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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) LES AVENTURES DE TINTIN

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) LES AVENTURES DE TINTIN L'ÉTOILE MYSTÉRIEUSE Encre de Chine pour la copie dite de sécurité d'une planche au format à l'italienne, composée des strips 24 à 26 de « L'Étoile Mystérieuse », publiés dans le journal « Le Soir » en 1941, au rythme d'un strip par jour. Chaque strip monogrammé. 33,8 x 46,2 cm. Encadrée. Superbe passage au cours duquel Tintin, fou de joie car venant d'échapper à la soi-disante « fin du monde », sonne à la porte de l'observatoire et se retrouve nez à nez avec l'astronome Hippolyte Calys et son collaborateur. Historique : Le 5 février 1942, avant même d'employer Alice Devos le 15 mars de la même année comme coloriste, Hergé se rend chez Casterman à Tournai. De grand projets innovants, bouleversant sa façon de travailler, sont en route. En effet, le passage à la couleur et la refonte en 62 pages de ses albums changent sa manière de travailler et notamment le format de ses planches. Hergé travaillant seul doit découper celles-ci au format rectangulaire en 4 strips ; il commence par L'Étoile Mystérieuse. Avant le découpage, il réalise une copie de sécurité à l'aide d'une table lumineuse à l'encre de Chine sur papier avant de découvrir le système des bromures, ancêtre de la photocopie. Il se doit de garder une trace pour une éventuelle publication dans un quotidien étranger dans l'ancien format à l'italienne en 3 strips. Il était difficile pour Hergé d'effacer définitivement son travail, il mit donc tout son talent et toute son habileté dans la réalisation de ces planches dites de sécurité. Cette œuvre représente une des rarissimes opportunités d'acquérir une planche au format qu'Hergé utilisait pendant la guerre, et tout simplement une planche de cette époque mythique dans l'œuvre d'Hergé. Estimation 160 000 - 200 000 € Sold for 202,099 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2013-06-07
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Heisman trophy original plaster sclpture by frank eliscu, 1935

For seventy years, the Heisman trophy has been awarded to the best player in college football, voted on by more than 1,000 sportswriters and announced every December at New York’s vaunted Downtown Athletic Club (DAC). Many of the players have become both household names, first round draft picks and Pro Football Hall of Famers, such as Paul Hornung, Marcus Allen, Barry Sanders and Roger Staubach, while winning the award remains the pinnacle for others who have left football for more private lives. Their excellence remains embodied in sport’s most dynamically sculpted trophy. The first award was called the DAC trophy. However, in 1936 gridiron coach, innovator  (he pushed to legalize the forward pass) and first DAC athletic director John Heisman passed away, and, in his honor the DAC renamed the trophy to reflect his contributions. The trophy itself - the running back in full stride with lhis right arm outstretched  is an icon of the sport of football, chosen by the DAC committee and instantly recognizable to the hardcore and casual fan alike. Frank Eliscu, a 23-year old sculptor New York native was chosen to design it to be cast in bronze. His first design was made of clay; his second sculpted in plaster to be used as the model for the mold. The follwing tribute to Eliscu and the Heisman trophy, written in 1990 by the late legendary New York Times obituary writer Robert McG. Thomas, Jr., most aptly describes the story behind the creation of the trophy and its sculptor. Frank Eliscu - From Feet of Clay to Greatness in Bronze Time is running out. His team is behind, and he has gotten the call. He has taken the handoff, broken through the line and bulled his way past the linebackers until he is not in the open field with only a single determined defender between him and the goal line. The game is in the balance. As the defender closes in from the right, sure that he can bring the ballcarrier down, the runner shifts the ball from his right hand and tucks it firmly into the crook of his left arm, pressing it close to his body. Then, in one fluid motion just as the tackler arrives, he takes a sudden graceful sidestep and throws his right arm out, shoving the tackler away with his open hand. As quickly as he appeared the tackler is gone, now merely an implicit fallen figure as the runner surges forward. The touchdown is made. The game is won. A beautiful run, but this is the moment we remember: the runner alone in full stride, his arm outstretched, moving away toward football immortality. If ever there was a run and a moment worthy of Heisman Trophy, this is it, but then, of course, this is the Heisman Trophy. That the Heisman Trophy is at once one of the world’s most recognized and respected awards for individual athletic achievement and an actual trophy-cast in bronze and standing on a black onyx base on a marble pedestal-may be more than happenstance. It is tempting to wonder whether the club’s annual presentation could have attained its present preeminence if the committee of founders had decided to honor the year’s outstanding college football player by establishing, say, a Heisman Award, symbolized by a suitably imposing plaque, or even a Heisman Cup, complete with graceful handles. But the actual unassailable fact is that when the members of the Downtown Athletic Club created the annual award in 1935 they also decreed that a trophy depicting a football player would be created along with it. And Frank Eliscu is the man they chose to create it. It is also tempting to wonder what the Heisman may have become if the founders had entrusted the trophy to another sculptor. They could hardly have known at the time that the Heisman would be the first of hundreds of celebrated works by Eliscu ranging in scale from the inaugural medals of President Gerald Ford and Vice President Nelson Rockefeller to the monumental “Cascade of Books” above the entrance to the James Madison Building of the Library of Congress. At the time he was assigned to create what became known as the Heisman Trophy, Eliscu was an impoverished 23-year-old graduate of Pratt Institute whose sole professional output has been department store mannequins and dolls’ heads.  To be sure, he was not the first choice. To a man, those who were considered the leading sculptors of the day either turned up their noses at the very idea of creating a sports trophy or hid their disdain behind a demand for payment far beyond the club’s means. Eliscu was different. He needed the money. He no longer remembers exactly how he came to the committee’s attention, but as the 82-year-old Eliscu recalled in an interview from his home in Sarasota, Florida, in the spring of 1994, “It was my first commission.” If there seems to be a prayerful veneration in Eliscu’s work, it may be no accident. Eliscu, who was born in Brooklyn on July 13, 1912, and grew up in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan, recalled that the first tentative explorations of what was to become his art were made with the residue of his great-grandmother’s prayer candles. “I would take the paraffin with me into the tub when I took a bath and work it underwater,” he said. His first figures were of horses’ heads. “I loved to make animals,” he said. Eliscu’s horses seemed so real, so alive that his talent was instantly apparent. “I became something of a local celebrity,” he said. In time, word of his talent spread beyond Washington Heights to Harrison Tweed, one of New York’s most prominent lawyers and a major patron of the arts. Tweed, who operated what amounted to a summer arts colony for talented youngsters at his estate in Montauk, Long Island, invited Eliscu to spend 10 weeks at the camp, and a lasting friendship was born. “He became the closest thing next to my own father,” Eliscu said. Tweed introduced the young Eliscu to leading American artists and gave Eliscu’s own art an important boost by paying the production costs of his first work in bronze, “Diana and the Fawn,” which was exhibited at the National Academy of Design while Eliscu was still in high school. Unable to afford college after graduation from George Washington High School, Eliscu worked for a mannequin maker and a toy company before he won a scholarship covering the first year of a three-year art program at Pratt. When the scholarship ran out, Tweed came to the rescue, paying for the last two years in exchange for art lessons every Monday night in his apartment at 10 Gracie Square. Tweed, whose name has been preserved in the law firm, Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, also performed a critical service when Eliscu was offered the Heisman assignment. “He insisted on looking over the contract before I signed it,” Eliscu said. After it passed muster, Eliscu signed it and went to work. Much as he needed the $200 fee, Eliscu has always insisted that he approached the work not as a commercial venture but as a labor of love, which is to say, a labor of art.  “I wanted to make the best thing I could,” he said. “I worked and I changed, and I gave it everything I could.”   Working entirely from his imagination, his only guidance from the club was to produce a football player in action, Eliscu made three wax “sketches,” about four inches high, of different poses. It is interesting to speculate how well defensive players might have fared in the annual balloting if the club had selected Eliscu’s favorite. It was of a lineman tackling a ballcarrier, their conjoined bodies rising into a graceful S. When the sketches were completed, a three-coach delegation from the club, Lou Little of Columbia, Jim Crowley of Fordham and John Heisman himself, paid an inspection visit to Eliscu’s studio at the old Clay Club at 4 West 8th Street. All agreed on the straight-arming ballcarrier, but after studying the figure, it was suggested that the outstretched arm, which Eliscu has pointed straight ahead, would be more natural if it extended out to the side, to better mimic how a runner would push a tackler away. To drive their point home, as Eliscu watched openmouthed, three of the most famous figures in the world of football held an impromptu mock scrimmage right there in this studio, taking turns stiff-arming each other. Eliscu got the point and simply pushed the pliable wax arm back until it pointed in the correct direction. To translate the form into the ultimate trophy, Eliscu worked in clay attached to an armature made of lead wire. He used his own imagination, “artistic license,” he calls it, in forming the body and shaping and detailing the powerful biceps and calf muscles that are so prominent on the muscular figure. Even the face, he said, was of his own imagining. The one area he was not willing to trust to his artistic vision was the figure’s costume. Knowing that Ed Smith, a high school classmate, was a football player at New York University, Eliscu asked Smith to bring his uniform to the studio and pose in it. The Heisman may have been Eliscu’s first professional work, but it was hardly his last. Since then there has rarely been a day that Eliscu has not spent creating. He even rendered crucial artistic service to the nation in World War II. Assigned to an Army engineering unit at Fort Belvoir in Virginia, he spent the early part of the war making invasion maps and models for landings from Salerno to Normandy. Then, after a flood of war casualties began arriving back in the United States, he was transferred to a medical unit at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, where he assisted in the grisly work of assisting in plastic surgery and cutting cartilage to form into noses and chins. Eliscu, by then a sergeant, gained an unusual footnote in the history of plastic surgery when he developed a technique of tattooing to remove birthmarks and provide color to reconstructed lips. Since the war Eliscu has not only been one of the nation’s most acclaimed and honored artists, he has also been one of the most prolific. He has turned out hundreds of pieces from the studio he maintained first at his home in Ossining, New York, and more recently in Sarasota, Florida, where he lived with his wife, Mildred. Whatever his subject and whatever his medium, Eliscu, who has worked in everything from wax to stone, strives to satisfy his lifelong passion for breathing movement into otherwise inanimate objects. “To me, movement is almost giving life to bronze,” he said. “I try to put [in] action even if a thing is stilled or seated, through expression or a tilt of the head.” He also shuns abstract art in favor of realistic forms, which allow him to achieve, as he puts it, “a sense of recall, where you look at something and you’re moved to recall what it makes you feel.” Ask him to name his favorite works, and Eliscu, who can choose them from museums all over the country, mentions his original, “Diana and the Fawn,” “Holocaust,” in Orlando; “Cascade of Books,” in Washington, D.C.; the “Shark Diver,” at Brookgreen Gardens in South Carolina; and, yes, the Heisman. “It’s an honest work,” he said. “I think that the Heisman has a feeling. I think that you can feel not only the movement but the intensity of the piece. That’s what I call honesty.” It is true that the statue depicts a run that never literally happened. Yet it symbolizes a run that happens every fall, year after year, just as Frank Eliscu imagined it. For him the Heisman is more than a trophy. It is a work of art. “I liked it then,” he said, “and I like it now.” Robert McG. Thomas Jr.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-12-10
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Babe ruth 1920 game bat signed and presented to chicago mayor william

