The de Villars condition is exemplary It has benefited from a thorough, body off restoration several years ago while in the care of its current owner executed by marque specialists. The paintwork shows very well, as does the extensive brightwork throughout the coachwork of the car. The engine and bay are clean, well detailed and very correct while the underbody shows virtually no wear from use. The interior of the Delage is equally impressive, as the green leather piped with cream as intended by de Villars shows handsomely and complements the exterior color scheme and white steering wheel exquisitely The owner relates that the gearbox and engine remain fresh from the restoration and are still in virtually like new condition. Notably, the exhaust note gives off a fantastic and highly memorable sound. This is the first time that the Delage has been seen in public for at least the last 50 years; it is indeed a pleasure to rediscover the magnificence of such a master work and it is an event within itself. Despite being hidden away for so long, one can anticipate that its next public viewing will most certainly be on the greens of Pebble Beach. In the world of automobiles, some are valued for their exceptional engineering; others for the beauty of their coachwork. Some are prized for their rarity, while others have noteworthy historical importance. It is only when all these things combine that an individual motor car becomes a treasure to be revered for generations. RM Auctions is delighted to present the magnum opus of Delage and the D8S. In this very clear and crisp photograph, the D8S is pictured in the early 1950s still in Portugal. One can see that the car remains in very good, complete original condition. Additionally, the brightwork on the fenders is visible however it appears to have been painted over, the headlamps also appear to have been changed as well. Perhaps what is most important though is that the Delage's coachwork has not been disturbed throughout as the raked windshield, long hood and disappearing top remain just as they did when new and today. Photo Courtesy of Laurent Friry. Addendum Please note that a 2.5% import duty is payable on the hammer price of this motor car should the buyer be a resident of the United States. Chassis no. 38012

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-08-17
Hammer price
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1955 Ferrari 750 Monza by Scaglietti

Period racing history in Italy, Cuba and Venezuela Comprehensive restoration in the early 2000s, with a refresh in 2013 Ferrari Classiche certified With interesting, multi-continent period racing history, a recent restoration and Ferrari Classiche certification, this beautiful 750 Monza is a highly desirable example of Maranello’s rare four-cylinder sports racer. According to its factory build sheets, chassis number 0534 M was initially completed in March of 1955, after further testing, a 3.0-litre 750 Monza engine was fitted in April of 1955. Finished in rosso paint with a blue interior, the Scaglietti-bodied spider is believed to have been sold new in April 1955 to Count Bruno Sterzi of Milan, yet it is not confirmed if he raced the car during the 1955 season. The next season, the car was sold to Ottavio Guarducci in early 1956. His first known event was the Trofeo Vigorelli in March of 1956 at Monza, where he competed on race number 264. The car’s next event was the Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore in June of 1956, where it finished 17th overall. Guarducci assumed solo duties at the Aosta-Gran San Bernardo hill climb a month later and at the Grand Prix of Venezuela in November, finished in yellow with two blue stripes, roared to a 9th-place finish and 5th in class. In February 1957, the Monza was piloted by Guarducci at the Cuban Grand Prix in Havana, now featuring a head fairing and fin in the style of a Jaguar D-Type. It was sold to a Venezuelan owner by the end of the decade, and the original engine was reportedly removed around this time. The Ferrari finished first in class at the Premio Ciudad Ojeda in 1959 while driven by Jose Zilio, but in 1961 a significant accident side-lined the car during a race at Cucuta, Colombia. The Zilio brothers repaired the spider, modifying the coachwork with a truncated tail and changing