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ENKI BILAL

ENKI BILAL BLEU SANG, CHRISTIAN DESBOIS 1994 Original sur calque n°5. Mine de plomb et crayon de couleur sur calque. Rehaut à l’acrylique blanche. Signé 38,8 X 50,5 CM (15,28 X 19,88 IN.) Splendide calque très caractéristique de l’art de Bilal. Son trait fluide, à la mine de plomb, épouse les courbes féminines avec une grande sensualité, tandis que sa virtuosité dans le rendu des matières (notamment les cordelettes), ses personnages de profil perdus dans leur rêverie, l’originalité des costumes et des décors et, enfin, ces rehauts de bleus propres à l’artiste sont autant d’éléments qui ont bâti sa réputation. Cette oeuvre correspond à une période-clé chez Bilal. Au même moment, il décline son univers au cinéma et opère une véritable réflexion sur l’image et l’expression artistique sur différents supports. Cette remise en question modifiera complètement son modus operandi, jusqu’ici enfermé dans le “carcan” de la bande dessinée : chaque case devient un enjeu artistique spécifique, un geste pictural en soi, tout en portant une narration qui la relie à l’ensemble de l’oeuvre. Bilal efface ensuite la frontière entre le neuvième art et les autres, reprenant des détails de ses planches pour les reproduire et les prolonger sur toutes sortes de support. Un cas unique dans l’univers de la bande dessinée, qui fait de Bilal l’un des artistes français vivants les plus cotés.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-05-21
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Henry Zimmerman’s 1907 Chicago Cubs Championship Medallion

Henry Zimmerman's 1907 Chicago Cubs Championship Medallion, On the 100th anniversary of the 1907 baseball season, we recall that the National League pennant race was dominated by the defending champion Chicago Cubs. The baseball juggernaut won 107 games during the season with only 45 losses as they ran away from Honus Wagner's Pittsburgh Pirates team by 17 games. The World Series was no different as the Cubs swept Ty Cobb and his Detroit Tigers to win their second straight World Championship. The team would win for a third consecutive time the following year. This 1907 Chicago Cubs Championship Gold Medal was presented to Henry Zimmerman the team's rookie second baseman. This heirloom has resided within the Zimmerman family for decades. Zimmerman, a fine batsman for many years, would hit .295 in his 13 year major league career. In 1912, Zimmerman was a one man wrecking crew who led the majors in six separate hitting categories, while racking up a .372 batting average and narrowly missing the Triple Crown by 3 RBI's. In 1907, the rookie had the distinction of playing behind the legendary Hall of Fame second baseman and team captain Johnny Evers, the hub in the Cubs' famed double play combination of Tinker to Evers to Chance. Zimmerman's own championship Gold Medal is exquisite in its design and phenomenal in its pristine state of preservation, representing the Cubs team during the height of their greatness. On its face, the Gold Medal features a Cubs head with a brilliant ruby eye, clasping a fine diamond in its mouth laid on a globe of the world encircled by a pair of bats crossing over two baseballs. On the back it is scripted: "Presented to Henry Zimmerman, Member of the Chicago National League Ball Club by the National Commission, for winning the 1907 Worlds Baseball Championship." The gold medal measures 1 1/2" in diameter. Baseball awards of this quality, vintage and importance are seldom seen in today's marketplace. LOA from near family of Henry Zimmerman.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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1927 Lou Gehrig Signed Original Wire Photograph with Babe Ruth