Babe in the Big Apple "They all flock to see him,” because the American fan "likes the fellow who carries the wallop." – Miller Huggins In a time when baseball, reeling from the 1919 Black Sox scandal, declining attendance and declining credibility, needed a revitalization, Babe Ruth's bat saved the day. By destiny’s hand, the most visible, dominating, and popular athlete in American history was brought to New York City to play on baseball’s biggest stage. At the dawn of the Roaring Twenties, Babe Ruth turned baseball on its head, sparking fan interest and excitement, and the birth of the most enduring dynasty in sports history. As one of the games most promising young pitchers, Babe Ruth had led the Boston Red Sox to World Series titles in 1915, 1916 and 1918. Ruth's pitching mark was 89-46 with the Sox, but his booming bat was too loud to be heard only every four days. Red Sox manager Ed Barrow, at the suggestion of outfielder Harry Hooper, began playing the Babe in the outfield in-between his starts. By 1919, he played 130 games and was now an everyday player hitting home runs with unprecedented regularity. The long balls that flew from Babe Ruth’s bat also flew in the face of the games convention, changing its very nature with each successive clout. He seemed poised to lead the Red Sox to the top of the league for years to come. But, despite the Babe's obvious value as a slugger, he was dealt to the New York Yankees prior to the 1920 season, in a deal that would haunt Boston owner Harry Frazee forever. America was in a social revolution as the 1920’s began – Prohibition went into effect on January 16, just days after the announcement of Ruth’s sale to the Yankees – and baseball turned around as radically as the country did. The game changed more between 1917 and 1921 than it did in the next forty years. Despite the high-profile presence of such outstanding batters as Cobb, Wagner, Lajoie, Speaker, Jackson, and a few others, during the first two decades of the century hitting was a lesser art in a game that honored pitching and low scores. The term “inside” baseball was almost sacred, and John McGraw was its high priest. It meant playing for a run, a single run. Bunting, base-running, sacrificing were the core elements of baseball offense. All of this changed after Ruth’s breakthrough in 1919. It was not a gradual evolution but sudden and cataclysmic. Crushed by his sale to the Yankees, Ruth was uncertain of his future upon his arrival in New York City. But his doubts failed to affect his performance in 1920. During his first season in pinstripes Ruth clouted 54 homers, surpassing the combined totals of every other team in the majors except one. That same season, Ruth slugged an astonishing .847, a record that stood for more than 80 years. In 1920, the Yankees, coincidentally, became the first team to draw more than one million fans to a ballpark, more than double the attendance of any other club. In the media capitol of the world, the combination of Ruth’s boundless charisma and unmatched prowess on the diamond, elevated him to a level of popularity in his day greater than that of any public figure in American history.                       The Babe Meets Big Bill “My greatest desire is that no shadow of corruption, dishonesty or wrong-doing shall cloud any of the varied and multitudinous activities of the city government during my term of office.” – Chicago Mayor William Thompson in his Inaugural Address, April 26, 1915 William Hale Thompson, also known as 'Big Bill' Thompson, was one of Chicago's most interesting, colorful and eccentric mayors. He was known as the Builder Mayor, taking the mayoral oath of office a mere three short months before the city’s Eastland disaster. His corresponding actions and reactions immediately following the disaster and are a measurable and irrevocable part of Chicago history. Much like Babe Ruth, Big Bill was a larger-than-life demagogue. As a brilliant chameleon of a politician, he brought excitement and theatrics to the office and was renowned for his showmanship. Thompson once staged a "debate" between himself and two white rats, which he carried on stage to represent his political opponents. His speeches on many occasions provide a great insight into the period, the politics, and the mayor himself. However, in spite of many notable achievements throughout his three terms in office, Thompson’s tenure is characterized by controversy. Chicago in the twenties was ruled by gangsters - first Johnny Torrio, and then his successor Al Capone. Mayor Thompson was suspected of being in the pocket of both. During Big Bill's reign as mayor, the police were ineffective in combating organized crime. Bribery and corruption were rampant. Thompson was reputed to allow the gangsters free rein over the city. His critics said he ignored crime, concentrating instead on his own issues - including more anti-British saber rattling, and threats to "punch King George in the snoot." Thompson’s memorable political career ended after losing the race for governor in 1936 and a fifth campaign for mayor in 1939. On March 19, 1944, he died at the Blackstone Hotel at the age of 76. At the time of his death, though never factually linked to the underworld figures he was presumed to be beholden, two safe deposit boxes in his name were discovered to contain nearly $1.5 million in cash. While in office, the flamboyant Thompson never missed an opportunity to attract attention, regularly rubbing elbows with members of Chicago’s high society. In 1920, when Thompson’s home town White Sox hosted the Yankees at Comiskey Park, a press opportunity presented itself that Big Bill could not resist. No spotlight shone brighter than that which followed Babe Ruth, the most popular and enigmatic baseball star in the world.  Thompson sought to meet the great slugger, knowing full well that such a meeting of moguls would be great fodder for the local media. A Gift For the Ages Accepting a gracious invitation on the part of the Mayor of Chicago, Ruth was escorted to the office of Big Bill after an afternoon game on September 17th, 1920, which saw the Yankees fall to the White Sox by the score of 6-4 at Comiskey Park. He arrived bearing a gift of his game bat. Prior to handing over his embattled club in front of ready cameras, Ruth inscribed the barrel, “To Mayor Thompson, From ‘Babe’ Ruth September 17th, 1920”. No finer present could a baseball fan receive. Immediately, a place of prominence was designated for it, so that all whom entered the Mayors office could see that considered among Big Bill’s friends was the greatest ballplayer in the world. Things began to sour for Thompson in 1923. In the midst of campaigning for a third consecutive term, he learned that he was being investigated for fraud by the State's Attorney. Upon learning of this investigation, Thompson withdrew from the mayoral race. Going out with a flourish, the former mayor announced that he was leaving to head an expedition to the South Seas to find tree-climbing fish. "I have strong reason to believe that there are fish that come out of the water, can live on land, will jump three feet to catch a grasshopper, and will actually climb trees" he proclaimed. Prior to leaving office, Thompson asked his longtime secretary, one of his most loyal employees, if there was a certain memento he’d like to have as a keepsake from their years of working together. Having admired the bat every day since it was delivered by Ruth himself, it was given to him as a symbol of gratitude from the former Mayor. Babe Ruth 1920 Game Bat Signed and Presented to Chicago Mayor William “Big Bill” Thompson This bat is offered here on behalf of the family of this former secretary of Mayor Thompson. It is a monumental revelation in the field of sports memorabilia. In the category of Babe Ruth game used bats it stands near the pinnacle.  Condition wise, the 35 ¾ inch, 42 ½ ounce relic has few peers.  The markings, finish, and overall quality of the Hillerich & Bradsby Co., “dash-dot-dash” model 125 are extraordinary. The usage wear is magnificent, indicating it was a favored weapon of Ruth’s. Furthermore, with provenance that is beyond reproach, it is one of a precious few legitimate Ruth game bats that bear his signature. An accompanying photograph of Ruth presenting the bat to the Mayor is detailed enough to show its grain pattern (a veritable “thumbprint” for bats). The addition of this “photomatch” elevates the status of this Ruth gamer into rarified company. It is a museum caliber treasure from Ruth’s pivotal first season as a Yankee, and arguably the most important of his storied career.  LOA’s: SCD Authentic (grade: A10* - Dave Bushing, Dan Knoll & Troy Kinunen), PSA/DNA (John Taube & Vince Malta), PSA/DNA (Steve Grad), Consignor Manufacturer Characteristics: Center Label: Louisville Slugger, Louisville, Ky. Label Description: Hillerich & Bradsby Co., 125 dash dot dash.  Trade Mark Reg. US Pat Off. Labeling Period: 1917-1921 (early Ruth signature model) Bat Weight: 42 ½ ounces Bat Length: 35 ¾ in. Finish: Standard Wood: Professional Grade Ash