the steering box to left-hand drive. Subsequently acquired by Domingo Olavarria of Venezuela, 0534 M surfaced in a scrapyard in Maracaibo by 1976, and was then sold to Edoardo Magnone of Dorzano-Vicenza, Italy, who was at the time the Venezuelan importer for Fiat. By 1983, the Monza had returned to Italy, and two decades of possession followed before Magnone offered the unrestored car for sale, eventually selling it to Emilio Comelli of Brescia in 2000. A ground-up restoration soon commenced, taking roughly five years to complete. Significantly, the car retains its correct, numbers-matching gearbox and a correct 750 Monza four-cylinder from 0470 MD was then fitted. The spider was next acquired by its current owner who entered the car at several vintage events, including Le Mitche Sport a Bassano del Grappa in June 2012 and the Mille Miglia Storica in 2011, 2013, 2014 and 2015. Notably, from 2013–2014 the Monza was treated to a full coachwork restoration by the experts at Quality Cars in Vigonza, Italy, and subsequently granted Ferrari Classiche certification. Eligible for the most desirable vintage tours worldwide due to its early build date, and sure to be welcomed at major concours d’elegance, this beautiful 750 Monza would make an outstanding addition to any collection. • Un passato di corse in Italia, Cuba e Venezuela • Il restauro delle parti meccaniche degli inizi del 2000 è stato seguito da alcuni interventi di carrozzeria nel 2013 • Certificata Ferrari Classiche Con un ricco storico di corse disputate in più continenti, il recente restauro e la certificazione Ferrari Classiche, questa bellissima 750 Monza è un raro esempio di Ferrari sportiva a quattro cilindri. Secondo i registri di fabbrica, l'auto con telaio 0534 M è stata inizialmente terminata nel marzo del '55, ma dopo una serie di test, nell'aprile dello stesso anno il motore è stato rimpiazzato da un 3 litri Monza. Verniciata in Rosso, con interni blu, si crede che la spider Scaglietti sia stata venduta nuova nell'aprile '55 al conte Bruno Sterzi di Milano, ma non c'è riscontro che abbia corso durante quella stagione. Per quella successiva fu venduta a Ottavio Guarducci, all'inizio del '56. E il suo primo evento noto è stato il Trofeo Vigorelli nel marzo del '56 a Monza, a cui ha partecipato col numero 264. La gara successiva è stata il Gran Premio Supercortemaggiore di giugno, dove è arrivata al 17° posto. Guarducci, poi, ha partecipato in solitaria alla Aosta-Gran San Bernardo il mese successivo e quindi al Gran Premio del Venezuela a novembre, dove l'auto, riverniciata di recente, gialla con due strisce blu, è arrivata al 9° posto assoluto e al 5° di classe. Nel febbraio del 1957, la Monza è stata guidata da Guarducci al Gran Premio cubano dell'Avana, ora con cupolino e pinna in stile Jaguar D-Type e una nuova vernice gialla. Venduta a un venezuelano alla fine degli anni '50, si dice che il motore originale sia stato sostituito questa volta. La Ferrari è arrivata prima di classe al Premio Ciudad Ojeda nel'59, guidata da José Zilio, ma nel '61 un incidente l'ha costretta al ritiro durante una gara a Cucuta, in Colombia. I fratelli Zilio hanno riparato la spider, modificandone la linea con una coda tronca e portando la guida a sinistra. Successivamente acquistata dal venezuelano Domingo Olavarria, l'auto con telaio 0534 M, riaffiora da uno sfascia carrozze di Maracaibo nel '76, quando viene venduta a Edoardo Magnone di Dorzano, Vicenza, all'epoca importatore venezuelano Fiat. Nel 1983 la Monza torna in Italia e rimane di proprietà di Magnone prima che la rivendesse, non restaurata, a Emilio Comelli di Brescia nel 2000. È allora che partì un restauro importante, che ha richiesto cinque anni di lavori. Interessante da notare che l'auto conserva il cambio originale e un corretto 750 Monza, quattro cilindri, proveniente dal telaio 0470 MD. Successivamente la spider è stata acquistata dal suo attuale proprietario, con cui ha partecipato a una serie di gare, tra cui Le Mitiche Sport di Bassano del Grappa, giugno 2012, e la Mille Miglia Storica nel 2011, 2013, 2014 e 2015. Dal 2013 al 2014, la carrozzeria della Monza è stata restaurata completamente dagli esperti di Quality Cars di Vigonza e successivamente ha ottenuto la certificazione Ferrari Classiche. Grazie alla sua data di costruzione con quest'auto si può partecipare alle gare storiche, come pure ai concorsi d'eleganza più famosi del mondo. Questa 750 Monza è una straordinaria aggiunta per qualsiasi collezione. Chassis no. 0534 M Gearbox no. 33 S