1927 Lou Gehrig Signed Original Wire Photograph with Babe Ruth, Nineteen twenty-seven was the breakout year for Lou Gehrig. He led the American League with 175 RBI and 52 doubles while batting .375 with 47 home runs. But even that superhuman effort could not wrest the spotlight from his legendary teammate who would shatter his own home run record by belting 60 and batting .356 with 164 RBI. Gehrig, it seems, wouldn’t have had it any other way. Years later, when asked about toiling alongside Ruth, Gehrig responded with typical modesty, "It's a pretty big shadow. It gives me lots of room to spread myself." Gehrig played the game in a machine-like fashion, pounding out home runs and driving in piles of runs year after year in that shadow. However, as Gehrig's numbers swelled and his consecutive games played streak mounted, it clearly set him apart from the other superstars in the game. The modest Gehrig even shunned the attention that the streak brought him, all the while letting his performance speak for itself, earning deeper admiration from both fans and peers alike. This is the quintessential photograph of Gehrig and Ruth dating from their most prolific season together in 1927. Together that season they led the Yankees to 110 wins and a sweep of the Pirates in the World Series. An original wire photo, it bears the International News stamp on the reverse. Measuring a full 8" by 10", the crystal clear image captures the two giants of the game in their Yankee home pinstripes on the field at Yankee Stadium. Gehrig has neatly signed the image in a style that is unmistakably of the 1927 period. The large black ink signature rates 8-9/10 and is ideally placed across his lower body. Gehrig would remain in the suffocating shadow of Ruth until 1935, when Lou had his only chance to star solo. The following season would bring the fisherman's kid from San Francisco to once again deny Gehrig sole possession of the limelight. The photo has been inspected prior to framing, revealing minimal condition flaws including a small tear at the top border and a few minor surface wrinkles. This is one of the finest autographed Gehrig photos in existence. Excellent plus condition. Framed. LOAs from PSA/DNA and JSA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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JOHN LENNON NEVER BEFORE HEARD INTERVIEW TAPES

JOHN LENNON NEVER BEFORE HEARD INTERVIEW TAPES A recording on two high quality cassette tapes between Bill Jobes and John Lennon on February 6, 1975. At the time Mr. Jobes was a staff correspondent for The Washington Star Newspaper. Mr. Jobes interviewed Lennon for an investigation he was doing into the US government efforts to deport him. They spoke for an hour about a wide range of topics including Lennon's music, working with other artists, The Beatles, his experiences as a target of intelligence agents and the role of artists in society. The article resulted in a question and answer feature article. Few people have heard this recording and it is a remarkable insight into Lennon's true love of America and his feelings toward his life and future. The tapes start off as an interview and then become a discussion between Mr. Jobes and Lennon. JOBES: Tell me about working with Elton John LENNON: I did not work with him a lot but I did work on Lucy...I did all the reggae, that was my contribution...There was not time for the legal department to okay my name for credits so I used Dr. Winston O'Reggae... In those days we all did. JOBES: Is there a lot of that going around? LENNON: It's true, yes we all did...Those days things were secretive, nowadays companies give other musicians credit...Just last night I played with David Bowie, and I am going to call EMI tomorrow to make sure I get the credit... But in the old days, we just did it.. You can hear Mick and Paul in Carly Simon's You're So Vain track.. Once you know it, you can always hear Mick...You can not miss it. JOBES: Do you get bothered walking down the street? LENNON: No, it's not 1965. Sure I get stopped for autographs...If you are having an opening or you have had a lot of publicity lately then its different... Like Led Zepplin is right now...But staged publicity generates the most...Take Sgt. Pepper's Opening...I will never forget it. It was an amazing experience...I could hardly get into the theatre. It was such a peculiar feeling.. For a while before that album, I forgot what it was like.. This is how it is? JOBES: Tell me about your average day? LENNON: I do not have an average day....I do all my composing and song writing at home....mostly on the piano. JOBES What is happening to music now? LENNON: I have no idea JOBES: What was going through your head when you came here? LENNON: Literally, I got off the plane in 1971 and Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin were the first people that contacted me. Before I even knew it, I started performing at these rallies...Being an artist, I sort of go with the wind and the next thing I knew my phone was being bugged....I took them for face value..., I took them for what they said, we used to argue about peace and violence as Yoko and I were against the violence no matter what the revolution was about...And then an article in Rolling Stone came out that said Yoko and John heading a rally in San Diego during the Republican Convention..nothing had been confirmed, then the roof came down...A lot of discussion about it... The next minute there is noise on the phone and people outside my door, I realize my phone is being tapped... I was being followed... My feeling was I supposed to know as they did not try to hide...the thing that stopped it was I went on the Dick Cavett Show and told everyone... nervously and quickly .... think back, then there was no Watergate, and I was begining to doubt my own sanity.... My friends told me I was a rock and roller and to stop being paranoid. Jobes and Lennon then get into a discussion about John and Yoko's problems with immigration and the rest of the tape is basically a discussion between the two. Below are some of John's comments: Immigration case said that they were just treating us the same.... They said they treated Yoko exactly the same but after she had been to court, spent money, they realized that she had no court case of marijuana in England, she did have a green card from her first husband and that we were just two peaceniks... They had nothing on her, rather then that she was my wife....we knew that instructions were coming from Washington even though they kept saying that it was a local case...but we found out that a letter was sent Strom Thruman.... Leon, our immigration lawyer was great, he knew from the start that they were not treating us like normal aliens.... lots of well to do Liberals helped us....some would tell us that if we got the right high powered lawyer in Washington then it would be over right away but if the case has to be solved by knowing someone, I do not want it to end that way... I have been wronged, I am not causing a riot, and I am basically a musician... I thought it over a lot...This has caused me a lot of bread, pain and harassment...I am scared to leave America. I have paid since I have been here, a round figure about a half a million in tax just to live here and I saw in a few papers that Mr. Lennon is here because this is the land of milk and honey.. But I am paying my way...I employ people, I generate money and I pay my taxes... That's a lot of taxes considering I have not done much lately....I wanted to go on the road but Immigration held me back.. I have a good time in this country...I want to be here...I am not leaving....I am a good citizen..I bring people more pleasure then pain... Why are they doing this to me?..It's stupid. I think Watergate is the best thing that has happened in the world. It could only happen here...That's why I love this country.. I love the energy and the people. ..I do not resent people...who can I resent? I am going to sit this out.. I love New York City...There is nothing in the world you can not find in New York City and most you can get on the phone.. I want to be liquid, not penniless, no big offices.... Lennon Music is a small office...there is one girl... I just want to make the music, write the songs... I no longer have the dream of wanting to be the record company... The Beatles were a huge business... A giant industry and suddenly we found ourselves involved in all these companies...We just wanted to be rock musicians and the next minute we turn around and people are asking us to make all these decisions...Can we use your image on a lunch box?... I am an artist and that's what I want to be... let me make the music...the record business is filled with lawsuits and the immigration is just one lawsuit. I would like to live life without litigation. The Long and Winding road...It has its prophecy...I panicked after I wrote it that maybe I will end up broke...And not just about money... I did not want to be possessed by material goods. I did not want it to take over my life.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-17
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JOHN LENNON NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN 16 MILLIMETER FILM FOOTAGE