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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HERGÉ Georges REMI dit 1907 – 1983

HERGÉ Georges REMI dit 1907 – 1983 TINTIN AU TIBET Mine de plomb pour le crayonné de la planche n°5 (pl.11 & 12) de Tintin au Tibet, publié en 1960 aux éditions Casterman. Croquis et annotations dans la marge. Planche dédicacée et signée. Encadré. Très beau passage qui se termine avec un gag concernant Haddock. À noter la présence du dessin d'annonce du Journal Tintin pour cette aventure. Au verso plusieurs croquis de la page de titre du journal Tintin. 55 x 36,5 cm. Avec cette planche crayonnée, on retrouve quelque peu l'esprit comique du cinéma muet dont Hergé a toujours reconnu l'influence. Le capitaine Haddock, qui donne du rythme avec ses phases de colère et de maladresse, temporise. Mais, une fois de plus, le dessinateur procède par allusion pour que son personnage perde momentanément l'équilibre. Le dessin, volontiers extravagant, et fidèle à un mouvement qui se renouvelle constamment, déborde du support : le trait passe d'une case à une autre, d'un niveau à un autre, et occupe l'espace pour mieux affirmer son pouvoir temporel, dans une anarchie contrôlée où se développent les grandes lignes directrices. Tout est pensé en terme d'action et de fluidité, de combinaisons entre les différents éléments, mais toujours avec une vision esthétique d'ensemble. La ligne claire est un état de conscience, une démarche ascétique beaucoup plus cérébrale et exigeante qu'elle ne le laisse supposer. Alors Hergé explore, expérimente. Le trait, immatériel et impatient, se dissimule, s'efface, se contredit, puis se libère enfin. Sans pesanteur. Net, parfaitement identifiable. La magie opère : c'est le plaisir absolu du dessin. Fidèle à Ingres, « Probité de l'art ». Estimation 120 000 - 180 000 € Sold for 189,600 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-11-22
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) LES AVENTURES DE TINTIN

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) LES AVENTURES DE TINTIN TINTIN AU TIBET Mine de plomb pour le crayonné de la planche 32 de l'album « Tintin au Tibet », 20ème album de la série, publié en 1960 aux éditions Casterman. La dernière case reprend la case 10 de la planche 33 de l'album. 55 x 36,5 cm. Nombreux croquis et annotations dans les marges dont plusieurs études d'expressions de Tharkey et 3 crayonnés de Haddock pour les cases 4 et 9 de la planche 33 de l'album. Au verso (reproduit page 40), une version totalement inédite de la suite de l'histoire dans laquelle Tharkey découvre Tintin gisant inanimé au fond de la crevasse et lui prodiguant les premiers secours. Tintin lui racontant alors ses découvertes notamment la pierre sur laquelle le nom de Tchang est gravé en caractères chinois et dans notre écriture, ainsi que la découverte d'ossements au fond de la grotte. Tharkey en déduit naturellement « moi croire lui enlevé par Yéti !... Et lui mangé par Yéti ». Les crayonnés d'Hergé sont très exactement dans le même rapport avec ses mises à l'encre (et les imprimés qui s'en suivent) que les lavis de Poussin ou les dessins de Monsieur Ingres avec leurs tableaux. Chaque fois les bouillonnements de l'esquisse furent discrétisés (voire discrédités) par des mises-au-net de l'œuvre finale. En ce sens, Hergé est un classique. Mais ses brouillons nous révèlent aussi son versant résolument moderne ! Des milliers de traits turbulents y captent le mouvement. Et la puissance du monde de Tintin s'est jouée à ce niveau là : fluides, motricités, chocs, vitesses. La planche 32 des crayonnés de « Tibet » est particulièrement importante parce que Hergé y affrontait le blanc des neiges éternelles. Cette achromie n'étant pas du tout celle de la virginité de la surface du papier (ni celle d'une pureté morale) mais bien celle d'une vibration première qui qualifie les tout grands dessinateurs et peintres : Turner, Delacroix, Klee, Pollock. Pierre Sterckx Estimation 140 000 - 160 000 € Sold for 189,468 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2013-06-07
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1932 babe ruth autographed game used bat - (psa/dna autograph grade mint 9)

"He was a circus, a play and a movie, all rolled into one," said teammate Lefty Gomez. "Kids adored him, Men idolized him. Women loved him. There was something about him that made him great." The most visible, dominating, and popular athlete in American history, Babe Ruth turned baseball and the world on its head. Long after his last home run, his name has come to signify greatness and strength. No item in the realm of sports memorabilia symbolizes the essence of American sport more so than a bat used by Babe Ruth. It is the tool he used to single handedly lift the game of baseball from its depths in the wake of the 1919 Black Sox scandal and reclaim its status as America’s National Pastime.  This is a game used Babe Ruth Hillerich & Bradsby professional model 125 bat that dates from one of the most storied seasons in his career. Based on factory records, this model is one of two identical bats, featuring a distinctive “Hack Wilson” style knob that was shipped to Ruth in 1932. That epic season culminated with Ruth’s infamous “Called Shot” against the Cubs in the World Series. The Yankees victory in that series brought Ruth his last of seven World Series titles. Measuring 33 ¾” in length and weighing 36.4 oz., the uncracked bat shows solid game use including numerous ball marks on the barrel. Made of the finest quality ash, the bat retains rich color, with strong factory markings. Elevating the stature of this bat into the pantheon of elite Ruth gamers is the fact that several years after it was retired by Ruth, the bats keeper got the Bambino to add his large, bold inscription, “To Jerry From Babe Ruth Sept. 11th 1939” ideally placed on the barrel. The quality of the inscription warranted a grade of MINT 9 based on a third party assessment by PSA/DNA, making it the highest graded autographed Ruth game bat recognized by that firm to date. The bat has been cautiously preserved, retaining a look and feel that reaches back to the golden years of baseball, when Ruth was King of the Diamond. LOAs from MEARS (Bat grade A8.5) and PSA/DNA (Auto. grade MINT 9).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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Fine and Important Märklin "Lusitania" Ocean Liner

Fine and Important Märklin "Lusitania" Ocean Liner Germany, circa 1912 , The first class passenger's acronym for the most desirable cabins, P.O.S.H. (Portside Out, Starboard Home) has become synonymous with sumptuous luxury. This is an apt description for the "Lusitania," one of Märklin's most important ocean liners crafted at the height of their creative genius. The deck, finished in faux wood planking, is fitted with a host of elegant and intricate details including working anchors and chain, tall foremast fitted with searchlight and crow's nest set just before a multi-tiered superstructure. This is fitted with a bridge with stairs and an observation post, four top quality funnels and over two dozen ventilators of various shapes and sizes, a walkway incorporating a cabin and domed panel skylight, and ship's wheel controlling the rudder bearing the Märklin logo. The hull is handsomely finished in white with portholes over a blue lower deck with portholes over copper red over brick red at keel and two hinged gates on railing with gangway secured below. Marked "Lusitania" in gold at bow on either side. There is a view of the lower deck made possible by small cutouts in the hull on both sides. This adds to the toy's realism on one hand while stirring the imagination on the other. Electric (dry cell) motor housed in hull. In the case of the "Lusitania" what is often said about wine is true of the toy's finish. Age has improved it. Its gentle fading and crazing add to its appeal and enforces the feeling that it is a regal survivor of a long ago era.   Length: 37 ½ inches

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-12-17
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Circa 1931 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Home Jersey