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
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1937 Talbot-Lago T150-C SS 'Goutte d’Eau' Coupé by Figoni et Falaschi

An authentic example of the famed Talbot-Lago ‘teardrop’ coupé Rare SWB lightweight T150-C SS sports-racing chassis; original chassis, engine, and drivetrain Restored to its original teardrop design first fitted to this chassis One of two examples with fully enclosed front fenders An iconic Figoni et Falaschi design, coveted the world over for its outstanding beauty Among the most desirable coachbuilt sporting automobiles of its era Chassis number 90110, offered here, is one of only two examples of the fabulous ‘Goutte d’Eau’ built by Figoni et Falaschi with fully enclosed front fenders—a feature more often seen on the company’s Delahaye designs of this period. The finished car left Talbot on 25 November 1937 carrying body number 677 and was identical to the body mounted earlier that year on chassis number 90107, the famous and widely photographed Goutte d’Eau that belonged to Princess Stella of Karputhala. Like so many other exceptional cars, chassis number 90110 was hidden during the war years, although it is likely that it was damaged during the hostilities. On 25 June 1946, the car was registered in the books of the famous coachbuilder Hermann Graber in Wichtrach, Switzerland. At that time, the owner, Mr H. Frey from Wengen, commissioned a new convertible body for the chassis in the post-war idiom, a procedure that was common at the time. Graber’s design drawings for this cabriolet are dated 11 May 1946. Importantly, the original chassis, engine, and drivetrain were retained. Mr Frey enjoyed his car for the next 20 years before it was acquired by Mr G. Frey of Zürich on 4 April 1966. Twenty-one years later, Mr G. Frey sold the car to the current owner on 29 January 1987. The car has therefore only had three owners for the past 71 years. In 2000, the owner decided to bring the car back to its first Figoni et Falaschi configuration. Auto Classique Touraine in Tours, France, was commissioned for the work. Managed by Patrick Delâge, grandson of Louis Delâge, Auto Classique Touraine is famous for its meticulous construction techniques, always seeking the highest level of originality and authenticity. The company was an ideal choice as it had already crafted a perfect re-creation of a Goutte d’Eau body for another T150-C SS. It took close to three years to complete this outstanding re-creation of the original fully enclosed teardrop coachwork. The progression of the work to a wholly authentic and correct standard is fully documented by a movie that was made over the course of the restoration. Furthermore, the paintwork has been recently treated by Agerra Detailing SA in Switzerland to display a better than new look. The Goutte d’Eau, or teardrop, is justly regarded as one of the most beautiful and enticing designs of all time. It is a shape that elevates form to the realm of art and a reference point for iconic beauty against which all other late-1930s automobiles are measured. Aficionados and amateurs alike are stopped in their tracks at concours when confronted with the serene perfection of its lines. Coupled with what the French call belle mécanique, nimble road manners, and superior acceleration for its time, courtesy of the T150-C SS chassis and drivetrain, it is a very exciting package that speaks directly to any serious automotive enthusiast. The first authentic ‘teardrop’ to be offered in recent years, chassis number 90110 is a rare opportunity to acquire a great car that will be the absolute focal point of any collection, event, or concours where it is presented. • Un autentico esempio delle famose Talbot-Lago ‘a Goccia d’Acqua’ coupé • Un raro telaio da corsa e per uso sportivo di T150-C SS alleggerito e con passo corto; telaio, motore e trasmissione originali • Fedele riproduzione della prima carrozzeria, a Goccia d’Acqua, montata su questo telaio • Uno dei soli due esemplari con parafanghi anteriori completamente chiusi • Un disegno tra i più belli di Figoni e Falaschi, una