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1938 Talbot-Lago T150-C Lago Teardrop Coupe

The 1948 24 Hours of Spa Class Winning and The Only Long Wheelbase Lago Speciale Teardrop Coupe In Existence COACHWORK BY FIGONI ET FALASCHI 170bhp (rated 140bhp), 3,996cc six-cylinder engine with hemispherical combustion chambers and triple Stromberg carburetors, Wilson four-speed pre-selector transmission, transverse leaf spring independent front suspension, leaf spring and live axle rear suspension, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,950mm PROVENANCE Ordered new by Antoine Schumann, banker and race driver, Paris, in 1938. Delivered September 1938 at Figoni workshop. Special features included central rear fin, color-coded dashboard, twin razor bumpers, Talbot Speciale insignia, side chrome decoration, interior mounted door handles, and split windshield Type Faux Cabriolet, 3 forward facing seats (original color of dark blue) Sold by agent Luigi Chinetti for 165,000 French Francs First registration no. 9183 RM 3 (as pictured herewith) Sold to Freddy Damman in Brussels in 1948, registered 2536 Won its class at the 1948 24 Hours of Spa (then painted grey) Sold in 1979 to Michel Seydoux, Paris. (color changed from burgundy and black to black) Sold by auction in 1981 to its next private owner, an adventurer of no fixed address. REFERENCES: Adatto, Richard. From Passion to Perfection, The Story of French Streamlined Styling 1930 – 1939. Editions SPE Barthélémy, 2003, Paris, France. Borgeson, Griffith. Figoni et Falaschi: The Coachbuilder as Sculptor. Automobile Quarterly, Vol. XX, Number 1, 1982, Kutztown, PA, USA. Spitz, Alain. Talbot – Des Talbot-Darracq Aux Talbot-Lago. Editions E.P.A 1983, Paris, France. A UNIQUE HISTORY Bugatti, Delahaye, Delage, Hispano Suiza and Talbot-Lago – these marques comprise the greatest names in French automotive history and have become some of the most prized of all European classic collector cars. The Talbot- Lago offered here presents a truly rare opportunity to own one of most exotic and significant European sports cars ever produced. The story begins at the very dawn of the automobile, in 1893, when three of the early French automobile pioneers – Darracq, Serpollet, and Clement – banded together, ultimately forming Société Darracq et Cie in Suresnes, a suburb of Paris. By the turn of the century, Darracq automobiles were being sold in many countries, and before long, an English company m(financed by Earl of Shrewsbury and Talbot) was formed to represent the firm in Great Britain, and S. A. Darracq (1905) Ltd. was created. Meanwhile, the Sunbeam Motor Company, Ltd. Of Wolverhampton, England was embarking on a racing program. When engineer Louis Coatalen joined Sunbeam in 1909 the British firm became a dominating force in racing. By the end of the second decade it was becoming more important for automobile manufacturers to consolidate in order to reduce costs, streamline production, and share resources. Finally, in 1922, the English Darracq company acquired Sunbeam, and the resulting company was renamed Sunbeam Talbot Darracq Motors Ltd., and it now controlled the French Darracq company – which had been renamed Automobiles Talbot S.A.. Following the formation of STD, Sunbeam’s Louis Coatalen remained the director and immediately set about building a new Sunbeam racing design. By 1921 STD was competing with 3-litre straight eight-powered racing cars in that year’s Indianapolis 500. Two cars were entered as Sunbeams and one as a Talbot-Darracq, but all three were identical except for the radiator badges. Notably, one of the Sunbeams finished 5th. Even more success followed. Later in the French Grand Prix at Le Mans three Talbot-Darracqs, two Sunbeams and two Talbots would be entered –again all identical except badging. Never one to miss an opportunity, Coatalen embarked on a land speed record campaign that resulted in five world land speed records from 1925-27. One of the most memorable achievements occurred at the 1930 running of the 24 Hours of LeMans, where two Talbots placed third and forth behind the fabulously powerful Speed Six Bentleys – but finishing ahead of the competition from Mercedes-Benz and Alfa Romeo. Though some may have been surprised by this result, Georges Roesch - who was the mastermind behind Talbot’s engineering at the time - was not. Beginning in the mid- twenties, Roesch was determined to build one of the fastest, quietest and most dependable sports cars ever created. He focused on reducing noise, vibration and excess weight, while squeezing every ounce of performance out of a high revving and high compression engine that was often smaller than the competition. When 5,000 rpm was considered the ceiling for an engine of the twenties, Roesch developed an engine that reached 6,000 rpm and an unbelievable compression ratio of 8.5 to 1. In 1928, Talbot featured the first pressurized cooling system ever offered in an automobile, which was soon followed up by the 90 Series engine that achieved a compression ratio of 10 to 1. After various racing successes in 1930, Roesch developed the 105 Series with a 3-liter, six-cylinder engine that produced an amazing 140 horsepower at 4,500 rpm in race form. This was superior even to the Type 35 Bugatti, which was rated at just 135 horsepower. Even with the racing successes – and product improvements – produced by Roesch and Coatalen, Talbot was only marginally successful in the sales arena. By 1933, their French sales branch in Suresnes was ready to fold and the factory located there was in even worse shape. In fact, Sunbeam- Talbot-Darracq was on its last legs when a young Italian engineer named Major Anthony Lago stepped into the picture for the first time. Anthony Lago was one of many Italian trained engineers who sought out the French automobile industry because the work being done there was at the leading edge of automotive design and engineering at the time. The innovations pioneered by the French had led to domination of international Grand Prix racing, and it was this climate of development that in turn attracted bright young minds from other countries. Lago started his automobile career selling Isotta- Fraschinis in London after serving in the Italian Army – where he rose to the rank of major during World War I. The Isotta-Fraschini was the finest Italian car ever produced up to that time, and featured world-class craftsmanship, engineering and style. The attention to every detail that was evident in the Isotta made a lasting impression on Lago. Major Lago then went on to work in a series of automotive engineering apprenticeships throughout London, including a stint at Sunbeam. He later worked at Wilson, assisting in the final development of the preselector gearbox. Later, it was this experience that lead him to acquire the foreign distribution rights to the Wilson gearbox and subsequently use it in his own cars. (By 1931-32 such prestigious firms as Alvis, Crossley, Daimler, Invicta, Lanchester, MG, Standard, Armstrong-Siddeley, Isotta-Fraschini and Talbot were using Wilson gearboxes as an alternative to manual boxes.) By 1932, Anthony Lago’s fascination with racing led to his position on the Armstrong-Siddeley works team and competing in the 1932 Alpine Trials. Later that year, he joined the struggling Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq firm, now on the brink of financial collapse in both England and France, rising to the position of assistant director. Lago was sent to the Suresnes factory in France to assist in a last gasp re-organization. Strange as it may seem, the British side of the company apparently had little involvement with its French sibling. When Lago moved to Suresnes, the company was set to liquidate the French factory. Lago argued against this and was made the new director-general and given the opportunity to try to save the company. The following year Rootes bought the English side of Sunbeam-Talbot-Darracq. Lago, who had acquired considerable financial support, assumed control of the French Talbot concern. After assuming control of the company, Lago hired an engineer named Walter Brecchia, and together they created the first Talbot-Lago based on a Talbot-Darracq three liter Type K78. Although these were pleasant enough cars, they were hardly exciting – certainly not what was needed to take checkered flags, nor were they suitable platforms for elegant custom coachwork Brecchia’s next engine proved to be a brilliant design. Based on the seven main bearing six cylinder K78 block, displacement was increased to four liters, and a new cylinder head fitted that dramatically improved both breathing and volumetric efficiency. It was a hemispherical head design, with valve gear actuated by a low set camshaft with crossed pushrods acting through both long and short rocker arms. This new six-cylinder engine was able to develop 140 hp at 4,200 rpm, breathing through twin Solex carburetors. A consummate salesman, Lago somehow persuaded French racing great René Dreyfus to manage his new Talbot-Lago race team. Dreyfus delivered in June of 1936 at the French Grand Prix at Montlhéry when Lago asked him to “stay ahead of the Bugattis for as long as you can.” All three Talbot-Lagos finished in the top ten, running toe-to-toe with the Bugattis before mechanical problems slowed them near the end. The next year – after a productive year of product improvement –Talbot-Lagos placed first, second, third and fifth at the 1937 French Grand Prix – and Lago’s dream of producing one of the world’s greatest sports cars was now a reality. The victories would continue, with a win at Tourist Trophy races at Donnington Park, and a first place in the 1938 Monte Carlo Rally. They were competitive around the world, including at such renowned venues as the Mille Miglia, where they acquitted themselves well against the best that Ferrari and Alfa Romeo could field. In international Grand Prix racing in the late 1930s the Talbot-Lago racing cars were unable to successfully compete against the omnipotent German Mercedes-Benz and Auto-Union teams. Nonetheless they developed uncanny reliability, and often did surprisingly well, proving the old racing adage “to finish first, first you must finish”. Anthony Lago never let racing distract him from his passion to build the finest French cars of all. That meant luxury cars, the best of which were clothed by the great design houses of Paris. His reliable new engine would provide the basis for a powerful new chassis, and the glory of Talbot-Lago’s racing record would provide the perfect image to attract wealthy and powerful new clients to his order book. Lago’s greatest achievement was the Talbot-Lago T150-C chassis. The C stood for competition, a reference to the car’s racing success. The nomenclature was hardly superficial, as this was a case where racing truly did improve the breed. Features such as a large capacity oil pan, punched handbrake lever, a dual braking system, and a higher compression ratio were taken directly from the racing program. Two versions of the race-derived chassis were offered. The first, designated SS (taken from the English phrase “Super Sport”) referred to a short wheelbase (2.65m) chassis, designed for elegant two or three place coachwork. As the shortest (and lightest) chassis, it was generally the one used as the basis for the company’s racing programs. A second, somewhat longer (2.95m) chassis was also offered, called the “Lago Speciale”. Mechanically identical to the SS, it was intended to accommodate more luxurious coachwork. In fact, the weight difference was just 130kg, and the performance of the new four liter engine was great enough that many owners raced their Lago Speciales as well. Both chassis offered exceptional roadholding, a result of the car’s independent front suspension with its advanced geometry, along with light weight and excellent brakes. Racing success certainly enhanced the appeal; it was this demand, combined with Lago’s collaboration with Joseph Figoni and Ovidio Falaschi and their Figoni et Falaschi coachbuilding firm that would lead to the creation of what many believe are the most beautiful cars ever built. FIGONI ET FALASCHI: MASTERS OF ELEGANCE There is little doubt that the era of exuberant French coachwork precipitated a tidal change in automotive design. Gone were the largely functional forms of the twenties and early thirties, replaced by the fanciful curves and sensuous lines that ushered in the era of the automobile as art. Although others were versed in the style to one degree or another, it was the Parisian firm of Figoni et Falaschi that is widely regarded as the innovator of the new look. Christened Giuseppe Figoni in Piacenza, Italy in 1894, Joseph Figoni was born in Italy but moved to France as a young child with his parents. After graduating from vocational school in 1908, Figoni apprenticed to a local carriage builder where he developed his understanding of the principles of body construction and began to develop his appreciation for the lines, forms, and proportions of good design. Figoni served in the French armed forces during the war, leaving in 1921 to start his own body shop. He developed his coachbuilding skills accommodating the needs of his clientele, and repairs began to be supplanted by updates and modifications. By the mid twenties, he was building complete bodies. Figoni’s early work was quite conservative, probably a reflection of the wishes of his affluent clientele. Nonetheless, his early designs show a sophisticated sense of line and proportion. Far from extravagant, these early cars were like a well-tailored suit: impeccable craftsmanship combined with just enough flair in the cut to stand out from the ordinary. By the turn of the decade, Figoni had begun to earn commissions for racing cars, and it was these unlikely orders that began to shift his image and reputation in a more sporting direction. Alfa Romeos, Lancias, Bugattis, and other sporting marques began to figure more prominently in his shops. Even as his design talent flourished, Joseph Figoni’s methods remained primitive. For many years, he would build a framework outline of the body directly on the chassis, using strips of steel welded together. While not as sophisticated as an engineering drawing, his method had the decided advantage of allowing him to directly translate a concept into a three dimensional reality. Adjustments were easily made until he (and the client) was satisfied, at which point the steel framework would be used directly by the panel fabricators to clothe the chassis. By the mid thirties, as the shop grew and became more sophisticated, he began to make scale models of a new design in clay, turning the result over to draftsmen to create the drawings that would be used to build the body. The principle was the same – the form would be realized and refined in three dimensions before being translated into drawings – the reverse of the more normal practice of the time. In 1935, several events would take place that would prove pivotal both for Figoni and for French design. In May of 1935 Joseph Figoni took in a partner. Ovidio Falaschi, a successful Italian businessman, was to provide working capital and business expertise. By all accounts, the partnership was a success, with both men making substantial contributions. The second seminal event was that Figoni was introduced to the work of the famed French artist Geo Ham. Accounts vary as to the extent of the role that Ham played in the creation of the new design ethos, but earlier work by Ham makes it clear that his design ideas were at least a source of inspiration for Figoni. The third event was the development of the Delahaye 135 in 1935/6. The 135 introduced a new lower radiator and independent suspension, which not only improved the car’s handling dramatically, but also lowered the chassis. It was these innovations that created the canvas on which Figoni would design the 1936 Paris show car. It is difficult today to appreciate the magnitude of the innovation. Here was a rakishly low car that had no vertical lines; the body was all outrageous curves, with four skirted fenders hiding the wheels. It was outrageous, stunning, and utterly unlike anything ever seen. Priced at a lofty 150,000 francs, it was snapped up immediately by Aly Khan, an international playboy and the son of the Aga Khan III. While Ham may have influenced the design of that first Delahaye 135, most historians believe that the remarkable series of designs that would follow were the work of Joseph Figoni. It was during this period that Figoni began to turn his attention to the Talbot-Lago. In fact, in 1937 Lago and Figoni signed an agreement to work together exclusively, and for a time they did. It was a collaboration that would result in the greatest cars of the era. THE 16 TEARDROP COUPES: “GOUTTE D’EAU” Prominent among them was a series of coupes, the first one commissioned at the request of a French businessman, M. Jeancart, resulting in what many believe was Figoni’s most important and successful design -– the so-called Teardrop or “goutte d’eau” coupes. It is believed that just sixteen of these Figoni coupés were built with two slightly different body styles. The first car, in what is now known as the ‘Jeancart’ design after the name of its first owner was a beautiful aerodynamic coupé with a long streamlined rear. Five of these cars were built, either on the short C-SS chassis or on the Lago Speciale, with one car built on a T23 chassis. Most notable in this series are chassis 90101, the car that finished third at Le Mans in 1938 as part of the Chinetti Team (90106), and the example offered here, chassis 90034 which finished first in its class in the 1948 24 Hours of Spa. Although the existence and whereabouts of the Chinetti car are unknown, both shared external front lights for racing in the night, a split windscreen to reinforce the roof structure and glass and were devoid of the rear spats in an effort to increase ventilation to the rear axle and brakes – both were clearly constructed and intended to race. FIRST STYLE Jeancart Style no. 9221 CHASSISSTATUS 90034width=100>Exists; on long chassis; Offered at RM Monterey 2005. 90101width=100>First one; rebodied; currently missing. 90104width=100> Exists; now restored. 90116width=100> Missing; whereabouts unknown. 93064width=100> Exists; On 3L T23 chassis, - now with T150-C engine Table #1 above illustrates the ‘Jeancart’ series, and their current status. Since the Jeancart bodies are all different, each one can be easily recognized based on a variety of subtle differences. 90034 does include many of the interesting details featured on some of these including not only the split windscreen but the special front end treatment in the style of Figoni design number 558, integrated door handles, sunroof, double rows of bonnet louvers and the elegant chrome fairings enhancing the bodywork’s natural curvature. On that premise, 90034 I certainly one of the most noticeable, outstanding and stylized examples of the series. SECOND STYLE Model New York Style no. 9220 CHASSIS STATUS 90103 Exists; first one; NY show car. 90105 Exists; repainted. 90106 Exists; restored. 90107 Exists; unrestored original. 90108 Exists; unrestored project; stolen in 2001. 90109 Exists; restored. 90110 Graber rebody in 1946; now rebodied to original NY style. 90112 Exists; unrestored original. 90117 Exists; restored. 90123 Rebodied based on 90112. 93041 Exists; On 3L T23 chassis, now with T150-C engine. The others were built in the ‘New York’ style, named after the car shown at the New York Auto Salon in 1937. Except for one car on a T23 chassis, these were all T150-C short chassis cars. Table #2 above illustrates the ‘New York’ series, and their current status. Whether in the ‘Jeancart’ or ‘New York’ style, all these handbuilt cars show minor differences, probably accounted for by the first owner’s personal desires. Two cars in the ‘New York’ series had fully skirted front fenders, and headlamp treatment varied. Some with recessed headlamps were transformed to the bullet design early in their life. Perfectly proportioned, these Teardrop Coupes are arguably the pinnacle of the French streamlined design movement and it is all too easy to forget today that these works of art are now nearly seventy years old. Exquisite coachwork, fitted to a powerful chassis, and all of it designed for the enjoyment of true grand touring. Most of the Teardrops were designed to accommodate two people however a few cars, like 90034, could accommodate three. They were the most advanced French automotive creations of their time, combining race bred technical competence with a brand new design inspired by aerodynamic efficiency directly linked with advances in aviation. Among the world’s greatest cars, only the legendary Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 can be compared with the T150-C in the sense of offering the magical blend of a proven racing chassis combined with avant garde coachwork. One of the great appeals of a Figoni et Falaschi design – then as much as now – was competition in the concours d’ elegance of the day. A largely European phenomenon, wealthy clients would commission both automobiles and dress for the purpose of competing, with honors awarded to the most elegant fashions, rewarding both coachbuilder and couturier. Figoni’s talent extended beyond coachwork, as he sought new colors, leathers, and fabrics that would enhance his designs and reward his clients. Although there were some good designs that followed the teardrops, in many ways they represented the end of an era as well. With chassis costs on the rise, the coachbuilding world was in decline before the war. After the war, carmakers turned to monocoque designs and production bodies to improve efficiency and lower costs. Meanwhile, particularly in France, tax authorities put the final nail in the coffin by implementing oppressive taxes on luxury cars. As French carmakers struggled, levies on foreign chassis were raised even more, eliminating that avenue of survival for the coachbuilder’s trade. By 1950, Falaschi had left the firm, returning to Italy to open a hotel. Figoni carried on for several years more, but ultimately transformed the business – now run by his son, Claude – into a new car dealership and repair shop. Joseph Figoni died in 1978, at the age of 84. Today, his son Claude remains involved in the history of his family firm, assisting historians and collectors to keep the record straight – and the passion alive. CHASSIS 90034: SPEED AND BEAUTY In the flourishing artistic envoronment of prewar Paris, if you were a wealthy, youthful, fashionable Parisian resident at the end of the 1930s, you surely resided in one of the magnificent townhouses of the city center. Your residence was decorated with the most exquisite of custom designed furniture by Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann, one drank from custom made René Lalique glasses and the walls were adorned by works by the pre-eminent artists of the time including Pablo Picasso and Francis Picabia. Undoubtedly, such a modern thinking sportsman would have had the most fashionable French car of the period in front of his door, and there would have been nothing more appropriate than a Teardrop Coupe. The Teardrops were all unique, each reflecting the tastes and wishes of its patron. Chassis no. 90034 may well be the most unique of all. It is the only example built on the longer Lago Speciale chassis – some 30 cm, or 11.8 inches greater than the SS. One can safely assume that the intent was to create a superb grand touring car; the result, embodied in the Lago Speciale, chassis no. 90034, meets those criteria superbly. Although the Lago Speciale was hardly a long wheelbase chassis by the standards of coachbuilt automobiles, the effect of the added length on the coachwork is quite breathtaking. 90034 was subtly transformed by the lengthening of the body and the execution of its design was so well done that it is not immediately obvious; upon closer examination a number of pleasing differences appear. The added length is mostly aft of the firewall, giving a longer body and tail. Additionally, it has a physical presence unlike many of its counterparts as its slightly wider track gives it a very balanced and sporting stance. The Jeancart style seems to fit the longer wheelbase with such ease and proportion that it opens the door to the question of whether it was always destined to be on a longer chassis. The added length in the body makes it appear even lower while giving a more pleasing shape to the window area as well. At the same time, the longer tail balances the long hood, a dramatic effect that is enhanced by the subtle notchback that is the identifying characteristic of the ‘Jeancart’ version of the Teardrop coupe. Furthermore there was a distinct advantage to the lengthened chassis as it provided for more adept road handling at high speeds on the long straights of La Nationale 7 as well as possibly for the Le Mans track which was at the time a succession of long straights linked by only a few corners. One of the most striking aspects of this design is the graceful chrome beltline that sweeps back from the hood line, before splitting in two with one tail continuing the sweeping line, while the second arcs down into the door. A classic Figoni detail, it is seen on several open cars, but on no other Teardrop. In the world of important French cars, provenance is second only to design, and 90034 stands as one of the best of the Teardrops, having a continuous history from new, a commendable and unique competition record, and no history of fire, accident, or deterioration. Furthermore, all the car’s major components remain intact and together. Ordered new by Monsieur Antoine Schumann, 90034 was commissioned as the wealthy Parisian banker’s replacement for his Figoni bodied Bugatti Type 50. Schumann’s Bugatti was a team car that he had purchased directly from the factory. Schumann is known to have been a close friend of none other than racing great Pierre-Louis Dreyfus and is seen pictured with Dreyfus in the paddocks at the 1939 24 hours of Le Mans in which they took part in together, among other races. Antoine Schumann was part of the “Ano-Nime” duo. Schumann and Dreyfus wanted to race anonymously as to hide some of their lavish personal exploits from their employees and shareholders. Under the “Ano-Nime” race name (Schumann being referred to as the “Nime” and Dreyfus as the “Ano”) they would race together at Le Mans on two separate occasions. Schumann’s choice for his next car made logical sense as Dreyfus had spent the last several years campaigning for the Talbot-Lago marque, winning numerous races throughout Europe. Another interesting friend in the mix was race driver and automotive entrepreneur, Luigi Chinetti. Chinetti was always a fan of the T150-C. So much so, that during an interview in Automobile Classique, Chinetti went as far as to rate the Talbot-Lago T150-C models on par with the 2.9 Alfa Romeos he had known so intimately. Notably, Chinetti was the only official sales agent for the Talbot-Lago Figoni Teardrop Coupes throughout all of Europe. At an astounding price of 165,000 French Francs, the Lago Speciale ordered by Antoine Schumann represented one of the most expensive automotive purchases one could make in 1938. It is important to consider that with Schumann being a race driver and given his close relationship to both Dreyfus and Chinetti, 90034 was undoubtedly a highly specialized order. One look at the Teardrop’s exquisitely detailed dashboard shows an array of gauges, most of which are indicative of a race bred motor car with a competitive purpose. Upon inspection, one can see that the SchumannTalbot-Lago was fitted with an extraordinary number of accessories and one-off features from the radiator to the exterior lighting and full size sliding sunroof. The Schumann Talbot was given Figoni production number 738, a number that can be found on the car in numerous places even today as all of its stamped components remain intact and original. The long wheelbase Talbot was delivered to Antoine Schumann finished in a handsome shade of dark blue. This is confirmed by both Figoni records and visual inspection. While it is clear that though the Lago Speciale has been repainted as many as five times, it is remarkable that the original dark blue may still be found in the panel fittings of the fenders and other areas including behind the dashboard and inside the glovebox. It is so rare to see this aspect of a car’s originality and to find it on something as significant as this Teardrop Coupe speaks volumes as to the Talbot-Lago’s integrity and provenance. Sadly, Antoine Schumann was not able to escape the clutches of World War II and was killed while fighting in the French army. The Talbot had likely been hidden away during the war and largely forgotten in light of the circumstances. In a recent conversation with Paul Frère, the noted racing champion and automotive journalist, he remembered seeing the Lago Speciale in Brussels in approximately 1946. At the time the Talbot was for sale at a high-end dealership, Garage Mesuy, and was in “excellent and perfect” condition. Frere even remembers where the dealership was located on Rue de Stassard, Porte de Namur in what is now downtown Brussels. Frère also remembered the unique engine and exhaust note when hearing the Talbot at the 1948 24 Hours of Spa as well. It is quite remarkable that after so many years the Talbot could be remembered so vividly however, as there was little to compare it to, one can only imagine the impact that seeing a motor car so stunning could have upon those who were lucky enough to see it. The next owner of the Talbot would be Freddy Damman, a young racing enthusiast who fell in love with the car at first sight. Damman, who is today survived by his daughter, purchased the Talbot in 1947. Following the purchase of the car, Damman repainted the Talbot in a light grey and subsequently prepared the Lago Speciale for its racing debut at the 1948 24 Hours of Spa. Driven by the team of Freddy Damman and co-driver and mechanic Constant Debelder, 90034 finished an impressive first in class. In the postwar period, racing cars were hard to come by asIn the postwar period, racing cars were hard to come by as manufacturers struggled to rebuild, to locate raw materials, and to export. With its racing bloodlines, it is not surprising that this example would be raced – as several other Teardrops we Chassis no. 90034

