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THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS, 1954

THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS, 1954 An elaborate stage costume worn by Marilyn Monroe as hat-check girl and sultry singer "Vicky Hoffman". Co-starring Ethel Merman, Donald O'Connor and Dan Dailey, the film tells the story of a vaudeville song and dance family. This was Ms. Monroe's twenty-second film, the year after she appeared in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (in which she sang onscreen for the first time) and How To Marry A Millionaire. In the film she describes herself as a "singer between engagements - six months between." The costume is constructed of a fleshtone full length gown with an attached matching net overlay; heavily embellished with a flower and leaf pattern of sequins with silver and white bugle beads. At the top of the waist-high left leg slit, a cluster of monofilament fiber with silver and glitter flowers. When the actress was required to cover her bare leg in stills and alternate filming for release in countries that forbade such "nudity", a separate pleated insert was basted in. The tag sewn in the zipper seam 1-25-1-4692 M.Monroe A-729-28, and the tag 20th Century Fox. Together with a headpiece of silver and glitter flowers, accented with a spray of monofilament fibers; the tag 1-25-4-4692 M. Monroe A-729-29; and costume footwear, a pair of size 6 1/2A silver satin "Pacelle" of Saks Fifth Avenue shoes; the production and scene number handwritten inside the heel straps. Accompanied by a black and white photograph of Ms. Monroe wearing the costume.

  • USAUSA
  • 1995-06-28
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MY FAIR LADY

MY FAIR LADY LOEWE, Frederick and LERNER, Alan Jay. "MY FAIR LADY, " based on George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion. Opened in New York, 15 March 1956. Production staged by Moss Hart, starring Julie Andrews and Rex Harrison, Stanley Holloway and Catherine Nesbitt. Cinema version released 1964. LERNER & LOEWE SONGS OMITTED FROM THEIR "MY FAIR LADY": ALL UNPUBLISHED AND UNPERFORMED Frederick Loewe's personal archive of manuscript music from the creation of My Fair Lady, which is widely regarded as the best musical-theatrical work of its type, a show which originally ran for a remarkable 2,717 performances at the Mark Hellinger Theater in New York and enjoys worldwide popularity even now. My Fair Lady remains the only show ever to be voted unanimously the best musical, by the New York Drama Critics Circle and won no fewer than 6 Tonys. This group of Loewe's manuscripts consists of numbers composed for but not used in the show; all are entirely unpublished and have never been performed or recorded. (performance rights of course, remain with the agents of the composer and lyricist). The Library of Congress possesses the only other manuscripts of My Fair Lady, an apparent fair copy, presented by the composer in the 1960s. No other manuscripts are known to survive from this, certainly the most successful collaboration of Lerner and Loewe and these songs, not used in the production, are otherwise unknown and have never been published. Present are early drafts of at least 7 numbers, three of which are fully worked out in piano-vocal score ; all are in the hand of Frederick Loewe as are the cover sheets. Totalling 36 Contents: "The Pygmalion Waltzes," mechanical copy of Loewe's working piano score, with pencilled notes and deletions by Loewe, 4 pages (incomplete at end?) "Come to the Ball," mechanical copy of Loewe's working piano-vocal score, 10 pages, with pencilled label by Loewe: "from 'My Fair Lady,' never used," signed "Fritz," and with his handwritten note that it was to be sung by the character "Higgins"; other deletions and revisions in score by Loewe "Please Don't Marry Me" (Higgins), autograph melody and lyrics by Loewe, 3 pages "Shy," piano-vocal score, 3 pages "Shy" (Liza), piano-vocal score, 3 pages "There's a Thing Called Love" (Liza), melody and lyrics, 2 pages, "Dear Little Fool" (Higgins), melody, 1 page "Lady Liza" (Higgins, Pickering), melody and lyrics, 1 page "Liza - Counter" (Higgins, Pickering, etc). melody (duet), 2 pages "What Is A Woman," melody, 1 page, title "Lady Liza" on verso in Loewe's hand. [With:] "There's A Thing Called Love," typescript lyrics (4 verses) , 1 page. My Fair Lady My Fair Lady

