All auctions in one place

  • Toys & Collectibles

    6 220 For sale

    808 685 Sold

  • 0—452 000 000 USD
  • 22 Mar 1989—13 Mar 2018

Filters

Clear all
- USD

Want your valuables appraised by experts?

Send in an object valuation push image

Winsor McCAY 1869 – 1934

Winsor McCAY 1869 – 1934 LITTLE NEMO IN SLUMBERLAND Encre de Chine et crayon bleu pour une pleine page de cette série représentant Little Nemo et un lion. Planche publiée en 1909. Historique ! Encadré. Traces d'adhésif et petites déchirures marginales. Petit manque coin 2ème case à droite. Petites salissures. Petits trous le long des marges et ne touchant pas le dessin. 72 x 57,5 cm. C'est en octobre 1905 que les lecteurs du New York Herald découvrent les aventures d'un jeune garçon aux prises avec ses songes extravagants et ses cauchemars, Little Nemo in Slumberland. Cette bande dessinée, qui succède à Dream of the Rarebit Fiend et Little Sammy Sneeze, met en avant toute l'étendue du talent de dessinateur et de conteur de Winsor McCay et assure sa renommée. Les planches, saisissantes dans leur esthétisme Art nouveau teinté de surréalisme, doublé d'un rythme cinématographique étonnamment moderne, associent une désarmante simplicité graphique, qui s'appuie souvent sur des arabesques donnant l'impression d'effleurer la feuille de papier, et une poésie inédite où se mêlent visions fantastiques, cadre et arrière?plan spectaculaires, personnages étranges. Ce qui frappe immédiatement les esprits est cet univers baroque sublimé par un décor architectural presque sans limites, merveilleusement complexe et métaphorique, aux perspectives originales exploitées dans toutes leurs possibilités afin d'exacerber le délire du héros et entretenir la narration, avec des lignes fantastiques et parfois organiques qui rappellent les influences ornementales d'Otto Wagner ou de Joseph Hoffmann. Winsor McCay part à la découverte du rêve, de sa logique, de sa cosmologie et de ses paysages illusionnistes. Il explore toutes les possibilités de la mise en page avec des effets de cadrage innovants et des bouleversements d'échelle. Son dessin s'amuse avec les apparences, brouille les références pour que la fable s'impose d'elle-même et participe à la création de la planche. Le trait, est le catalyseur des images mentales. Les personnages bougent à peine et se laissent porter par les ondulations de la surface : c'est l'environnement immédiat qui engendre une réaction en chaîne et anime le récit. Ainsi naissent et ressucitent les images, puzzles émotionnels qui se reconstituent avec une inlassable constance. Le rêve de Little Nemo, pris dans une dynamique cyclique, s'amplifie à chaque case et, invariablement, il se termine. Ultime métamorphose. Le réveil est brutal. Encre de Chine et nuit blanche ne font désormais plus qu'un. Estimation 35 000 - 45 000 € Sold for 56,880 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-11-22
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Macbeth: A Tragedy. Acted at the Dukes-Theatre. London: printed for

SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM. 1564-1616. Macbeth: A Tragedy. Acted at the Dukes-Theatre. London: printed for William Cademan, 1673. 4to (204 x 143 mm). [A]2 B-I4 K2. [4], 67 pp. 20th century roan, spine gilt. Some old staining to title and list of players, long vertical crease to title with a few tears to bound edge and chip to right margin with no loss of text, two tears to B1 touching text but with no loss, small hole to B1 with loss of one word and near complete loss of one other, headlines and page numerals of several leaves shaved, final leaf tattered and with 3 long tears, one of which touches the word FINIS, small hole to E2, a few pencil scribbles and annotations. FIRST SEPARATE AND FIRST QUARTO EDITION. RARE: we trace no complete copies, and only two incomplete copies, in the auction records of ABPC and RareBookHub. Macbeth was first printed in the first folio of 1623, and did not appear separately until the present edition. The list of players on A2 corresponds to William Davenant's production at the Duke of York's Theatre, but the text follows that of the first folio. (Davenant's edited text appeared the following year.) This copy was unrecorded by Bartlett and Pollard in their 1939 census of Shakespeare's plays in quarto. The census located just three copies in private hands, one of which lacked the final two leaves. Another private copy, also lacking the last two leaves, last sold at Sotheby's in 1961. Bartlett 111; Wing S-2929. Cf. Bartlett & Pollard p 131. Charlton Heston played Macbeth on stage and on live television several times in his career, including a production at the Ahmanson Theater in 1975, starring opposite Vanessa Redgrave.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-03-23
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

Marianna an important George II English wooden doll in original court mantua , 1747