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-19
Hammer price
Show price

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

300 bhp 3,286 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual rear-mounted transaxle, four-wheel upper- and lower-wishbone coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Delivered new to famed film director John Frankenheimer Documented correspondence from Maranello Concessionaires History recorded by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini Recent cosmetic restoration by a marque specialist Submitted for Ferrari Classiche certification Includes books and tools At the Paris Motor Show in October 1966, Ferrari introduced an upgraded version of the 275 GTB that had debuted two years earlier. In most respects, the new car was nearly identical to its predecessor, as it also employed the long-nose body style that had been adopted later in the original 275’s production run, which prevented front lift at speed. The major difference in the new car laid under the hood, where a revised version of Gioacchino Colombo’s short-block, 3.3-liter V-12 engine (now dubbed the Type 226) was fitted with dual overhead camshafts; this was the first appearance of such valve actuation in a production Ferrari road car. A slightly modified hood with a raised center section was added to the Scaglietti bodywork to accommodate the taller engine profile. The engine, also benefiting from dry-sump lubrication and the standard provision of six carburetors, developed 20 more horsepower than its predecessor, giving the nimble 275 chassis an added jolt of performance. The new four-cam 275 Berlinetta was Maranello’s most dynamic road car yet, and it would forever be remembered as the last of the classic, vintage V-12 front-engine models, as the forthcoming 365 GTB would feature completely different aesthetics, marking a transition to 1970s styling. Only 330 examples of the 275 GTB/4 were produced before the model was discontinued in 1968, adding a degree of rarity to the revered Ferrari as well. CHASSIS NUMBER 10451: THE FRANKENHEIMER FOUR-CAM Chassis number 10451 claims impressive ownership provenance, having originally been purchased by John Frankenheimer, the famed Hollywood director who was responsible for such hits as The Manchurian Candidate, Grand Prix, and Ronin, among many others. A fascinating compendium of original correspondence between Mr. Frankenheimer and Col. R.J. Hoare, of England’s Maranello Concessionaires, copies of which are on file, summarizes the film director’s experience with the GTB. According to the British distributor’s order sheet, number 325, Frankenheimer specified his 275 in left-hand drive and with alloy wheels and a steel body finished in Blu Sera paint. The interior was to be appointed with beige carpets and a grey headliner. On August 14, 1967, Ferrari mailed Frankenheimer to let him know that such a car could soon be made available, and ten days later, he contacted Maranello Concessionaires to authorize their execution of the transaction on his behalf. The research of marque historian Marcel Massini clarifies that 10451’s chassis had been sent to Sergio Scaglietti’s carrozzerria in Modena on July 7, where it would receive its handsome GTB coachwork, which was completed on September 28. Just days earlier, the dual overhead-cam, 3.3-liter V-12 had been assembled under the supervision of well-known Ferrari engineer Amos Franchini. When completed, the Berlinetta was finished as-requested, in one of the most attractive original color combinations, Blue Sera over a beige leather interior, and equipped with a provision for a radio. In his communication, Mr. Frankenheimer arranged to have one of his representatives take delivery of the car at the factory and then drive it to Budapest, Hungary, where he would soon be on location filming The Fixer. Many of his letters to Col. Hoare were, in fact, written on The Fixer stationary. On September 18, Col. Hoare submitted his official order to Ferrari’s Modena headquarters, and their SEFAC Bill of Sale to Frankenheimer is dated October 10. Two weeks later, Col. Hoare sent Mr. Frankenheimer a letter at his address at the Royal Hotel in Budapest, which acknowledged that delivery had taken place and described how pleased he was with the transaction. Frankenheimer responded, “The car did indeed arrive and it is beautiful. It is without doubt the best Ferrari that I have ever owned. I will be taking it to Vienna this weekend for its 2,000-mile check-up.” Unfortunately, the attention from Wolfgang Denzel (Ferrari’s authorized mechanic in Vienna) resulted in the carburetors being misadjusted, and Frankenheimer soon had trouble with improper fuel mixtures, a problem that was exacerbated by the unforgiving Hungarian winter. On one occasion, this led to the GTB stalling in the middle of a crowded street, leaving a multitude of curious townsfolk prodding at the exotic automobile in curiosity, much to the director’s utter dismay. Frankenheimer quickly called upon Col. Hoare, who dispatched driver Michael Salmon to collect the car. The six-time Le Mans veteran piloted the Ferrari back across Europe, and in a letter he wrote to Frankenheimer in January, Salmon admitted the carburetors required much work. This was soon addressed by the factory, and the car was on to better running order, with Frankenheimer writing, “In spite of all the problems, I think the 275 GTB/4 is without a doubt the finest Ferrari I have ever owned.” Upon completion of filming The Fixer, Mr. Frankenheimer tended to some business in London, where he had arranged for shipping of the Ferrari to America onboard famed Cunarder Queen Elizabeth. After being imported to the United States, the 275 remained in his care for a few years, until it was acquired in 1971 by Karl Fekete, of Inglewood, California, who retained possession until 1986. Malibu-based collector Paul Forbes purchased and owned the car for a brief period, and then the GTB/4 spent four years in Japan, under the care of two different owners, prior to being acquired in 1990 by well-known Hans Thulin for his Consolidator Collection in Sweden. After being offered for sale by Thulin in 1992, the Ferrari passed through the care of esteemed collector Chris Cox, who then sold it to vintage racing enthusiast Bruce Male, of Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. Male kept the superlative GTB for two decades, during which he repainted the exterior in Fly Giallo, as demonstrated by an appearance at the Rolex Vintage Festival at Lime Rock in September 2004. In the last six months, this well-maintained GTB/4 was treated to a significant freshening, with Carl Steuer, of Blackhorse Motors in Los Angeles, California, performing a complete engine-out service and detail of the motor and transmission. The brakes and suspension were completely rebuilt, with a new master cylinder installed, and the engine compartment and undercarriage were properly refinished in the correct paint. The brightwork was re-chromed as needed, and all exterior trim was evaluated and replaced where necessary. The interior was substantially restored with all-new proper leather and carpeting from the well-regarded HVL in the Netherlands; though, the original leather was saved for future sample matches, for the owner who values comprehensive authenticity. The sympathetic freshening was completed this year and has resulted in an impeccably presented GTB/4, one that features a deep finish on its Fly Giallo paint and correct detailing throughout the undercarriage and interior. Bolstered by the incredible provenance of primary ownership by the legendary John Frankenheimer, whose automotive interests nearly equaled his cinematic triumphs, this sensational Ferrari beacons for exhibition at finer concours d’elegance and FCA meets. Otherwise, the car may be equally enjoyed on the road, with the four-cam motor providing brisk performance and the type 596 chassis providing spirited handling. More authentic 275 GTB/4 examples with such significant provenance rarely come to market, making 10451’s availability a mandatory consideration for any dedicated collector of vintage Maranello road cars. Chassis no. 10451 Engine no. 10451

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1928 MERCEDES-BENZ 26/120/180 TYP S TORPEDO ROADSTER

The Property of a Lady, one family owned from new 1928 MERCEDES-BENZ 26/120/180 TYP S TORPEDO ROADSTER COACHWORK BY SAOUTCHIK Commission No. 40156 Engine No. 72151 Cream with red leather upholstery and tan cloth top Engine: six cylinder, in-line, single overhead camshaft, supercharged with dual carburetors, 6,789cc, 120/180bhp; Gearbox: four speed manual; Suspension: live axles with semi-elliptic leaf springs; Brakes: four wheel mechanical drum. Left hand drive. The premise for the merger of Daimler Motoren Gesellshaft and Benz & Cie. in 1926 was standard management logic. Both companies were on the ropes following Germany's post-World War I depression and desperately needed to rationalize models and manufacturing. That was the logic, but the Daimler-Benz merger worked because it resulted in some of the most exciting, famous and successful automobiles ever built. Gottlieb Daimler had experimented with supercharging before the turn of the century. His son Paul, Chief Engineer at Daimler after the war, brought supercharging's first practical automobile application in the single overhead camshaft 2.6 liter four cylinder 10/40/65 (the numbers designate the engine's taxable/naturally aspirated/supercharged horsepower ratings) in 1922. Development was cut short when Paul Daimler left the company in late 1922 but resumed when Dr. Ferdinand Porsche arrived in Untertürkheim in April 1923 from Austro-Daimler. Porsche applied his skills to developing a replacement for the single overhead camshaft six cylinder 28/95, a 7 liter giant derived from Paul Daimler's DF80 aircraft engine. Porsche's first effort displaced only 3,920cc, the 15/70/100. The masterpiece, however, was the replacement for the 28/95. Displacing 6,246cc, it was designated the 24/100/140 and has become known as the Mercedes model K. The powerful engine exposed the existing Mercedes chassis' shortcomings in both handling and brakes, and Dr. Porsche turned his attention to remedying these in the next, short wheelbase (134 inch), model K. With the merger completed between Daimler and Benz, a process begun in 1925 and formally consummated on June 26, 1926, the joined companies' product lines, manufacturing and management were integrated and rationalized under the leadership of Wilhelm Kissel, a Benz executive. Most importantly the marques' competition in racing ended and the combined companies' performance-development efforts were placed squarely behind the Mercedes. The immediate result of the renewed focus and the concentration of the engineering talents of Dr. Porsche, Hans Nibel and Fritz Nallinger was the Mercedes-Benz Typ S, an automobile that would forever establish the credentials of Mercedes-Benz at the pinnacle of high performance luxury automobiles. The post-war recession evaporated, succeeded by an era of prosperity and a new social freedom, the Jazz Age. The Typ S, vigorous, powerful, vibrant and purposeful, became its signature, the pinnacle of aspirations that in the Twenties seemed accessible to all. The Typ S engine was all new. Now larger (6,789cc), it had larger valves, dual carburetors, a modestly increased compression ratio and a larger supercharger that delivered 7psi boost when engaged. Rated 26/120/180 horsepower, it owed little more than its single overhead camshaft and six cylinders to the earlier K and its predecessors. The design ingeniously deals with one of the major problems of Twenties automobiles, flexible chassis. For the S the Mercedes team designed a 'unit' engine and transmission, complete from the radiator mountings to the back of the transmission with torque tube drive to the rear axle. The massive powerplant contributed its own rigidity to the chassis structure, which itself was completely revised. The frame rails now kicked up over both the front and rear axles, with semi-elliptical leaf springs at all corners. The radiator was lowered to barely higher than the massive engine which itself was moved a foot to the rear for better weight distribution. Despite the refined, massive construction, the Typ S rolling chassis was 510 pounds lighter than the K. The Typ S with its 7-tier radiator gave a 3 1/2 inch lower hood and much more sleek profile than the later Typ SS model which used the higher 8-tier radiator. The S was, in its time, the ultimate supercar. Fitted with streamlined, lightweight two- and four-seat open coachwork from Sindelfingen and Europe's finest coachbuilders it was a sportwagon for select, successful owners who prized quality, flair and performance above all else. It also was exclusive, with only 124 Typ S and 114 Typ SS built. Barney Oldfield drove a Mercedes-Benz Typ S. So did Zeppo Marx, Ralph De Palma, Al Jolson, Andre Dubonnet and Harold Vanderbilt. One of them was ordered from Mercedes-Benz, Inc., the factory branch in New York, in 1928 by Mrs. Charles Levine. Mrs. Levine - who must have been particularly worldly and sophisticated - specified two seat Torpedo Roadster coachwork by Saoutchik in Paris. The transaction, however, was for reason or reasons unknown not consummated when it arrived in New York. The spectacular one-off, low windshield Saoutchik-bodied Mercedes-Benz Typ S remained on the showroom floor, attracting showroom traffic but doing nothing for the branch's profitability. The salesmen got on the phones and one of them eventually contacted Frederick Henry Bedford, Jr., a young but successful prospect who numbered a Mercedes among his possessions and a directorship of the Rockefellers' Standard Oil among his accomplishments. That car is still owned by his direct descendant, and is offered here today. Family history has it that Mr. Bedford was somewhat put off by the price quoted by Mercedes-Benz, Inc., but upon seeing the car and contemplating the generous discount offered to take it from the dealer's stock, was persuaded of its value and took it home in early 1929 to Greens Farms, Connecticut, an exclusive enclave on the shores of the Long Island Sound within yacht-commuting distance from Wall Street. Just down the street there lived another young sportsman, Briggs Swift Cunningham, who later that year would marry Frederick Bedford's cousin, Lucie. Briggs and Lucie Bedford Cunningham honeymooned in Europe where Briggs bought his own Mercedes-Benz SS four-seat phaeton, the show car on the Mercedes-Benz stand at the London Motor Show. It was personally delivered to him and his bride at their hotel in Paris by Rudolf Caracciola, the Mercedes-Benz factory's racing driver. After their tour of France, during which Lucie Cunningham and the SS won a Concours d'Elegance Prize at Cannes, their car was shipped back to their new home in Greens Farms. Frederick Bedford also succumbed to the allure of the Typ S, at one point driving it as far as Pittsburgh where he met a young lady at a party at the Rolling Rock Club in Ligonier. Mr. Bedford, perhaps aided by the charm of his sleek, fast Mercedes-Benz Typ S Saoutchik Torpedo Roadster, made an impression on Margaret Stewart. She abandoned her date and accepted his offer of a ride home that evening in his Mercedes-Benz. She later accepted his offer to be his bride. The three remained together until Mr. Bedford's untimely death in 1952. The Mercedes-Benz was put on blocks in the family garage where it stayed for nearly thirty years until Mrs. Bedford's interest in it was renewed by her granddaughter's thoughtfulness on the occasion of her 75th birthday. The catalyst was a birthday cake, carefully crafted in the image of the cream Mercedes-Benz, and a poem about the car. It precipitated Mrs. Bedford's restoration of the car by Gus and Rich Reuter, who had been maintaining exotic European automobiles since 1929. Two years later the Bedfords' Mercedes-Benz Typ S emerged from the Reuters' shop, carefully restored and presented in its original livery of cream with dark red frame and suspension, red leather interior and tan cloth top. The only departures from its original presentation were substituting leather for the original reptile-skin upholstery and leaving off the discs which covered the original wire wheels. Saoutchik's coachwork for this Mercedes-Benz Typ S emphasized, without excess, the stunning long hood-short deck proportions of the S chassis. Sweeping front fenders crown at the level of the hood side break and combine with the low, slightly raked and veed windshield and delicate chrome fender edge moldings to complement the dramatic, low hood of the 7-tier radiator Typ S. The low Typ S chassis allowed Saoutchik to do away with running boards while the massive side-mounted spare wheels and tires add a purposeful, masculine element highlighted by a row of louvers tapering along the top of the hood, breaking up while still accenting the hood's length. Saoutchik was a master of folding top mechanisms and the top of the Mercedes-Benz Typ S Torpedo Roadster folds completely out of view under the rear deck. With the top down, the clean profile and short vee windshield highlights the sporting character of the chassis, ameliorated by Saoutchik's chrome fender edge trim and a complementary chrome accent which curves up from the bottom of the cowl to the windshield post and along the body break to the tail. Carl Zeiss headlamps nestle in body color housings between the front fenders just forward of the vee-shaped Mercedes-Benz radiator which is tucked, in Dr. Porsche's radiator/engine/transmission unit, behind the front wheels' center line. The interior is equally enthralling. Dominated by the giant four-spoke wood-rimmed Mercedes-Benz steering wheel, it has a beautifully finished wood dashboard and door cappings. While described by Saoutchik and Mercedes-Benz as a Torpedo Roadster, the body has roll-up windows for comfort and security from the weather. As restored, it also includes a tonneau cover. A true two-seater, the body's rear deck opens to reveal room for luggage as well as for the tools and tire-changing equipment which Twenties motoring required. Following restoration in 1982 the Bedfords' 1928 Mercedes-Benz Typ S Torpedo Roadster was shown once at an AACA (Antique Automobile Club of America) concours where it was awarded a National First Prize. It was subsequently given to Mrs. Bedford's granddaughter and was later selected by Mercedes-Benz to be a featured car during its Centennial celebration in 1986. There it was spotted by James Rockefeller, one of the founders of the Owls Head Transportation Museum, who recognized its connection with his family and it was then loaned to Owls Head where it has been ever since. Located near Rockport, Maine, Owls Head has featured the Mercedes-Benz as one of its prize exhibits, giving it regular care, occasional exercise and continuous mechanical and cosmetic attention along with the other exceptional automobiles and airplanes in its world-class display. Only once has it been outside the Owls Head Museum, for a special exhibit at the Portland, Maine Museum of Art in the early '90s. Christie's is especially privileged to offer this exceptional example of one of the world's most important and desirable automobiles. Still owned by the original purchaser's family and exactly as it was restored for Margaret Stewart Bedford a quarter century ago, its odometer shows only 31,550 miles. A classic of impeccable history, breeding and provenance, its style, rarity and brutal supercharged performance combine to make this a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire a one family owned, Mercedes-Benz 26/120/180 Typ S with sensuous, striking coachwork by Saoutchik.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-08-17
Hammer price
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1935 Duesenberg Model SJ Town Car by Bohman & Schwartz

320 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine with a centrifugal supercharger, three-speed manual transmission, beam-type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 153.5 in. A one-off streamlined creation on a factory-supercharged chassis Designed for Mae West; built for candy heiress Ethel Mars Formerly owned by William Harrah and Richard Dicker Featured in all of the important Duesenberg texts Original engine, chassis, and body; ACD Certified Category 1 (D-044) The ultimate SJ Duesenberg After the Walter M. Murphy Company, of Pasadena, California, closed its doors in 1932, former employees Christian Bohman and Maurice Schwartz continued work on their own. They rapidly took up Murphy’s surviving customer base and evolved many of their former employer’s designs, as well as created several new bodies on Model J and SJ chassis. Many of the latter were designed by Duesenberg’s new chief factory designer, J. Herbert Newport, who brought with him a more flamboyant line than his predecessor, Gordon Buehrig. In the book that he later co-wrote with Louis Steinwedel, Duesenberg, Newport included his original sketch of a streamlined design for a formal open-drive town car, along with a caption that read, “A design originally created by J. Herbert Newport for Mae West in 1934.” This would have been one of Newport’s first designs for a Duesenberg chassis, but it clearly showed ahead-of-its-time thinking, with its sweeping, curvaceous fender lines, European-style rear wheel “spats,” and side-mounted spare “shrouds” that eventually made it onto the final car. Ms. West, the famously vivacious actress, eventually declined the design on the basis of either cost or impatience for its creation, depending upon whom you ask. It was instead picked up by another fascinating lady, Ethel V. Mars, who would will and fund it into being on a factory-supercharged, 320-horsepower SJ chassis. Duesenberg built only 38 superchargers, which were moved around to roughly 50 different chassis during the “factory era.” The Mars car, engine number J-553, is significant for having been supercharged from new and for being one of very few four-door “formal” cars that were so-equipped. More importantly, its styling cues would inspire future Bohman & Schwartz and Newport designs, as well as set the design curve that would be followed by the last remaining West Coast Duesenbergs. ETHEL’S YEAR The year 1935 was a good one to be Ethel Mars. She was the widow of the inventor of the Milky Way and Snickers bars, among other confections, and had begun raising and training race horses on their 2,800-acre Tennessee farm. Within a year of her husband’s death, she had proved herself to be both a capable businesswoman and a superb judge of equine talent. Milky Way Farms’ top-of-the-line horses had won $107,565 in 1935 alone, after which their owner went on bit of a spending spree, leaving behind $108,000 for 29 yearlings at the annual Saratoga sales. She also picked up a new Duesenberg SJ chassis, the car offered here, which she promptly sent off to be bodied with the design that had originally been created for Mae West. The car reportedly cost $20,000, which would put it in the realm of the most expensive Duesenberg ever built. It was finished in Chinchilla Grey, with fur carpeting in the rear passenger compartment and grey upholstery, to which Mrs. Mars had her chauffeur’s uniform made to match. The distinctive art deco interior design, with its delicate door moldings and plush rounded cushions, was fully Bohman & Schwartz, although it had been adapted from Murphy’s design for a Cord L-29. The completed Duesenberg was extensively photographed when new, including by Bohman & Schwartz at the factory in Pasadena, and it also had a brief appearance in the November 16, 1936, issue of Time magazine, during its New York Auto Show coverage. It was also used, with Mrs. Mars’s chauffeur at the wheel, in advertisements for Vogue Tires, whose double-sided whitewalls could be found on the car. KNOWN PROVENANCE According to the records of Duesenberg historian Dwight Schooling, the Model SJ remained with Mrs. Mars until her passing in 1945. The following year, it was sold by her estate to renowned Chicago Duesenberg dealer John Troka for $2,500. Over the next six years, it would be passed from Troka to a handful of Chicago-area owners, at one point being used as a taxi and then as a local bank president’s “rainy day car.” In 1951, the Duesenberg was sold by Troka to Walter and Wladzia Podbielniak. The Podbielniaks, both talented engineers and inventors, had made a considerable fortune in manufacturing laboratory equipment and lived a flamboyant nouveaux riche lifestyle. Mrs. Podbielniak would be chauffeured between the couple’s State Street offices and their Lake Shore Drive castle in the Duesenberg or drive herself in a Delahaye upholstered in leopard skin. The Podbielniaks’ lifestyle was brought down by their eventual divorce, the breathless details of which occupied Chicago’s gossip pages for some time. A liquidation sale of the Lake Shore Drive house was held in 1961, but Wladzia’s reserves on her cars were not met, and she held onto the three automobiles until 1966, when she sold them en masse to William Harrah for his famous Automobile Collection in Sparks, Nevada. The Duesenberg remained on display in the Harrah Collection, in largely original and somewhat shopworn condition, for 20 years. Prior to its sale in 1986, it was refinished in bright red by the Harrah’s shop and was then sold to retired railroad executive and car collector Richard Dicker. Mr. Dicker proceeded to give the Town Car the total restoration that such an important car justifiably deserved, which was left in the hands of Robert Turnquist’s Hibernia Auto Restoration of New Jersey. Hibernia refinished it in Chinchilla Grey Poly, correctly reupholstered the interior, and installed a correct reproduction supercharger after replacing the original unit, which, as on most SJs, had been removed in the 1940s. In this form, the car was widely shown all over North America at various concours d’elegance. Following Mr. Dicker’s passing in 1995, his Duesenberg was sold to the Blackhawk Collection. It went on to be owned by two further respected enthusiasts in the coming years, and then it found its way into the Andrews Collection. By this time, the car had been refinished by RM Auto Restoration in its present menacing black livery and with an interior to the original design but in bright coral, as a dazzling counterpart appropriate for a wealthy socialite. The car has been beautifully preserved during its time in the Andrews Collection, still appearing fresh in every detail, and it has made only a handful of appearances at major concours d’elegance, including Amelia Island. IN EVERY BOOK As an exceptionally well-known and important Duesenberg, the so-called “Mars Town Car” has been the subject of numerous magazine feature articles, with the most prominent being the December 1987 issue of Car Collector magazine. It is noteworthy for appearing in every book published on the Duesenberg marque, including Josh Malks’s Illustrated Duesenberg Buyer’s Guide (page 94), J.L. Elbert’s The Mightiest American Motor Car (page 58; photos on pages 62 and 63), Fred Roe’s The Pursuit of Perfection (page 139), and Dennis Adler’s Duesenberg (pages 120 and 121). Its history file includes not only Mr. Schooling’s report on the car but also the large reference file from the National Automobile Museum and its certification paperwork from the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, which recognizes it as a Category 1 car, number D-044, which was issued during Harrah’s ownership. This Duesenberg is a singular car that had been owned by singular people, and it has few equals. Chassis no. 2582 Engine no. J-553