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-11-18
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Rare and Important Unpublished Autograph Draft of the "Remarkable Story of Chicken Little,"

Rare and Important Unpublished Autograph Draft of the "Remarkable Story of Chicken Little," by John Greene Chandler, (1815-1879), c. 1840, comprising thirteen pages on blue lined paper, with numerous holographic corrections and word count marginalia, 8vo, (lacking page 9, tape remnants to edges of first leaf, lower right corner of most leaves chewed affecting some text, overall smudging and handling wear). Sold together with a printer's proof of the 1840 edition and a group of ephemera related to the story.Note: The 1840 version of this classic tale was distilled from the voluminous story presented here. This version provides a far richer and fuller version that includes additional characters, the birth of Chicken Little and a plethora of side notes and thoughts on many of the classic characters, Hen Pen, Duck Luck, Goose Loose, Turk Lurk and Drake, who all fall prey to sly Fox Lox. This celebrated tale of youthful panic and how gullible others can be came from the fertile imagination of John Greene Chandler of Petersham, Massachusetts. His first work in 1838 was Grandmother's Toy Book and in 1840 he wrote The Remarkable Story of Chicken Little. The fanciful story was first printed and distributed at a fair held at Quincy Hall in Boston. The purpose of the fair was to raise additional funds to complete the Bunker Hill Monument, whose cornerstone had been laid some fifteen years earlier. As chance would have it, the small pamphlet was read by the editor of Godey's Lady's Book, Mrs. Sarah J. Hale, who reviewed it very positively in her newspaper, The Monument. This enthusiastic response propelled this 19th century fable to become an icon of children's literature and eventually made the name Chicken Little synonymous with paranoia and over-reaction.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-05-03
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Books

Books A collection of 359 books given as gifts to Brando or signed by the author, some with portions of the text underlined and highlighted and with notes in the margin in Brando's hand, titles include: NOHAIN, Jean AND CARADEC, F. Le Petomane, Los Angeles, 1968, inscribed on the front endpaper in blue ink Marlon = This man was a True artist. Love = Johnny [Depp]; KAZANTZAKIS, Nikos The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel, New York, 1958, inscribed on the front endpaper in black ink You see - There's this here Greek God.... Love Sidney [Lumet] Sept. '59; GILLESPIE, Dizzy To BE, or not...to BOP, New York, 1979, inscribed on the inside front cover in black ink To Marlon, who's simply a "gas", Your buddy, Dizzy Gillespie 3/20/86 accompanied by a note on Quincy Jones headed stationery, dated 24 March, 1986, Dear Marlon, As promised. Love, Quincy; MEANS, Russell Where White Men Fear To Tread: The Autobiography of Russell Means, New York, 1995, inscribed on the title page in black ink To Marlon - A humble man who has not taken the credit he deserves for what he has done for my People. Thank you - Russell Means, 6-10-96; ALLEN, Steve Mark It And Strike It, New York, 1960, inscribed on the front endpaper in blue ink To Marlon, With admiration, Steve Allen; FUGARD, Athol The Blood Knot, New York, 1964, inscribed on the inside front cover in black ink Mr. Brando: Mr. Burton and Miss Taylor have been good enough to help me get this copy to you. I merely said "where is Marlon Brando? There is a play that I think he might like to do as a movie." and they said they'd get it to you. Hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed playing it.... Sincerely, James Earl Jones (a lot)

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-30
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Withdrawal