Early Dolls. The painted gesso face with finely carved features, defined cheeks, chin and nose, with finely painted red mouth and two red dots for nostrils, inserted black enamel eyes, with two red dots to corners, painted eyelashes, the eyebrows in one line with short dashes painted above and below, having nailed on shoulder lengh fair hair, the well formed torso tapering to the waist, with rounded hips, the arms attached with padded cloth, and having finely carved painted wooden lower arms with delicately carved fingers, the legs painted in white and peg-jointed at hips and knees, wearing original crimson, blue and cream striped silk sack-back dress, the open fronted bodice with decorative stomacher, elbow-length sleeves and lace-trimmed engageantes with separate ruffles and metal buttons, cream silk and lace bonnet with flowers, co-ordinating cream silk underskirt, another layer in white cotton and an extreme pink linen pannier with ties, having a hanging silk covered pomander and a pair of free-hanging secret pockets, with scarlet silk overlay, each false quilted and ornately embroidered, the first with a foliate and figural design, the other with a green shield and surrounding foliage, accessed through pocket slits to the dress and petticoats, another fringed and flounced narrow white underskirt, long white cotton socks with two pink garters, pink silk pointed shoes with silk ribbon ties and leather soles, in her wooden box with hand written paper label to lid 'a doll given to Grandmama Marianna Davis in Paris, when she was 3 years old, after she had recovered from a dangerous illness', box containing red and cream woolen blanket, straw work rattle, bone teething ring, extra cuff and silver paper shoe, and two pairs of carved wooden lower arms, (slight crack to paintwork to nose, two fingers to right hand and one to left with damage/loss, three fingers with slight paint loss to tips),

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2011-11-15
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

1923 world series ball signed by yankees/giants incl. ruth & stengel

Upon the completion of the palatial Yankee Stadium in 1923 the Giants, who in 1913 had no qualms about asking the struggling Highlanders/Yankees franchise to come in out of the cold and join them as Polo Grounds tenants, had more than a few qualms now. Once considered the "only game in town," despite the presence of two other New York clubs, the Giants had become the second game in town. While the Yankees had yet to win baseball's biggest prize, the World Series, the Yankees clearly were winning the battle for fans. After all, they had the game's top drawing card -- Babe Ruth. And now they had the game's finest park. Soon, the Yankees demonstrated they had major-league baseball's best team, too. A 16-game victory margin in the AL pennant race was an indication of this club's capabilities. Ironically, the player who proved the biggest obstacle in the Yankees' path to World Series supremacy was Casey Stengel, who more than a quarter-century later won lasting fame as manager of the Bronx Bombers. A 34-year-old Giants outfielder, Stengel was the hero of the first Series game at Yankee Stadium and delivered the big blow in the second game there. The Yankees had now gone winless in their last nine Series games against the Giants, losing eight and tying the other. Babe Ruth would put an end to this streak.  In helping his club reach the pinnacle of the baseball world, Ruth had a marvelous Series. He slugged three homers, a triple, a double and two singles, drew eight walks and batted .368. The Giants did thwart the Yankees on one front. When Yanks first baseman Wally Pipp was injured late in the season, the AL club sought permission to use a late-season call-up from Hartford in his place. Giants manager John McGraw blocked the request, and Pipp started all six games. Who was the youngster? A 20-year-old named Lou Gehrig. The 1923 World Series -- which featured two Yankee Stadium crowds in excess of 62,000 and another surpassing 55,000 -- was the first to hit the $1 million figure in gate receipts. More significant, though, was the fact this fall classic was the first won by the New York Yankees. This official AL ball features a combination of 27 signatures from the 1923 World Series combatants. Included are Yankees; Ruth (7/10), Meusel, Bengough, Dugan, Ward, Schang, Shawkey, Bush, and others.  Giants include; Stengel, Meusel, Groh, Youngs, Cunningham, Gowdy, and more.  Signatures of Nick Altrock and Harry Heilmann also appear on the ball. The period notation “1923 World Series” appears above Ruth’s signature. The ball is heavily shellacked and darkly toned while the signatures remain in the 6/10 range on average. Very good to excellent condition overall.  LOA: PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
Hammer price
Show price

A NEVER BEFORE SEEN CACHE OF LOVE LETTERS FROM JOHN FORD TO MAUREEN O'HARA, WRITTEN DURING THE PERIOD FORD WAS DEVELOPING THE SCRIPT TO THE QUIET MAN