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

Just 729 km from new; arguably one of the best preserved in the world Believed to be one of 19 "lightweight" examples ordered without a radio or power windows Single ownership since 1993 Virtually as new throughout Recent full service, including new timing belts Retains its original manuals, including original service book Application for certification submitted to Ferrari Classiche A ‘BRAND NEW’ FERRARI ICON – OFFERED AT ITS PLACE OF BIRTH Built and overseen when Enzo Ferrari was at the helm of his company, the 288 GTO was the second vehicle in Ferrari’s history to bear the fabled Gran Turismo Omologato moniker. Conceived to compete in Group B rallying, the series was disbanded before the 288 GTO ever turned a wheel in anger, yet the 272 cars built to homologate the model quickly found willing homes with Ferrari’s best clients. Today, it is a cornerstone of any collection of Ferrari supercars, and the car to which the F40, F50, Enzo and LaFerrari owe a debt of gratitude. The 255th example built, this particular 288 GTO is perhaps the finest and most original example left in existence and therefore, can be counted amongst the most desirable Ferraris offered for sale in recent memory. Finished in Rosso Corsa (FER 300/6) over Nero (VM 8500) leather with matching black inserts, the car was ordered without power windows or a radio, believed to be one of 19 examples ordered as such, leaving the driver to focus on the task at hand and shedding precious ounces in the pursuit of relentless performance and making the car all the more desirable to connoisseurs and true driving enthusiasts. When new in 1985, chassis number 57709 was imported to the United States by Robert A. Penkhus of Colorado City, Colorado, with the intention of being driven on the road in that country. As such, the car was converted to comply with DOT/EPA regulations by Amerispec upon its importation. However, the car was driven very seldom by Penkhus, and was offered for sale by him in the Ferrari Market Letter in May of 1986, listed as only having 290 miles (466 km) on its odometer. The car was subsequently bought by David Livingston of Seattle. Livingston also did not put much more mileage on the 288 GTO, and by the time he offered it for sale in 1993, the car was listed as only having been driven 729 km from new. The car was then purchased by its current owner in 1993. Part of a significant collection, the car was subsequently parked and not driven since, and has remained in storage until it was discovered this year. Upon the car’s discovery, it was immediately removed from storage and has recently received a full service, including changing of the timing belts, affirming its status as perhaps the finest and most original 288 GTO in existence. Accordingly, for such a low-mileage and unmolested example, chassis number 57709 presents in virtually as-new condition, retaining all of its proper and original factory markings throughout. The discovery of this 288 GTO is akin to finding the proverbial needle in a haystack. Beautifully preserved both inside and out having only been driven 729 km over the course of its life, finding another 288 GTO like this simply might not be possible, given that the model is now over 30 years old. Despite its age, the 288 GTO remains a legend, and a car that is just as desirable now as it was when new, holding an important place in Ferrari’s history as the first supercar of its kind. Potential buyers should be asking themselves one question: When is the next time that I’ll be able to buy a brand new 288 GTO at the factory? • Solo 729 chilometri totali; probabilmente uno dei migliori esemplari conservati al mondo • Si stima che sia una delle sole esempi "leggeri" 19 ordinate senza radio o finestrini elettrici • Di un unico proprietario dal '93 • Praticamente nuova • Recentemente tagliandata, comprese le cinghie della distribuzione • Manuali originali, incluso il libretto di garanzia • Domanda di certificazione presentata a Ferrari Classiche UNA FERRARI ICONICA, PROPOSTA NEL SUO LUOGO DI NASCITA Costruita sotto l'occhio attento di Enzo Ferrari, ancora al comando dell'azienda, la 288 GTO è stato il secondo modello Ferrari ad essersi fregiato della nota dicitura Gran Turismo Omologato. Concepita per competere nel Gruppo B, purtroppo il campionato è stato annullato prima che la 288 GTO abbia avuto il tempo di mettere il muso in pista, ciononostante le 272 vetture costruite per omologare il modello furono immediatamente comprate dai migliori clienti della “rossa”. Oggi è una pietra miliare di qualsiasi collezione di supercar Ferrari. È l'auto a cui le successive F40, F50, Enzo e LaFerrari sono debitrici. Esemplare numero 255, questa 288 GTO è forse l'auto più originale di questo modello, diventando così una delle Ferrari più desiderabili proposte recentemente. Verniciata in Rosso Corsa (FER 300/6), con interni in pelle Nero (VM 8500), ha gli inserti neri abbinati. La vettura era stata ordinata senza finestrini elettrici e radio, si pensa sia uno dei soli 19 esemplari ordinati con queste specifiche, è un'auto studiata per non distrarre il pilota dal suo piacere di guida, risparmiando qualche chilo prezioso a tutto vantaggio delle prestazioni esuberanti, dettaglio che rende quest'esemplare un oggetto del desiderio per intenditori e veri appassionati di guida. Importata negli Stati Uniti da Robert A. Penkhus di Colorado City, Colorado, da nuova nel 1985, l'auto con telaio numero 57709, per essere guidata sulle strada americane, però, è stata convertita da Amerispec per rispettare le normative DOT / EPA. Comunque sia è stata guidata molto raramente da Penkhus, che l'ha messa in vendita attraverso la Ferrari Market Letter nel maggio 1986, con soli 466 chilometri segnati dalla strumentazione. L'auto fu poi acquistata da David Livingston di Seattle. Livingston a sua volta non ha aggiunto molti chilometri alla GTO e, nel momento in cui l'ha rivenduta nel 1993, ne aveva 729. Acquistata dal suo attuale proprietario nel '93, fa parte di una notevole collezione, la vettura è stata successivamente parcheggiata e non guidata da allora, rimanendo nascosta fino a quest'anno. Dopo il ritrovamento è stata immediatamente rimossa dal deposito per essere sottoposta a un tagliando completo, compreso il cambio delle cinghie di distribuzione, confermando così la nomea 288 GTO più bella in circolazione. Di conseguenza, quest'esemplare intonso e con così poca strada (telaio numero 57709), si presenta in condizioni praticamente nuove, mantenendo inalterate le impostazioni originali di fabbrica. La scoperta di questo 288 GTO è stata come trovare l'ago in un pagliaio. Bellissimo stato di conservazione sia interno che esterno, guidata per soli 729 chilometri nel corso della sua vita, trovarne un'altra simile è impossibile, visto e considerato che il modello ha ormai più di 30 anni. Nonostante la sua età, la 288 GTO rimane leggendaria e altrettanto desiderabile di quando era nuova. Auto con un ruolo importante nella storia della Ferrari, è stata la prima supercar del suo genere. I potenziali acquirenti dovrebbero farsi una domanda: quando mi ricapiterà di poter comprare una 288 GTO “nuova” in fabbrica? Chassis no. ZFFPA16B000057709

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
Hammer price
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1954 Ferrari 500/735 Mondial Spider by Pinin Farina

Seldom shown since its days in competition Known history with single ownership for nearly two decades Campaigned successfully in California in the 1950s Believed to be fitted with a 735 2.9-liter, four-cylinder engine While the 500 Mondial and 750 Monzas are generally always at the forethought of the majority of enthusiasts’ minds when thinking about four-cylinder Ferraris, four-cylinder engines of other displacements also found their way into some of Ferrari’s sports racers. A number of different four-cylinder engines were being experimented with by Ferrari in the early to mid-1950s, one being the 735 engine. Making its debut in 1953, this new engine had a displacement of 2.9 liters and was fitted with dual-overhead camshafts and twin Weber 50DCOA/3 carburetors, making it capable of producing 225 bhp at 6,800 rpm. Completed by the factory in October of 1954, chassis number 0448 MD was born as a 500 Mondial, the 12th of a total of 13 Pinin Farina Spiders built, placing it in the first series of cars. It was sold new to Anthony “Tony” Parravano of Inglewood, California. However, before leaving the factory, the car is believed to have been fitted with a 735 engine, for reasons that are presently unknown. Both the stampings on the engine and chassis frame match, but are of a non-typical font. This engine would, however, have been a welcome upgrade to 0448 MD. Thanks to its larger cubic capacity by almost a liter, it would add roughly 75 horsepower to the car’s overall output, making for an instantly discernable jump in performance. Parravano quickly made himself known as an entrant of numerous exotic Italian sports cars in Californian racing circles, and in the events where his 735 Mondial was raced, it consistently proved to be at the front of the pack. In February 1955, at Willow Springs, it placed 4th Overall and 1st in Class with Bob Drake at the wheel. In March of 1956, at the same venue, 0448 MD was driven to a 3rd place finish by Pat O’Connor. The car was listed for sale in Motoracing magazine by Tony Parravano in April of 1957, but it appears to have not been sold by him, nor was it actively raced, over the course of the next three years. Parravano eventually sold the car to a friend, Javier Valesquez in Mexico City, in the spring of 1960. Curiously, around April of 1960, Parravano was in trouble with the IRS and disappeared on 8 April of that year, never to be heard from again. Some cars still remained in his custody, and were later sold by the U.S. government. Valesquez was the director and organizer of the Mexican Grand Prix, and upon purchasing the car, it is noted that he removed its rollbar, yet the holes for the bodywork were not patched in and remained as-is. Valesquez retained ownership of 0448 MD for the following 12 years, eventually selling it to noted Ferrari collector Robert N. Dusek of Solebury in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. At this time, the car was missing its aluminum passenger seat cover, and Dusek sourced one from Charles Betz in California. Dusek would go on to own the car for more than two decades, selling the car in 1999 through a broker who in turn traded it to its current custodian. Offered publically for the first time in 18 years, the car has been seldom seen since leaving the race track in the late 1950s, making it hugely eligible for historic racing and concours events following a restoration. Chassis number 0448 MD, a fascinating example of a rare four-cylinder Ferrari, offers much greater performance over the much more prevalent 500 Mondial, and would certainly be a much-in-demand machine wherever it goes. Addendum Please note that the title is in transit. Chassis no. 0448 MD Engine no. 0448 MD

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1969 Ferrari 365 GTS by Pininfarina

320 bhp, 4,390 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three twin-choke downdraft Weber 40 DFI 7 carburetors, five-speed manual rear transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. One of 20 only built; one of the rarest road-going Ferrari Spiders Just six caretakers over 47 years Matching numbers throughout; Ferrari Classiche certified Includes complete tool roll, jack, and factory manuals Six-time FCA Platinum award winner; exceptional in every regard Exhibited at the Cavallino Classic, Concorso Italiano, and the Quail Motorsports Gathering Featured in Forza magazine By early 1966, Ferrari had several models in production, including the family oriented 330 GT 2+2, the premium appointed 500 Superfast, and the dual-purpose 275 GTB. None of these models, however, offered anything quite resembling the unique combination of luxury, performance, and styling possessed by the 250 GT Lusso, which ceased production in 1964. At the Geneva Motor Show in March 1966, Ferrari finally addressed this shortcoming with the debut of a new two-seat grand tourer steeped in luxury. The 330 GTC, and its open-bodied GTS sibling, were tremendously popular with more restrained sporting customers, offering elegant aesthetics and classic Ferrari performance. Late in 1968, the 330 GTC and GTS were quietly upgraded to more formidable engine specifications, with the single overhead-cam motor now displacing 4,390 cubic centimeters, and developing 320 horsepower and a formidable 267 foot-pounds of torque. In this new arrangement, the engine delivered a notably wider power band, with significant torque arriving as low as 2,500 rpm. Minor cosmetic changes visually differentiated the two models, with the new 365 cars featuring engine-cooling vents on the hood rather than the fenders, and a modified interior HVAC vent arrangement. The 365 was also produced in a much smaller quantity, with only 168 coupes and 20 spiders built before the model was discontinued entirely in 1970. Now viewed as the ultimate factory hot rod of the 330 GT platform, the 365 GTC and corresponding spiders combined rarity, exquisite design, and the most powerful single overhead-cam motor ever used on a Ferrari road car. Benefiting from a premium restoration in the 1990s, as well as just six owners over 47 years, this outstanding late-production GTS is a faithful and minimally driven example of the powerful vintage roadster. The penultimate example of the 20 spiders, chassis number 12489 was ideally equipped by the factory with air conditioning and a dashboard-top interior lamp. Completed in a very elegant and rare finish of Blu Caracalla paint and trimmed with a Grigio Speciale leather interior, this car was delivered new in June 1969 to George Woolley, a dealer in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. A short time later, the Ferrari was purchased by its first owner of record, Lee Morris of Montreal. Mr. Morris sold the spider in 1975 to Thomas Sherman of Berkeley, California, who went on to retain possession for nearly 20 years. The first two owners drove the car rather sparingly and, remarkably, by 1990 the odometer had accrued only 34,850 miles. When Mr. Sherman offered the 365 for sale at that time, it was reportedly completely original except for a new clutch, exhaust, and battery. The GTS found a buyer in 1992, when Ferrari of San Francisco arranged a purchase by German resident Christian Groenke. After a brief period of storage in Idaho, 12489 was shipped to Europe and entrusted to the esteemed Sportgarage Bruno Wyss in Zofingen, Switzerland, for a comprehensive two-year restoration that was completed in 1996. In addition to a mechanical overhaul, the undamaged body was treated to a new finish in Blu Ultrascuro paint, and the interior was refreshed with cream leather. Shortly after the restoration’s completion, the 365 was exhibited in August 1997 at the OldTimer Grand Prix at the Nürburgring. In 1999, the rare Ferrari was purchased by Barry and Susan Konier of Saratoga, California, who in turn sold the car a year later to nearby resident Tim Montgomery. The new owner had become a strong believer in the single overhead-cam 365 range, and to this end he also bought a 365 GTC to match. As his collection manager later described to Forza magazine, “The idea was to make a pair, basically have bookends.” While the coupe was registered with tags reading “150 MADE,” the spider was appropriately registered as “20 MADE.” Mr. Montgomery exhibited the car on numerous occasions, starting with Concorso Italiano at the Quail Lodge in August 2000, and the X Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in January 2001, where the car garnered an FCA Platinum Award. Eight months later the GTS reprised its Concorso appearance at the Vintage Ferrari Concours, where it won another Platinum Award. In January 2002, a second Cavallino appearance netted yet another Platinum Award, and the car then returned to the West Coast in May for the FCA’s National Meet in Los Angeles, where a fourth Platinum was bestowed. The year concluded with one more appearance at Concorso Italiano. In August 2004, Mr. Montgomery presented 12489 at the FCA International Meet at Monterey, California, winning a fifth Platinum Award, and the following year he displayed the GTS at the Newport Beach Concours d’Elegance in Southern California. The impressive exhibition run essentially concluded in 2006 with a Gold-awarded appearance at the Cavallino Classic in January and display at the renowned Quail Motorsports Gathering in Carmel Valley, California, in August. Shortly thereafter, both cars were the subject of a color feature by the noted automotive writer and Pebble Beach judge Winston Goodfellow, which was printed in the June 2008 issue of Forza. As Mr. Goodfellow opined about the car’s mechanical and aesthetic virtues after spirited first-hand use, “The GTS is much like a lighter 365 California on steroids, delivering whoosh-like, linear acceleration . . . . Uninhibited by a roof, [it] sings louder and more throatily than the GTC. Without the 330’s fender louvers, the Pininfarina-penned shape becomes that much more pure . . . it’s a true master stroke of elegance.” In 2007, the Ferrari was sold to the consignor, becoming a part of his renowned collection. Continuing the car’s longstanding record of ideal maintenance and minimal use, the new owner returned the car to the Cavallino Classic in January 2011, where it won another Platinum Award. He also entered the spider at the prestigious Louis Vuitton Serenissima Run from Monaco to Venice in April 2012, and the odometer currently displays approximately 10,235 kilometers. In July 2016, the Maranello factory issued a Classiche Red Book confirming that 12489 retains all of its original matching-numbers drivetrain components, original-type brakes, suspension, Borrani RW 4039 wheels, and the original coachwork. Boasting six Platinum Awards and a desirably limited chain of just six caretakers since it rolled off the factory floor, this breathtaking 365 GTS embodies rarity and elegance, comprising one of the most powerful luxury spiders of the 1960s. With only 20 such cars built, significantly rarer than the Daytona Spider, California Spider, and Pinin Farina Cabriolet, the 365 GTS is rarely offered for public sale. This beautiful spider now beacons its next caretaker to indulge in the rewarding torquey performance of the 12-cylinder Tipo 245 C engine, or to continue the car’s exceptional record on the show fields and at FCA events. Chassis no. 12489 Engine no. 12489 Gearbox no. 143

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-01-20
Hammer price
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1937 TALBOT LAGO T150 C SS TEARDROP COUPÉ

The ex-Tommy Lee, Brooks Stevens 1937 TALBOT LAGO T150 C SS TEARDROP COUPÉ COACHWORK BY FIGONI ET FALASCHI Chassis No. 90105 Engine No. 85019 Body No. 655 Red with red leather and fawn cloth interior Engine: straight six, twin high camshafts, twin carburetors, 3,996cc, 140bhp at 4,100rpm; Gearbox: four-speed pre-selector; Suspension: independent front by top wishbone and lower transverse semi-elliptic leaf spring; Brakes: four wheel hydraulic. Right hand drive. Known simply as the Goutte d'Eau or Teardrop this is an example of one of the greatest series of automobiles ever constructed, a perfect marriage of two companies at the top of their game, Talbot-Lago and Figoni et Falaschi. The story of the running gear originates when the Sunbeam Talbot Darracq combine collapsed in the mid-1930s. While the Rootes brothers took over the British operations, wisely the receivers were content to let Anthony Lago continue to run the French operation at Suresnes near Paris, and the energetic and capable Lago breathed new life into the business setting out to build a notable range of fast sports and touring automobiles. Under his direction, the French Talbot organization performed a major role on the automobile scene. By the end of the decade not only was the marque very active in racing, both in Grand Prix and in Endurance, it also produced high performance road cars, their technology being closely related to the competition cars. The most major strategic move that Lago made shortly after he took ownership of French Talbot, was to instruct the chief engineer Walter Beccia to design a new range of cars working on applying pushrod overhead valve technology to the existing range of engines, the 15CV 2.7 litre, 17CV 3 litre and 23CV 4 litre. The latter unit now in the overhead valve form produced over 160bhp and was designated T150C, the 'C' standing for 'course' or competition. Lago combined this with the inherited chassis with independent front suspension by transverse leaf springs and Wilson pre-select gearchange that Lago himself had been instrumental in the development of. Talbot called their 4 litre sports cars 'Lago-Specials'. The cars began their chassis sequence at 90001 in 1936. It is estimated that some 63 chassis were supplied between 1936 and 1939. Recognising the enormous racing potential of the car, Lago quickly exploited this and in the winter of 1936/37, Lago built his a 'SS' or Super Sport model, for which he took the T150C chassis and shortened it to 2.65m. The definitive sports version of the chassis, it weighed in at some 130 kilos less than a standard T150C. Chassis numbers for Super Sport chassis had a '1' as the middle digit, starting with 90101. The introduction of the sports T150 C-SS coincided nicely with the revolt of Delahaye, Bugatti and other French manufacturers against the German domination of the Grands Prix and their instigation of a Sports Car only Grand Prix de L'ACF. Although not completing their first race the 3 hours of Marseille, the results quickly began to improve and their persistence produced a 1-2-3 and 5th place finish in 1937 at the French GP. For the other half of the equation one looks no further than the same country and to one of the most legendary 'carrossiers' of their day, Figoni et Falaschi. Never was the phrase 'Rolling Sculpture' more apt than when describing the legendary coachwork penned by Joseph Figoni. From the mid-1930s, he was backed by wealthy Italian businessman Ovidio Falaschi, whose passion for flamboyant coachwork funded and inspired Figoni's continued development of increasingly aerodynamic and avant garde body styles on the luxury chassis of the day. They were to comment in period "We really were true couturiers of automotive coachwork, dressing and undressing a chassis one, two, three times and even more before arriving at the definitive line that we wanted to give to a specific chassis-coachwork ensemble". When influenced by artist Geo Ham this produced the 'sweepspear' designs which featured bodywork mouldings stretching back from the radiator to the rear wings, and these led to his finest, if not the finest design ever, the faux cabriolet, which became known universally as the 'Goutte d'Eau' or 'Teardrop'. They were the undisputed epitome of the coachbuilder's art in the immediate pre-war period, and even today the Teardrop looks advanced and it is almost inconceivable to imagine its design approaches 70 years of age. Just fourteen were constructed and of these only even fewer used the Super Sport chassis as their basis, they were famed and fabled their combination of design underpinned by the sporting Talbot-Lago chassis meant that they were as at home on the race track as on the concours d'elegance circuit, though today they are a more familiar find in the latter category. Three iterations of Teardrop were built, noted by Figoni as design 9221, which was more a coupé style and had an indentation or notched back, the 9220 with a full flowing fastback tail, and a New York model, being as shown at the 1938 New York Auto Salon. 90105 is an example of the latter and is perhaps the holy grail of these fabulous machines, being one of very few survivors still in predominantly original order. That the car remains in such remarkable condition is the result of a succinct and unblemished history, coloured by noted car connoisseurs. The fourth of fourteen built, of which all but one survive, this car was the only example not to have been fitted with a sunroof, instead for cabin ventilation the twin windscreens open outwards on compact dash operated ratchet winders. The car wears a laurel wreath around its badge signifying that it would have originally been supplied to the export market, i.e. America. Before this it was first registered in Paris with the number '9187 RL 3', which is borne out by a least one known image in which it is identifiable by its lack of sunroof line. It is thought that Frederic McEvoy, the 1937 World Bobsleigh Champion and double gold medallist of that year, may well have used the car prior to its export, his name has certainly been connected with the car in the past, though it is known that he was a dealer for these cars and his use is assumed to have been for promotional purposes. Shortly after this, in 1939 it was sold to America through Luigi Chinetti, then representative for Figoni and Talbot-Lago, to enthusiast, collector and Playboy, Tommy Lee in 1939. Los Angeles-based Lee habitually campaigned the Talbot-Lago, it was as well-known for being blasted up and down the local boulevards and for drag racing as it was for being raced on the dry lakebeds against the hotrods, this all still in its stock form! While it was housed alongside his other cars which included a series of 2.9 Alfas, and other Teardrops including chassis 90107, that of the Maharani of Khapurthala. On Lee's death his cars were consigned to Roger Barlow's International Motors in Los Angeles, at which time note is made that it passed to a Mr Neal and then to Ralph Knudsen of Milwaukee. Taking the car back to his home state, Wisconsin, the car came under the eye of Brooks Stevens, the famous industrial designer. Stevens' sphere of influence was huge and he was responsible for many important designs of everyday things, such as the Steam-O-Matic iron, Allis-Chalmers tractors, Miller High Life Soft Cross logo and the sensational 1959 Scimitar All-Purpose sedan, with Reutter body. To a man with such interest in design, as well as a passion for racing, the 'Teardrop' would have been a most fitting addition to his growing stable of cars, and seeing it parked outside a local restaurant he immediately negotiated its sale. An article in Road and Track in 1957 records that shortly after purchasing the car Stevens entered the car Watkins Glen in 1950, when driven by Jim Floria it performed very well, though 'after a few gyrations at Stone Corner' it was 'retired to the pastures of a concours life while still in one piece'. This rather modest reference belies the truth that the car actually came home a respectable 11th overall and was also run locally to Stevens at Wilmot Hills, Wisconsin that same year. It would later share a garage for the second time with the Lee 2.9 (Chassis 412030), when this too joined Stevens collection in 1968. Brooks Stevens kept the car for more than four decades until around the time of his death when it was sold to collector Bruce Lustman. In his ownership he had the car mechanically restored to correct original specifications. It later passed into the present collection ownership in 1998. Fully recorded in Richard Adatto's excellent reference work on the 1930s aerodynamic era of styling From Passion to Perfection, 90105 not only retains its original unique coachwork, but is also widely regarded as retaining all of the original running gear, engine, gearbox and axles it began its life with. More surprisingly, many of its detail features survive also, the interior leather and hatched headlining material still being present, though showing their age, the twin opening windscreens being operative, the trunk lid still has its period lining and along the trunk shut lines have cross-hatched chrome trims. All these and more are testament to the long term Stevens ownership and the select number of connoisseurs that have presided over the car, and but for an over officious museum curator, who commissioned the repaint to the current red whilst Stevens was away from his museum the car would perhaps still even sport its original French Blue livery. The 1957 Road and Track article notes that the car had been advertised for sale in February 1949, when it was quoted as a 'Fine example of European craftsmanship - Talbot Lago with masterpiece in coachwork by Figoni and Falaschi. A real sports car, while providing comfort, reliability and elegance.' Words that are as true today as they were then and Teardrop Talbot Lagos have always been appreciated as such. The new owner of this remarkable automobile will therefore join a role-call of some of the most noted car collectors of all time, collectors who have consistently achieved outright victories at the most esteemed International Concours d'Elegance events. Understandably they rarely change hands, which makes the acquisition of 90105 a fabulous opportunity, be it for entry in similar future competitions in a conservation class or as a definitively complete basis for a concours restoration. One of the all-time greats, Christie's is honoured to present it for sale.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-08-18
Hammer price
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1931 Duesenberg Model J 'Disappearing Top' Convertible Coupe by Murphy

265 bhp, 420 cu. in. DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed Warner Hi-Flex manual transmission, beam-type front and live rear axles with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142.5 in. One of about 25 original Murphy Disappearing Tops built Original chassis, engine, and body Painstakingly restored and a multiple award winner ACD Club Certified Category 1 (D-146) The Walter M. Murphy Company, of Pasadena, California, produced roughly 100 bodies for Duesenberg, which was more than any other coachbuilder, and it more or less served as the de facto Model J body maker on the West Coast. Their most popular body style was the two-passenger convertible coupe with a rumble seat, of which about 60 were made, but not all of these were equal. Murphy initially produced the convertible coupe with a top that folded down into a low pile and was exposed behind the driver’s seat, in the fashion of most convertibles of the time. Roughly 25 of these were produced, followed by a series of interim cars, mostly one-off designs, in which the top folded down into a well behind the seat and was covered by a low leather snap-on tonneau. This eventually evolved into a true “disappearing top” model, in which a flush-fitting metal lid replaced the tonneau, creating a smooth, flat line that ran from the edges of the hood to the doors and down over the rear deck. This top, coupled with Murphy’s signature thin “Clear-Vision” windshield pillars and disappearing side windows, gave the convertible coupe the sporting appearance of a true roadster. Unlike the standard convertible coupes, which were often produced for Duesenberg factory stock, the disappearing top models were all fully custom, as recognized by their 900-series body numbers, and they were built for their original owners. This special status, along with their spectacular lines, has made them perhaps the most iconic bodies on the Model J chassis. A HOLLYWOOD MODEL J Body number 921 was installed on a short-wheelbase Model J chassis, number 2414, and featured engine number J-395, which, according to the notes of late Duesenberg historian Ray Wolff, had been tested on August 12, 1930. The body was delivered to the Duesenberg company on May 4, 1930, and it cost the original owner $2,130. According to the records of Duesenberg historian Dwight Schooling, the earliest owner of J-395 was Blake Garner, who owned the car in Chicago as of 1936. Despite much research on the part of RM Sotheby’s, little is known about Mr. Garner. The car is likely to have been originally primrose yellow with apple green fenders, as this is the color scheme it wore for many years. By 1941, the car had come to Los Angeles, where, at a gas station, it was photographed in its yellow and green livery by Jim Talmadge, the son of silent film stars Buster Keaton and Natalie Talmadge and a well-known Model J enthusiast himself. The car had been purchased by George Schweiger Sr., a dentist who was also a part owner of an auto rental company. Pacific Auto Rentals, as it was known, specialized in a very useful business in Hollywood: supplying prop cars for the film studios. The company operated out of 310 South Barendo Street, in what is now Koreatown, in Los Angeles, and it boasted an enviable inventory of just about every imaginable vintage vehicle, from Model Ts to Mercedes-Benzes to Isotta Fraschinis and even a few Duesenbergs. If you see a great car in a 1930s Hollywood film, chances are that Pacific Auto Rentals was behind it, and the firm has become a legendary name to Southern California car enthusiasts, equating them with the fabled hordes of the Brucker Family and Art Austria. According to a February 1951 Popular Mechanics article on the Pacific Auto Rentals fleet, “a very fine Duesenberg Convertible Coupe became ‘camera shy’ and was sadly sold to a Duesenberg enthusiast.” In May 1949, J-395 was sold by Schweiger to John Guthrie, a man with homes in New York City and Coalinga, California. By October 1950, it had passed to H.D. Carmichael, also of Coalinga. In 1956, J-395 rejoined the Pacific Auto Rentals fleet. It would remain with PAR for the next three decades, during which time it became a considerably well-known automobile in West Coast ACD circles, as well as one of the most widely known Duesenbergs by the public. In 1962, it appeared alongside Bette Davis and Joan Crawford in the famous thriller What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? In the 1970s, it was a regular in the television series Bring ‘Em Back Alive, as well as a featured player in the 1976 film Gable and Lombard. The car was also the subject of a feature article in the August 1970 issue of Car Classics magazine. Following the passing of George Schweiger Sr. in the early 1980s, the entire Pacific Auto Rentals Collection was sold to the Imperial Palace of Las Vegas, which cherry-picked the cars and sold the remainder at an auction on the front lawn of the Ambassador Hotel on August 18, 1985. Here, J-395 was sold to renowned Philadelphia collector Oscar Davis, who had it refinished in all-over cream with a maroon chassis. In 1993, J-395 was sold back to the Imperial Palace, reportedly as the 50th Duesenberg in their vast collection. When the collection dispersed in 1998, it spent time in the Blackhawk Collection, and then it was acquired by Chris and Kathleen Koch, of Palm Coast, Florida. The Kochs reportedly invested more than $500,000 in the Duesenberg’s present restoration, which included a full mechanical restoration by Brian Joseph’s highly respected Classic & Exotic Service, of Troy, Michigan. A cosmetic restoration and final assembly were handled by a talented Florida-based restorer, Steve Cooley Jr., of Tavares. After three years of painstakingly rebuilding virtually every component, the car was presented at its first concours, the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded a Best in Class. It went on to be shown a further 17 times in a two-year period, and it won nothing less than first place each time. Today, as a long-term resident of the Andrews Collection, there is no doubt that this car remains one of the finest Disappearing Top Convertible Coupes extant, and it is still capable of winning many more times on the concours field. Its restoration still appears fresh, even after participation in two 1,000-mile Duesenberg Tours, with the first one being in Texas in 2010 and the second in Virginia in 2014, and it shows no significant signs of wear and tear. With its impeccable provenance, its original chassis, engine, and body, and its ACD Club Category 1 Certification, as well as an important file of history and photographs, it is surely the preeminent example of what may well be the greatest Duesenberg body style. Chassis no. 2414 Engine no. J-395 Body no. 921