vettura ambita in tutto il mondo per la sua straordinaria bellezza • Tra le automobili più desiderate, con carrozzeria sportiva speciale, della sua epoca Il numero di telaio 90110, offerto qui, è uno dei due soli esemplari prodotti del favoloso disegno ‘Goutte d'Eau’ costruito da Figoni e Falaschi con i parafanghi anteriori completamente chiusi, una caratteristica vista più spesso applicata sulle vetture Delahaye del periodo. La vettura finita ha lasciato le officine Figoni il 25 Novembre 1937 con il numero di carrozzeria 677, con una carrozzeria identica a quella montata qualche mese prima sul telaio numero 90107, la famosa e ampiamente fotografata “Goutte d'Eau” che apparteneva alla principessa Stella di Karputhala. Come tante altre vetture eccezionali, anche quella con numero di telaio 90110 ha passato nascosta gli anni della guerra, quando, molto probabilmente, è stata comunque danneggiata. Il 25 giugno 1946, la vettura viene registrata nei libri del famoso carrozziere Hermann Graber a Wichtrach, Svizzera. Il proprietario del momento, il Signor H. Frey di Wengen, ha commissionato per il suo telaio una nuova carrozzeria aperta con un disegno realizzato nel linguaggio del dopoguerra; una procedura diffusa all’epoca. I disegni di progettazione di Graber per questa cabriolet sono datati 11 Maggio 1946. È importante sottolineare che il telaio, il motore e la trasmissione originali sono stati tutti conservati. Il Signor H. Frey ha goduto la sua auto per i successivi 20 anni prima che fosse acquistata, il 4 Aprile 1966, dal signor G. Frey di Zurigo. Ventuno anni dopo, il 29 Gennaio 1987, il signor G. Frey ha venduto l'auto all'attuale proprietario. La vettura ha quindi avuto solo tre proprietari negli ultimi 71 anni. Nel 2000, il proprietario ha deciso di riportare la macchina alla sua prima configurazione, quella di Figoni e Falaschi. La Auto Classique Touraine di Tours, in Francia, è stata commissionata per il lavoro. Gestita da Patrick Delâge, nipote di Louis Delâge, la Auto Classique Touraine è famosa per le sue tecniche di costruzione meticolosa, sempre alla ricerca del massimo livello di originalità e autenticità. La società è stata una scelta ideale in quanto aveva già creato una perfetta ricostruzione di una carrozzeria “a Goccia” per un altra T150-C SS. Ci sono voluti quasi tre anni per completare questa eccezionale ricostruzione della carrozzeria'originale, a goccia, completamente chiusa. La progressione del lavoro ed il livello di totale autenticità ricreata, sono ampiamente documentati in un film che è stato realizzato nel corso del restauro. Inoltre, la vernice è stata recentemente trattata dalla Agerra Detailing SA in Svizzera, per acquisire un aspetto migliore del nuovo. La Goutte d'Eau, o a Goccia d’Acqua, è giustamente considerato come uno dei disegni più belli e seducenti mai realizzati. Si tratta di una forma che si eleva al regno dell'arte, un punto di riferimento per la bellezza tradizionale, contro la quale si misurano tutte le altre automobili della fine degli anni ‘30. Esperti e non si devono arrendere, ai concorsi, quando si confrontano con la perfezione serena delle sue linee. Accoppiata con quella che i Francesi chiamano “una bella meccanica”, ha un agile comportamento su strada ed una accelerazione, per il suo tempo, superiore,. Grazie alla sua trasmissione ed al telaio T150-C SS, offre un pacchetto molto interessante che parla direttamente a tutti gli appassionati, seri, di automobili. Il primo autentico esemplare di vettura ‘a Goccia’ ad essere offerto in questi ultimi anni, la vettura con il numero di telaio 90110 è una rara opportunità di acquistare una grande macchina che sarà il punto focale assoluto di qualsiasi raccolta, evento o concorso dove verrà presentata. Chassis no. 90110

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-05-27
Hammer price
Show price

1955 Ferrari 375 MM Berlinetta by Pinin Farina