JOHN LENNON NEVER-BEFORE-SEEN 16 MILLIMETER FILM FOOTAGE 1974 Two reels of never-before-seen 16-millimeter film footage depicting John Lennon walking around New York City in November 1974. Lasting approximately 40 minutes and shot without sound, these are the original camera film reels and the only known prints to exist. This project was initiated by a young filmmaker who approached Lennon and asked to film him with a new camera; Lennon responded in the positive and the result is this footage which truly captures "a day in the life" of a post-Beatle John. One stipulation Lennon had was that he would "direct" the film and be able to edit and keep portions of it for his own use, which he later did. (The few scenes John selected have been seen before, but the remaining footage on these two film reels has never before been publicly seen in any form.) Because he knew this footage was being shot without sound, Lennon got creative; the result being this remarkably spontaneous, candid and intimate portrait of him intertwined with the city that he loved. The footage still intact on the two reels is briefly described in the following ten "scenes:" 1. Lennon attending the premiere of the Robert Stigwood play, "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band on the Road" at the Beacon Theater; also evident are Lennon's close friends Peter Brown, Jack Douglas and girlfriend May Pang as well as Robert Stigwood himself 2. Lennon walking around midtown NYC and making a special stop at famed jewelry store, Tiffany's, on 5th Avenue 3. Lennon walking around Central Park and dancing on a bandstand for a number of minutes, then playing on an empty bench; John, May and friends take a short car ride 4. Lennon feeding animals at the zoo with several children and then imitating a baboon for them 5. Lennon in Central Park signing autographs for children and playing on park statues with them 6. Lennon walking alone in Central Park with some excellent close-ups of his face 7. Lennon playing an organ and dancing on a small stage in Central Park 8. Lennon taking over a vending cart in Central Park performing some magic tricks as a small crowd gathers; John shares some food with fans 9. Lennon riding in a hansom cab around the streets of NYC, making several stops along the way to admire the buildings and to talk with fans, police, cab drivers and others; many great close-up shots of John (and the white hansom cab horse) 10. Lennon in his office bending some paperclips and taking phone calls; many close-up shots of John here with his "I Love Elvis" and "Save Lennon" buttons evident Technical Aspects of Film This footage was shot directly onto Kodak color reversal stock, a process that produced a positive print only. No other print is known to have been struck from these reels. In 2001, the two reels were taken to a professional film laboratory to undergo a full restoration. Before any transfer was attempted, the film was fully prepared; the sprockets/splices were carefully inspected and corrected when necessary, a complete hand-cleaning removed all dirt and scratches and a chemical treatment reduced the chance of film breakage or rot. After the preparations were completed, a comprehensive telecine film-to-tape transfer was made. The color and contrast levels were carefully corrected to meet modern standards by using the latest equipment. This was done on a scene-by-scene basis, resulting in a fully restored and superior copy, which was then transferred into the digital domain. This re-mastering process created three restored copies which are included with the two reels of films; one Digital Betacam (Pal) cassette producing 625 lines of resolution, one Super VHS videocassette and one standard VHS videocassette.