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-05-02
Hammer price
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1974 McLaren M16C Indianapolis

800 hp, 159 cu. in. Offenhauser DOHC turbo-charged four-cylinder engine with Hillborn fuel injection, Hewland LG500 transmission, lower front wishbone suspension with top rockers and coil springs, reversed rear lower wishbones with single top links, twin radius arms and coil springs over dampers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in. Winner of the 1974 Indianapolis 500 Driven by Johnny Rutherford, started in 25th position The first of his three Indy 500 wins The second of three Indy 500 wins for McLaren cars in the 1970s Concours-winning restoration to original specification in 1991 Complete record of ownership and racing history Driven by Rutherford at the 2009 and 2011 Goodwood Festivals of Speed If this orange McLaren M16C looks familiar to you, perhaps you saw Johnny Rutherford win the Indianapolis 500 on May 26, 1974. You’d certainly remember him if you saw him: starting in 25th position, he shot up to 12th in only three laps. A battle ensued between Rutherford and A.J. Foyt for about 50 laps, until Foyt blew an oil line. Rutherford took the lead for 59 of the last 60 laps, and he never looked back. He won the race by a full 22 seconds and had lapped every car in the field, except second-place Bobby Unser. Johnny Rutherford and the McLaren went on to win the Milwaukee 150 on June 9, 1974, and the Pocono 500 on June 30th. He finished 4th at the Michigan 200 on July 21st and 4th at the Trenton 300 Race 1 on September 22nd. He was also 6th at Trenton on April 7th, 7th at the Trenton 300 Race 2 in September, and 7th in Phoenix on November 2nd. Rutherford had quite a year, and while he was runner-up to Bobby Unser in the championship, his McLaren was on the cover of the 1974 Indianapolis 500 Yearbook. “Lone Star J.R.’s” race record is matched by few drivers. Rutherford started racing stock cars in Texas in 1959 and then sprint cars in 1961, winning the USAC Sprint Car Championship in 1965. He qualified for a 1963 Daytona 500 support race at record speed. Rutherford’s NASCAR career included 35 starts from 1963–1988, and he won his first outing, which was for Smokey Yunick. Later, Rutherford was a regular IROC competitor for five years: 1975, 1977, 1978, 1980, and 1984. Rutherford raced for the McLaren team for seven years, from 1973 through 1979. He won two Indy 500s for McLaren in 1974 and 1976, and a third for Chaparral in 1980. His Indy record is spectacular: Beginning in 1963, he ran twenty-eight 500s and finished the race 24 times, starting his last Memorial Day Classic in 1988. He won the pole position in 1973, 1976, and 1980, and at Michigan in 1984, he set the all-time IndyCar qualifying record at 215.189 mph. He was the first driver to win all three 500-mile races, and he is one of only six IndyCar drivers to record nine straight seasons with a victory. Rutherford won a total of 27 Indianapolis car races. The McLaren that carried Rutherford to the Indy 500 Victory Circle was designed in 1971. Gordon Coppuck reconsidered his M15 design after observing Lotus’s success with the wedge-shaped 72. Uncertain about Formula One, Coppuck thought the low nose would be ideal for circle racing, so he moved the radiators to the sides. The aluminum monocoque carried the turbo-charged Offenhauser four-cylinder engine as a stressed member, and A-frames handled the rear suspension. The engine cover swept up to include a rear wing and balance the downforce on the nose. Roger Penske and Mark Donohue visited McLaren in late 1970 and bought two of the new M16s. McLaren Works drivers, Peter Revson and Denny Hulme, joined Donohue at Indianapolis in 1971. Revson got the pole and Donohue took the early lead, until his gearbox failed. Al Unser won in an Eagle, but Revson finished 2nd, while Hulme broke down. Donohue would later score two wins with the M16. The M16B was introduced for 1972, with a shorter nose and the wing further back. Penske bought two more cars to run the whole season. Bobby Unser had an even faster Eagle for Indy, but Penske turned down Donohue’s turbo boost, gambling that the other cars would break. They did, and Donohue won. McLaren revealed the M16C in 1973, with a rounder body, better engine cowling, and a cockpit like the upcoming M23 F1 car, which was based on the same design and would win two world championships. McLaren hired Rutherford to partner Revson as a Works driver for the USAC season, and Rutherford promptly grabbed the Indy 500 pole in the car offered today, M16C-5, at 198.413 mph. However, the race was a nightmare. It was delayed by rain for two and a half days and was marred by tragedy. Three horrific crashes killed two drivers, Art Pollard and Swede Savage, and badly injured Salt Walther. Rutherford had mechanical problems and a fuel leak, but, ultimately, he finished 9th. He would win at Michigan later and record two 2nd places, a 3rd, a 4th, and two 5th places. The Indianapolis 500 was worried about safety in 1974, so the rear wings were reduced in size and the fuel load was cut from 75 gallons to 40. In addition, the turbos were fitted with 80-pound pop-off valves in an effort to slow the cars. Rutherford in M16C-5 was partnered with David Hobbs in the McLarens Works, which was updated to M16C/D specification. Despite having the second fastest lap speed of 190.446 mph, Rutherford didn’t qualify on Pole Day. He was forced to start 25th of 33 cars, but it seemed to matter little. By the third lap, he was running 12th. After A.J. Foyt blew an oil line, Rutherford would lead 59 of the last 60 laps, winning by 22 seconds over Bobby Unser and lapping everybody. Rutherford’s winning speed was 158 mph. He would go on to win two more IndyCar races that year. In December 1976, Rutherford’s car, M16C-5, was sold to a private team, WalMotor, which was owned by George Walther and Salt Walther, who had been injured at the race in 1973. Salt Walther failed to qualify for the Indy 500 in 1977. Graham Mcrae tried to qualify for Indy in 1978, but he was unsuccessful. He entered the Mosport Park 300k in June 1978 but did not start. However, on July 26, 1978, the team got some good news. Tyler Alexander, director of McLaren Racing, wrote to Jeff Walther, verifying that M16C-5, which was sold to WalMotor in December 1976, was definitely the 1974 Indianapolis 500-winning car. The M16 had been competitive far longer than expected and wasn’t replaced until 1977. It almost had five Indy 500 wins. Peter Revson finished 2nd in 1971, and Rutherford was laying 2nd in the 1975 Indy 500 when the race was stopped by rain after 435 miles. He actually won the 1976 race in a reversal of the situation, when the race was stopped at 255 miles. Still, M16s won three Indy 500 races in six years, which is a remarkable achievement. In 1978, M16C-5 was bought by Florida collector Rick Carroll, who had it restored to the exact specifications of the 1974 Indianapolis 500. When Carroll passed in 1991, it was sold to the present owner for a then record price for an IndyCar. Interestingly, other interested parties included McLaren principal Ron Dennis. Since being returned to running condition, M16C-5 has made some significant appearances, with a number of them being with its most famous driver. In 2005, it was displayed in the Ritz-Carlton ballroom at Amelia Island, Florida, for a celebration of Indy 500 drivers at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, and there, Rutherford signed the car. At that event, Rutherford was named Grand Marshal for the 2006 Amelia Island Concours. In 2006, Rutherford’s Indy 500 winner won First in Class among “The Cars of Johnny Rutherford” at Amelia Island. Fittingly, perhaps, the trophy was a bronze model of M16C-5 itself. Also in 2006, M16C-5 was driven by Rick Hamlin on pace laps at the Brickyard before the Indy 500 race. M16C-5’s winning streak continued at the 2009 Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance, where it won First in Class among “The Cars of Bruce McLaren.” It didn’t just stand around and look pretty either. Reunited with his old crew chief, Denis Daviss, at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in both 2009 and 2011, Johnny Rutherford treated 180,000 spectators to runs at the hill climb in his old warrior. From March through June 2011, M16C-5 was on display at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum, along with other Indy 500 winners, celebrating the Brickyard’s centennial. The new owner of McLaren M16C-5—one of, it should be noted, only a handful of pre-IRL Indianapolis 500 winners remaining in private hands—can be certain to be welcome at any events for which the car is eligible, in both concours and historic racing. If he’s lucky, Johnny Rutherford, surely the most qualified driver, will be happy to accompany M16C-5, for old time’s sake. Addendum Please note that this vehicle is a race car and will, therefore, be offered on a Bill of Sale. Please note that the client has advised us that the printed catalog copy as written by RM contains an error. While it states that this car is "one of only two 500 winners not in the Indianapolis 500 Hall of Fame," it should have read that this car is "one of only a handful of pre-IRL Indianapolis 500 winners remaining in private hands." Chassis no. M16C-5

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
Show price

1954 Ferrari 500 Mondial Spider Series I by Pinin Farina

170 bhp, 1,984 cc dual overhead-camshaft inline four-cylinder engine with two Weber 40 DCOA/3 carburetors, four-speed manual transaxle, independent front suspension with transverse leaf springs, de Dion rear axle with parallel trailing arms and semi-elliptic leaf springs, tubular steel frame, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 88.6 in. Offered from the Estate of William H. Tilley One of four factory Works entrants in the 1954 Mille Miglia Ferrari Classiche Reb Book certification Presented and awarded at numerous Concours d’Elegance, including Pebble Beach and the Cavallino Classic History documented by Ferrari expert Marcel Massini Though Ferrari is best known for its prodigious front-engine V-12 road cars, the manufacturer actually produced several models of four-cylinder sports/racers during the 1950s that are every bit as breathtaking as their more muscular siblings. During the 1950 Formula Two races, Enzo Ferrari noticed that four-cylinder race cars from manufacturers like HWM and Cooper were hot on the tails of his 12-cylinder cars on the handful of twisty circuits that generally lacked long straightaways. The fact was that the four-cylinder engines developed peak torque at a much lower rpm band than the 12-cylinder cars, enabling them to maximize their potential in a far shorter distance. By contrast, the high-revving V-12 cars were only developing a fraction of their power when the next set of turns required braking. Aware of this inherent flaw in the V-12 on such winding courses, Ferrari assigned Aurelio Lampredi to develop a four-cylinder motor, which eventually debuted during the 1951 Bari Grand Prix as a 2.5-liter unit that could develop 200 horsepower. Ferrari’s foresight turned out to be quite prudent, as Formula One racing was essentially cancelled during the 1952 and 1953 seasons because Alfa Romeo withdrew from competition, leaving Ferrari as the only remaining entrant of note. Therefore, Formula Two events became the basis of the Driver’s Championships during those two years, and the Lampredi engine was ideally poised to dominate. Scuderia driver Alberto Ascari had little trouble in securing consecutive championships in the four-cylinder F2 monoposto, bringing Ferrari the title in 1952 and 1953. Once it became clear how effective Lampredi’s four-cylinder motor was, experimentation with sports/racing chassis was inevitable, and various combinations involving all three iterations of the new engine, which had been developed in 2-liter, 2.5-liter, and 3-liter forms, were eventually attempted. In early 1954, Ferrari finally offered the four-cylinder sports/racer to customers as a two-liter model, with each cylinder displacing almost 500 cubic centimeters. The car was dubbed the 500 Mondial, in recognition of Ascari’s back-to-back World Championships. Starting with chassis 0404MD, 18 spiders and two berlinettas were built over a run of first-series cars, most of these bodied by Pinin Farina. A second series of 10 Scaglietti-bodied cars with slightly more powerful engines followed, resulting in a total of just 30 examples of the 500 Mondial before it gave way to the three-liter 750 Monza. Unlike the prototype four-cylinder sports car that placed 2nd at the 12 Hours of Casablanca in late 1953, which had a standard frontally located gearbox, the customer cars featured a rear-mounted transaxle that further optimized weight distribution and handling. In addition to its rarity and notability as the customer car commemorating the 1952–1953 Ferrari Championships, the Series One 500 Mondial Spider is also significant as one of the final Ferraris to feature the elegant barchetta-style coachwork that defined Maranello’s early sports cars. Chassis 0418MD is just the sixth 500 Mondial built, with its certificate of origin completed on April 8, 1954, and according to noted marque expert Marcel Massini, this car was one of four Mondials entered by the factory at the XXI Mille Miglia on May 1. While records do not precisely reflect who drove which chassis, it is now believed that 0418MD was driven by either Sterzi and Rossi or Pineschi and Landini, suggesting that the car may have finished as high as 15th overall and 5th in class. Not long after, this Mondial was made available for purchase, and it was acquired on July 14 by Mario and Bianca Piazza, of Trieste. At the III Messina 10-hour race on July 24, 0418MD placed 11th overall. Though officially entered at the XXII Mille Miglia on April 30, 1955, and the Grand Premio Supercortemaggiore race at Monza on May 29, the car did not start at either race. In mid-1955, this enchanting Spider was imported to Caracas, Venezuela, and purchased by Gustavo Garcia, who quickly resold it to Ramon Lopez, a driver with the Equipo Madunina. During its time in competition with the Venezuelan scuderia, 0418MD was also driven by Guido Lollobrigida, the cousin of Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida. Piloted by Mr. Lopez, the Mondial placed 10th overall at the 1955 Grand Prix of Venezuela and 2nd overall at Maracay in August 1956. When entered in the Venezuelan Grand Prix in November 1956, the car featured a new livery of white paint with a dark tri-color stripe, and a year later, it finished 14th overall at the 1957 event. After some attention by Abele Caviccioli’s shop in Caracas, 0418MD was painted military green for a sponsorship by the Venezuelan Ministry of Defense, and then, it returned to white for its entry in the La Trinidad contest of March 1958, where it took 1st in class and was driven by Mr. Lollobrigida. The Mondial was photographically depicted during this triumph in the official 1959 Ferrari Yearbook. During the early 1960s, the car passed through two more South American owners before being imported to the United States in 1964. Raced in the Midwest by Fox Valley Sports Car Club of Wisconsin, 0418MD was purchased a year later by Ken Hutchison, of Tower Lake, Illinois. By 1970, the Mondial had come into the care of E. Fox, of Florida, and was equipped with a Chevy V-8, suggesting that the original MD-designated motor may have blown out during competition. A proper 500 Mondial engine was sourced from 0506MD (then owned by Bruce Lavachek, of Arizona,) and installed. As a motor from the second-series 500 Mondial with larger carburetors, the new engine brought a dividend of an extra 10 horsepower, further maximizing the car’s brisk performance. Within a few years, the Mondial was acquired by noted racing car collector David Uihlein, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where it rejoined the company of 0414MD, one of the three other Series One Pinin Farina-bodied Spiders that had been entered at the 1954 Mille Miglia. Advertised by Joe Marchetti’s International Autos Limited, in Chicago, through a 1984 edition of Cavallino magazine, the Mondial was purchased by well-known collector William Jacobs, of Joliet, Illinois, who campaigned it at the 1984 Mille Miglia and retained possession until 1987, when the car was sold to Paul Tavilla, of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Under Mr. Tavilla’s care, 0418MD underwent a complete cosmetic and mechanical restoration, after which it was entered in the Mille Miglia Storica from 1987 through 1989. More notably, perhaps, the car was presented at the inaugural Cavallino Classic Concours d’Elegance in Palm Beach in February 1992, earning First Place in the four-cylinder class. On June 11, 1993, 0418MD’s exhibition acclaim continued with a Second in Class at the 29th Annual FCA National Concours at Palm Beach Gardens, Florida. This Spider was shown one more time by Mr. Tavilla, at the Cavallino Classic in February 1995, before being purchased that December by Dennis Machul, of Oak Brook, Illinois. Mr. Machul treated the Mondial to some additional attention, commissioning a full restoration by the renowned Skip McCabe, of Mundelein, Illinois. Mr. McCabe expertly refinished the body in Rosso paint and installed a brand-new, period-correct interior and a revised hood with the addition of a 375 MM-styled hood scoop. Though, it should be noted that the original hood is also included with the car. Completed in early 1997, the stunning restoration debuted that August at the Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance in Rochester, Michigan. Then, 0418MD resumed its vintage rallying pursuits, competing in the Ferrari North America Challenge Rally in Colorado in June 199 and the XI Colorado Grand in September, where it was photographed for issue number 134 of Prancing Horse magazine. Chassis 0418MD then earned a Platinum Award at the 2000 Cavallino Classic, and three months later, it was featured in issue number 116 of Cavallino magazine. This sensational 500 Mondial placed 6th overall in the race for drum-brake cars at the Ferrari-Maserati Historic Challenge at Road America in August 2000, and again, it campaigned at the Colorado Grand in 2001. Mr. Machul exhibited this Spider at least twice more during his ownership, including at the 2005 Cavallino Classic. In March 2005, chassis 0418MD was purchased by Oscar Davis, of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, who presented the car at Cavallino in 2006 and participated in the Mille Miglia in 2007. Acquired from Mr. Davis by Mr. Tilley in 2009, it is no overstatement to say that the extraordinary Pinin Farina Spider immediately became the crown jewel of his Ferrari collection, as it would with most such collections. Featured as the cover car of the November 2009 issue of Sports Car Market magazine, 0418MD continued to occasionally grace California’s concours over the next few years, winning the ICON Award for Most Sporting Classic at the Rodeo Drive Concours d’Elegance in June 2010 and appearing at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in August 2012. Today, 0418MD’s restoration has held up beautifully, with very nice paint, an interior marked only by continued use on rallies and events, and extremely good panel gaps throughout. By loosening the leather hood straps, the entire hood can be taken off for closer inspection of the engine. The engine bay is very tidy and everything appears correct. Fitted on the driver’s side are two side-draft Weber 40DCOA/3 carburetors that are numbered 106 and 102, respectively. The engine stamping appears on the passenger-side center section of the engine block and is stamped 0506MD, in the correct font. The numero interno for this engine also appears on the rear of the engine block, and it carries the stamping 30MD, which is correctly designated to this motor and is confirmed by Ferrari Classiche, as stated in the certification binder. The chassis number appears clear on the main left chassis tube towards the front of the car, and it is stamped 0418MD. Interestingly, the steering box number, which can be found clearly under the front of the nose on the underside of the steering box itself, is dated and numbered 2 4 54, unit number 52; in other words, the steering box is most likely the original one delivered on the car, as it is dated only six days prior to the final completion date on April 8, 1954. What is significant about this is that it indicates that the steering box is the original one to the car, and it also signifies that there was never any major front-end damage. Many of these cars that have suffered front-end damage have replaced their steering boxes with later date and unit stampings. Tastefully fitted to 0418MD are modern cooling fans, a current electronic ignition, and full belly pans, which are all desirable and necessary upgrades for modern driving or rally events. These items can easily be removed should the cars next owner wish to show the car at concours events and bring it back to completely original configuration. The dash is particularly attractive with five highly visible Veglia gauges. All the gauges work properly, and there is no cracking or damage to any of them. Chassis 0418MD rides on four correct Borrani wire wheels, which are fitted with period-looking Dunlop Racing tires. The wire wheels are painted grey, and they are all equipped with correct chrome center-locking Borrani knock-offs. The car is currently equipped with two mirrors, and it comes with the passenger side cover, for a more streamlined, aerodynamic look; a larger, full two-person windscreen; the original hood, which lacks the center scoop; the spare tire, which is located in the rear; the ever-important red Ferrari Classiche certification binder; and full FIA and FIVA paperwork. An RM specialist had the opportunity to drive 0418MD and said that it performs wonderfully. “The four-cylinder cars are such a pleasure to drive…they are light, nimble, and still have lots of torque. This car, in particular, starts on the button and is extremely well balanced. It takes the driver back to the day when open-air competitive driving on the small narrow streets of Italy was at its prime!” This car remains an eligible candidate for numerous vintage events of note, where its torque-happy delivery at low rpm ensures delightful bouts of competitive rallying. Future ownership that is intent on display can also be assured that 0418MD will continue to draw consideration at national events, where its unique provenance as an early 1950s Ferrari sports/racer will always earn the admiration of knowledgeable enthusiasts. Impeccable in every respect, this superb Pinin Farina-bodied 500 Mondial is an exceptional example of Ferrari’s early four-cylinder sports cars that is undoubtedly worthy of the most accomplished collections. Chassis no. 0418MD Engine no. 0506MD