340 hp, 4,522 cc SOHC V-12 engine, three Weber 42 mm DCZ/3 carburettors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension by double wishbone and coil springs, rear live axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and trailing arms, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm (102.4") - The last 375 MM built: one-off Pinin Farina Berlinetta foreshadows the TdF - One of only ten 375 MM Berlinettas built - Matching-numbers - Restored by Wayne Obry, after 30 years continuous ownership - Shown new at Turin Motor Show (1955) - Shown at the most exclusive events: Pebble Beach, The Quail, Cavallino Classic, Villa d’Este - Class winner at Pebble Beach in 2004, Cavallino Classic in 2005 - Documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini For about a year in 1954-55, the Ferrari 375 MM was the .44 Magnum of sports-car racing. It was deafeningly loud and had a kick like a mule. Its Formula 1 V-12 engine could blow through the opposition, driven by the likes of Jack McAfee, Jim Kimberley, Ken Miles, Masten Gregory and Carroll Shelby. Conservatively estimated at 340 horsepower and with a 180 mph top speed, a 375 demanded the highest level of driving skill – especially coming out of the corners. It remains an unforgettable experience for drivers and spectators alike. Meanwhile, away from all the engine noise, tyre smoke and adrenaline-fuelled excitement, cooler heads in Italian design studios were defining the aggressive essence of Ferrari style – the family look that would mark the GT Berlinettas and Spyders of the future. Most of these elements appeared in the 340 and 375 Barchettas and Berlinettas, and this car, 0490 AM, is significant in that it is the very last 375 MM to be built by Pinin Farina in 1955. From here on, there would be 250 GT Ellenas and Tour de Frances, 410 Superamericas, 250 Testa Rossas and California Spyders. In all, there were only ten 375 MM Berlinetta coupés built and 14 Barchetta spyders. They’re all slightly different (0366 AM was re-bodied by Scaglietti after an accident), but 0490 AM is the end of the line. It’s also the last even-numbered car built by Pinin Farina. Future Ferrari styling cues that bowed on 0490 AM include front fender vents (which would be widely copied) and a lower grille with a flatter top, which projected in the style of the upcoming 1958 250 Testa Rossa and evolved into the 1965 275 GTB. 0490 AM also features rear window louvers, which would appear in the 250 GT TdF model, and headlights without bezels, which were continued on other models. One feature 0490 AM does not share with its siblings is the exaggerated rear-fender treatment. Provenance The history of 0490 AM is recorded in detail by Ferrari expert Marcel Massini. It is notable in that while the car was never raced, it was fortunately spared the extensive rebuilds that so often accompany an exciting past in motorsport. Mechanical work on 0490 AM continued at the Ferrari factory throughout December 1954 until the 22nd, when the chassis was completed following completion of the engine, gearbox and rear axle. On 10 March, the chassis arrived at Pinin Farina to be bodied by the expert coachbuilder. The completed car was displayed on the Ferrari stand at the 27th Turin Motor Show from 21 April to 1 May, 1955, next to a grey 250 Europa GT coupé, 0379 GT. The car was returned to Pinin Farina after the show for a significant number of detail modifications, as documented by Mr. Massini: • Small separate radiator access door with a lock was built into the hood in front of the air intake. • Chromed strip added on top of the hood scoop. • Oval rear mirror was removed from the dashboard and a rectangular mirror attached to the roof instead. • Side windows were replaced by sliding windows. • Bakelite shift knob was replaced by a metal one. • Outside fuel filler cap was fitted with a lock. • Spears on side vents removed. • Glove box added. • Ashtray added. • A medal of St. Christopher, the patron saint of travellers, added to the transmission tunnel. • Leather straps on bonnet replaced. • Chrome strip on side window modified. • Possible repaint from ivory to silver gray metallic. On 3 November, the date was engraved on the car’s Sekurit windshield, and before the end of the year it was in the hands of its first owner, Ferrari dealer and race driver Inico Bernabei, in Rome. He resold it, apparently quite soon after and most probably to Count Antonio Naselli of Trevinano di Acquapendente in Tuscany, about 80 miles north of Rome. Naselli didn’t keep it long; 0490 AM was exported to the U.S. in 1960 and sold to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York City. Chinetti repainted the Berlinetta in Rossa Corsa and sold it to Ed Weschler of Natosha, Wisconsin