Circa 1931 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Home Jersey, Lou Gehrig will forever be lost in the glare of New York Yankees teammate Babe Ruth's vast spotlight. But nothing about Gehrig's accomplishments should be minimized, from the 2,130 consecutive games he once played as the “Iron Horse” to his longtime link with Ruth as the enforcer of baseball's most prolific slugging duo. Gehrig was a rock-solid 6-foot, 210-pound left-handed slasher who rocketed line drives to all sections of the park, unlike the towering, majestic home runs that endeared Ruth to adoring fans. And unlike the gregarious Ruth, Gehrig was withdrawn, modest and unassuming, happy to let his teammate drink the fruits of their tandem celebrity. But those who played with and against Gehrig understood the power he could exert over a game. As the Yankees' first baseman, cleanup hitter and lineup protection for Ruth, Gehrig was an RBI machine. He won four American League titles and tied for another and his 184-RBI explosion in 1931 is a still-standing A.L. record. His 13 consecutive 100-RBI seasons—he averaged an incredible 147 from 1926-38--were a byproduct of 493 career home runs and a not-so-modest .340 average. It's hard to overstate the havoc wreaked by Gehrig's bat. He topped 400 total bases in five seasons, topped 150 RBIs seven times, hit a record 23 grand slams, won a 1934 Triple Crown, hit four homers in one 1932 game and cranked out a World Series average of .361 with 10 homers and 34 RBIs. In 1927, when Ruth hit his record 60 home runs, Gehrig batted .373 with 47 homers and 175 RBIs winning the MVP award. The Ruth-Gehrig relationship powered the Yankees to three World Series championships, and when Ruth left New York after the 1934 season, Gehrig and young Joe DiMaggio powered the team to three more. But Gehrig is best remembered for the iron-man streak that lasted from 1925-39, when Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis— now known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, ended his career prematurely and tugged at the heart strings of a nation. Gehrig, finally accorded the recognition that long had eluded him, died two years later. This is one of only a handful of known examples of a Lou Gehrig game used Yankees home pinstriped jersey. Based on a thorough inspection of jersey’s own physical traits as well as documented photographs of Gehrig wearing what appears to be an identical jersey, we have identified its era of usage to the 1931 season. In a career full of great seasons, 1931 was a watershed for Gehrig. He batted .341 and led the league with 184 RBIs setting a still-standing single season record. During the 1931 season, Ruth and Gehrig combined for 92 home runs and 347 runs batted in, the most ever by a pair of teammates. The Yankees, as a team, averaged more than seven runs a game. Gehrig, having never won a home run title, finally notched a league leading total of 46 in 1931. However, Gehrig had to share the title with Ruth who matched his output of 46. In April of that season an event occurred that can be viewed as a capsulization of Gehrig’s subordination to Ruth. With Lyn Lary on base, Lou Gehrig hit a home run into the stands at Washington. The ball, however, bounced back on the field and Lary saw a Washington outfielder catch it for what he believed was the last out of the inning. Gehrig circled the bases, but was called out when he "passed" Lary on the basepath as Lary headed for the dugout. Instead of a home run, Gehrig was credited with a triple, costing him the single home run he needed to claim sole ownership of the home run title at seasons end. Manufactured by Spalding, this jersey is tagged exclusively for Gehrig featuring red chain stitching in the collar that reads “L. Gehrig.” Every technical aspect of the body of this uniform is as it was when last in the custody of Gehrig with a few exceptions. All of the seams and tagging are original and unaltered. Gehrig’s own customization of cutting the sleeves can be validated by the photograph presented in the catalogue. Appropriately, there is no evidence of an “NY” logo ever having appeared on the front since this feature was not instituted on Yankees uniforms until 1936. Post-Gehrig alterations to the jersey include the removal of the felt portion of Gehrig’s number 4 on the back, although remnants of black stitching still reveal the outline of the numeral. Secondly, the outline of lettering that appears to be “STANTON” appears faintly on the front of the jersey indicating its one time designation for service in a minor league. The jersey shows signs of extensive use and wear including general and consistent soiling throughout the jersey. Significant fabric stress/damage appears in the upper back portion of the jersey as well as in the front shoulders with a 1/2”  hole on the left shoulder and fabric tears on the left. Most of these damaged areas have been professionally restored and reinforced in some cases by the addition of supportive fabric applied to the interior.  There are a few areas of red staining/fabric bleed in the lower 1/3 portion of the jersey. The second button from the top has been replaced, but this appears to be a vintage repair. In spite of these technical imperfections the jersey retains excellent visual appeal. In the pantheon of sports memorabilia a jersey worn by Lou Gehrig has few peers. Columnist Jim Murray called Gehrig "Gibraltar in cleats" and sportswriter John Kieran said of him, "His greatest record doesn't show in the book. It was the absolute reliability of Henry Louis Gehrig. He could be counted upon. He was there every day at the ballpark bending his back and ready to break his neck to win for his side. He was there day after day and year after year. He never sulked or whined or went into a pot or a huff". Gehrig was the same in baseball as he was when he faced a fatal disease that struck him in the prime of his life. Ruth may have been rightfully dubbed “The Sultan of Swat” or the “The Colossus of Clout” among other things, but Gehrig’s acclaim as “The Pride of The Yankees” has never been disputed. LOA from MEARS.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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Babe ruth’s 1938 brooklyn dodgers full uniform

In 1933, with Ruth aging and Gehrig slumping, the Yankees fell to second place. By this time the Babe seldom played an entire game, often being removed for defensive reasons in the late innings. His playing career clearly winding down, Ruth set his heart firmly on becoming the manager of the Yankees. After making his wishes known, they suggested he manage their Class AAA club in Newark to get some experience. With injured pride he refused.  After the 1934 season Ruth, somewhat sulking with an uncertain future, led a group of Americans on a tour of Japan. Upon his return, Ruth, the greatest star the game has ever known, was presented with a contract offer for $1 dollar by the franchise he had almost single-handedly built into a dynasty. The Yankees offer was a mere formality, enabling Ruth to refuse, and thus retire on his own recognizance. In 1935 the Braves came forward and offered Ruth what they described as a three-level position: player, assistant manager, and vice president. The last two were a sham. Boston was only trying to beef up their attendance by using the aging legend as a gate attraction. In spite of his rapidly diminishing skills, Ruth showed one last glimpse of his former greatness. On May 25, 1935, in Pittsburgh, Ruth homered in his first two trips to the plate, singled in his third appearance, and in the seventh inning hit a ball over the right field roof of Forbes Field. It was his final major league home run, and it was, typically, a monster shot. He played in only a handful of games after that for the Braves. The closest Babe Ruth ever came to realizing his managerial dream came three years later when he returned to New York as a coach with the Dodgers in 1938. Ruth’s hope was renewed briefly, as he proudly donned this Brooklyn uniform, hoping to parlay the position into something bigger. During his first and only return to Major League baseball after his official retirement in 1935, Ruth was a tremendous drawing card for the talent starved Dodgers, and the Brooklyn front office made sure he kept very high profile. Not only was Ruth appointed first base coach, (where the fans would be sure to see him throughout the entire game), but he was also ordered to take pre-game batting practice with the club so the fans could once again witness the “Sultan of Swat” hitting a few balls out of the park. In spite of the “side show” atmosphere, Ruth clung to hope. But when the club’s managerial post opened the next year Leo Durocher got it, and Ruth wasn’t rehired. He hung up his Brooklyn Dodgers uniform after one season. This would be the last baseball uniform he would ever wear as a professional. Ruth spent the next ten years of his life waiting for the call to become a manager, but it never came. Ruth’s last major league uniform, from his lone season with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1938, consists of his jersey, pants, and socks. The heavy white flannel Spalding jersey and pants each feature Ruth’s name in red chain stitch. Other significant features include the 1939 World’s Fair patch on the left sleeve of the jersey, and custom lacing affixed to the tail allowing Ruth to keep it neatly tucked into his pants. The royal blue matching socks are stitched with separate numbers “14” and “26”, differing from Ruth’s uniform number 35. Consistent wear is evident throughout, and many characteristics of the uniform can be matched to accompanying vintage photos of Ruth wearing it. It remains in its original state, unaltered since the day removed it for the last time, thus ending the greatest career in sports history. LOA: SCD Authentic (A 9.5).

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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ALBERT UDERZO

ALBERT UDERZO ASTÉRIX, LES LAURIERS DE CÉSAR (T.18), DARGAUD 1972 Planche originale n°13 prépubliée dans Pilote n°627 de novembre 1967. Signée. Encre de Chine sur papier 43,8 X 53,4 CM (17,24 X 21,02 IN.) Formidable planche des Lauriers de César où René Goscinny et Albert Uderzo sont au sommet de leur art. On se rappelle qu’au cours d’un repas très arrosé, le chef Abraracoursix avait promis de rapporter à son beau-frère rien de moins que les lauriers de César ! Nos deux Gaulois cherchent donc, coûte que coûte, à se faire engager au service du dictateur romain, ce qui leur vaut une exposition au marché des esclaves, seul moyen trouvé pour se faire recruter. Cette planche, qui se suffit à elle-même sur le plan narratif, rassemble toutes les qualités de la série Astérix : elle commence par une bagarre générale, la spécialité d’Uderzo qui, selon les propres mots de Goscinny, est « capable de dessiner clairement et avec talent n’importe quoi, jusqu’a, et y compris, un combat de pieuvres dans de la gelée de groseilles ». La suite est comme un petit théâtre : les personnages sont posés à même la case, comme sur une scène. Le dialogue, goscinnien à souhait, est un chef-d’oeuvre d’absurde. C’est une des séquences les plus savoureuses de l’album. Il est normal qu’Astérix prenne l’ascendant dans la négociation puisque le marchand d’esclaves n’avait accepté de vendre nos héros qu’à contrecoeur, d’où cette réplique-culte : « Bon, je vous prends mais pas a compte ferme. Si je ne vous vends pas aujourd’hui, vous irez vous faire vendre ailleurs ! »

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-05-21
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CASABLANCA 1942, BEST SCREENPLAY ACADEMY AWARD PRESENTED TO HOWARD KOCH

CASABLANCA 1942, BEST SCREENPLAY ACADEMY AWARD PRESENTED TO HOWARD KOCH The gold plated brittania statue with the front plaque on the base inscribed ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ARTS AND SCIENCES FIRST AWARD 1943; on the reverse the plaque ACADEMY FIRST AWARD TO HOWARD KOCH FOR WRITING SCREENPLAY OF "CASABLANCA"--12 in. high. Howard Koch (1902 - ) began his career as a playwright in the late 1920s including Give Us This Day and In Time To Come. John Houseman had read his work and told Mr. Koch that he and Orson Welles had an hourly radio play to do; they were looking for a writer they could get very quickly. In 1938 his script the War Of the Worlds became a legendary radio broadcast, directed by Orson Welles. Arriving in Hollywood in 1939, director John Huston helped him get a job at Warner Bros. for $300 a week; Howard Koch's initial contribution to film came in 1940 with Virginia City. After writing The Sea Hawk for Errol Flynn, and The Letter for Bette Davis, Hal Wallis asked him to collaborate with writing team Julius and Philip Epstein on Casablanca. Howard Koch is unquestionably responsible for giving Humphrey Bogart's character "Rick" his fierce political beliefs. While the Epsteins and Koch worked on eachother's scripts, Hal Wallis acted as intermediary and the three writers never actually wrote together. The final result shows the contributions and talent of all writers involved. In 1947 Howard Koch was subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee. Most of the nineteen "unfriendly" witnesses were writers and despite the fact that Mr. Koch had not been called to testify, and was not a member of any Communist party, he was nonetheless "blacklisted" and forced into exile. He continued his writing career in Europe under an assumed name, completing such works as "A Letter From An Unknown Woman", for which he was named one of the 10 "great's" of all time at the World's Critics Meeting in Lisbon in 1948. In 1961 he once again began to script British films (Loss Of Innocence, The War Lover) under his own name.