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
Show price

1938 Talbot-Lago T150-C SS Teardrop Coupé by Figoni et Falaschi

140 bhp, 3,996 cc inline six-cylinder engine with hemispherical combustion chambers and triple Stromberg carburettors, Wilson four-speed pre-selector gearbox, independent front suspension with transverse leaf spring, leaf spring and live axle rear suspension, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 2,650 mm (104.33") - A triple award winner at Pebble Beach in 2009 and Best of Show at Meadow Brook in 2010 - Shown at concours events in period - Show-quality restoration by RM Auto Restoration - One of only 11 examples with Second-Series “New York” Figoni coachwork - Rare Factory sunroof - Sophisticated race-bred, short-wheelbase T150-C SS Talbot-Lago chassis The T150-C SS chassis is arguably one of Anthony Lago’s greatest achievements. The “C” stood for competition, a reference to the marque’s racing success, while “SS” signified “super sports,” the short 2.65-metre wheelbase version of the competition chassis. Its race-bred six-cylinder engine featured an overhead valvetrain, hemispherical combustion chambers, high compression, triple carburettors and a large-capacity oil pan. Other competition items included a punched handbrake lever and a dual braking system. Intended for sporting two- or three-place coachwork, it was also the lightest chassis and offered exceptional road holding by virtue of its advanced independent front suspension, plus excellent braking. Racing success certainly enhanced the appeal; it was this demand, combined with Lago’s collaboration with the Figoni et Falaschi coachbuilding firm, that resulted in the creation of what many believe to be the most beautiful automobiles ever conceived. Figoni et Falaschi: Masters of Elegance There is little doubt that the era of exuberant French coachwork precipitated a tidal change in automotive design. Gone were the largely functional forms of the 1920s and early 1930s, replaced by the fanciful curves and sensuous lines that ushered in the era of the automobile as art form. Although others were versed in the style to one degree or another, the Parisian firm of Figoni et Falaschi remains widely regarded as the truest innovator of the groundbreaking new look. Joseph Figoni began to turn his attention to Talbot-Lago. In 1937, Figoni and Lago signed an agreement to work together exclusively, and for a time they did. The finest product of their collaboration was the landmark “Teardrop” or “goutte d’eau coupé,” with just 16 ultimately produced in two series. Regardless of the series, each Teardrop was coachbuilt, and consequently there are minor and even major variations from one car to another. For example, two were built with skirted front and rear wheels, some featured bullet headlamps between the radiator grille and fenders, while others featured headlamps recessed behind chrome grilles. The first series, named “Jeancart” after the first patron of the design, was a lovely aerodynamic coupé with a slight notchback design. Five were built, with three on the T150-C SS chassis, one on the three-litre T23 chassis and one on the T150-C Lago Speciale long-wheelbase chassis. The second series, débuted at the New York Auto Show and named “Model New York” in honour of the occasion, was quite similar in concept but featured an uninterrupted fastback profile. While not all such cars were officially designated “Model New York” by Figoni, all share the same appearance and characteristics, and consequently they are usually listed together by marque experts. Chassis no. 90112: Speed and Beauty Perfectly proportioned, these Teardrop Coupés mark the peak of the French streamlined design movement of the 1930s. Chassis 90112, the wonderful example offered here, is one of only 10 examples of the Style 9220 Model New York built on the short T150-C SS chassis (one additional car was built on the T23 Baby chassis). It is also one of just three surviving examples fitted from new with a factory-fitted sunroof. One of the most striking aspects of this design is the pair of graceful chrome grilles behind which the headlamps are hidden. A classic Figoni detail, it graces just a handful of the surviving cars. Provenance In the world of French cars, chassis 90112 stands as one of the best Teardrops, having a continuous history from new and no history of fire, accident or deterioration. All of its major components remain intact and together, including its chassis, engine and Figoni coachwork. It was ordered new by M. Troussaint, Director of the Casino at Namur, Belgium, and delivered to him in May 1938. Notably, it was shown at the 1939 Brussels Concours d’Elegance, and it was presented at the 1939 Concours d’Elegance in Deauville, France. With the onset of war and the fall of Belgium in the face of the German Blitzkrieg in May 1940, 90112 disappeared from view but eventually resurfaced in storage during the 1950s, prior to its acquisition by the Belgian royal family. Following the death of the King, a family member, who kept the car at their villa in Belgium, apparently inherited it. At some point in time, 90112 had been partially disassembled, in preparation for restoration, but the work was never undertaken, making 90112 one of the most original unrestored examples of its kind when the present owners acquired it during the mid-2000s. Restoration RM Auto Restoration was tasked with returning 90112 to concours-quality condition. The project began with a thorough inventory and dismantling of the remarkably complete car. Most of the original wooden framework supporting the coachwork survived the intervening decades, and during the restoration, every joint was painstakingly dismantled, cleaned and refastened. Where wood rot had appeared, primarily in the lower portions of the doors, new pieces were fabricated in the exact manner of the originals and carefully installed. While the sheet-metal was complete, previous repairs were poor. Although much of the original sheet-metal was saved, some metalwork was required, with identical materials and workmanship used to ensure the faithful restoration of the coachwork. The frame remained excellent, requiring little more than a thorough cleaning and refinishing. Similarly, the original chassis components were rebuilt and reinstalled, and every drivetrain component was rebuilt and cosmetically refurbished. Extensive research ensured that each detail was faithful to the original materials and finishes. To this end, several separate trips to visit other cars were made in order to photograph and document original features for authenticity. The interior trim and upholstery are identical in form and pattern to the originals. The wooden trim was carefully repaired and properly refinished, and the carpet, headliner and upholstery were painstakingly cut and fitted to match the original patterns. Each instrument was restored, and a new electrical wiring harness was fabricated for the complete car. Each light, bezel and lens were carefully rebuilt and reinstalled. Hundreds of hours were dedicated to careful block sanding and preparation for painting. The finish is a correct shade of silver accented with a subtle grey two-tone. In testament to the authenticity and quality of its restoration, 90112 earned no fewer than three awards at the 2009 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, including the J.B. and Dorothy Nethercutt Most Elegant Closed Car Trophy, First in Class J-2: European Classic Closed and the Art Center College of Design Award. In 2010, 90112 continued its winning ways by earning the Breitling Watch Award for the Car of Timeless Beauty at Amelia Island in March, followed by Best in Class: European and Best of Show at the Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance in July. Any surviving Talbot-Lago is a rare and delightful thing, particularly when it has been restored to such a high level. 90112 is exceptionally rare and attractive and is sure to garner invitations to the world’s most exclusive concours events, where its combination of performance and breath-taking “teardrop” coachwork is sure to impress. ITALIANTEXT 140 cv, motore 6 cilindri in linea di 3.996 cc con camere di combustione emisferiche e tre carburatori Stromberg, cambio a quattro marce con pre-selettore Wilson, sospensione anteriore a ruote indipendenti con balestra trasversale, assale posteriore rigido con balestra, freni a tamburo sulle quattro ruote. Passo: 2.650 mm (104.33") - Vincitrice di tre premi a Pebble Beach nel 2009 e Best of Show a Meadow Brook nel 2010 - Esibita in concorsi anche quando era nuova - Restaurata in condizioni da concorso da RM Auto Restoration - Uno dei soli 11 esemplari della seconda serie "New York” con carrozzeria Figoni - Raro esemplare prodotto con il tetto apribile - Sofisticato esemplare sul telaio a passo corto Talbot-Lago T150-C SS, nato per le corse Si può dire che il telaio T150-C SS é stato uno dei più grandi successi di Antonio Lago. La “C” sta per competizione, con riferimento ai successi sportivi della casa, mentre “SS” sta per “super sports”, con riferimento alla versione a passo corto (da 2,65 metri) del telaio da competizione. Il motore 6 cilindri da competizione presenta il comando valvole in testa, camere di scoppio emisferiche ad alta compressione, tre carburatori e coppa olio di grande capacità. Altri particolari da corsa sono la leva del freno a mano alleggerita e il doppio sistema frenante. Progettato per carrozzerie sportive a due o tre posti, è il telaio più leggero della serie ed offre un'eccezionale tenuta di strada, grazie alle avanzate sospensioni anteriori a ruote indipendenti, e un'ottima frenata. Il successo sportivo sicuramente lo rese più attraente; e fu questo impegno, combinato con la collaborazione fra Lago e la Carrozzeria Figoni et Falaschi, che portò alla nascita di quella che molti ritengono sia la più bella automobile mai concepita. Figoni et Falaschi: Maestri d'Eleganza Ci sono pochi dubbi sul fatto che l'era degli esuberanti carrozzieri francesi abbia portato ad un cambio epocale nello stile automobilistico. Le forme puramente funzionali degli anni Venti e dei primi anni Trenta erano state superate, sostituite dalle fantasiose curve e sensuali linee che inaugurarono l'era dell'automobile come forma d'arte. Sebbene anche altri carrozzieri fossero versati per questo stile ad un certo livello, i parigini Figoni et Falaschi sono considerati dai più come i veri innovatori del nuovo stile. Giuseppe Figoni aveva già posto la sua attenzione sulla Talbot-Lago, quando, nel 1937, lui e Lago sottoscrissero un accordo di esclusiva, che durò per qualche tempo. La più bella creazione nata dalla loro collaborazione fu l'immortale coupé "Goutte d’eau" (Goccia d'acqua) del quale furono costruiti solo 16 esemplari, distinti in due serie. Anche se era una serie, ogni esemplare della "Goutte d'eau" era costruito a mano e di conseguenza ci sono piccole e, a volte, anche grandi differenze fra un esemplare e l'altro. Per esempio, due vetture vennero costruite con entrambe le ruote anteriori e posteriori coperte, alcune hanno fanali a goccia scoperti posizionati fra la griglia del radiatore e i parafanghi e altre hanno i fanali nascosti da griglie cromate. La prima serie, denominata “Jeancart” dal nome dell'acquirente del primo esemplare, era un attraente coupé aerodinamico con l'ingombro del baule leggermente visibile (che gli americani definiscono "notchback"). Ne furono costruiti cinque esemplari, tre sul telaio T150-C SS chassis, uno sul telaio T23 con il motore 3 litri, e uno sul telaio a passo lungo T150-C Lago Speciale. La seconda serie, presentata al Salone dell'Auto di New York e per questo denominata “Modello New York”, era del tutto simile nel concetto alla precedente ma con un profilo posteriore ininterrotto (definito "fastback"). Anche se non tutti gli esemplari furono ufficialmente chiamati da Figoni “Modello New York”, tutti condividono la stessa linea e le stesse caratteristiche, e di conseguenza sono sempre elencati insieme dagli esperti della marca. Il telaio n. 90112: Velocità e Bellezza Perfettamente proporzionati, i coupé "Goutte d'eau" rappresentano la massima espressione dell'aerodinamico stile francese degli anni Trenta. Il telaio 90112, la splendida vettura offerta, è uno dei soli 10 esemplari del "Modèle New York dessin n° 9220", costruiti sul telaio a passo corto T150-C SS (un ulteriore esemplare fu costruito sul telaio T23 Baby). E' anche uno dei tre esemplari ancora esistenti nati in fabbrica con il tetto apribile. Uno dei più attraenti aspetti di questa linea sono le due leggiadre griglie cromate dietro le quali sono celati i fanali. Un particolare classico di Figoni, si ritrova solo su poche delle vetture ancora esistenti. Provenienza Fra le vetture francesi, il telaio 90112 rappresenta una delle migliori "Goutte d'eau", avendo una storia continua fin da nuova e non avendo subito incendi, incidenti o altri danni importanti durante la sua esistenza. Tutti i suoi maggiori componenti sono intatti e presenti, compresi il telaio, il motore e la carrozzeria di Figoni. Essa fu ordinata nuova dal signor Troussaint, direttore del casinò di Namur, in Belgio, che la ritirò nel maggio 1938. Da notare che nel 1939 la vettura fu esibita ai Concorsi d'Eleganza di Bruxelles e di Deauville, in Francia. Con lo scoppio della guerra e la conseguente caduta del Belgio all'attacco tedesco del maggio 1940, la 90112 scomparve dalla circolazione, per riapparire negli anni Cinquanta e quindi essere acquistata dalla famiglia reale belga. Sembra che alla morte del re, la vettura fu ereditata da un membro della famiglia che l'aveva tenuta nella sua villa in Belgio. Ad un certo momento, la 90112 era stata parzialmente smontata in previsione di un restauro che non fu mai iniziato; questo la rese uno dei più originali e mai restaurati esemplari della serie quando fu acquistata a metà degli anni 2000 dall'attuale proprietario. Il restauro RM Auto Restoration fu incaricata di far ritornare la 90112 in condizioni da concorso. Il lavoro iniziò con il totale smontaggio della vettura, straordinariamente completa, e l'inventario delle parti. La maggior parte dell'originale intelaiatura in legno di supporto alla carrozzeria era sopravvissuto allo scorrere del tempo e durante il restauro ogni giunzione fu accuratamente smontata, pulita e rinforzata. Dove il legno si era deteriorato, soprattutto nella parte inferiore delle portiere, fu sostituito con parti accuratamente costruite come nel passato e attentamente montate. Sebbene i pannelli di lamiera fossero tutti presenti, alcuni di essi erano stati in precedenza riparati in modo non corretto. Molti di loro sono stati salvati, ma per alcuni è stata necessaria la sostituzione, effettuata con pannelli di identico materiale e lavorazione, al fine di assicurare un fedele restauro della carrozzeria. Il telaio era in eccellenti condizioni e ha richiesto poco più di un'accurata pulizia e lavori di dettaglio. Similmente, i componenti del telaio originale furono restaurati e rimontati, così come ogni componente della ciclistica fu restaurato, anche esteticamente. Accurate ricerche hanno assicurato che ogni dettaglio fosse fedele all'originale sia come materiale sia come finitura. Per questo motivo, sono stati necessari diversi viaggi per visionare altri esemplari, al fine di fotografare e documentarsi sui particolari originali per rispettare l'autenticità della vettura. I pannelli interni e la tappezzeria sono identici per forma e materiali agli originali. Le finiture in legno sono state attentamente riparate e finite correttamente e i tappetini, le bordature e la tappezzeria accuratamente tagliati e fissati per rispettare i modelli originali. Ogni strumento è stato restaurato ed è stato costruito un nuovo completo impianto elettrico. La fanaleria e i vetri sono stati ricostruiti e rimontati. Centinaia di ore sono state spese per l'accurata preparazione della carrozzeria prima della verniciatura: una corretta tonalità di argento con due delicati toni di grigio. A testimonianza dell'autenticità e della qualità del restauro, la 90112 ha vinto ben tre premi al Concorso d'Eleganza di Pebble Beach del 2009: il trofeo J.B. e Dorothy Nethercutt per la Vettura Chiusa più Elegante, la vittoria nella Classe J-2 Vetture Europee Chiuse e il premio dell'Art Center College of Design. Nel 2010, la 90112 ha continuato a mietere successi: il premio Breitling Watch per la Vettura dalla Bellezza Senza Tempo e la vittoria di classe ad Amelia Island in marzo; la vittoria fra le vetture europee e il Best of Show al Concorso d'Eleganza di Meadow Brook in luglio. Ogni Talbot-Lago esistente è un oggetto raro e delizioso, in modo particolare quando è stata restaurata ad un così alto livello. La 90112 è eccezionalmente rara e attraente, sicuramente in grado di ricevere inviti ai più esclusivi concorsi del mondo, dove la combinazione fra le prestazioni e la carrozzeria mozzafiato "Goutte d'eau" impressioneranno tutti coloro che avranno l'opportunità di ammirarla. Addendum Please note that this car is eligible for import into the UK at 5% VAT. Chassis no. 90112

  • CANCanada
  • 2011-05-21
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1965 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

280 hp, 3,286 cc V-12 engine with triple Weber dual-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, four-wheel independent suspension with upper and lower wishbones, coil springs, and tubular shocks, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Current ownership for 40 years A remarkably well-preserved long-nose, alloy-bodied 275 GTB Just over 59,000 original kilometers from new Features all original books and tools THE 275 GTB ALLOY By the mid-1960s, it seemed as if Ferrari could do no wrong. With their competition cars emerging successful at nearly every major race on the calendar and their road cars attracting more and more customers every year, the company had handily cemented its reputation within the history of the automobile, and each new car that exited the factory gates in Maranello seemed to be better than the last. Ferrari’s 275 GTB was a clear evolution of the 250 GT SWB and the 250 GT/L Lusso. It was introduced at the 1964 Paris Auto Show to replace the aging 250 series of grand touring cars, and it marked the beginning of another fantastic series of V-12-powered berlinettas. At the time, the 275 was the most advanced road going Ferrari ever produced, as it utilized a 3.3-liter version of the classic Colombo V-12. In an effort to improve handling, the overall height of the engine was reduced to achieve a lower center of gravity, and the 275 GTB was the first car from the marque to boast a four-wheel independent suspension and a rear-mounted five-speed transaxle gearbox, helping it to achieve a better weight distribution at the same time. The car proved to be better in every way than the cars it replaced, as it boasted all of the performance that the iconic SWB offered but was still just as luxurious as the Lusso. The 275 GTB produced 280 horsepower and was capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in just over six seconds, leading to a top speed of 160 mph. The long-nose construction on the later cars also helped eliminate the undesirable high-speed lift characteristics of the early variants, further increasing the already flexible nature of the car. Its combination of incredible performance with enough space for a weekend’s worth of luggage for two clearly made this a dual-purpose grand touring car and the perfect choice for the well-heeled individual looking to win races, drive across Europe, or both. As such, customers had free reign to outfit their cars as they saw fit, leading to some cars leaving the factory outfitted with racing in mind, while other were outfitted primarily for comfort and touring. Of course, the most desirable option was alloy bodywork. Some of Ferrari’s most competitive competition cars were bodied in aluminum, including the 250 GTO and competition versions of the 250 SWB. This option was considerably lighter than the normal steel bodywork and was often selected by clients looking to race their new cars, as the use of aluminum allowed them to shed a few unnecessary pounds and therefore increase their car’s performance. While the design of the car was penned by Pininfarina, the bodies were hand-beaten by Scaglietti’s craftsman in Modena. By the time production switched over to the more powerful 275 GTB/4, only a handful of aluminum-bodied examples had been produced, cementing their desirability for years to come. CURRENT OWNERSHIP FOR 40 YEARS The example offered here, chassis number 08069, was manufactured in 1965 by Ferrari. It was a long-nose 275 GTB with alloy bodywork and triple Weber carburetors, and it was finished in Argento Metallizzato (106-E-1) over full Nero (VM 8500) leather seats, according to noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini. It was subsequently delivered new to Ferrari’s official dealership in Milan, M. Gastone Crepaldi S.a.s. Later that year, Crepaldi sold the car to its first private owner, a Mr. Zaniboni, who was residing in Italy. Sometime thereafter, Zaniboni sold the car to its second Italian owner, a Mr. Ghisa, another Italian citizen who was living in the city of Trieste. It is believed that this 275 GTB was exported from Italy to the United States sometime in the early 1970s and was then subsequently purchased by Ronald DeLorenzo, of Youngstown, Ohio. DeLorenzo listed the car for sale in the July 1974 issue of Road & Track magazine. The advertisement notes that it was still wearing its silver and black interior, with 31,000 kilometers on the odometer, and it further mentioned that DeLorenzo was the car’s only owner in the United States. After seeing the advertisement, the car’s current owner contacted DeLorenzo and purchased it for $6,700. Since then, the car has remained in the state of Ohio, with the same caretaker, a well-regarded collector and enthusiast of Italian cars, for the past forty years, all but nine years of the car’s entire life. In his ownership, the car saw frequent use, and the odometer currently shows just over 59,000 original kilometers from new, as documented by titles from its current ownership and the ad from Road & Track. The car is remarkably well preserved, with its only deviation from its original configuration being a single repaint in red by Joe Piscazzi in Akron, Ohio, early on in his ownership. Over the course of the next 40 years, the car was driven and shown around its adopted home of Ohio and occasionally at larger shows in the Northeast United States, including at the Meadowbrook Concours d’Elegance and the Ferrari Club of America’s annual meet at Watkins Glen in 1990. Utmost care was always taken by the current owner to preserve the remarkably original condition of the car, and as a result, it shows very well and has simply never needed to be restored. The interior and seats remain in excellent original condition, with a charming, slight patina that is only achieved through years of careful use and is impossible to recreate. Furthermore, it is important to note that the car is still accompanied by its original owner’s pouch and manuals and its original complete tool roll. Following a recent light cosmetic and mechanical service earlier this summer, the 275 GTB is ready for whatever is next owner has in store, be it concours events, driving events, or long-distance cruising, just as its manufacturers intended. The alloy-bodied 275 GTBs are considered by many to be the most desirable variant of the 275 GTB, as they hold a close link to Ferraris competition cars, and they are also one of the rarest, as fewer than 60 road versions were built. Chassis 08069 is a wonderful example of a highly original alloy-bodied 275 GTB, and it is being offered today by its current custodian for the first time in 40 years. Even though 275 GTBs have become more desirable to collectors in recent years, alloy-bodied examples have always been in high demand, and they rarely come up for sale, especially ones that have been in single ownership for four decades. Considering its highly original condition and wonderful provenance, chassis 08069 would make a spectacular addition to a collection of cars bearing the Cavallino Rampante, and it would undoubtedly be nearly impossible for one to find an alloy-bodied 275 GTB in such beautifully preserved condition coming from long-term ownership. The owner, who historically followed the Ferrari mystique, recalls Scaglietti’s own description of the 275 GTB as “the ultimate creation” of Ferrari’s Gran Turismo. “I can’t disagree,” said the current owner. And neither can we. Chassis no. 08069 Engine no. 08069

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
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1970 Porsche 908/03

2nd Overall with Hans Herrmann and Richard Attwood at the 1970 Nürburgring 1000 KM Utilized by Porsche for testing and development of the 908/03 platform Recently restored to its 1970 Nürburgring livery 1st in Class at the 2017 Masterpiece Concours d’Elegance at Schloss Dyck The only one of the three factory development Porsche Salzburg cars available for public sale Comprehensively documented history by Jürgen Barth, including numerous factory development records Built by Porsche in January 1970 specifically for use by the factory, chassis number 003 was used at their facilities in Weissach for final testing of the 908/03 prior to the 1970 racing season. Porsche primarily developed the 908/03 with two particular races in mind: the Targa Florio and the Nürburgring 1000 KM (due to their peculiar twisty natures). Stunning victories at the Nürburgring 1000 KM (1st and 2nd overall) as well as the Targa Florio (also 1st and 2nd overall) left no doubt about the superior handling abilities of the 908/03. While it was not raced by Porsche in that year’s Targa Florio, chassis 003 was used by Porsche in the pre-test of the event in order to prepare and determine how to properly set up the 908/03 for that specific race, as well as the upcoming Nürburgring. According to period documentation supplied in a report from Porsche historian and former racing driver Jürgen Barth, chassis 003 ran a total of 14 laps on the 72-kilometer long road course in pre-tests with noted drivers including Brian Redman and Jo Siffert. This exhaustive report, approximately 100 pages of documentation, features factory test and race reports, technical correspondence, engineering notes and modifications, as well as a comprehensive history. For the 908/03 as a model, the Targa Florio proved to be a massive success. The teams of Jo Siffert/Brian Redman and Leo Kinnunen/Pedro Rodríguez finished 1st and 2nd, respectively, with another 908/03 finishing 5th. Without a doubt, Porsche’s success at this event was indebted to the work that Porsche did at the pre-test, as detailed in the Barth report. The first and only formal competitive outing for this 908/03 was at the Nürburgring 1000 KM several weeks later. Chassis 003 was campaigned by de-facto factory team Porsche Salzburg and driven by Hans Herrmann and Richard Attwood. During qualifying, Herrmann’s fastest lap was a 7:57.10, placing him 4th in qualifying. Dicing primarily with the SEFAC and Filipinetti Ferrari 512Ss, although those were in another class altogether with twelve-cylinder engines rather than eight. Porsche’s “less is more” approach once again proved to be quite fruitful in the overall standings. Porsche took the top two positions, with chassis 003 coming in shortly behind Vic Elford and Kurt Ahrens Jr., campaigning chassis 008 also under the Porsche Salzburg banner. This race would mark the end of the 908/03’s factory competitive effort, as Porsche would continue to campaign its big brother, the 917, for the remainder of the 1970 season. That 1970 season proved to be a huge success for Porsche, clinching that year’s Manufacturers Championship, a title that Porsche could not have won without the 908/03’s exceptional finishes at both the Targa Florio and Nürburgring 1000 KM. Herrmann and Attwood’s success at the Nürburgring was not the last time this pair of drivers would find themselves co-piloting for Porsche that year. They would go on to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in a 917, also under the Porsche Salzburg banner. Afterwards, chassis 003 was retained by the factory for further testing, specifically to test a solid rear suspension. The car had gained rear fins in an effort to add to its aerodynamic stability. At this time, the car was involved in an accident, although no details regarding the reason or extent of the damage are known. Towards the end of 1973, Porsche sold chassis 003 to Hans Dieter Blatzheim, after which it was acquired by Porsche factory driver Siggi Brunn. Brunn purchased a number of other 908/03 components from other racing teams around the same time as well. Over the course of the next few years, Brunn rebuilt the car using a variety of Mehako aluminum tubes for the chassis, sourced directly from Porsche, utilizing approximately 30–40 percent of the car’s original chassis tubing. This work is believed to have been performed by former Porsche mechanics who built these cars in the 1970s. Furthermore, the chassis received further reinforcing to avoid cracks, a common problem that has occurred in many other 908s due to the fragile nature of the original magnesium chassis and the stress placed on it at speed. Thirty-one years after placing 2nd at the Nürburgring, chassis number 003 returned to the track for testing in its newly reconstructed form and was granted an FIA Historical Technical Passport at that time to prepare for use in historic racing. In Brunn’s ownership, the car took to the track in 2004 at Spa-Francorchamps for the One Hour historic race in the Classic Endurance Championship. The car was eventually sold in 2007 from Brunn to Uli Schumacher, who campaigned the car under his ownership. It was raced at the Le Mans Classic in both 2010 and 2012 and at the Oldtimer GP at the Nürburgring in 2010, and was also displayed at the Techno Classica in Essen in 2011. In preparation to run the Le Mans Classic, the car was fitted with a spare nose that included headlights for night driving. This spare nose is included with the car today, as are three sets of wheels and tires, one set of tire warmers, and a spare engine block (FOB). After coming into the ownership of its current custodian in Austria, it was decided that the car should be returned to its most significant livery; the pale yellow that it wore when it placed 2nd at the Nürburgring 1000 KM in 1970. After being completely and magnificently restored by Rudi Walch (RWS-Motorsport, Anger, Germany – with numerous photos and full invoices on file) completed in 2016, adding a new fuel tank and fire system for safety, the car was shown in July 2017 at the Masterpieces Concours d’Elegance at Schloss Dyck. Presented by Jürgen Barth, the car proved to resonate well with both the judges and the public, and it was awarded First in Class honors. Having proven its worth at historic racing events and more recently at concours events, the impressively documented chassis number 003 played a significant part in both of the 908/03’s most important finishes in the 1970 season. Of the three cars campaigned by Porsche Salzburg and used by Porsche for development purposes, one remains with Porsche in the factory museum; one has remained in long-term ownership by a former Porsche team driver in Germany for decades, unlikely to be separated from his collection; and the third is, of course, the car offered here. As such, it is a significant track weapon that would surely be competitive in both historic racing as well as international concours, and one that would provide entry to some of the most exclusive and exciting classic car events on the planet. Addendum Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this lot if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Chassis no. 908/03-003

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1965 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Alloy by Scaglietti

Ferrari Classiche certified Factory alloy body, long-nose, six carburetors, and “interim” driveshaft Recent, correct restoration; offered with books and tools Well-known ownership history; documented by marque historian Marcel Massini A superb 275 GTB/6C in a most desirable specification Today’s collectors divide the 275 GTBs into early (short-nose) and late (long-nose) cars. As with many things Ferrari, the reality is not so simple. While high-volume carmakers produced endless quantities of nearly identical cars, Ferraris were still built – to an astonishing degree – by hand. As improvements were devised, they were incorporated into production, often with the very next car. In other cases, features from earlier production would appear on later cars, to the delight of their owners and to the consternation of historians. The changeover to a longer nose design, introduced at the 1965 Paris Salon, was the result of front-end lift at high speed. Another common point of differentiation is driveshaft configuration. The earliest cars were fitted with an open Hotchkiss-style normal U-joint and driveshaft setup, the perfect alignment of which was crucial to avoid vibration. Unfortunately, the driveline could become misaligned over time, and sorting it out required skill and special training. Ferrari therefore switched to a driveshaft and constant velocity (CV) joint setup with a center bearing (referred to as the “interim” setup), which made the alignment process much simpler. This particular 275 GTB/6C, chassis 07933, is an “interim” car with one of the most desirable specifications available – a lightweight alloy body, long-nose, and six carburetors. The alloy-bodied cars are, aside from the competition cars, the most desirable variants. The body was constructed in lightweight aluminium, like the competition cars, to save weight and thereby improve performance. With its lightweight alloy body and six-carburetor setup, this car easily has the same performance as the next evolution of the 275 range, the GTB/4. Marcel Massini’s records note that the car was delivered to Luigi Chinetti Motors of Greenwich on 22 October 1965, and the following month was officially sold to Judge Samuel Leibowitz, a name that frequently appears in Chinetti records as a “straw man” used to finance the ordering of Ferraris. In May of 1966 it was passed by Chinetti to Dick Gilberti Motors of Reading, Pennsylvania, noted on Chinetti’s order sheet as having an alloy body and six carburetors, as well as an FM radio, and finished in silver. Gerald Bowes, an industrialist from Villanova, Pennsylvania, acquired the car in the 1970s and would maintain it for most of the decade. In 1979 he sold the Ferrari to Phil Tegtmeier, also of Villanova, who would maintain it for nearly 20 years before selling it to the local Porsche dealer in 1998. After being advertised several times in 1999, it was sold to well-known Miami Toyota dealer and collector, Craig Zinn. By 2002 the car was owned by E.J. Van Kouwen, a Dutch owner who passed it later that year to Guus Bierman, who registered it as AL-06-064. Mr. Bierman exhibited the car at the Uwe Meissner Modena Motorsport Track Days at the Nürburgring in July 2003, and is believed to have retained it until 2006, when it was sold to Mario Bernardi of Germany. Two years later the Ferrari was again sold, to shoe store magnate Andreas Schläwicke, from whom it was acquired by the current owner in 2010. The consignor drove the 275 GTB/6C on several events, including the XXIII Tour Auto Optic 2000 in both 2013 and 2014, and several rallies in South America, then commissioned its full cosmetic restoration, including the correct finish of Argento, as was used in 1965, with a new Blu leather interior. In its restored form it was shown at the XXV Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in 2016. Today it is complete with its Ferrari Classiche Red Book certification, as well as proper sets of books and tools. This is a superb 275 GTB/6C, with all of the best, most desirable features, and is ready for continued show success or rallying enjoyment. Chassis no. 07933 Engine no. 07933 Gearbox no. 421