The batting helmet worn by roger maris during the 1961 home run chase

For years, Babe Ruth's 1927 record of 60 home runs withstood the challenge of many a mighty slugger. Hack Wilson, Jimmie Foxx, Hank Greenberg, Johnny Mize, Ralph Kiner, Willie Mays, and Mickey Mantle each finished seasons within ten or fewer home runs of breaking Ruth's record. None of them could equal the Babe's mark. In 1961, however, things would change. As had occurred back in 1927, two Yankees pushed each other in the home run race. The 1961 version of Ruth and Gehrig was the duo of Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle, a pairing that had already won three of the last five American League MVP awards. Injuries to Mantle curtailed his pursuit of the record, but Maris tied the Babe's record by hitting his 60th homer of the season on September 26, and had four games left in which to best Ruth's mark. However, it was not until October 1st, the final game of the season, that Roger would hit the record-breaking home run, pulling a 2-0 fastball from Boston's Tracy Stallard into the right field stands and thus pushing the single-season home run record to 61. But the race was not without controversy, and what should have been a glorious pursuit, was one often earmarked by strife and bitterness. The divergence in character and personality of the two Yankees played a part in the controversy. Ruth loved the crowd, he loved to live it up -- on and off the field. Maris was a quiet man who was willing to be a team player to move baserunners into scoring position. Breaking Ruth's record was not an easy task for a normal man. For Maris, the chase for Ruth's record was almost unbearable. Maris started to lose his hair as the chase wore on. He was fond of quiet moments and he liked to show little emotion. His integrity and his willingness to fight for what he thought was right irritated reporters. The fans never seemed to catch on to the type of person that Maris was. For Maris, the day he hit the 61st home run of the season must have been the beginning of some of the emptiest days of his life. Some claimed that his achievement was tainted because Maris had played in 161 games in the 1961 season. Ruth had only played in 151 games. Commissioner Ford Frick made the ruling that an asterisk would be attached to Maris' record. The asterisk was eventually removed from Maris' accomplishment. The 61 home runs were only a part of Maris' incredible season in 1961. Maris led the American League with 142 runs batted in and 132 runs scored. He won his second consecutive American League MVP honor and he helped the Yankees capture a championship with a World Series win over the Reds. Many years after his death, Maris finally did get much of the recognition he had sought in life. As Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa battled for the home run record in 1998, Maris' accomplishment received renewed coverage and attention. On the day that McGwire hit his 62nd home run, he stopped in the midst of his celebration to acknowledge the Maris family sitting near home plate at Busch Stadium. "Buddy" In his life and Major League Baseball career, little known player and manager Buddy Hassett enjoyed a front row seat in watching the Yankee dynasty build over several eras, from Ruth and Gehrig, to DiMaggio to Mantle and Maris. This culminated in the 1961 season, where Hassett, as a coach, was a close friend and eye witness to Maris as he chased and ultimately broke Babe Ruth's "untouchable" single season home run record. Hassett befriended the quiet, sensitive Maris, during what was a trying season for Roger, forging a close friendship. At the end of that magical and stressful 1961 season, Roger gave Buddy this batting helmet, which he had used throughout that historic campaign. Prior to his death in 1997, Buddy Hassett decided to pass on this historic artifact to Kevin Lester, the young son of his personal friend. Lester, the helmets new keeper, would later go on to experience success as an actor in Hollywood. Ironically, his most notable work, would come as a teammate of Robert Redford's in the acclaimed baseball film "The Natural". The Helmet An integral "tool of the trade" from the front lines of Maris epic quest, this helmet was manufactured by ABC. The manufacturers sticker on the interior shows it to be a size 7 1/2. Also on the interior is a piece of white tape with Maris' name and number "9" written in black marker. The padding is well worn. The outer surface of the helmet also shows tremendous wear including a repaired 4 inch crack on top. The "NY" logo in white felt is affixed to the front. Numerous photos of Maris exist from 1961, showing him wearing what could likely be this very helmet, based on closely matching scuff marking. Articles of provenance include; A signed letter of provenance from Buddy Hassett as well as a signed baseball card to Kevin Lester. A letter of provenance from Kevin Lester and articles pertaining to his appearance in The Natural. Copies of newspaper articles pertaining to Hassett and Lester. LOA from MEARS.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) LE LOTUS BLEU Encre de Chine pour