  • USAUSA
  • 1994-12-06
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The finest exhibition quality 7 'bc inch gauge model of the Sir William Stan...

The finest exhibition quality 7 'bc inch gauge model of the Sir William Stanier London Midland and Scottish Railway Pacific 4-6-2 LMS Locomotive and Tender No 6230 Duchess of Buccleuch , an accurate replication of the original engine in every detail and was built according to the drawings of Crewe and took ten years and over 18,000 hours to build the model, it was built by the famous model engineer Mr Harry Powell of Crewe and his brother Norman,the paintwork and lettering by Louis Raper, this magnificent model is fitted with a fully brazed and riveted superheated copper boiler with Belpaire firebox and all normal fittings including safety valves, regulator, blower, whistle, brake, injector and blowdown valves, incorporating full external detailing and smoke deflectors, fine scale cab fittings include wheel reverse gear, lever operated sliding firedoors, draincocks and ejector levers, three pressure gauges, twin water sight gauges, mahogany planked floor with steel panel and scale checker-plate, a wealth of classic fittings. Chassis with twin outside cylinders fitted with Walschearts valve gear and two inside cylinders, scale twin ratchet lubricators, brass lubrication boxes, draincocks, sanding gear, working steam brakes, leaf springs and beautifully finished wheels, fluted motion, exceptional external detailing, smoke deflector plates,these were later fitted to all of the class. Tender details includes 4000 gallon Type II plaque,handbrake, water pick-up control, steam-driven mechanical coal pusher with cylinder guides and lifting eyes. The model finished in LMS maroon with yellow and black lining. Length 113 Cab Width 13 'bd The Stanier Duchess Class designated 7P operated throughout Great Britain and were ostensibly Princess Cornation Class Locomotives which were nicknamed Duchesses and many of both of the combined classes carried streamlining in the pre-and-immediately post-war period. They hauled the heaviest express trains from Euston through to Scotland including The Royal Scot and earlier Coronation services. One of the class was sent to the USA for the World Fair of 1939 in its streamlined form. All the class were withdrawn in 1965 and three remain in preservation. * Sir William Stanier FRS. Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS at the company Crewe works. * Harry Powell worked all his life at Crewe locomotive works, he was a Master Coppersmith and chief of the copper-shop at Crewe. This locomotive was delivered to Jack Salem in Switzerland by Harry Powell and Louis Raper. On arrival Harry Powell said to Jack Salem Well you wanted the finest piece that has ever been built and here it is .

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-04-25
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Casey Stengel’s 1951 New York Yankees World Series Ring

Casey Stengel's 1951 New York Yankees World Series Ring, Nineteen fifty-one will forever stand as a definitive year in the history of the New York Yankees franchise. Not only does it represent the hub of the Yankees record run of five consecutive titles, but it also signifies the lone convergence of three of the team's most iconic figures. Casey Stengel, whose tenure with the Yankees would prove to be the most successful in team history, had managed DiMaggio for two seasons since Casey took the helm after the departure of Bucky Harris in 1948. They had won the World Series twice together in two tries. However, by 1951, the great DiMaggio's career was winding down. It has often been reported that he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. His retirement was also hastened by bone spurs in his heel. The 1951 season would be the curtain call of the "Yankee Clipper". However, it also marked the arrival of the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, who bore the weight of unbridled expectations to fill the gap in centerfield. Word had spread that this young phenom’s monumental power and blazing speed might actually make him a viable replacement to the irreplaceable Joe DiMaggio as the "new" Yankee idol. So convinced of this were the Yankees that they assigned their young prodigy uniform number "6," the next in a sequence that included Ruth (#3), Gehrig (#4), and Joltin' Joe (#5). Though some referred to 1951 as a season of change for the Yankees, the end result was more of the same, another championship title. The Yankees dispatched their cross-town rival New York Giants in 6 games, ending their Cinderella season ("The Giants Win The Pennant!"). It was a sweet ending for some and a new beginning for others; Game 6 marked the final Major League game for DiMaggio, who was headed for retirement at age thirty-six, while Mantle would appear in eleven more World Series. The Yankees were now 14-4 in World Series appearances and 1951 marked the solidification of the second coming of a baseball dynasty. This is Casey's own 14k gold 1951 Yankees Championship ring, remaining in virtually the same condition as when he received it. A shimmering .30-carat diamond rests in the center of the ring's face. The manufacturer's stamping "Dieges & Clust" and his name "Charles D. Stengel" appear inside the size 10 band. Classic design elements include the proclamation "New York Yankees World Champions" encompassing the face, and the year "1951" on both sides above the Yankees top hat logo. Casey's ultimate prize ranks among the most important World Series rings ever offered for sale publicly. LOA from the Stengel family.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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Circa 1933 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Road Jersey

Circa 1933 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Road Jersey, Lou Gehrig will forever be cast in the glare of New York Yankees teammate Babe Ruth's vast spotlight. But nothing about Gehrig's accomplishments should be minimized, from the 2,130 consecutive games he once played as the "Iron Horse" to his longtime link with Ruth as the enforcer of baseball's most prolific slugging duo. Gehrig was a rock-solid 6-foot, 210-pound left-handed slasher who rocketed line drives to all sections of the park, unlike the towering, majestic home runs that endeared Ruth to adoring fans. And unlike the gregarious Ruth, Gehrig was withdrawn, modest and unassuming, happy to let his teammate drink the fruits of their tandem celebrity. But those who played with and against Gehrig understood the power he could exert over a game. As the Yankees' first baseman, cleanup hitter and lineup protection for Ruth, Gehrig was an RBI machine. He won four American League titles and tied for another and his 184-RBI explosion in 1931 is a still-standing A.L. record. His 13 consecutive 100-RBI seasons (he averaged an incredible 147 from 1926-38) were a byproduct of 493 career home runs and a not-so-modest .340 average. It's hard to overstate the havoc wreaked by Gehrig's bat. He topped 400 total bases in five seasons, topped 150 RBIs seven times, hit a record 23 grand slams, won a 1934 Triple Crown, hit four homers in one 1932 game and cranked out a World Series average of .361 with 10 homers and 34 RBIs. In 1927, when Ruth hit his record 60 home runs, Gehrig batted .373 with 47 homers and 175 RBIs winning the MVP award. The Ruth-Gehrig relationship powered the Yankees to three World Series championships, and when Ruth left New York after the 1934 season, Gehrig and young Joe DiMaggio powered the team to three more. But Gehrig is best remembered for the iron-man streak that lasted from 1925-39, when Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis' now known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, ended his career prematurely and tugged at the heart strings of a nation. Gehrig, finally accorded the recognition that long had eluded him, died two years later. The style of this road grey Yankees flannel jersey dates it to the pivotal 1933-34 period, when Ruth was in his final seasons in New York and the torch of Yankee greatness was being passed into a single hand. Manufactured by Spalding, this jersey is tagged exclusively for Gehrig featuring red chain stitching in the collar that reads "L. Gehrig." A "Spalding" manufacturer's tag resides to the right. Every technical aspect of the of this jersey appears as it was when last in the custody of Gehrig with the exception of the letters "YO" of "New York" on the front and Gehrig's number "4" on the back having been expertly restored. Each sleeve has been trimmed of approximately two inches of length, a customization attributed to Gehrig, and supported by numerous photographs from the era. Several small holes on the front and back have been patched on the interior with vintage material. The jersey shows signs of usage wear to an awe-inspiring degree, yet retains outstanding display quality and a sense of timelessness. In the pantheon of sports memorabilia a jersey worn by Lou Gehrig has few peers. Columnist Jim Murray called Gehrig "Gibraltar in cleats" and sportswriter John Kieran said of him, "His greatest record doesn't show in the book. It was the absolute reliability of Henry Louis Gehrig. He could be counted upon. He was there every day at the ballpark bending his back and ready to break his neck to win for his side. He was there day after day and year after year. He never sulked or whined or went into a pot or a huff". Gehrig was the same in baseball as he was when he faced a fatal disease that struck him in the prime of his life. Ruth may have been rightfully dubbed "The Sultan of Swat" or the "The Colossus of Clout" among other things, but Gehrig's acclaim as "The Pride of The Yankees" has never been disputed. LOA from Richard Russek/Andy Imperato.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Henry “hank” aaron 1954 milwaukee braves rookie road jersey