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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1935 Bugatti Type 57 Atalante Prototype by Carrosserie Bugatti

The third Atalante built; unique early Atalante coachwork features Extremely rare coachwork by Molsheim’s in-house carrosserie One of approximately 34 built on the Type 57 chassis Originally owned by two-time Targa Florio winner and factory director Meo Costantini Retains original matching-numbers engine and coachwork panels Engine upgraded in period by the factory Single-family ownership for 62 years; less than 26,000 original kilometres accrued Documented with factory records, correspondence, and by marque expert Pierre-Yves Laugier Of all the factory-penned body styles built on Bugatti’s Type 57 chassis, perhaps none is as significant as the Atalante. With only 34 examples produced from 1936 to 1938, the T57 Atalante is much rarer than the Stelvio, Ventoux, or Galibier, and the design’s purposeful lines and proportions (credited to Jean Bugatti but perfected by in-house stylist Joseph Walter), provided sportier packaging for the 57’s advanced dual-overhead cam engine and independently sprung chassis. Exceeded in cachet today only by the Type 57SC Atlantic, the Atalante is overwhelmingly regarded as the most sporting iteration of the celebrated Type 57. Chassis number 57254 is one of the earliest Atalante examples built, being one of four prototypes of the rare body style. The model was originally designated by the manufacturer as the ‘faux-cabriolet’, and this is how 57254’s body style is described in factory production records. Technically the third Atalante built, though bearing the second-lowest chassis number of the four, 57254 was assembled in the spring of 1935, ultimately one of just 10 examples built that year. Only three are still known to exist, of which this car is undoubtedly the most original. While many forthcoming Atalantes were bodied by the nearby Gangloff, this example was clothed by Carrosserie Bugatti at the Molsheim factory, as clarified by an unusual nameplate. Such badges are extremely rare, generally only found on the Type 49 drophead coupés and a few Type 55 roadsters, as well as Jean Bugatti’s personal Type 41 Royale Coupé. While 57254 shares most details of the later Atalante coachwork, it features a unique low roof, a bonnet with longer single-column louvers, forward-leaning rear wheel spats, and semi-closed front fender edges. Completing assembly on 16 May 1935, the Atalante was delivered nine days later to its first owner, the factory’s legendary co-director and former racing manager and driver, two-time Targa Florio champion Meo Costantini. After just two months, the Type 57 was returned to Molsheim for engine upgrades, as reflected by a factory repair note dated 17th July. The original motor was disassembled and re-fitted with upgraded pistons and a special intake manifold, while the valve guides and camshaft were adjusted. By March 1936 the Bugatti passed to a Mr Rigaud of the Seine Dept., and he sold the car the following month to Louis Dubreuil, a livestock merchant from Mauze sur le Mignon. The Atalante was registered in November under his name with the Niort registration number 4743 XL 2. Two years later, Mr Dubreuil attempted to trade 57254 back to the manufacturer for a Type 57S, as demonstrated by correspondence with the Paris showroom (including letters to the famed director and racing driver Robert Benoist, who would soon fight with the French Resistance). Unable to come to terms with the factory, Dubreuil kept the Atalante as a daily driver until the outbreak of World War II, at which point the car was domiciled. In January 1955, a new registration system was instituted in France, and the Bugatti received a new registration plate in Mr Dubreuil’s name, 744 AW 79, which the car wears to this day. After the owner passed in 1957, the Atalante was inherited by his niece and essentially remained in storage for the following 41 years. In December 1998, after 62 years in the Dubreuil family’s ownership, chassis 57254 was purchased by a French collector who briefly sold it to a private owner before re-acquiring it. Currently displaying just 25,733 kilometres of actual use, this rare Bugatti has never left France, and accrued only 700 of those over the last 60 years. After a colour change to two-tone black and red during Mr Dubreuil’s tenure, the car has now been repainted in its original monochromatic finish. Other than this alteration, the T57 is almost entirely original, including the original body panels stamped with the number 3 (representing the third Atalante produced). Also retaining the original matching-numbers engine and unmodified cable-actuated brakes, 57254 features its original door panels, seat back, and proper leather seat bottom in the original tan colour, original gauges, and the extremely rare original factory-issued tool kit. This distinctive early Atalante is documented with factory paperwork, former owners’ correspondence, period articles and photographs, and a history with inspection notes by marque expert Pierre-Yves Laugier. Originally owned by the legendary Meo Costantini and ideally preserved by a single French family for 62 years, this extremely rare factory-bodied Atalante has been optimally prepared for future touring use or presentation at finer concours d’elegance the world over. • La terza Atalante costruita; caratteristiche della carrozzeria uniche, tipiche delle prime Atalante • Carrozzeria estremamente rara, realizzata dall’officina interna della casa di Molsheim • Una delle circa 34 costruite su telaio Tipo 57 • Originariamente di proprietà del due volte vincitore della Targa Florio e direttore della fabbrica Meo Costantini • Ancora con il motore ed i pannelli della carrozzeria stampati con i numeri originali • Motore potenziato all’epoca, direttamente dalla casa • Proprietà di una sola famiglia per 62 anni; Meno di 26.000 chilometri percorsi da nuova • Documentata con i registri della casa, lettere e dallo specialista del marchio Pierre-Yves Laugier Di tutti gli stili di carrozzeria disegnati e assemblati in fabbrica e costruiti sul telaio Tipo 57 di Bugatti, forse nessuno è così significativo come l'Atalante. Con solo 34 esemplari prodotti dal 1936 al 1938, la T57 Atalante è molto più rara della Stelvio, della Ventoux o della Galibier e, le linee e le proporzioni progettuali (accreditate a Jean Bugatti ma perfezionate da stilista interno Joseph Walter) forniscono alla T57 il perfetto aspetto sportivo per accompagnare l’avanzato motore a doppio albero a camme in testa ed il telaio dotato di ammortizzatori telescopici. Oggi superata in carisma solo dal Tipo 57SC Atlantic, l'Atalante è considerata come l'iterazione più sportiva del celebrato telaio Tipo 57. Il telaio numero 57254 è uno degli esemplari più antichi di Atalante, essendo uno dei quattro prototipi costruiti con il raro stile della carrozzeria. Il modello è stato originariamente designato dal produttore come "faux-cabriolet" e, questo è il modo in cui viene definito questo disegno nei registri di produzione di fabbrica. Tecnicamente la terza Atalante costruita, anche se porta il secondo numero di telaio delle quattro prodotte, 57254 è stato assemblato nella primavera del 1935, come uno dei soli 10 esemplari costruiti quell'anno. E’ oggi conosciuta l’esistenza di sole tre Atalante e, tra loro, questa auto è senza dubbio la più originale. Mentre molte delle carrozzerie delle successive Atalante saranno prodotte dalla vicina Gangloff, questo esemplare è stato abbigliato dalla Carrosserie Bugatti presso la stessa fabbrica di Molsheim, come specificato da un’insolita targhetta. Questi distintivi sono estremamente rari e, generalmente, vengono trovati solo sulle drophead coupé del Tipo 49 e su alcuni esemplari di roadster sul Tipo 55, nonché sulla vettura personale di Jean Bugatti, la Coupé montata sul Tipo 41 Royale. Sebbene la vettura 57254 condivida la maggior parte dei dettagli della carrozzeria con quelli che troveremo sulle successive Atalante, è dotata di un tetto, unico, abbassato, di un cofano con aperture più lunghe disposte su una singola fila e di copri ruote posteriori inclinati in avanti e con i bordi frontali semi-chiusi. Terminato l’assemblaggio il 16 Maggio 1935, nove giorni più tardi l'Atalante è stata consegnata al suo primo proprietario, il leggendario respoonsabile della produzione e direttore sportivo e pilota, due volte vincitore della Targa Florio, Meo Costantini. Dopo soli due mesi, la Tipo 57 è stata riportata a Molsheim per gli aggiornamenti del motore, come risulta da una nota di riparazione della fabbrica datata 17 Luglio. Il motore originale è stato smontato e ricostruito con pistoni migliorati e un collettore di aspirazione speciale, mentre i guida valvole e l'albero a camme sono stati regolati. Nel Marzo del 1936 la Bugatti passa ad un certo Sig. Rigaud del Dipartimento della Seine che, il mese successivo, la rivende a Louis Dubreuil, un commerciante di bestiame di Mauze sur le Mignon. A Novembre, l'Atalante viene immatricolata a suo nome con targa di Niort 4743 XL 2. Due anni dopo, Dubreuil tenta di scambiare la 57254 con il produttore, per una Tipo 57S, come dimostrato dalla corrispondenza con il rivenditore di Parigi (incluse, le lettere al famoso regista e pilota Robert Benoist che, poco dopo avrebbe cominciato a combattere nella resistenza Francese). Non avendo raggiunto un accordo con la fabbrica, Dubreuil decide di tenere l'Atalante come vettura di tutti i giorni fino allo scoppio della seconda guerra mondiale, quando la macchina viene rimessata. Nel Gennaio del 1955 entra in vigore, in Francia, un nuovo sistema di immatricolazione e la Bugatti, sempre di proprietà di Dubreuil, riceve una nuova targa di circolazione, 744 AW 79, che adotta ancora oggi. Dopo la morte del proprietario nel 1957, l'Atalante è stata ereditata dalla nipote e, essenzialmente, è rimasta chiusa in garage per i seguenti 41 anni. Nel dicembre del 1998, dopo 62 anni di proprietà della famiglia Dubreuil, la Bugatti con numero di telaio 57254 viene acquistata da un collezionista francese che la rivende ad un nuovo proprietario, per poi ricomprarsela poco dopo. Oggi il contachilometri testimonia, per questa Bugatti che non ha mai lasciato la Francia, una percorrenza effettiva di soli 25.733 chilometri, con 700 di questi percorsi negli ultimi 60 anni. Dopo essere stata riverniciata bicolore, rosso-nero, quando di proprietà di Dubreuil, l'auto è ora riverniciata nella sua tonalità monocromatica originale. Oltre a questo, la T57 è quasi interamente originale, inclusi i pannelli originali della carrozzeria stampati con il numero 3 (ad indicare la terza Atalante prodotta). Inoltre, la macchina è ancora equipaggiata con il suo motore originale, con tutti i numeri corrispondenti, e monta ancora i freni a cavo, mai modificati, ha i pannelli porta originali, gli schienali e le sedute dei sedili nella corretta pelle del colore arancione, gli strumenti originali ed è ancora dotata del rarissimo set di attrezzi originali forniti dalla fabbrica. Questa caratteristica Atalante ha una storia comprovata con tanti documenti di fabbrica, dalla corrispondenza degli ex proprietari, da articoli e fotografie dell’epoca e dalle note seguite all’ispezione dell'esperto della marca Pierre-Yves Laugier. Originariamente di proprietà del leggendario Meo Costantini e, perfettamentee conservata da una sola famiglia francese per 62 anni, questa rarissima Atalante con carrozzeria Bugatti è oggi preparata in modo ottimale per un futuro utilizzo turistico o per essere presentata ai più raffinati concorsi d'eleganza in tutto il mondo. Chassis no. 57254 Engine no. 202

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-05-27
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2004 Maserati MC12

630 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine, six-speed Cambriocorsa paddle-shift transmission, front and rear independent suspension with double wishbones, steel dampers, and coaxial coils and springs, and four-wheel Brembo cross-drilled and ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,800 mm Less than 6,000 kilometres; Italian-delivery example Retains its original engine Recently serviced by Motor Service Srl One of just 50 constructed Utilizing the incredible Ferrari Enzo as a basis, Maserati and designer Frank Stephenson put their own unique twist on Ferrari’s most significant car to date. With Maserati on the rise, the time was right to produce a world-beating supercar, and the Enzo was the perfect platform. With only 50 examples produced, the MC12 proved to be hugely desirable from the moment it was announced. Not only did it make waves in the showroom and on the open road, but the race-spec MC12 Corsa saw considerable success in the GT and GT1 World Championship series. Delivered to its first owner in Verona in December 2004, this MC12 is a truly exceptional example. Having travelled just under 6,000 kilometres from new, it remains in excellent condition throughout. Prior to sale, the MC12 was sent to Motor Service Srl, the official Ferrari and Maserati dealership in Modena, Italy, and was serviced to ensure that it remains ready to return to the road. It is also worthwhile to note that an aftermarket rear view camera has been installed, providing much-needed assistance in parking and low-speed manoeuvres in close quarters. Much rarer than an Enzo and arguably more striking, the MC12 is an automobile that demands attention and respect wherever it goes. It is undoubtedly the most significant Maserati produced in the 21st century and an automobile that will only become more desirable over time. Seldom offered for sale, the opportunity to acquire an MC12 should not be ignored, and this particular example is ready for whatever its next owner chooses. Motore V-12 a 65°, doppio albero a camme in testa per bancata, 5998 cc, 630 Cv, cambio a 6 rapporti “Cambiocorsa” sequenziale con sistema di comando tramite palette al volante. Sospensioni indipendenti sulle quattro ruote con doppio quadrilatero, ammortizzatori in acciaio contrapposti con molle coassiali, freni a disco Brembo, intagliati autoventilanti. Passo: 2800 mm • Meno di 6000 chilometri percorsi; originariamente consegnata in Italia • Motore originale • Recentemente tagliandata presso la Motor Service Srl • Una delle sole 50 costruite Utilizzando l’incredibile Ferrari Enzo come base, Maserati e il designer Frank Stephenson hanno aggiunto un tocco unico alla più importante Ferrari mai prodotta fino a quel momento. Con Maserati in piena ripresa, era il momento giusto per mettere in produzione una supercar di livello mondiale con il marchio del tridente e la Enzo si è rivelata la piattaforma perfetta da cui partire. Con soli 50 esemplari prodotti, la MC12 è stata una delle auto più ambite sin da quando è stata annunciata. Non solo ha creato stupore nei saloni di vendita o ne crea quando vista su strada aperta, ma la versione da gara MC12 Corsa ha conquistato numerosi importanti successi nel Campionato del Mondo della serie GT e GT1. Consegnata al suo primo proprietario a Verona, nel Dicembre 2004, questa MC12 rimane un esemplare straordinario. Ha percorso poco meno di 6000 chilometri da nuova, ed è rimasta in eccellenti condizioni generali. Prima della vendita, la MC12 è stats mandata presso la Motor Service Srl, la concessionaria ufficiale Ferrari e Maserati di Modena, per essere tagliandata e preparata per garantirne la perfetta efficienza e per renderla pronta a tornare sulla strada. E’ importante sottolineare anche che, è stata aggiunta una telecamera posteriore aftermarket, per garantire la necessaria visibilità posteriore durante i parcheggi e le manovre negli spazi ristretti. Nettamente più rara di una Enzo, ed effettivamente più di impatto, la MC12 è una vettura che viene ammirata e rispettata ovunque vada. E’senza dubbio, la Maserati più significativa prodotta in questo 21° secolo, ed è un’automobile che, nel prossimo futuro, diventerà sempre più ricercata. Raramente offerta in vendita, l’opportunità di acquistare una MC12 non dovrebbe essere sottovalutata e, questa specifica vettura, è pronta per fare tutto quello che il suo nuovo proprietario potrà desiderare. Chassis no. ZAMDF44B000012100 Engine no. 000032

  • ITAItaly
  • 2016-11-25
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2003 Ferrari Enzo

660 bhp, 5,998 cc DOHC 65-degree V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic engine management and electronic fuel injection, six-speed electro-hydraulic computer-controlled sequential F1 transmission, limited-slip differential and traction control, front and rear pushrod-actuated double wishbones with horizontal external reservoir coil-spring damper units, and four-wheel ventilated carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in. The 295th Enzo of 400 produced Just two owners and 560 miles from new Formerly owned by renowned boxer Floyd Mayweather Surely one of the finest Enzos extant FERRARI’S 21ST CENTURY SUPERCAR At the Paris Motor Show in 2002, the pressure was on for Ferrari to unveil its latest supercar. The company was back on top after years of struggling both in motorsport and in sales, and it was clear that their next supercar, the successor to the Ferrari F50, would be a monumental milestone for the company. The importance of this new car was definitely not lost on Luca di Montezemolo, who introduced the car thusly to the automotive press in Paris: “The third millennium has begun with Ferrari enjoying a period of great competitiveness on the world’s racing circuits; in fact Formula 1 has never offered the company so authentic a laboratory for advanced research as it has in recent years. To bring together our racing success and the fundamental role of races, I decided that this car, which represents the best our technology is capable of, should be dedicated to the founder of the company, who always thought racing should lay the foundations for our road car designs. And so this model, which we are very proud of, will be known as the Enzo Ferrari.” Designed by Pininfarina, the Enzo was a drastic departure from the cars that came before. From nose to tail, form was a secondary consideration to function in order to allow for an unrivaled driving experience. Nevertheless, Pininfarina did a fantastic job in sculpting the company’s namesake with enduring presence to match its exceptional performance. Gone was the massive rear wing that defined both the F40 and the F50, replaced by just a small speed-activated spoiler at the rear and aided by improved aerodynamics throughout. The protruding nose was a styling cue taken from Ferrari’s contemporary Formula 1 racecars and sought to highlight the Enzo’s use of race-inspired technology. Inside, there were few creature comforts, aside from the requisite leather-trimmed carbon-fiber bucket seats and air-conditioning, in order to keep the car as lightweight and focused as possible. In keeping with its rich tradition of limited-production supercars, the Enzo would be produced in limited numbers as well. By the end of production, just 399 examples were built, with an additional car built especially for Pope John Paul II, leaving total production at 400. CHASSIS NUMBER 135440 This particular Enzo, bearing chassis number 135440, was produced in 2003 as the 295th example built. Finished in Rosso Corsa over a Nero leather interior, the car was built as a U.S. delivery example but was believed to have been sold new to Adel al Marzoqi of Abu Dhabi. The Enzo remained in Dubai where it was sparingly driven before being exported to the United States sometime thereafter. The Enzo was purchased early last year by Floyd Mayweather, widely considered to be one of the greatest boxers of all time and an automotive enthusiast with a penchant for supercars. While in his collection, the Enzo shared garage space with three Bugatti Veyrons and numerous Ferraris, among other European supercars. Mayweather drove the Enzo some 200 miles during his tenure, and today the odometer reads just 560 miles from new, making it one of the lowest-mileage Enzos known. In accordance with its limited road time, the Enzo remains in excellent condition throughout and presents in virtually as-new condition. Chassis 135440 was shipped to Ferrari of Beverly Hills in September of this year, where it received its 5,000 miles service; all the fluids were changed, along with the oil and air filters. Furthermore, the car is accompanied by service invoices from Ferrari of Beverly Hills, as well as the original seat covers, steering wheel cover, and car cover, with their respective bags, owner’s manuals, a complete tool kit, and a wheel knock-off tool. The seminal supercar of the early 21st century, the Enzo is without a doubt the most important vehicle produced by Ferrari under the leadership of Luca di Montezemolo. Seamlessly combining Formula 1-inspired technology with groundbreaking design, the Enzo brought Ferrari into the 21st century. This was the gold standard to which all other supercar manufacturers compared their machines. With two owners and just 560 miles from new, this Enzo is truly among the finest examples in existence. Chassis no. 135440 Engine no. 79706 Assembly no. 52427

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
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1953 Ferrari 250 Europa Coupe by Vignale

200 bhp, 2,963 cc SOHC 60-degree V-12 engine with triple Weber 36 DCZ/3 carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with double wishbones and double leaf springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical springs and Houdaille shocks, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102 in. Displayed at the 1954 World Motor Sports Show in New York An important one-off Vignale design on an early road-car chassis 2012 Villa d’Este and 2015 Cavallino Classic award winner Ferrari Classiche certified FERRARI AND VIGNALE In the marque’s early days, Enzo Ferrari was obsessed with finding the right “look” for his road cars in an effort to define his company from a visual standpoint. He courted a number of different coachbuilders who provided not only Ferrari with a number of different styles to choose from but also the customer. At the tail end of the era of the coachbuilt automobile, Ferraris could be swathed with bodies by a variety of European, primarily Italian, coachbuilders, allowing clients to commission their car to their own unique taste. Opening their doors just one year after the conclusion of the Second World War, Carrozzeria Vignale of Turin was founded by its namesake, Alfredo Vignale, and his brothers, Guglielmo and Giuseppe. Crafting bodies for other manufacturers such as Cisitalia, Fiat, and Lancia, Vignale quickly earned a reputation for quality craftsmanship and innovative designs. Their reputation was further reinforced when Vignale teamed up with Giovanni Michelotti, one of the most celebrated designers of the time. Together, they would create a number of bold and impactful designs for Ferrari, all of which were handcrafted. Each body would be unique, with its own signature flair and bravado. Outwardly, Vignale-bodied Ferraris are easily identifiable by their juxtaposition of sharp angles and rounded edges, with numerous louvers, air inlets, and other styling cues, including frequent use of two-tone paintwork. Some of these features were fitted simply for ornamentation, while others served a functional purpose. Regardless, Vignale’s designs differed greatly from those of their rival coachbuilders Pinin Farina, Ghia, and Touring, giving them a distinguished style all their own. From the first Ferrari to wear Vignale coachwork in 1950 to the end of their relationship in 1954, the company had bodied over 150 different automobiles bearing the Cavallino Rampante. Today, these vehicles have become some of the most sought after and desirable Ferraris ever built due to their unique character and charisma. Vignale and Michelotti dared to be different and etched their names into automotive history with their bold designs. CHASSIS NUMBER 0313 EU Ferrari built just 22 of the 250 Europa before the introduction of the second-series 250 Europa GT in January 1955. Of these 22 examples, 18 were bodied by Pinin Farina with just four by Vignale, making them the most desirable of the series. The example presented here, chassis number 0313 EU, is the second such Vignale-bodied example built. Furthermore, after this car, only five additional road-going Ferraris would be fitted with Vignale coachwork, making it one of the last of its kind. Chassis 0313 EU is an exemplary example of Vignale coachwork, exhibiting many of the characteristics for which both Vignale and Michelotti were known. The car’s headlights are inset into the front bumpers, which creates pronounced “eyebrows” above the headlights, and the front turn indicators are deeply recessed into the front wings. A chrome trim strip wraps around the bodywork from the front wheel arches toward the stern and around the trunk, emphasizing the length of the car. Furthermore, the vents just ahead of the doors and on the sail panels are accented with chrome. Shipped to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York City in December 1953, this car would be on the world stage a month later when it was displayed by Chinetti at the World Motor Sports Show at Madison Square Garden in January of 1954. By this time, the Ferrari was repainted red, allegedly at Chinetti's request, prior to the show. Following the show, the Ferrari was purchased by Mike Garber of Framingham, Massachusetts, for a price of $17,500. He kept the car for four years before selling it through Gaston Andrey to George H. Parker of Rome, New York, for $4,900 plus an Aston Martin in trade. Thus, the car became Parker’s four-season daily driver and proved to be quite reliable over the following two years, leaving him stranded only once when a stretched timing chain needed to be replaced. In fact, Parker was married in March 1959, and he and his new bride immediately hit the road in his Vignale coupe, driving across the country to California for Mr. Parker’s new job. The first part of the trip went smoothly, but unfortunately by the end of the trip, the Ferrari was losing oil pressure and required a new gasket by the time they arrived in Los Angeles, where Mr. Parker replaced it himself. The Ferrari was retained by the Parkers until they sold it in 1960 to Leonard Renick, a Cadillac dealer in Fullerton, California. He was obviously a man with a penchant for GM products because the original Lampredi engine was replaced with a supercharged Chevrolet V-8, a common engine swap at the time as correct Ferrari parts proved difficult to source. Furthermore, the car’s distinctive bumpers were removed along with its rear chrome trim, and its nose was repaired after a minor incident. As of 1968, chassis 0313 EU was owned by Philip Stanton of Los Angeles, who sold the car to Ferrari of Los Gatos in 1976. It was purchased there later that year by Constantine Baksheef and Alec Sokoloff of Palo Alto. Sometime thereafter, the 250 Europa was taken off the road, but it would remain in California. It was discovered in 2003 by Tom Shaughnessy and sold six years later by him to Heinrich Kämpfer of Seengen, Switzerland, who immediately shipped the car to his homeland to be fully restored. RETURN TO THE LIMELIGHT No stranger to early Ferraris and with a well-regarded reputation for accurate, correct, and well-executed work, Kämpfer restored the car himself in Switzerland. Parts that had gone missing over the years, including various trim pieces, the bumpers, and the grille, were reproduced to exacting specifications. Kämpfer even sourced an ICI nitro-cellulose lacquer paint to refinish the car in Bruno Siena. Furthermore, Max Gimmel AG in Arbon, Switzerland, the very same company that produced the original leather for the car in 1953, was commissioned to reproduce the interior. Even the Wilton wool carpeting was shaved down from 9 millimeters to 5.5 millimeters in thickness to be as accurate as possible. During this time, the engine, number 0331 EU, was found to be largely complete, though the block was found to be beyond repair. As such, a new block was cast by Ferrari Classiche, and that engine was fitted to a gearbox of the correct type. By the end of the restoration in October 2011, it was estimated that Kämpfer spent 3,000 hours of work on the car with an additional 800 hours completed by outside specialists. Reflecting the restoration’s overall attention to detail, the Ferrari is accompanied by an incredible file, detailing not only the history and restoration of the car but also containing samples of the paint, leather, and carpet, as well as original screws, nuts, bolts, and clamps found on the car when it was disassembled prior to the restoration. The car’s first public outing was at the Concorso d’Eleganza Villa d’Este in 2012, where it was awarded the Trofeo Foglizzi for best interior design. The restoration of the car was further lauded in issue 194 of Cavallino magazine, where Alan Boe authored an 11-page color feature about this car, its history, and the restoration. Subsequently, the Vignale coupe was purchased by Tom Peck of Orange County, California, in 2013. During his tenure, the car was shown at the 60 Years of Ferrari celebration on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills in October 2014 and further profiled in the November 2014 issue of Automobile magazine. Following it showing at the 2015 Cavallino Classic, where it was awarded Platinum and the Ferrari Classiche Cup for most outstanding factory-certified Ferrari, chassis number 0313 EU was purchased by its current custodian. Today, it remains just as beautiful as it was the day it left Vignale’s facilities and is a highly compelling example from Ferrari’s coachbuilt era. While the designs of Pinin Farina ended up winning over Enzo’s heart, forever associating that coachbuilder with Ferrari going forward, it is the designs of Vignale that peak the curiosity of collectors, enthusiasts, and historians the most. The partnership between Ferrari and Vignale was seemingly short yet was highly influential and important to the marque’s history and design language, making those cars incredibly desirable today. Returning to the Empire State for the first time in nearly 60 years, chassis 0313 EU presents as well today as when it was first on display at Madison Square Garden in 1954. Chassis no. 0313 EU Engine no. 0331 EU Body no. 134 Gearbox no. 34 D