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) LE LOTUS BLEU Encre de Chine pour le projet de couverture de l'édition française du Journal Tintin n°161 daté de 1978. Cette couverture annonçant la republication de la version originale du Lotus Bleu, mise en couleurs par les Studios Hergé, à l'initiative de Christian Goux. Projet très proche de la couverture publiée. Tous les personnages majeurs de cette aventure y sont représentés. A noter qu'un premier projet légèrement différent est publié page 193 de l'ouvrage de Philippe Goddin ' Hergé et Tintin Reporters ' paru en 1986 aux éditions du Lombard. 25,5 x 19,5 cm. Encadré. Est joint une lettre à l'en-tête des Studios Hergé, rédigée par Alain Baran, secrétaire particulier d'Hergé, adressée à la rédaction du Journal Tintin à Bruxelles et datée du 24 août 1978. Cette lettre fait état de l'envoi de ce dessin au siège du Journal Tintin à Bruxelles. Que veut dire ce texte en idéogrammes chinois ? Gageons : « Le Lotus Bleu ». Hergé lui a donné une importance égale, si pas supérieure, au déroulé de ses personnages, car il accordait une grande importance au pinceau chinois. Il est vrai que c'est Tchang qui lui a permis d'étoffer son art. Tout le monde est présent : depuis Rastapopulos (qui cependant ne se montre pas dans le Lotus Bleu) jusqu'à la maman pleurante de Tchang (lequel est inséparable de Tintin). Dessin très enlevé, entre la mise au net et le crayonné. Hergé y a réussi un exercice de style prodigieux, montrant à quel point son registre de dessinateur est étendu. Pierre Sterckx Indian ink for the cover project of the French edition of the Journal Tintin, no. 161, dated 1978. This cover is announcing the reissue of the original version of the Lotus Bleu, colour execution by the Hergé workshop, iniciated by Christian Goux. This project is very close to the published cover. All main caracteers of this adventure are represented. A first, slighly different project has been published on page 193 in " Hergé et Tintin Reporters " by Philippe Goddin at éditions du Lombard in 1986. 25,5 x 19,5 cm. Framed. Enclose a letter on head paper of the Hergé workshop by Alain Baran, personal assistant of Hergé, send to the editorial of the Journal Tintin in Bruxelles, dated August 24th, 1978. This letter refers to the sending of this drawing to the headquater of the Journal Tintin in Bruxelles. Estimation 20 000 - 25 000 € Sold for 40,037 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-06-05
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Jean-pierre gibrat

JEAN-PIERRE GIBRAT PARIS SOUS LA NEIGE Illustration originale, 2015. Signée. Encre de Chine, encres acryliques de couleur, aquarelle, rehauts de gouache sur papier aquarelle. 76 × 47,2 cm (29,92 × 18,58 in.) Le Canal Saint-Martin est connu pour son Hôtel du Nord immortalisé par Marcel Carné en 1938 et dont les répliques sont devenues cultes, notamment celle qu’Arletty décoche de sa gouaille typiquement parisienne : « Atmosphère ? Atmosphère ? Est-ce que j’ai une gueule d’atmosphère… » Gibrat, qui connaît ses classiques, représente ici la fameuse écluse du canal enjambée par la passerelle d’acier. Il nous plonge dans une ambiance hivernale, tendre et apaisée, instant de grâce volé à l’Occupation. « Tous les dessins ont leurs coulisses, leur petite histoire, quoi. Suivez-moi, je vais vous en chuchoter une. Je l’avais presque terminé. Avec un début de fierté, je le montre à une amie, dont l’anonymat sera préservé car nous sommes dans l’hiver 1943. Elle le regarde longuement, avec le sérieux des gens mandatés d’opinion. Puis elle me dit ceci : “Est-ce bien normal que Jeanne se promène en petites chaussures d’été sous la neige ? Prendrais-tu plaisir à ajouter un peu de souffrance à la rigueur de l’époque ?” Dans une impardonnable distraction, j’avais chaussé cette pauvre Jeanne de sandalettes ajourées, parfaites pour une chasse aux papillons dans le Luberon autour du 15 août, mais plus contestables pour battre le pavé gelé du canal Saint-Martin. Le changement de souliers s’imposait, il fut fait sans délai et sans tickets de rationnement. » J-P G.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-11-19
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.

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