through Augie Pabst in Milwaukee. Weschler paid $8,000, an undoubted bargain. Weschler registered 0490 AM as Q32 502 in Wisconsin in 1961 and kept it until the late 1960s, attending a Ferrari meeting at Road America at Elkhart Lake in that time. He sold it to Carl De Bickero, of Palos Heights, Illinois, who repainted 0490 AM red with a black roof and registered it on 1970 Illinois plates 715 166. On 23-25 April, 1970, De Bickero showed 0490 AM at the 9th Annual Ferrari Club of America Annual Meeting in Chicago and won the trophy for the shortest distance driven – certainly a tongue-in-cheek award. De Bickero showed the car again at the regional Ferrari Club of America meet at Lawrence Knaack’s home in Long Grove, Illinois on 22 August, 1971, but in 1972 De Bickero sold 0490 AM to Lawrence Slattery of Chicago, who already owned a 330 GT 2+2. Slattery certainly loved 0490 AM, because he kept it for 30 years, though there’s little evidence of him showing the car, except for on 26-28 August, 1977, when he turned up at the Ferrari Club of America Central States Region Concours and Track Event at Blackhawk Farm Race Track in Rockford, Illinois. Slattery advertised 0490 AM in October 2002, showing just 20,990 kilometres. Restoration and Awards In November 2002, noted collector Manuel Del Arroz of Diablo, California bought 0490 AM before it was featured in the Japanese magazine Scuderia (#43) and then shipped to Wayne Obry’s Motion Products Inc. in Neenah, Wisconsin. 0490 AM was featured before restoration in the April-May 2003 Cavallino (#134). In the course of the following year it was completely restored, and in 2004 the car was registered on California black plates as 168 RZH. It was immediately entered in the 54th Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in Monterey, California on 15 August in Class M-2 Ferrari Speciale, which it won, scoring 100 points. Two days later it was shown at nearby Quail Lodge in Carmel Valley, at the 40th Annual Ferrari Club of America National Meeting. It received a Platinum Award and also the Luigi Chinetti award for the most outstanding Ferrari road car. On 22 January, 2005, 0490 AM was shown at the Cavallino Classic at The Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida and won the Grand Turismo Cup and Best of Show GT Ferrari. Up to this point, the string of awards was simply stunning – the very best and most desirable honours a Ferrari or any other collector car could hope to secure. Nevertheless, looking further afield, del Arroz shipped the car to Zurich, Switzerland on 1 April, 2005, where it was examined by FIVA steward Dominik Fischlin on 9 April and awarded its papers. Manuel del Arroz next took 0490 AM to the Concorso d’Eleganza at Villa d’Este, at Lake Como, Italy on 22-24 April, 2005. The car placed 2nd in Class for Closed Cars 1940-59, directly behind another Obry restoration, the 250 GT Europa 0403, with coachwork similar to that of the ex-Roberto Rossellini 375 MM. The car then returned to Chicago and was featured as the cover car in the U.S. Cavallino magazine (#148), the August/September issue. Little was heard of 0490 AM for several years until it was sold to UK exotics dealer Martin Chisholm in January 2010. Chisholm subsequently lent 0490 AM to preeminent European magazines Classic & Sports Car in July and Classic Driver in December 2010, and both of them wrote about it enthusiastically. Best of the Best As a one-off body and the last of a significant model line, 0490 AM occupies an unassailable position in the Ferrari lexicon. Its list of desirable features is virtually endless – not only did its trendsetting design foreshadow future Ferrari models, but it was the last 375 MM built. A matching-numbers car with its original motor and “no-stories” provenance, it was restored by a marque expert and documented by noted historian Marcel Massini. It is always going to draw a crowd at any concours, and if the new owner ever feels the urge to take to the track, he will be a welcome sight and sound. All he has to worry about is braking from about 180 mph! ITALIANTEXT 340 cv, motore V-12 con un albero a camme in testa di 4.522 cc, tre carburatori Weber 42 DCZ/3, cambio manuale a quattro marce, sospensione anteriore a ruote indipendenti a doppio trapezio e ammortizzatori a molla, assale posteriore