  • USAUSA
  • 2003-07-25
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Dr. No, 1962

Dr. No, 1962 A bikini of ivory 'cotton' worn by Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder in the 1962 United Artists/Eon film Dr. No, the two-piece costume comprising a top, constructed from Andress' own under-wired brassière, covered in ivory cotton, the cups decorated with a dart detail, gathered at the centre and decorated with a bow detail, the bikini briefs, cut across the grain, gathered at the hips and embellished with decorative straps, fastening at the left-hand side and lined in cotton -- the bikini designed by Andress in conjunction with the film's director, Terence Young and made in Jamaica by a West-Indian dressmaker known to Andress and Young; it was the only one made for and worn by Andress as Honey Ryder and had been designed to be a practical working 'action' garment suitable to withstand the rigours Andress' role imposed on it; accompanied by corresponding stills, two colour and one black and white, (all printed later), each -- 10x8in. (25.4x20.3cm.) Ursula Andress has particularly fond memories of working on the first Bond film and said: "This bikini made me into a success. As a result of starring in 'Dr.No' as the first Bond girl, I was given the freedom to take my pick of future roles, and to become financially independent...My entrance in the film wearing the bikini on that beautiful beach seems to now be regarded as a classical moment in cinema, and made me world famous as 'The Bond Girl'

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2001-02-14
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Nba’s 50 greatest player signed lithograph

In conjunction with the NBA’s 50th Anniversary in 1996, the NBA named it’s 50 greatest players. Remarkably, 49 of the 50 players selected were alive and present when they were honored as part of the 1996-97 All-Star festivities. The celebration included the signing and subsequent unveiling of a series of these 25” x 39” lithographs. Printed on the highest quality acid-free paper, each piece bears the image of all of the 50 greatest players as selected by the NBA itself. The edition was limited to 250 individually numbered pieces worldwide with 50 going directly to the players. A scant 200 were offered to the public. However, after many were secured by league officials, an eager collecting community was left with an incredibly short supply. The 50 Greatest Players lithograph is the ultimate symbol of the NBA’s remarkable evolution. It features basketball’s early pioneers such as Mikan, Cousy, Arizin, and Schayes, who transformed the fledging league from what was once considered little more than a traveling tent show, laying a foundation for the worldwide stage that is today’s NBA. All of the greatest players that followed on their path are also represented such as Michael Jordan, Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Jerry West, Oscar Robertson, Shaquille O’Neal, etc. The offered example is numbered 87 of 100 from the “NBA edition” and is framed to museum standards. The NBA’s 50 Greatest litho is easily the most comprehensive and important lithograph series ever created in any sport. An enduring symbol of basketball history that will never be equaled. Includes its original hardbound LOA signed by NBA Commissioner David Stern. Additional LOA: PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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1958-59 boston celtics nba world championship trophy