Henry Louis Aaron, born in 1934, grew up as one of eight children in Mobile, Alabama. As a youngster he worked hauling 25 pound blocks of ice, building strength in his wrists that would serve him well when he became a professional ball player. Like many resourceful children without money and material things, he did what he could do to hone his skills, including swatting bottle caps with a broomstick for hour on end. Though Hank never played for his high school baseball team (they did not have one), he participated in sandlot contests where he could, and by age 16 was good enough to join a semi pro club, the Mobile Black Bears. A year later in 1951, the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro Leagues signed Hank.  They put him at shortstop though they were sure he could play anywhere and signed him for $200 a month. Henry’s major league break came a year later when the Boston Braves signed him in 1952 and sent him to Eau Clair Wisconsin of the Northwest League. He hit an impressive .336 and was named to the Leagues All Star team as well as its Rookie of the Year. A year later, he was one of a trio of African Americans to break the color line in the South Atlantic “Sally” League. Racial animosity was constant on road trips through the South, but the baseball diamond proved to be Hank’s refuge from a sometime distressing life.  The game was his personal tonic and Hank led the circuit with a .362 batting average with 125 RBI and 115 runs scored. In 1954, fate pointed its finger Hank’s way when Bobby Thompson, the Braves starting left fielder broke his ankle. Even the gracious Thompson years later said “Magic is the only way to describe it” when recalling his raw 20 year old replacement. Hank’s Braves debut took place not in Boston, but in Milwaukee where the team had recently moved. For that 1954 season alone Aaron was assigned jersey number 5, which would later be changed to the number 44 he is most readily identified with. Hank’s .280 average, 13 homers and 69 RBI in 122 games in ’54 were impressive for any rookie, but for Aaron it was just an adjustment period. Soon, as history tells us, Hank became as formidable as any hitter in baseball, frustrating even the games most experienced pitchers. “Throwing a fastball past Henry Aaron is like tying to sneak the sun past a rooster”, said the St. Louis Cardinals fireballer Curt Simmons, speaking on behalf of shell shocked pitchers throughout the National League. Sheer ability, consistency and resilience were the earmarks of Aaron’s prolific career. For 20 consecutive seasons he totaled more than 20 home runs; 15 times topping the 30 homer mark, and eight times he walloped 40 or more home runs. As Aaron biographer Lonnie Wheeler wrote, "(Hank) Aaron's excellence was not expelled in blinding bursts of energy, but rather played out, patiently and inexorably, over a whole generation." It is from 1954, Hank’s rookie year that we offer one of the finest game used jerseys ever presented at auction. Manufactured by Wilson, the size 40, zip-front flannel survives in outstanding original condition, with solid evidence of game use. Tagging on the front tail includes Aaron’s name and year “’54” chain stitched on a felt backing. Among its superb design features are the team name and tomahawk logo embroidered on the front, and the colorful Braves patch on the left sleeve. Aaron’s number “44” adorns the front and back, which was changed by the team from his original 5 at the end of the 1954 season. A portion of the outline of the original number “5” is faintly visible behind the “44” on both sides of the jersey. As was common in this era, Aaron likely donned this jersey for spring training the following season in 1955, and perhaps a portion of that regular season as well. Aaron’s vintage signature and “Best Wishes” salutation appear on the left side of the front. LOAs from MEARS (Grade A9), PSA/DNA and JSA. NOTE: A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this jersey are being donated by consignor Steve Myland to the Big Brothers and Sisters of America, an organization for which both Mr. Myland and Hank Aaron have been longtime supporters through time and personal resources.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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Babe Ruth 1921-31 Louisville Slugger Professional Model Bat (Graded A10, GU10)

Babe Ruth 1921-31 Louisville Slugger Professional Model Bat (Graded A10, GU10), Babe Ruth played baseball like he lived life: with loud, gaudy, entertaining gusto. There was nothing subtle about the happy-go-lucky Sultan of Swat, who paraded through his career, forged an enduring relationship with adoring fans and then withstood the test of time as the greatest power hitter in baseball history. Ruth's legendary home run totals-714 in his career, 60 in 1927—are no longer records, but they still stand as milestone numbers by which all power hitters are judged. His legendary carousing still enhances the irascible image that colors his aura. More than anything, the magnetic Ruth is hailed as the savior of the game, the man who ushered in the longball era and revitalized baseball when it was mired in the bog of the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Ruth became a New York icon as he powered his way through the Roaring '20s and the Great Depression, posting shocking homer totals of 59 (1921), 60 (1927) and 54 (1928) while leading the Yankees to four World Series championships and anchoring one of the most devastating lineups in history. Lost in the fog of Ruth's 12 American League home run titles, 13 slugging championships, four 50-homer seasons and six RBI titles was a career .342 average that still ranks 10th all time. No single sports memorabilia item consistently inspires more awe than a bat used by Babe Ruth. For veteran hobbyists or casual fans, the allure of a bat wielded by Ruth in his prime, the ultimate tool of his trade, is unfailing. For many reasons this example is among the finest of known Ruth gamers. The first and most identifiable feature of this George "Babe" Ruth professional model bat is its rich, dark “Hornsby” finish, so described because it was a preferred finish on bats used by fellow batting legend Rogers Hornsby. Its usage characteristics are ideal. Manufactured during 1921-31 period, the uncracked 35 1/4", 40 oz. club shows many ball marks visible throughout the barrel. A close examination of the handle indicates there was once three rings of tape, of which the 'ghosts' are still visible. Available photos show Ruth holding a bat with similar tape present. All barrel brands are deeply burned with no visible flaws. Enhancing the considerable physical qualities of the bat is its spectacular provenance. This Ruth game used bat is accompanied by a letter from former Brooklyn Dodger, Tony Cuccinello, who was given the bat by the Babe when he was a coach for the Boston Braves in 1936. Cuccinello's letter of authenticity is dated November 21, 1981. We must note there are two typos in Cuccinello's letter, both of which are innocent in nature and in no way alter the spirit of the letter. In his letter Cuccinello mistakenly refers to Ruth being coach with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1936, as opposed to the correct year of 1938. Also, he erroneously refers to the 1938 Boston Bees as the "Braves." In a third party assessment conducted by both SCD Authentic (precursor to MEARS) and John Taube of PSA/DNA, it earned their highest marks of “A10” and “GU10” respectively. Its physical attributes notwithstanding, rarely do game bats of this importance include player provenance of this magnitude. A remarkable gift from the Babe to Tony. LOAs from David Bushing and Troy Kinunen of SCD Authentic (Grade A10), and John Taube and Vince Malta of PSA/DNA (Grade GU10) and Tony Cuccinello.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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DINGLEY HALL