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
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1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 by Scaglietti

300 bhp, 3,286 cc DOHC Colombo V-12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in. Matching numbers throughout; Ferrari Classiche certified Rare and stunning color combination of Blue Sera over Pelle Bleu Excellent restoration; ready for FCA and concours events A superb example of the legendary Ferrari “Four-Cam” Some would argue that the 275 GTB boasts the best design ever penned for a production Ferrari Berlinetta. As the car is perfectly proportioned, with a long hood line and a short yet spacious boot, just one look at it is enough to make enthusiasts go weak at the knees. But, if the 275 GTB was the best-looking Ferrari Berlinetta, then the 275 GTB/4 was definitely the best iteration to drive and enjoy. The model, introduced in 1966, added little to the already brilliant exterior design of the car—simply exterior-mounted and chromed rear trunk hinges and a slight bulge in the hood. However, it was that bulge that hinted at the updates underneath, namely the addition of a second overhead camshaft to each cylinder bank, making the 275 GTB/4 the first Ferrari road car to boast dual overhead camshafts. This provided the already potent V-12 engine with an additional 20 horsepower. With only 330 examples produced before Ferrari transitioned to the 365 GTB/4 Daytona, the “Four-Cam’s” rarity, looks, and spectacular driving characteristics make it one of the most celebrated grand touring Ferraris of all time, and a must-have for any collection. CHASSIS NUMBER 10051 This particular 275 GTB/4 was delivered new in July 1967 to the proprietor of Tecnotele S.p.A, a Milan-based company. The car was finished new in the unique but striking color combination of Blue Ferrari (20-A-185) over Pelle Bleu (VM 3015), colors seldom seen on Ferraris both then and today. The Four-Cam remained in Italy for the following six years, before it was imported to the U.S. by Bart J. McMullen, a Ferrari enthusiast and resident of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Chassis 10051 would then move to Greenfield, Indiana, with its second American owner, Jerry D. Leonard, with whom it shared garage space with another 275 GTB/4, chassis 10675. It was noted that during this time the car was driven regularly by Leonard during the warmer months of the year. The car subsequently changed ownership, and by August 1976, it was described as being “blue with blue leather, wire wheels, and super low mileage.” The car was purchased later that year by Jim Hunter, a Ferrari enthusiast and the co-owner of FAF Motorcars, which was, at that time, the official Ferrari dealership in Atlanta, Georgia. Hunter sold the car in 1982, but it would remain in the Atlanta area, as it was purchased by another local collector, Bruce Vineyard, who owned several Ferraris, including a Daytona Spider and a 512 BB/LM. Vineyard drove and enjoyed the car, always ensuring that it was properly maintained and serviced. After many happy years of driving and enjoying this GTB/4, Mr. Vineyard decided in the late 1990s that the car deserved a complete and no-expense-spared restoration. He commissioned Mike Gourley’s Continental Coachworks to manage the project, and they contracted the mechanical work to FAF (now known as Ferrari of Atlanta) and the cosmetic details to Charlie Kemp’s Ferrari South. The restoration took five years, and when it came time to select colors, Mr. Vineyard opted to go with Giallo Fly over a Nero interior. Chassis number 10051 remained in Mr. Vineyard’s stable for several more years, until he finally decided to part with the car after nearly 25 years of ownership. In the spring of 2008, chassis number 10051 was purchased by Larry Alderson, who subsequently showed the car at both the Concourso Italiano and the 2009 Dana Point Concours d’Elegance, where the car won Best in Class. In 2011, the car was refinished to its current and original Pelle Bleu interior, with a Blue Sera exterior, which is a stunning period-correct Ferrari hue that is very similar to 10051’s original Blue Ferrari finish. Following the completion of this cosmetic restoration, the car was shown once again at the Dana Point Concours d’Elegance in June 2011, where it won First in Class yet again and was also voted Best Closed Design. The car was purchased by its current owner in August 2011, and it has been regularly exercised while in his collection. Its restoration still presents extraordinarily well, and it would surely attract lots of attention at FCA and concours events, as it has in the past. It has recently been granted Ferrari Classiche certification and is accompanied by its red binder, which confirms that it is matching numbers throughout. In addition to the Classiche binder, it is important to note that the car retains its manuals and tools, as well as a proper jack. As captivating to drive as it is to behold, the 275 GTB/4 is truly one of the greatest grand touring berlinettas ever built. It stirs the soul not only with its stunning design but also with its fabulous V-12 engine. Chassis number 10051 is a remarkable example, as it retains all of its original mechanical components, as certified by Ferrari Classiche, boasts known ownership from new, and is finished in a unique color scheme seldom seen in today’s market. Indeed, when the current owner acquired the car, he did so specifically because he was absolutely stunned by the car’s beauty when he first saw it in person. Certainly RM’s own specialists have had the very same reaction, and when considering that the 275 GTB frequently ranks on industry polls as the most attractive Ferrari ever built, we can safely conclude that any enthusiast would consider 10051 as one of the most stunningly beautiful road cars in existence. Like all great works of art, much of its value is derived from its visceral impression, and given that criteria, this Four-Cam is unquestionably one of the most desirable motor cars in the world. Chassis no. 10051 Engine no. 10051 Body no. A0138 Gearbox no. 351

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1994 Ferrari F40 LM

720 bhp, 2,936 cc F120 B 90-degree V-8 engine with twin IHI turbochargers and Behr intercoolers, Weber-Marelli electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent pushrod suspension with rocker arms, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.45 in. Radically updated over the road going F40; lighter and much more powerful The 18th example of 19 produced One of just two with the pushrod/rocker arm suspension; the only example in private ownership Quite possibly the finest surviving example and perhaps the most original in existence Full service by Ferrari of Central Florida, including its timing belts in July 2013 The ultimate Ferrari F40; unrivaled track performance A RACE CAR FOR THE STREET GOES RACING Two hundred miles per hour was a mythical speed in the 1980s. Akin to the race to break the sound barrier 40 years earlier, and as hard as everyone tried, the 200-mph mark remained elusive. For the last 20 years, manufactures have been inching closer and closer to cracking 200 mph, but with ever step forward, the next step would prove exponentially more difficult. Many thought Porsche would be the first to crack the mark with their ground-breaking 959, but even they turned up three miles per hour short. Ferrari decided to make their own run at 200 mph. For their 40th anniversary, the factory went in the opposite direction of Stuttgart and built an incredibly lightweight and aerodynamic supercar that was fitted with an extremely powerful twin-turbocharged V-8. Sure enough, the plan worked, and the F40 was the first production car to break 200 mph, registering a top speed of 201.4 mph. The F40 proved that sometimes less is indeed more. While Ferrari never originally intended for the F40 to go racing, a number of individuals with the wherewithal to put the car on the track quickly realized the F40’s racing potential. Daniel Marin, of Charles Pozzi SA, successfully lobbied Ferrari to authorize Michelotto to produce a series of racing examples that adhered to IMSA rules, giving the world’s fastest production car a chance to earn its keep on the race track. This limited-production Ferrari, dubbed the F40 LM, for Le Mans, would be much more radical, exclusive, and exciting than the already intense F40 in every way. Michelotto took the opportunity to completely revamp the car by reinforcing the chassis and fitting more aggressive bodywork with more extreme front and rear wings, as well as uprated brakes and suspension, a competition-spec gearbox, wider wheels and tires, and an even more stripped-out interior, which featured a futuristic digital dashboard. In a further effort to save weight, the F40’s distinctive flip-up headlights were replaced with fixed lamps behind Lexan covers. In the end, the F40 LM weighed in at just 2,314 pounds. The engine, now designated F120 B, retained the same displacement as the road going car, but the output of the IHI turbochargers was upped to 2.6 bar and the compression ratio was increased to 8.0:1. Michelotto also fitted bigger Behr intercoolers, new camshafts, and a new Weber Marelli electronic fuel-injection system. Power was quoted as 720 horsepower at 7,500 rpm, but without the air restrictors required for competition, the engine could produce upwards of 760 brake horsepower! CHASSIS NUMBER 97904: THE FINAL F40 LE MANS According to Michelotto, chassis 97904 is the 18th example of 19 F40 LMs built. It is also one of only two examples updated with a pushrod and rocker arm suspension, which has greatly improved the car’s handling in conjunction with its refined aerodynamics. However, while this car was indeed ready to race at a moment’s notice, like other F40 LMs that came before it, chassis 97904 would never turn a wheel in anger on a race track when new, saving it from the rigors and possible damage associated with racing and leaving it as one of the finest and most original examples in existence. After the car was completed in July 1993, it was delivered new to Remo Ferri’s Maranello Motors Ltd. in Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada, which would later become Ferrari of Ontario. It was listed for sale by Maranello Motors in December 1994 and was later owned by John Bisanti, of Rhode Island. Bisanti showed the car a number of times in his ownership, including at the Cavallino Classic and the FCA National Meet in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1999, as well as once more at the Cavallino Classic in 2000. The car’s engine returned to Michelotto for a full service in July 2003 and chassis 97904 left Bisanti’s ownership that year, being purchased as part of The Pinnacle Portfolio shortly thereafter. Like all the other cars in the collection, it has been accordingly maintained and properly preserved. The car has been fully serviced by Ferrari of Central Florida in July 2013, where it received a timing belt service, along with having all fluids replaced, invoices for which accompany the sale. A recent compression test is also on file for inspection. Chassis 97904 is simultaneously a Ferrari of tremendous intrinsic collector value as well as the ultimate track machine that a driving enthusiast could search for. This example is unquestionably one of the finest of its breed, as it has not been subjected to the stresses of racing, and it is a perfect specimen of originality and collectibility. Simultaneously, though it has never been raced, it has nevertheless been serviced regularly, ensuring that it remains the very best and a virtually “brand-new” example, with which to go racing if desired. Equally important to note is that the only other F40 LM equipped with a pushrod suspension is currently owned by Ferrari themselves, making the opportunity to acquire chassis 97904 truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that will surely never be repeated. Whether its destination is a race track or a polished garage floor, this is the F40 LM to be considered. Chassis no. 97904 Engine no. 019 Gearbox no. 020

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
Hammer price
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1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spider by Scaglietti

352 hp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber 40 DCN17 carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension by coil springs and wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. A genuine Daytona Spider; one of 121 built One of 14 originally finished in Argento Metallizzato Fresh, full restoration by Bobileff Motorcars and Chris Dugan Enterprises Just over 17,000 miles, which are believed to be original Platinum Award winner at the 2014 Cavallino Classic Ferrari Classiche certified; includes books and tools ALONG CAME A SPIDER Ferrari’s 365 GTB/4 Daytona was the last of its series of front-engined V-12 grand touring cars, and it was truly an incredible automobile. It was nicknamed “Daytona,” after Ferrari’s iconic 1-2-3 finish at the 1967 24 Hours of Daytona, and it carried the torch from the widely acclaimed 275 GTB/4 in spectacular fashion. The Daytona, graced with an all-new 4.4-liter V-12 engine, boasted incredible performance, as 60 mph could be reached from a standstill in just 5.4 seconds and it could achieve a top speed of 174 mph, making it the fastest production car in the world at the time of its unveiling in 1968. Its design, penned by Pininfarina and handcrafted by Scaglietti, was vastly different from its predecessor, yet it was also instantly recognizable as a Ferrari in a style all its own. For the individual looking to cruise across Europe at high speeds and cocooned in luxury, there was simply no better choice. To many enthusiasts, the only way that Ferrari could improve the Daytona was to produce a spider. Such a model was unveiled at the 1969 Frankfurt Motor Show, and it proved to be an instant success, as it retained all the character and performance of the coupe yet also added the trill of open-top motoring. The Daytona Spider was the perfect vehicle for sunny locales like Monaco, St. Tropez, or Los Angeles, and it was destined for greatness when it was released. While the Daytona itself is a rare car, with only 1,406 total examples produced from 1968 to 1973, the Spider is considerably rarer, with just 121 built, and these true Spiders are by far the most valuable and desirable variants in terms of road going Daytonas. As such, the Daytona Spider is considered to be the ultimate expression of a grand touring Ferrari to many tifosi, and it is a rare, noteworthy occasion when a genuine example finds its way to the open market. CHASSIS NUMBER 16793 Chassis number 16793 started life exactly as you see it today. It was the 84th of the 121 genuine Daytona Spiders built by the factory, and in addition to being finished in Argento Metallizzato (106-E-1) over a Nero (VM 8500) interior and matching Nero soft-top, it was fitted with air conditioning and Borrani wire wheels, as documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini. The car was destined for the United States and shipped new to Bill Harrah’s distributorship in Reno, Nevada, with a sticker price of $29,665. Boyd Lavon Jefferies, the founder of the brokerage firm Jefferies & Company and a resident of Laguna Beach, California, would be the first owner of 16793, purchasing it directly from Harrah’s Modern Classic Motors. The car then passed through Ferrari of Houston, where it was repainted in a silver grey metallic and was resold to Tom Taham, of Texas. By December 1980, it had been purchased by James Hayes, also of Houston, and resided with him until at least October 1982. By 1993, chassis number 16793 was located in Kentucky and sold from ownership in the Bluegrass State back to California, where it was purchased by a chief judge of the Ferrari Club of America and Cavallino Concours, who was clearly an individual with an eye for detail, which further asserts the factory-correctness of this Daytona Spider. This gentleman would go on to own the car for the next few years, before it was decided that the Spider would be fully restored, reusing all of the car’s original components. With its current custodian, the Spider was sent to Bobileff Motorcars in San Diego, who was tasked with the cosmetic portion of the car’s full restoration, including refinishing the example in its original shade of Argento Metallizatto and completely restoring the interior. The car was then sent to Chris Dugan Enterprises in Oceanside, California, who finalized the sort of the car and road-tested it following a rebuild of both the engine and gearbox, which were performed to ensure that it is ready to drive in every manner. Following the completion of the restoration, the car was shown at the 23rd annual Palm Beach Cavallino Classic in January 2014 and was awarded Platinum in its class. Shortly thereafter, the car was certified by Ferrari Classiche as being completely authentic, and the car’s certification binder is included in the sale. Additionally, it is important to note that this Daytona Spider is accompanied by its full and original complement of books and tools, as well as its original window sticker and factory warranty card. Receipts from the restoration and a compression and leak-down test are also included with the car’s file. With only a handful of test miles accumulated since the completion of its restoration, and only 17,000 believed actual miles in all, chassis number 16793 is in absolutely immaculate condition. The brilliant Argento Metallizzato paintwork shines bright, the Nero leather upholstery appears as new, and the engine bay shows nary a sign of use. This car has already garnered an award at Cavallino, and it is undoubtedly ready to garner more awards at further concours events. As the Daytona was the last traditional two-seat, front-engine Ferrari until the introduction of the 550 Maranello in 1996, it is considered by many to be the ultimate expression of a classic Ferrari gran turismo. Its brilliant looks are a true match to its breathtaking performance. Although the car is arguably the most at home shuttling a driver, passenger, and their luggage down the coast in style, its race bred roots are apparent the moment one presses the accelerator, and it can easily outrun modern-day automobiles. Chassis number 16793 is perhaps the finest Daytona Spider in existence, and it is presented just as it was when it was new. It goes without saying that this would be an astute acquisition for any Ferrari collector, as it is a timeless example of Italian motoring in the finest sense. Chassis no. 16793 Engine no. 16793

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-01-15
Hammer price
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1949 Delahaye Type 175 S Roadster

165 bhp, 4,455 cc naturally aspirated overhead valve inline six cylinder engine, four-speed electro-mechanically actuated Cotal Preselector gearbox, Dubonnet coil spring front suspension, De Dion rear axle with semi-elliptic springs, and four-wheel hydraulic finned alloy drum brakes. Wheelbase: 116" - Believed to have been the 1949 Paris and 1950 New York Show Car - One of only 51 of this chassis originally built - Now re-united with its original engine (see text) - Amelia Island and Pebble Beach award-winner The Delahaye Chassis Emile Delahaye, a brilliant industrial engineer in France, built his first motor car in 1895 which was subsequently placed on display at the Paris Auto Salon. Production was on a small scale, but the cars bearing his name were soon appearing at racing events and proved both reliable and competitive. In 1901 poor health resulted in the sale of the company, which also resulted in a move to a new factory in Paris. Continually expanding, Delahaye established itself as a builder of reliable and robust trucks, fine automobiles, industrial engines and special service vehicles. Following a relatively lackluster period from the late 1920s through the early 1930s, Delahaye saw a revival of its fortunes beginning around 1933 and continuing until the outbreak of war. Based on a new series of four- and six-cylinder cars, the new models were headed by a sporting machine designated the 135. It featured independent front suspension and a higher output engine than the normal six-cylinder car. One of these new models was sent to Montlhéry where it set a ream of new records, including seven new world records, and maintained an average speed of 110 mph. Racing successes followed as well, including the Alpine Cup and several Grands Prix events. For 1936, a new triple-carbureted engine produced 160 bhp, and it was this car that swept second through fifth places at that year’s French Grand Prix, losing first to a Bugatti. A Delahaye won the prestigious Monte Carlo Rally in both 1937 and 1939. The 135 was the basis of Delahaye racing cars that followed, which culminated with a victory at Le Mans in 1938. At the same time, Delahayes were winning top awards at concours d’elegance with striking Art Deco coachwork from Europe’s most renowned craftsmen at Figoni et Falaschi, Chapron, Saoutchik, Franay, de Letourner et Marchand and other notable firms. Prewar development continued with the design and introduction of a new V12 racing engine, followed by the Type 165, a street car based on a refined version of the racing car. Unfortunately, the clouds of war were gathering, and development of passenger cars came to a halt. After the war, Delahaye introduced a brand-new design, the 175, a four-and-a-half liter six-cylinder design based on a new block with a seven-bearing crank. Output ranged from 140 bhp to 185 bhp for the sport models. It was Delahaye’s first left-drive chassis and was planned to compete with the Lago Record. The chassis was also state-of-the-art, featuring a Dubonnet front suspension and a De Dion rear axle with drive-shafts passing through the side rails of the frames. The brakes were hydraulic, with twin master cylinders and finned alloy drums. The gearbox was an electromechanically actuated unit by Cotal. A longer wheelbase 180 model was offered, and although the more popular of the two Delahayes offered, it found few buyers in Europe that could afford such extravagance at this time. Production ceased in 1951 after just 150 units – a mere 51 were of the 175 S version. Saoutchik The renowned coachbuilding firm of Saoutchik was formed in 1906 in a Parisian suburb known as Neuilly-sur-Seine by Jacques Saoutchik, a Ukrainian-born cabinetmaker. The quality of his work was exceptional, and his coachwork was respected for its workmanship and the quality of its fittings and finishes. However, it is not for this quality of work that he is remembered today but rather for the art and style of his designs. Where permitted by the client, his lines were daring, embellished with as much trim as possible and creating an outrageous visual effect that emphasized the lines of the coachwork. His unique ideas were the product of his fertile mind. Never accused of copying others, it was soon his competition that sought to emulate him. Just as a lion’s natural habitat is the African Savannah, Saoutchik saw his hunting grounds as the concours d’elegance events of the time. Patronized by the wealthiest of Parisians, these events followed the annual social “season,” from the banks of the Seine in Paris to the south of France, the Bordeaux regions and back again. Although the postwar period saw a dramatic decline in the demand for such exuberant coachwork, it was in many ways the high point of his work; for proof of this one need look no further than s/n 815023. Constructed on the magnificent 175 S chassis, the car’s svelte coachwork managed to minimize its bulk, with the result that the car looked slim and elegant while providing grand touring comfort. The astonishing cost of such truly bespoke coachwork finally sounded the death knell for the art form. Although Jacques Saoutchik passed the torch to his son Pierre in 1952, the great firm finally closed its doors in 1955. Of the Delahayes constructed after the war, this majestic roadster was probably the most extravagant. Built for the re-emerging concours circuit, Saoutchik was responsible for its extreme body which borrowed styling cues from many earlier cars – Saoutchik’s and others. Using the French curves of the thirties combined with more modern baroque ornamentation, Saoutchik conveys a sense of drama and movement with this design. With four completely enclosed wheels, the car is best seen in profile where its beautiful lines can be clearly seen. On the contrary, the car’s façade is brighter and more elaborate. Provenance: s/n 815023 One of the socialites who frequented the French Riviera in the early postwar era was an English movie star named Diana Dors. She was considered one of the blond bombshells of the period (along with the American “three Ms” – Jayne Mansfield, Mamie Van Doren and Marilyn Monroe). Her looks were most similar to Marilyn Monroe’s, and she played similar parts. Her acting skills were well respected, although her looks seemed to relegate her to parts that played upon her other attributes – the quintessential comedic “dumb blonde.” Financially, she did extremely well, ordering this lovely Delahaye when she was just 17 years old, and at age 20, she became the youngest registered owner of a Rolls-Royce in the UK. According to critics, her best work came in 1956 when she played a murderess in Yield to the Night. She was a regular in horror films as well, including The Amazing Mr. Blunden, The Unholy Wife, and The Sorcerer’s Apprentice. Incidentally, a likeness of her appears on the cover of the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album. According to Dors, before she died, she had managed to hide away more than £2 million in various banks. Eighteen months before her death, after her diagnosis with ovarian cancer, she gave her son Mark Dawson a sheet of paper, which she told him was a code that would reveal the whereabouts of the money. At the same time, she told her son that her widower, Alan Lake, had the key that would crack the code. Sadly, Lake committed suicide only five months after Dors died, leaving Mark Dawson a code that was now evidently unsolvable. Many doubted the story, and the code sheet certainly didn’t appear to be anything out of the ordinary. Her son persevered and hired an expert who recognized the encryption as a form of the Vigenere cipher, which would require a ten character decryption key. Ultimately, the encryption experts were able to work out the key “DMARYFLUCK,” which stood for Diana Mary Fluck, Diana’s real name. They were then able to use the decryption key to decode the entire message. While it was clearly linked to bank statements found in Lake’s papers, no money was ever found, and to this day her encrypted fortune remains the object of many amateur cryptographers. Presumably during Ms. Dors’ ownership, this remarkable Delahaye won top honors at the Grand Castle du Bois de Boulogne in Paris, the Monte Carlo Concours and Coup de l'Automobile in San Remo. By the seventies, the roadster had made its way to Colorado where its owner decided that maintenance issues resulting from the race-spec engine and Dubonnet suspension had become a problem. As a result, he decided to remove the components and fit a front-wheel drive engine and drivetrain from an Oldsmobile Toronado. For nearly thirty years, the original engine and car would remain separated. The vendor recognized the significance of the car’s original configuration and decided to commission Fran Roxas, a leading restorer, to undertake a comprehensive restoration beginning in the early 2000s. While the original suspension had been previously installed, a replacement motor was located and restored and reinstalled to perfection. The painstaking care taken during the restoration and the determination to get all the details exactly correct resulted in a process that consumed many years. Upon completion of the work in 2007, this seminal example of Saoutchik’s work was restored to its original glory. It seems fitting that the car’s first debut was at one of the world’s leading concours d’elegance events, and its return to glory was similarly prestigious – at the 2007 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Just a few months later, the car, and its magnificent restoration, were honored again, winning People’s Choice at the prestigious Amelia Island Concours d’ Elegance. In spite of the completion of the restoration, the owner never forgot the issue of the non-matching engine. With only 51 cars built, it seemed likely that the original engine would someday turn up – and sure enough, it did. Several months prior to its sale at this auction, the vendor followed a lead and successfully located the original engine and acquired it in order to reunite it with the car. While neither rebuilt nor reinstalled, the engine is fairly complete and does accompany the sale. Summary As is the case with most landmark examples of the coachbuilder’s art, much of this Delahaye's beauty is evident in the details, such as chrome accents that highlight the curves, the embedded turn signals or the small strips which flank the sides, adding grace, length and a sense of speed while cleverly hiding the door handles. The graceful façade was inspired by the Narvals produced just a year earlier. The astonishing interior is remarkably contemporary, incorporating a stylized eagle’s head on each door panel and bracketing an expansive dash panel that seems aircraft inspired with its rows of knobs and stunning transparent Lucite steering wheel. With the coachbuilt era long over in the United States, and very little of it remaining in the U.K., France, and Italy, s/n 815023 represents one of the very last examples of its kind – a true coachbuilt car, designed and built to satisfy one woman’s vision. It is a one-of-a-kind example in every respect and can easily lay claim to being the most outstanding, extravagant and beautiful postwar coachbuilt car in existence. Addendum Please note this car was purchased new in Paris by Sir John Gaul, a good friend of Prince Rainier, who garaged the car in a mews in Mayfair, London. This was one of two cars Mr. Gaul commissioned to his own specification after WWII by Saoutchik, the other being an extravagant Rolls-Royce. He evidently had a true obsession with Lockheed's Constellation, which informed much of his input on the Delahaye. After competing with the car at various concours events, Gaul sold the car to Miss Dors after about five years of ownership. For more information about this car's provenance, please speak with an RM representative. Please note that this vehicle is titled as a 1948. Chassis no. 815023