Simply put, the Boston Celtics are the most storied franchise in NBA history. The Bill Russell-led Celtics won 11 championships in 13 seasons, making it arguably the greatest dynasty in the history of American sports. When the Celtics first joined the newly created National Basketball Association (a combination of the BAA and the National Basketball League) in 1949-50, they finished last in the NBA's Eastern Division with a 22-46 record. A year later, with the addition of Bob Cousy, the All-American point guard out of Holy Cross, the first piece of the puzzle was secured. The Celtics added sharp-shooting guard Bill Sharman in 1951, and Cousy and the rest of the team showed rapid improvement. By the end of the 1952-53 season, the fast-breaking Celtics won a then franchise-record 46 games and swept the Syracuse Nationals in two games in the division semifinals. Over the next five years Boston would add Bill Russell, Tommy Heinsohn, K. C. Jones, Frank Ramsey, and Jim Loscutoff to its already high-scoring team. By 1956-57, Russell's rookie season, the Celtics were nearly unstoppable. Their 44-28 record was the best in the league that year. In the playoffs "the Green and White" swept Syracuse in three games to reach the NBA Finals. Boston prevailed in a tight series against the St. Louis Hawks, winning Game 7 when a Bob Pettit shot bounced off the rim as time expired in the second overtime. Cousy and Boston had won their first NBA Championship. The Hawks got their revenge the next year, besting the Celtics in six games in the 1958 NBA Finals. What followed was a period of dominance by Boston that has not since been duplicated by any other team-and probably never will. From 1959 through 1966 Boston won eight consecutive NBA titles. During the streak the Celtics brought in Tom "Satch" Sanders (1960) and John Havlicek (1962) completing a deadly combination of talent that made the Celtics the most feared team ever. Awarded to the Celtics upon winning their second title, this is the actual 1959-60 NBA Championship trophy received by team owner Walter Brown. Boston's four-game sweep of Minneapolis in the NBA Finals that year was the first in league history and marked the first in the Celtics astonishing run of 8 consecutive league titles. Standing nearly 3 feet tall, its quality and design are commensurate with the feat it represents. A plaque on the upper portion of the wood base is engraved with the words, “National Basketball Association and World Champions – Season 1958-59”. A plaque on the bottom of the base reads, “Boston Celtics”. Its overall state of preservation is exceptional. Few sports trophies of greater importance have ever resided in public hands. Provenance: This trophy was given directly by Walter Brown to Phil Edigan, longtime sports editor for the Christian Science Monitor and Sporting News columnist. Eldigan covered the Celtics throughout their reign, developing a deep friendship with Brown through their work together on numerous feature articles on the team. His detailed letter of provenance accompanies.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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Withdrawal

Ty Cobb 1925-28 H&B Professional Model Bat

Ty Cobb 1925-28 H&B Professional Model Bat, It's difficult to tell which is longer -- the list of records Ty Cobb left shattered when he retired from baseball, or the stories of his nastiness. "In legend I am a sadistic, slashing, swashbuckling despot who waged war in the guise of sport." Wrote Cobb, just before his death in 1961. He was possibly the only one not to believe the legend. Regardless of one's perception of his personality traits, his baseball accomplishments are fact, so told by the baseball record books that echo his name throughout. When he retired in 1928, he had set some 90 records. Seven decades later, he still holds many. Nobody has yet bettered his .367 lifetime average, his 12 batting titles, his hitting at least .320 for 23 consecutive seasons, or his 2,245 runs scored. He led the American League in slugging percentage and hits eight times, in steals six, in runs five, in triples and RBI four, in doubles three, and in homers once. Three times he batted above .400 and in one four-year span he averaged .401. Gone, though, is the treasured record of 4,191 hits, broken by Pete Rose 57 years later. From the final years of his storied career, as he was padding his cumulative offensive records, this bat was used by Cobb and still bears the telltale marks of his aggression. The H&B Ty Cobb signature model bat is uncracked with outstanding usage characteristics, including slight checking (grain separation) from repeated ball contact on the front and right barrel. Many ball marks are visible throughout and the right barrel has been scored. A moderate coat of vintage gripping substance remains on the handle. The quality of the wood is outstanding, though it appears as though some grain separation on the front and right barrel has been repaired. The labeling period can be pinpointed to 1925-28 when Cobb served the Tigers as both player and manager before transitioning to Philadelphia for his final two seasons. A bat used by the great Ty Cobb is a treasure in any form. The offered example is a superb specimen, evoking images of baseball's dark knight, staring down the pitcher with a menacing glare. LOA from John Taube of PSA/DNA (Graded GU7).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Ted Williams' Cleats Worn When He Hit His Last Home Run in The Final At-Bat of His Career