DINGLEY HALL a painted wooden dolls' house of five bays and three storeys with roof balustrade, pediment with clock and finial, double steps with four bronze Gryphon on plinths, each bay with hinged door, the central section with oriel window above an Italianate balcony, above a 16th century style Flemish strap-work scroll, carved with intials L I C 1877, --113¾in. (289cm.) wide, 77¼in. (196cm.) high and 20in. (51cm.) deep (for condition report and full inventory please contact the department) THE INTERIOR The little red sitting room (AT) Painted pink with a dark blue felt carpet, furnishings include a Rock and Graner painted wood grain day bed, upholstered in original buttoned red silk with gilt and chenille braid; an unusual large scale Gothic eight piece set of Waltershausen drawing room furniture, upholstered in red ribbed paper 'leather', printed in gold; a Waltershausen buffet printed with landscapes; an early simulated rosewood wall clock; a painted tinplate fireplace with 'smoking fire', gilded soft metal decoration and firearms; four wood grain Waltershausen items; a quantity of milk glass jugs, cups and saucers, painted with pink rosebuds and green leaves; a lobster; gilt-metal ornaments; a bisque headed doll with moulded blonde hair in original 18th century style frock coat; and ten gilt framed pictures The Drawing Room (AM) the walls hung with maroon cloth the floor with dark blue felt carpet; furniture includes a rare set of white and gold Rock and Graner upholstered in red silk; a pair of unusual Waltershausen four-tier corner shelves and five other Waltershausen pieces including a side table with heraldic devices; a miniature model of a Royal Naval frigate; a pinperle doll dressed as a Zoave with moulded composition turban; gilt-metal items; china and glass including bisque ornaments and a Chamberlains Worcester cat on grass The Kitchen (AB) The cream paper with printed blue borders and fitted bell-board, containing a painted tinplate 'Ice-Box' and cupboard; five bisque headed servants including a page in 18th century-style costume and chef with jointed wood body; a large wood grain painted dresser; copper and tinplate cooking pans; a boot brush; wooden bottles; a bone coffee grinder; cat and mouse; a boars head and a silver cup The Nursery (BT) The deep red flock paper printed with a gold diaper pattern, the carpet of green cloth, with six all-bisque children jointed at shoulder and hip, moulded blonde curls and painted features, in original clothes, two all-bisque dolls' house dolls jointed at neck and shoulder with moulded brown and grey boots and elaborate original clothes; a soft metal sewing basket, canopied bed and music stand; a Waltershausen globe; a Rock and Graner yellow 'bentwood' rocking chair, half-tester bed and side chair; a bone sailing boat, a painted bone Pantin and cup and ball; a cheval mirror; tinplate fireplace and bath The Study (BM) The paper with yellow stripe and carpet of green cross stitch, with elaborate tinplate fireplace; a wood day bed with original blue silk hangings surmounted by an eagle; four chairs and footstool upholstered in blue silk; a wood grain book case containing six miniature Latin books; other miniature books; a gilt metal pier glass with H.W. Morrell's sticker; a quantity of gilt metal framed pictures; a carved bone firescreen of a hunter; a cross-stitched hearth rug embroidered 'L.C.'; flagons, bottles and glasses; and a pinperle man with original top hat, red tail cot, blue waistcoat and breeches with gilt paper bands The Oriental Room (BB) Hung with Japanese prints, the carpet of red, blue and green cross-stitch with a very rare soft-metal hanging lantern containing four lithophanes of children; seven pieces of Japanese furniture with painted decoration, one drawer raises the curtain of a shrine when opened; eight German bisque figures of Chinese acrobats; a South German carved bone cupboard containing vessels, a chess set, ink stand and hand screen; a gilt fish bowl and stand; and a pinperle officer (See back cover for lantern) The Music Room (CT) Pink paint to side walls with a Waltershausen working square piano, an extending stool, a chair, an extending table, a sofa and a chess table with stained bone pieces; three Avery chairs upholstered in velvet; a soft metal plant stand, a small table, a magazine rack, a fire screen and pictures; silver lustre lamp and flagons; a pair of clear glass six-light chandeliers; and two pinperle gentleman in original clothes The Landing (CM) The panelled walls and battoned ceiling with turned wood banisters; a large elaborate pink, blue, yellow and clear Murano glass chandelier; two carved ivory heads of Baccus; two velvet coloured sheilds, one with original miniature musical instruments, the other with arms and armour, both with shop labels from London and Paris; two pinperle military gentleman; a Westacre red lacquer longcase clock and a pair of late 17th century portrait miniatures of a lady, and gentleman on ivory, gilt-metal frame ovals, approx --3 5/8in. (9.2cm.) The Hall (CB) Panelled, the central staircase carpeted in blue and flanked by doors, with elaborate soft-metal chairs, key cupboard, wall clock and corner shelves, the chairs and shelves brightly painted with tassels and cords; three varnished wood plant stands with original pots painted with flowers; a hall stand; four pieces of luggage including a travelling bath, two with Cremer labels; three pinperle men including a jockey; and a china headed doll wearing Alsatian costume The Chapel (DT) Panelled back and sides, furnishings including turned oak pillars and blue carpet with alter; rare Waltershausen prie-Dieu; Florentine paintings of angels on gilt-wood; soft-metal mass toys; miniature books; hand embroidered vestments and alter clothes; three bisque-headed dolls wearing red and white livery; and other worshippers Visitor's Bedroom (DM) The walls with striped green wallpaper, the carpet of mauve cross-stitch with a Rock and Graner cheval mirror; a table Lithophane; a set of pink upholstered drawing room furniture with gilt embossed paper decoration including piano, bookcase and day bed; soft metal firescreen, fire surround and letter holder; gilt metal framed prints and mirrors; and a clear glass four-light chandelier The Cabinet Room (DB) The walls with striped green wallpaper, the coloured crossed stitched carpet with key pattern border; furnishings include a rare set of large scale drawing room furniture, the backs upholstered with shell designs in green and pink brocade; a Waltershausen large scale break-front china cabinet containing a quantity of milk glass painted with flowers and a bonheur du jeur with soft-metal furniture; a six-light clear glass chandelier; a purple lustre decanter; a soft-metal magazine holder painted with a squirrel, belows and a fireplace; a pack of cards and gilt-metal framed pictures The Pink Bedroom (ET) Papered in pink with blue cloth carpet; furnishings include a set of 'satinwood' bedroom furniture hung and upholstered in pink silk; an Avery work table; a soft-metal towel horse, firescreen, fire surround and hanging what-not; two of Mon. Simone photographs of dolls; a copper coal scuttle; a carved bone hand mirror; glass candlesticks; two pinperle puppets and bisque headed doll dressed in green satin The Yellow Bedroom (EM) The walls with yellow striped paper with two glazed windows hung with original blue silk curtains over gauze, the carpet with green and blue cross-stitch; furnishings include a part set of 'rosewood' bedroom furniture upholstered in pale blue silk with lace edging; a gilt-metal birdcage, lorgnettes, picture and mirror frames; an elaborate pier glass decorated with gilt paper; a pair of German bisque figures of an 18th century style couple; a clear glass six-light chandelier and a pinperle puppet The Grand Salon (EB) The walls with yellow striped paper and carpets with green and blue cross-stitch; furnishings include a set of unusual drawing room furniture, the shaped backs with pale blue buttoned silk, the serpentine fronts with ribbed gilt paper; a Walterhausen bureau, octagonal table with shaped sides, two bookcases and matching sofa tables; a German bisque Chinese couple; a paraffin lamp; a turned wood teaset on tray; soft metal fire screen and five pinperle figures

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2003-10-29
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FRANQUIN André (1924-1997) LE TROMBONE ILLUSTRÉ

FRANQUIN André (1924-1997) LE TROMBONE ILLUSTRÉ Encre de Chine pour la couverture du recueil de cette revue, publié en 1980 aux éditions Dupuis. Signée et datée « 1980 » à l'encre de Chine, dédicacée à l'encre bleue par Franquin et sa femme Liliane. 49,8 x 39,7 cm. Est joint le calque de mise en couleur aux crayons. 44 x 32,7 cm. Exceptionnelle illustration résumant tout l'univers de Franquin. Les mots « Le » et « Illustré » sont imprimés. Pièce de musée. Ce recueil reprenait les 30 numéros de Trombone Illustré parus dans Spirou en 1977. Au début des années 70, Franquin regardait du côté des revues Charlie Hebdo et Hara-Kiri. « Nous aurions aimé trouver dans Spirou d'autres choses amusantes et nous aurions voulu le voir s'adapter à notre temps ». Fidèle à Spirou, il va tenter de bâtir quelque chose de nouveau à l'intérieur même du journal. Il fait alors appel à Delporte pour l'aider dans ce projet. L'objectif était de faire rentrer l'actualité dans le journal et d'adopter un ton plus irrévérencieux. C'est sous la forme d'un supplément pirate que le Trombone Illustré voit le jour dans le journal Spirou. Franquin y créé sa première Idées Noires. Franquin réalisera 26 des 30 bandeaux titres du Trombone Illustré qui sont autant de miniatures d'une extrême précision et splendeur graphiques. « C'est un truc fait avec patience. Nous avions fait imprimer les lettres, mais c'est tout de même un sacré travail, car lorsque je voulais dessiner un personnage devant une lettre, je devais gratter puis reconstituer ce qui manquait ». Franquin entoura les lettres du logo titre d'une foule de personnages « Les couvertures du Trombone Illustré, c'était habituer les gens à une famille de personnages. Il y a une foule de choses intéressantes à faire avec cela ». Dans cette couverture, on retrouve un couple d'amoureux, la famille Marsupilami ou encore l'évêque peu orthodoxe qui deviendra la Mitre Railleuse. Les éditions Dupuis décideront en 1980 d'en faire un recueil qui s'épuisera très rapidement. En voici la couverture. Estimation 30 000 - 40 000 € Sold for 145,259 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2012-03-31
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NAT NEUJEAN (né en 1923) SCULPTURE EN BRONZE REPRÉSENTANT TINTIN ET MILOU