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-12
Hammer price
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1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica LWB Coupé Aerodinamico by Pininfarina

340 bhp, 3,967 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 40 DCZ 6 carburettors, four-speed manual transmission with overdrive, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 2,600 mm 1962 Earls Court and Chicago Motor Show car The first of only 18 second-series long-wheelbase examples Previously of the renowned Yoshiho Matsuda Collection Fully restored in 2008 by Berlinetta Motors in St. Ingbert, Germany Beautifully presented in its original colour combination of Grigio Argento over Nero Matching-numbers example; a grand touring Ferrari par excellence THE 400 SUPERAMERICA AERODINAMICO By the 1950s, Ferrari had established itself not only as a world-class manufacturer of sports racing cars but also as a manufacturer of the world’s best grand touring cars for the road. Enzo Ferrari had come to fully realise that, in order to continue the success of his racing program, he needed to be able to create, market, and sell equally exceptional road cars. Throughout the decade, the Ferrari GT car had evolved immensely into a top-shelf luxury touring car, namely the 342 America and the 410 Superamerica, which became the last word in sporting luxury. However, these cars were known as heavy and unforgiving to drive, and many believed that such a prestigious automobile should have more refined driving dynamics. To address these changes, Ferrari introduced the 400 Superamerica at the Turin Motor Show in 1959. The 400 SA incorporated a number of changes from its predecessor, chief amongst which was a new Colombo short-block V-12 engine. The new powerplant was bored from its 250 GT dimensions of 3.0-litres to almost 4.0, and it was fitted with the outside-plug arrangement that had proven to be so effective in the Testa Rossa sports racers. This new Superamerica also benefitted from Dunlop disc brakes at all four corners, which replaced the drum brakes on the 410 Superamerica, and an overdrive that increased the top end ratio by 28 percent. These changes markedly improved the car’s performance and road manners and brought its driving characteristics in line with the car’s outstanding level of luxury. The earliest 400 Superamericas were constructed on Ferrari’s shorter, 2,420-millimetre wheelbase and clothed in open coachwork by Pinin Farina. When chassis 2207 SA, dubbed the Superfast II, was introduced at Turin in November 1960, it featured coachwork that had never before been seen on a Superamerica, and it stunned the crowd. The car’s body featured a pointed open-mouth nose leading to a slippery roof and belt lines converging into a delicately swooped fastback tail that catered toward aerodynamics, helping the Superamerica cut through the air. Two years later, at the London Motor Show in September 1962, Ferrari introduced a second-series 400 Superamerica. This car retained the distinctive Aerodinamico coachwork of its predecessors, but it now rode on the 250 GTE’s 2,600-millimetre chassis, which eventually replaced the earlier and shorter-wheelbase chassis. Approximately 18 long-wheelbase Coupé Aerodinamicos were constructed when production came to a close in 1964, adding to a total of 35 Series II examples, which also included the earlier SWB Superamericas. CHASSIS NUMBER 3931 SA Chassis 3931 SA was built by Ferrari as the first Series II car with a longer wheelbase and was sent to the Pininfarina works on July 18, 1962. Pininfarina worked on the car for over two months, creating a truly beautiful body, and it was completed on September 29, 1962. This car was quickly taken to London where it was unveiled at the Earls Court Motor Show, with Ferrari also noting that it was then displayed at the Chicago Motor Show. Originally delivered in Grigio Argento with Nero interior, the same combination it is presented in today, 3931 SA was one of only 14 Series II LWB cars to feature the desirable covered headlamps. Once its debut at the Earls Court Motor Show was over, chassis 3931 SA was exported to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York for $13,017, where it was then shown at the Chicago Motor Show. During the 1970s, the car was owned by Gary Wasserman who resided in San Francisco. In 1975, the car also appeared in Stan Grayson’s book Ferrari, The Man, The Machines. In the early 1980s, the car was completely restored by Terry York Motor Cars before being sold to Yoshijuki Hayashi in Tokyo, where it was registered on Japanese license plate 72 45. On January 9, 1995, chassis 3931 SA became part of the renowned Yoshiho Matsuda Collection, and it was displayed at the 1995 Matsuda Ferrari Museum of Art. In the early 2000s, the car was imported back to the USA where it was used sparingly before returning to Europe. Subsequently, the car was completely restored from 2003 to 2008 by Berlinetta Motors in St. Ingbert, Germany. The 400 Superamerica is often considered to be the grandest of Ferrari’s grand touring automobiles, as it is utterly uncompromising in every sense. The Superamerica offered its owners nothing but the finest in terms of automotive technology, with cutting-edge design, performance, and luxury. This particular Ferrari is one of the most important examples constructed, and it is truly capable of anything its next owner desires. Moteur V12, 3 967 cm3, 1 ACT par banc, 340 ch, trois carburateurs Weber 40 DCZ 6, transmission manuelle quatre rapports avec overdrive, suspension avant indépendante avec triangles inégaux et ressorts hélicoïdaux, essieu arrière rigide avec ressorts semi-elliptiques et bras tirés parallèles, freins hydrauliques à disques sur les quatre roues. Empattement 2 600 mm. • Voiture exposée aux Salons de Londres et de Chicago 1962 • Premier des 18 exemplaires de deuxième série châssis long • A fait partie de la célèbre collection Yoshiho Matsuda • Magnifiquement présentée dans sa combinaison de teintes d'origine, "Grigio Argento" et "Nero" • Numéros concordants ("matching numbers") ; "la" Ferrari de grand tourisme par excellence La 400 Superamerica Aerodinamico Au cours des années 1950, Ferrari a pris la place de constructeur non seulement de voitures de course de niveau international, mais aussi des meilleures automobiles de grand tourisme du monde. Enzo Ferrari avait fini par comprendre que, pour poursuivre avec succès son programme de compétition, il avait besoin de créer, promouvoir et vendre des voitures de route tout aussi exceptionnelles. Tout au long de la décennie, la référence en matière de Ferrari GT a évolué de façon très importante jusqu'à devenir une machine de route extrêmement luxueuse, à savoir la 342 America et la 410 Superamerica, le summum en matière de luxe sportif. Cependant, ces voitures avaient la réputation d'être lourdes et délicates à conduire, et de nombreux connaisseurs considéraient qu'un modèle aussi prestigieux se devait de présenter des qualités routières plus raffinées. Pour effacer ces défauts, Ferrari dévoilait en 1959, au Salon de Turin, la 400 Superamerica. Cette 400 SA adoptait un certain nombre de changements par rapport à sa devancière, à commencer par un nouveau moteur V12 Colombo. A partir de la cylindrée de 3 litres de la 250 GT, ce bloc se voyait réalésé pour passer à presque 4 litres, tout en étant équipé de bougies à l'extérieur du V selon une configuration qui avait donné de bons résultats sur les Testa Rossa de compétition. La nouvelle Superamerica bénéficiait aussi de nouveaux freins à disques sur les quatre roues, au lieu des tambours de la 410 Superamerica, et d'un overdrive qui modifiait de 28% le rapport final. Ces modifications permettaient d'améliorer les performances et le comportement routier de la voiture de façon très significative, en parfaite cohérence avec le niveau de luxe exceptionnel qu'elle présentait. Les premières 400 Superamerica étaient fabriquées sur le châssis Ferrari plus court, de 2 420 mm d'empattement, habillé d'une carrosserie cabriolet signée Pininfarina. Lorsque la voiture correspondant au châssis n° 2207 SA, dénommée Superfast II, a été présentée à Turin en novembre 1960, elle comportait une carrosserie qui n'avait encore jamais été vue sur une Superamerica et qui a immédiatement fasciné le public. Elle affichait à l'avant une calandre évoquant une bouche ouverte, qui menait à un toit effilé et à une ligne de ceinture caisse convergeant vers un arrière fastback délicatement galbé et profilé, favorisant la pénétration dans l'air de la Superamerica. Deux ans plus tard, au Salon de Londres de septembre 1962, Ferrari dévoilait la 400 Superamerica de deuxième série. Elle conservait la forme de carrosserie aérodynamique particulière de ses devancières, mais ici sur un châssis de 250 GTE de 2 600 mm d'empattement, à la place de la précédente plateforme, plus courte. Quelque 18 exemplaires de coupés Aerodinamico ont été produits avant que la production de s'arrête en 1964, portant le nombre total de Superamerica Série II à 35 exemplaires, dont font partie les précédentes versions châssis court. 400 Superamerica Châssis n° 3931 SA Le châssis n° 3931 SA a été fabriqué par Ferrari comme le premier de la Série II sur châssis long, et il a été envoyé chez Pininfarina le 18 juillet 1962. Le carrossier a travaillé sur la voiture pendant plus de deux mois, donnant le jour à une carrosserie de toute beauté qu'il terminait le 29 septembre 1962. Cette voiture était rapidement envoyée à Londres où elle était dévoilée au Salon de Londres, à Earls Court. Ferrari notait de l'exposer aussi au Salon de Chicago. Livrée à l'origine dans la teinte "Grigio Argento" avec sellerie "Nero", combinaison qui est encore la sienne aujourd'hui, 3931 SA fait partie des 14 exemplaires de Série II châssis long dotés des désirables phares sous cache profilé. Après son séjour au Salon de Londres, la voiture était exportée chez Luigi Chinetti Motors, à New York, pour la somme de 13 017 $, et de là elle était emmenée au Salon de Chicago pour y être exposée. Au cours des années 1970, cette Superamerica appartenait à Gary Wasserman, qui résidait à San Francisco et, en 1975, elle faisait une apparition dans l'ouvrage de Stan Grayson, Ferrari, The Man, The Machines. Au début des années 1980, la voiture était complètement restaurée par Terry York Motor Cars avant d'être vendue à Yoshijuki Hayashi, à Tokyo, où elle recevait l'immatriculation japonaise 72 45. Le 9 janvier 1995, châssis 3931 SA intégrait la collection réputée de Yoshiho Matsuda, et elle était exposée en 1995 au "Matsuda Ferrari Museum of Art". Au début des années 2000, elle repartait aux États-Unis où elle était utilisée avec parcimonie avant de revenir en Europe. La 400 Superamerica est souvent considérée comme la plus prestigieuse des Ferrari grand tourisme, car c'est une voiture conçue sans laisser de place au compromis. La Superamerica offrait à ses propriétaires le meilleur en matière de technologie automobile, avec un style, des performances et un luxe de très haut niveau. La présente Ferrari est un des exemplaires produits les plus importants, et elle est vraiment capable de répondre à tous les souhaits de son prochain propriétaire. Chassis no. 3931 SA Engine no. 3931

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-02-03
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1997 McLaren F1

1997 McLaren F1

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2008-10-29
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1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Alloy by Scaglietti

Desirable long-nose 275 GTB with factory aluminium bodywork Delivered new to U.S. Senator Adlai Stevenson III Retains its original engine and transmission Ferrari Classiche certified Built with desirable alloy bodywork, chassis number 08111 was born as a long-nose 275 GTB with triple carburettors and CV joint transmission. It was originally finished in Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) over a Nero (VM 8500) interior with full leather seats, just as it presents today. Completed by the factory in December of 1965, the car was sold new through Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, Connecticut, to Adlai Ewing Stevenson III. A graduate of Harvard College and later Harvard Law School, after serving in Korea and working in a law firm, Stevenson was elected to the Illinois House of Representatives and served there from 1965–1967, prior to serving as the State Treasurer from 1967–1970. He was finally elected to the United States Senate in 1970 and represented Illinois for 11 years as a member of the Democratic Party. His family was steeped in U.S. political history, as his grandfather served as Vice President of the United States under Grover Cleveland and his father was Governor of Illinois for four years, ran for President of the United States in 1952 and 1966, and served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations from 1961–1965. There is no doubt that a red 275 GTB would have turned lots of heads both in Illinois and Washington, D.C., and while it is not known when he sold the car, it had been sold to John A. Gross of Reseda, California, by at least 1973. Chassis number 08111 remained with him through 1976. By 1979, the 275 GTB had moved across the border to Vancouver, British Colombia, where it was owned by Dr Thomas M. Maxwell. Maxwell fully restored the car in 1984 and listed it for sale upon completion in late 1985. By 1986, the 275 GTB was sold to Mike Sheehan and subsequently traded to Swiss broker Charles Gnädinger, who brought the car with him when he emigrated to the South of France. Listed for sale again in France in 1997, the car was sold there to Jorge Raposo Magalhaes of Portugal. While in Portugal, the car’s interior was re-trimmed in tan, fitted with a new hood with a raised bulge similar to a 275 GTB/4, and fitted with a black air intake and grille. Subsequently sold to José Manuel Albuquerque of Cascais, the car remained in Europe with a handful of owners until being purchased in 2011 by its current custodian in Switzerland. Under his ownership, the car was shipped to Italy for a full restoration to original specifications. Bodywork was completed by Quality Cars in Padova, and the interior was re-trimmed in Nero by Luppi Tappezzeria, while the mechanics were handled by former mechanics of M.G. Crepaldi S.a.S. in Milan. Since the completion of the restoration in 2016, chassis number 08111 has been driven just 100 km from new and remains in excellent condition throughout. Confirmed as retaining all of its original major mechanical components by Ferrari Classiche during certification, this is truly an exceptional 275 GTB with a compelling ownership history. • Desiderabile 275 GTB “muso lungo” con carrozzeria originale in alluminio • Consegnata nuova al senatore americano Adlai Stevenson III • Ancora con il suo motore e la trasmissione originali • Certificata Ferrari Classiche Prodotta con carrozzeria in alluminio, oggi ambitissima, la vettura con numero di telaio 08111 è nata come 275 GTB “muso lungo”, triplo carburatore e trasmissione a giunto omocinetico. E' stata originariamente verniciata in Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) su interno Nero (VM 8500) con i sedili interamente rivestiti in pelle, esattamente come si presenta ancora oggi. Completata in fabbrica nel dicembre del 1965, è stata venduta nuova attraverso la Luigi Chinetti Motors di Greenwich, Connecticut, ad Adlai Ewing Stevenson III. Dopo gli studi all’Harvard College e la laurea alla Harvard Law School, dopo aver prestato servizio militare in Corea e lavorato in uno studio legale, Stevenson è stato eletto nell'Illinois House of Representatives, dove ha prestato servizio dal 1965 al 1967, prima di essere nominato Tesoriere dello Stato per gli anni dal 1967 al 1970. Eletto nel Senato degli Stati Uniti nel 1970, come membro del Partito Democratico, ha rappresentato l'Illinois per 11 anni. La sua famiglia aveva una lunga tradizione nella storia politica statunitense, in quanto suo nonno era stato vicepresidente degli Stati Uniti sotto Grover Cleveland e suo padre era stato governatore dell'Illinois per quattro anni, prima di candidarsi come presidente degli Stati Uniti nel 1952 e nel 1966 e di essere Ambasciatore degli Stati Uniti alle Nazioni Unite dal 1961 al 1965. Non c'è dubbio che una 275 GTB rossa avrà fatto girare molte teste, sia in Illinois sia a Washington DC. Mentre non è noto quando esattamente il Senatore ha venduto l'auto, sappiamo che è stata ceduta, verso il 1973, a John A. Gross di Reseda, in California. Il telaio numero 08111 è poi rimasto con lui fino al 1976. Nel 1979, la 275 GTB aveva attraversato il confine e sii trovava a Vancouver, nella Colombia Britannica del Canada, di proprietà del dottor Thomas M. Maxwell. Maxwell ha poi completamente restaurato l'auto nel 1984 e l'ha inserzionata per venderla verso la fine del 1985. Per il 1986, la 275 GTB è stata venduta a Mike Sheehan, prima di essere ri-venduta al broker svizzero Charles Gnädinger, che l’ha portata con sé quando è emigrato nel sud della Francia. Inserzionata in Francia nel 1997, viene poi ceduta a Jorge Raposo Magalhaes del Portogallo. E’ proprio mentre la macchina si trova in Portogallo che gli interni vengono professionalmente rivestiti in colore marrone ed il cofano riceve una nuova presa d’aria, con una gobba piuttosto pronunciata, come sulla 275 GTB/4 e, la macchina viene equipaggiata con una presa d’aria di colore nero, lo stesso della mascherina. E’ durante questa proprietà che l'auto viene spedita in Italia per essere sottoposta ad un restauro totale, conforme alle specifiche originali. La carrozzeria è stata restaurata dalla Quality Cars di Padova, mentre, l'interno è stato tutto rifinito in Nero da Luppi Tappezzeria con la meccanica gestita da un ex meccanico della M.G. Crepaldi S.a.S. di Milano. Dalla fine dei lavori di restauro, nel 2016, il telaio numero 08111 è stato guidato per soli 100 km e rimane, ancor aoggi, in condizioni eccellenti in tutto. Con le verifiche effettuate da Ferrari Classiche durante la certificazione, si è potuto confermare che questa 275 GTB ha mantenuto tutti i suoi componenti meccanici originali. Una 275 GTB veramente eccezionale con un’ importante storia legata ai suoi proprietari precedenti. Chassis no. 08111 Engine no. 08111 Gearbox no. 510

  • ITAItaly
  • 2017-09-09
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2015 Ferrari LaFerrari

4,000 miles and single ownership from new Desirable Nero over Nero color scheme Recent full service by Ferrari of San Francisco Still under its factory warranty until July of 2018 Always lovingly enjoyed and maintained by its current custodian; ready for further road use Delivered to its first owner and only Californian owner through Ferrari San Diego in July of 2015, this LaFerrari was custom-ordered in the rare and desirable combination of Nero, with matching black wheels with Giallo calipers and Nero leather upholstery in an effort to create a subtle and stealthy look. It is also fitted with a variety of carbon fiber options, including wing mirror stalks, fog lamps, and front and rear splitters finished in carbon fiber. The car has also been outfitted with the telemetry kit with inner cameras, black sports exhaust, and large-size seats. With only one owner from new, it has been driven and enjoyed on the open road, where it is reported to have always provided both exciting and reliable motoring. It was displayed at The Quail: A Motorsport Gathering in 2016. The car retains all its original books, tools, luggage, battery charging kit, both spare keys, and service invoices. It is important to note that the car has always been serviced and maintained as necessary at proper intervals by Ferrari of San Francisco, ensuring that it has always provided its owner with trouble-free motoring and guaranteeing many more miles of trouble-free motoring ahead. Furthermore, the car still retains another year of its factory warranty, which expires in August of 2018 and can be refreshed thereafter. Ferrari’s most technologically advanced and highest performing road car to date, the LaFerrari is a vehicle that demands respect due to its mind-bending performance, but one that can be driven and enjoyed frequently. The LaFerrari was a completed break in Ferrari tradition in that the powerplant is not only extremely powerful, boasting a total output from both its 6.3-liter V-12 engine and electric motor for a combined output of 949 bhp, but it also reduces the carbon footprint noticeably. Contemporary magazine road tests indicate full acceleration to 62 mph in less than three seconds. The 124 mph mark arrives in less than seven seconds, and the 186 mph mark in 15 seconds! Keep accelerating, and the LaFerrari will accelerate to a top speed of over 217 mph. For the collector that wishes to sample the pinnacle of Ferrari performance on the open road, there can be no better LaFerrari. Chassis no. ZFF76ZFA9F0211998 Engine no. 285533

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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1930 Bentley 6½-Litre Speed Six Sportsman’s Saloon by Corsica

One of the most beautiful, famous, and important Speed Sixes Immensely impressive, sinister original Corsica coachwork Formerly owned by Hugh Young, Barry Cooney, and Gordon Apker Very well known in vintage Bentley circles THE SPEED SIX: IN SEARCH OF POWER Created at the urging of foremost “Bentley Boy” and Bentley Motors chairman Woolf Barnato, the Speed Six was the racing derivative of the massive and potent 6½-Litre. It could be argued that, in its mechanical specifications, the Speed Six was very similar to and derivative of the 6½-Litre, but that is as fallacious as claiming that the 250 GTO is the same as a 250 GT Pininfarina coupe. The new model boasted from such a host of upgrades, including twin SU carburetors on a new square-section intake manifold. Its performance was above and beyond its sibling by incredible measure. In racing tune, 200 horsepower was possible, and period reports indicated a top speed of 120 mph, comparable to the mighty Duesenberg. Speed Sixes blasted all over Europe, so dominating Le Mans at 1929 that, at one point, they were so far ahead of the field that they were instructed to reduce to touring speed for the last few hours (and won anyway). After a dominating season they returned to Le Mans in 1930, repeating the same feat down to the “slow finish,” and marking Bentley’s fourth consecutive victory at the world’s greatest endurance race. As was true for other competition cars of the period, the Speed Six was not used strictly for racing. Chassis configured very similarly to the Le Mans cars were released to private owners and fitted with remarkable custom coachwork, few more remarkable than that offered here. GH 208: THE JOURNEYS OF A SINGULAR SPEED SIX This Speed Six, chassis number HM2861, was delivered to original owner J.W. Bealey of Little Minthurst Farm, Charlwood, Sussex, in September 1930, via Jack Barclay of London. As a very late Speed Six, it was constructed with all of the Le Mans-bred updates, including a stronger camshaft, 25-quart oil sump, and “C” type gearbox. Bentley Motors build records, copies of which are on file, detail the original specifications, including noting the original coachbuilder as Corsica Coachworks, also of London. Corsica’s spectacular body for the car ranks among the most memorable creations of a shop known for the audacious and impressive. Taking full advantage of the 152-inch chassis, they built a car that appears to be all engine, with a hoodline and cycle-style fenders extending almost half the length of the automobile, ending at a five-passenger Sportsman’s Saloon body with a low roofline, split windscreen, and truncated tail. Aside from Woolf Barnato’s famous streamlined coupe, no other “Speed Six” packed as much visual impact as the Bealey car. The late Hugh Young, a longstanding and highly respected member and officer of the Bentley Drivers Club, acquired the machine in Wool, Dorset, in 1958, by which time it had gained its current engine, LR2782, from another Speed Six. Mr. Young recalled that his wife “Ursula and I brought the Speed Six to Canada in the summer of 1959, in the hold of the Pinemore cargo ship in which we also traveled . . . . We then drove it – unrestored! – from Montreal to Winnipeg via the U.S. That was a real adventure!” After many years of driving enjoyment with the Speed Six, Mr. Young sold the car in 1976 to Barry Cooney, a well-known enthusiast from Oregon who has owned several vintage Bentleys and Rolls-Royces over the decades. In a recent conversation, Mr. Cooney noted that he took the newly acquired car to the well-known Bentley specialists Hoffman and Mountford and had them perform a full mechanical service before the car was shipped to the United States. Upon its arrival stateside, the new owner began using his Bentley exhaustively, including driving it on two occasions from his home in Portland to the Pebble Beach Concours, where it was displayed – fresh off the road – in 1981 and 1982. On at least one of those journeys, Mr. Cooney’s friend, the Rolls-Royce and Bentley historian, Diane Brandon, recalls a late-night drive through the mountains with the lights on, something that even the hardiest enthusiasts might not undertake today. On another occasion, the car was driven all the way to Victoria, British Columbia, for a Rolls-Royce Owners Club meet. In 1984, Mr. Cooney sold his well-traveled Bentley to the late, great collector, Gordon Apker, with whom it remained for the next two decades. During that time it was again returned to Pebble Beach, in 1985, memorably sharing the ramp with the famous “Blue Train” Bentley. It was then acquired for the collection of its current owner, in which it has been maintained since. Further restoration work was performed in the late 1990s, in which the car was refinished in its current livery, inside and out, and fitted with disc-style wheel covers, as it retains today. Among the rarefied ranks of Speed Six Bentleys, in which every one is special and unique, none packs the sheer emotional punch of the car enthusiasts known as, simply, “GH 208.” Its dark visage stops even the most jaded enthusiasts in its tracks, turns heads even among a Pebble Beach field, and simply and purely is considered one of the most beautiful closed W.O. Bentleys ever constructed. On other cars such statements would be cliché, but on the Corsica Sportsman’s Saloon, they are simply grand reality. Chassis no. HM2861 Engine no. LR2782

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
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