Ted Williams' Cleats Worn When He Hit His Last Home Run in The Final At-Bat of His Career, There has never been a more poignant last at bat for a major star in the history of major league baseball than that of Ted Williams, the Splendid Splinter, the last .400 hitter, the man who was quite simply the greatest hitter who ever lived. Many classic accounts have been written by witnesses of that final game on September 28, 1960 at Fenway, the ballpark where Williams had such a string of spectacular successes, and baseball historians have over and over again dissected and rhapsodized with great reverence that grey day over 35 years ago. Williams himself recalled the day as "one of the lousiest days you ever saw. The wind was blowing in---a dark, dreary, drizzly day, cold and threatening." His Sox were wrapping up a 65-89 season in which they would finish seventh in the AL, 32 games behind the Yankees, but for 10,454 full-throated patrons, his eighth inning plate appearance was the only moment that mattered. Acknowledging that this was it, the crowd gave Williams a two-minute ovation as he stepped into the lefthanded batter's box. Expressionless, Williams took the first pitch for a ball. Then came a high fastball at which Williams took a ferocious swing. He missed, but there was no doubt about his intentions. On the 1-1 pitch, Williams launched a 440-foot bomb that caromed off the canopy atop the bench in the Red Sox bullpen. The fans stood and delivered a ringing tribute to Williams, who, true to his custom, was oblivious to it, taking a businesslike home run trot with his head down. As he crossed the plate, head down, he briskly shook on deck hitter Jim Pagliaroni's hand, then made a beeline to the dugout, where he remained as the crowd implored him to make a curtain call for a full four minutes. An impervious Williams never reappeared. In the Red Sox clubhouse, Jim Carroll, a close friend of Ted's, visited with him immediately after the game as had been planned. It was then and there that Carroll, our consignor, retrieved these, the very cleats that Williams wore during his last at bat, for his final hit, the 521st home run of his extraordinary career. Carroll and Williams had been friends and fishing buddies for more than a decade. Accompanying the cleats is a package of information and news clippings corroborating our consignor's close friendship with the Splendid Splinter. Among these articles of provenance are excerpts from the 2004 book on Williams entitled, "Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero" by Leigh Montville in which Carroll is frequently mentioned. These excerpts include specific mention of Carroll's acquisition of these cleats with Williams' permission, as well as the fact that it was Carroll himself who drove Williams home after his grand exit that day.    Made by Spot Bilt, the well-worn cleats each have Ted's number "9" written in black marker on both tongues. A custom reinforced toe protector was added to the right cleat. Appearing just as they were, when removed by William after perhaps the most defining moment of his career, each still holds Fenway Park dirt caked in the spikes. LOA from Jim Carroll.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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Jean-pierre gibrat

JEAN-PIERRE GIBRAT MATTÉO TOME 3, TROISIÈME ÉPOQUE (AOÛT 1936), FUTUROPOLIS 2013 Couverture originale, 2013. Encre de Chine, encres acryliques de couleur, aquarelle, rehauts de gouache sur papier aquarelle. 35,2 × 44,2 cm (13,86 × 17,4 in.) Étonnants, les vacanciers de 1936 tels que les imagine Gibrat : endimanchés, les chaussures cirées, assis pour le piquenique sur une digue aménagée par la municipalité, fort peu rustique en réalité… Mais qu’importe ! Quand il capte la belle lumière de Collioure en cette journée d’été, la volupté de ses héros échappés l’espace d’un instant à leurs tracas quotidiens, quand il décrit avec une telle empathie cette jeunesse qui profite de la vie, Gibrat ne se trompe jamais : l’amour est éternel. MERCI, LÉON « La couverture d’un album, c’est comme la bande-annonce d’un film, il s’agit d’évoquer, de donner l’envie d’entrer dans la danse. Alors, on s’applique sur la partition, sans faire le malin. Mattéo est un personnage au pessimisme sifflotant, et dans ce récit il sifflote un peu plus fort qu’à son habitude, c’est le volet le plus joyeux de son parcours, j’ai donc essayé de traduire cette embellie. Les voici donc à Collioure, Augustin, Mattéo, Paulin et Amélie, dans la fraîcheur de leurs premières vacances. Les cartes postales ne sont pas encore des corvées de politesse, et ils ont bien envie d’en envoyer une au président du Conseil, avec juste deux mots : “Merci, Léon”. On retenait son chapeau en 36, mais pas son enthousiasme. » J-P G.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-11-19
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.

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