NAT NEUJEAN (né en 1923) SCULPTURE EN BRONZE REPRÉSENTANT TINTIN ET MILOU Sculpture en bronze réalisée en 1976 selon la technique dite « à la cire perdue », signée Nat Neujean. Cachet de la fonderie Pinella de Andreïs et Figli à Milan sur le socle. Hauteur : 180 cm. En 1947, «Les Amitiés Belgo - Françaises» firent appel à Nat Neujean pour réaliser un buste d'André Malraux. Connaissant l'admiration de Malraux pour Tintin, l'Ambassade de France conseilla à Neujean de se rendre chez Hergé. C'est à partir de cette date que se nouera entre le sculpteur et Hergé une amitié réciproque. Vers 1951, Hergé et les «Éditions du Lombard» eurent l'idée de commercialiser des figurines en vinyle des personnages de Tintin avec la société de jouets pour enfants MIRIM. Ils proposèrent à Nat Neujean de réaliser les modèles en plâtre. Le sculpteur se montra réticent, étant donné que les personnages n'étaient pas sa propre création. Finalement, à partir de dessins qu'Hergé lui avait fournis et après de nombreuses entrevues, Nat Neujean modela la première sculpture de Tintin de 20 cm de haut. Le père de Tintin et Milou fut très surpris du résultat: il découvrait pour la première fois son héros en trois dimensions! Suivront Haddock, Tournesol et les Dupondt. Peu de temps après, Hergé commanda à Nat Neujean un buste de Tintin de 40 cm de haut, taillé en pierre de France. Celle-ci trônera fièrement sur le bureau d'Hergé à partir de 1954. En 1958 toujours à la demande d'Hergé, Nat Neujean réalisa son portrait en bronze. Malheureusement pris par le temps, Hergé ne posa que très rarement pour le sculpteur, néanmoins Nat Neujean en fit un portrait saisissant de ressemblance. En 1975, à l'occasion du 30ème anniversaire du Journal Tintin, Raymond Leblanc (Directeur des Éditions du Lombard) et Guy Dessicy (Publiart) ont l'idée de faire une surprise de taille à Hergé: une statue en pied de Tintin et Milou de plus d'un mètre quatre vingt! Et c'est tout naturellement que sa réalisation fut confiée à Nat Neujean. Il commença par entreprendre une première étude préliminaire en terre de 70 cm de haut, d'abord sans Milou (il l'intégrera par la suite quand l'œuvre sera plus aboutie). Un mois sera nécessaire à Neujean pour réaliser l'œuvre finale de 180 cm de haut. Celui-ci confronté à divers problèmes de proportions fera appel à son fils Bertrand, alors âgé de 8 ans pour prendre la pose. Quant à Milou l'entreprise fut plus complexe, le modèle (le chien d'Alain Baran, secrétaire particulier d'Hergé) ne se montra pas très docile, mais Neujean tenait à avoir un vrai chien en face de lui, afin de donner à Milou une touche plus personnelle. Le compagnon de Tintin sera placé à coté de lui, mais tournera le dos à son maître témoignant de sa propre existence et de son indépendance. Inauguré le 29 septembre 1976, en présence d'Hergé et de Nat Neujean (ainsi que de nombreux invités de marque), au parc du Wolvendael à Uccle, le monument sera faute de temps présenté en plâtre patiné et coulé par après en bronze à la Fonderie Milanaise de Nat Neujean (De Andreis & Figli) selon la technique de la «cire perdue». Après plusieurs tentatives de vol et de dégradations, le monument fut placé momentanément en lieu sûr au Centre Culturel d'Uccle, où l'œuvre peut toujours être admirée aujourd'hui. Nat NEUJEAN (de son vrai nom Nathanaël Neuman) est né à Anvers le 5 janvier 1923. À 14 ans, il quitte son milieu familial, occupe un atelier à Anvers où il s'initie à la sculpture. Il est accepté comme élève libre à l'Académie des Beaux-Arts de cette ville, durant les années 1939 à 1942. En 1942, les autorités allemandes exigent l'expulsion des étudiants Belges d'origine juive des lieux d'enseignement. Nat Neujean quitte Anvers et réside à Bruxelles où il travaille tout en vivant dans la clandestinité. Après la guerre, il s'établit à Paris pendant les années 1946 et 1947, puis retourne à Bruxelles où il s'installe définitivement. C'est de cette époque que datent ses premières commandes et ses premiers portraits, parmi lesquels ceux d'Hergé, André Malraux et Ben Gourion. Il réalise à partir de 1950 ses premières expositions de groupe et une série de commandes officielles pour les villes de Namur (La Sambre et La Meuse en 1950), de Charleroi, de Bruxelles («L'Âme Sentinelle» 1982-84). Fortement éprouvé par les horreurs de la deuxième guerre mondiale, il commence les études préliminaires à «la Mémoire de la Déportation» à laquelle il consacrera une grande partie de son œuvre. Les victimes de l'Holocauste resteront omniprésentes dans son travail, offrant une image bouleversante de ces figures fantomatiques, destinées à la destruction totale. Une première exposition à New York (1964) est suivie d'une rétrospective au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Boston (1964) et d'une invitation à enseigner comme professeur étranger à la Fine Art School de l'Université de Boston. Par la suite, les sculptures de Nat Neujean seront exposées tout au long de la deuxième moitié du XXème siècle à Washington, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Palm Beach, Detroit, (États-Unis), à Toronto, Montréal (Canada), en Australie. La Belgique, les Pays-Bas, la France, l'Italie, l'Angleterre lui ont consacré à de nombreuses reprises, des expositions personnelles, ainsi que collectives avec des artistes de renom. Neujean est reconnu également comme portraitiste de personnalités tels que Paul Delvaux, Robert Schuman, Trammell Crow, Frank Stanton (Président de la Croix Rouge) M.Mannilow (Président des hôtels Sheraton), Giacomo Manzu, Henri Moore. Il est élu membre de l'Académie Royale de Belgique en 1972, et directeur de sa classe en 1978. Il est élu membre correspondant de l'Accademia Nazionale di San Luca di Roma en 1995. Nat Neujean travaille exclusivement depuis 1955 avec la Fonderie De Andreis à Milan. Estimation 125 000 - 150 000 € Sold for 143,883 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2011-11-26
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1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Card Complete Set of (176) In Original Cracker Jack Album

1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Card Complete Set of (176) In Original Cracker Jack Album, The Gill Collection - 1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Cards As an eleven year-old in Kingston, Ontario, Canada in 1914, young Ernie Gill pulled his first few Cracker Jack cards out of boxes of his favorite caramel coated popcorn treat. As with many young boys of the period who nurtured both a sweet tooth and love of baseball, he was captivated. The next year, inspired by the offer printed on the back of each card, he scraped together the requisite 25 cents to mail away for the entire 1915 set of Cracker Jack baseball cards and the additional 10 cents for the "Handsome Album" to keep them in. A keen collector, he carefully recorded the name and card number of each player in the album beneath their card. The set stayed with Ernie through several moves through the years, including his first move from Kingston to a boarding house in Toronto in the early 1920s. After graduating from Queen's University in Kingston, a gold medalist in mathematics, Ernest moved to Toronto to work for the Canada Life Assurance Company and to write his actuarial exams. He eventually became CEO and Chairman of the Board of Canada Life. In his spare time, he maintained his boyhood interest in baseball, playing the same position of catcher for Canada Life in the insurance league in Toronto that he had for the local Kingston area league teams of his youth. In the late 1980s, Ernie's cards came to light again with his final move and were subsequently passed down first to his daughter, Mary Byers, and then to his grandson, Christopher Byers, in whose care they have remained until being offered here publicly for the first time. The Cracker Jack baseball card series of 1914 and 1915 are the most popular caramel cards ever produced. Accurate player depictions replicated from photographic images set against a brilliant red background is the hallmark of the series. Their timeless design and ideal player selection has made the issue a favorite among collectors since the earliest beginnings of the hobby of card collecting. In 1914, cards from the series could only be obtained as inserted "surprises", one per every box of Cracker Jack. As a result, most of the Cracker Jack cards retrieved from boxes were already affected by some degree of staining even prior to being subjected to handling by sticky fingered children. The same one per box distribution method was employed in 1915, however, the newly established redemption offer for a complete set, gave ambitious kids like Ernie Gill the opportunity to get a complete series of 176 pristine cards that never had to be subjected to contact with the caramel coated product. This complete set of (176) 1915 Cracker Jack Baseball cards appears in predominantly the same uncirculated condition in which it was received and placed in its paper album by Ernie Gill in 1915. The whiteness of the white borders and redness of the red backgrounds are as vibrant as if time stood still. Typical of the issue, centering varies somewhat throughout, but is better than average overall. It is important to note, that the album was designed to secure the cards on its pages through paper corner mounts (tabs) and no adhesives have been utilized. The cards were inserted in two different ways, one way in which the corners of a card were slid behind the tabs, showing the corner tips. The other way was to insert the cards over the corner tabs, hiding the corner tips. In many cases, mostly when the corners were slid behind the tabs, faint marks and even line impressions appear on the cards. A more complete technical description of this set is available online. It is our pleasure to offer this heirloom on behalf of the family of the late Ernest Clark Gill (1903-1992).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Rare lou gehrig 1934-36 h&b "small signature" game bat

Lou Gehrig was the greatest player who was rarely considered the best player on his team. For more than a decade he shared the spotlight with Babe Ruth and then Joe DiMaggio, unable to match their flare or popularity. Asked about toiling alongside Ruth, Gehrig responded with typical modesty, "It's a pretty big shadow. It gives me lots of room to spread myself." Gehrig played the game in a machine-like fashion, pounding out home runs and driving in piles of runs year after year in that shadow. However, as Gehrig's consecutive games played streak mounted, it clearly set him apart from the other superstars in the game. But the modest Gehrig even shunned the attention that the streak brought him, all the while letting his performance speak for itself, earning deeper admiration from both fans and peers alike. Lefty Grove was one such peer who seemingly admired the humble Gehrig. This assumption is based on the offered bat, which was kept amongst his collection of career mementos. Gehrig and Grove were teammates on several All-Star teams beginning in 1933, and even toured Japan together during the famous off-season. Hillerich & Bradsby factory records indicate that the bat was produced for Gehrig between 1934-36. By every measure used in evaluating game used bats it is simply extraordinary. Measuring 34 ½ inches and weighing 36 ounces, its pronounced manufacturer’s markings include Gehrig’s facsimile signature stamped on the barrel in a form identifying the bat as a rare “small signature” style. Residue of a pine tar like substance appears on the barrel and heavy game use is apparent. In a third party assessment conducted by SCD Authentic, it was designated as the first Lou Gehrig bat ever to earn their highest mark of “A10”. Its physical attributes notwithstanding, rarely do game bats of this importance include player provenance of this magnitude. A remarkable gift from Lou to Lefty. LOA’s: SCD Authentic (A10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.

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