A NEVER BEFORE SEEN CACHE OF LOVE LETTERS FROM JOHN FORD TO MAUREEN O'HARA, WRITTEN DURING THE PERIOD FORD WAS DEVELOPING THE SCRIPT TO THE QUIET MAN 12 Autograph Letters Signed ("Sean," "Sean Aloysius," "Sean Aloysius O Feeney / John Ford" and "Pappy"), 33 pp recto and verso, various sizes (legal folio to 8vo), various places including Ireland, Korea, Maryland and Miami, November 19, 1950 to February 12, 1951, to Maureen O'Hara, on various stationeries, many with original autograph transmittal envelopes; 3 letters possibly incomplete. In her autobiography, O'Hara describes how her professional relationship with John Ford, who had directed her in How Green Was My Valley and Rio Grande, took a strange turn once his long-time dream project, The Quiet Man, went into production. As O'Hara headed to Australia to film Kangaroo, Ford flew to Ireland with Ward Bond in tow to scout locations, seek inspiration, and flesh out the story. From on board the plane to Ireland, he began to compose the first of a series of what can only be called love letters that surprised and puzzled her. O'Hara's explanation is that, as Ford immersed himself in the story of Sean Thornton and Mary Kate Danaher, and as she was the only actress ever considered to play the part of Mary Kate, the director fell in love with his film's love interest, and by extension with his leading lady. From the December 19th missive: "[Darling Maisin, I have a great need of you—a great physical urge—not the body but the heart—if I could only see you, just to hear you laugh] / I'm sorry about the mail business, the distance makes things tough, but I'm not expecting too much. You've a job to do—that comes first. You know my dear, that whatever you feel like doing or do is OK with me. I'm so grateful for the few weeks of happiness you've given me (few weeks! It was a lifetime!) You're still my darling loyal girl—come hell or high water & I'll always love & revere you. Please think kindly of me, not much—a little bit. BUSINESS: I think honestly we're getting a great story. The girl's part is simply terrific! It's the best part I've ever read for a gal, dramatic, comedic, wistful, pathetic—yet full of hell & fire, passionate & sweet. For goodness sake & your family's sake, bend every effort to get it. This is my farewell to movies & I want it good. It will be only great if you play it for I [sic] written it—guided it—slanted it for you. As my last picture—if the shootin' war holds off. I can only force myself to enthusiasm if you & Duke are present—" There may be more to the story than O'Hara lets on in her memoir, however, as the letters grow increasingly more urgent and affectionate, counting the days until the two are in the same town again. Ford's biographers have noted that the director maneuvered to have O'Hara's room next to his at Ashford Castle during the filming of The Quiet Man, and that everyone on set saw how besotted he was with her, though few believed that she returned his attentions. Because of the personal nature of these letters, the FitzSimons family has asked Bonhams to publish in the catalogue only the text that has already appeared in O'Hara's autobiography, and to require all previewers of this lot to sign a non-disclosure agreement to not reveal the contents before or after the sale unless the signer is the winning bidder. The letters will be on site at both the Los Angeles and New York previews, but they will be viewed by appointment only. For more information, please contact the department directly.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-11-29
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

Bert Lahr's working script from The Wizard of Oz

Bert Lahr's working script from The Wizard of Oz Metro-Goldwyn Mayer, 1939. Mimeographed manuscript by Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson and Edgar Allen Woolf, 113 pp, Culver City, CA, October 10, 1938, housed in goldenrod MGM wrappers with printed label to upper cover, with "Bert Lahr" block printed in pencil to upper cover and signed on p. 3 with additional pencil date of October 11, 1938, most pages of screenplay with vertical crease (indicating scene completion). WITH: an 8 x 10 black and white photograph of Lahr, signed ("Dad") and inscribed to his son, Herbie. Provenance: descended through the family of Bert Lahr. THE COWARDLY LION'S SCRIPT. A veteran of the Broadway stage and two-reel comedies, Lahr was cast in The Wizard of Oz in July of 1938. This draft, stamped "complete" to upper cover, is dated just two days before the beginning of principal photography (Lahr himself dates it again one day before shooting starts), and the content is very close to the final screen version, with the obvious differences (the "Jitterbug" song is present, as it would be cut later in the process). Lahr plays the lion and his Kansas counterpart, Zeke. According to the family, this script is the one that accompanied Lahr on set, a fact corroborated by the wear to the covers and leaves, and the horizontal folds to the pages throughout. It is not surprising that there is minimal line marking or annotations throughout, as for most of the production, Lahr was inside the lion suit, his hands covered by the paws. The script and the accompanying photo of Lahr inscribed to his son have remained in the possession of Lahr's descendents to the present day.

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-11-25
Hammer price
Show price

Bill Russell 1967-68 Boston Celtics Home Jersey

Bill Russell 1967-68 Boston Celtics Home Jersey, An Olympic gold medalist in 1956, and a twelve-time NBA All-Star, the aloof, introspective Russell was always more concerned with winning than personal stats or individual recognition. If any player in the history of the game could be defined by the single word "winner" it was Russell. The 6' 10" center out of the University of San Francisco was the cornerstone of the Boston Celtics' dynasty of the 1960's. An uncanny shot blocker, Russell revolutionized NBA defensive concepts. A five-time NBA Most Valuable Player and a 12-time All-Star, the angular center amassed 21,620 career rebounds, an average of 22.5 per game and led the league in rebounding four times. He had 51 boards in one game, 49 in two others and a dozen consecutive seasons of 1,000 or more rebounds. His many individual accolades were well deserved, but they were only products of Russell's philosophy of team play. His greatest accomplishment was bringing the storied Celtics 11 championships in his 13 seasons, a record of success that is seemingly unfathomable in team sports today. Until the ascent of Michael Jordan in the 1980's, Russell was acclaimed by many as the greatest player in the history of the NBA. Some consider the issue still worth debating. This Boston Celtics home dureen jersey was worn by the Hall of Fame great during the World Championship season of 1967-68. It can be pinpointed to this specific year based on the fact that this was the last year the Celtics used dureen jerseys and it was also the last year that this style "Wilson" label was used. On the left tail is the "Wilson" label with the size tag "46" adjacent. Across the front of the jersey is the name "Celtics." The player number "6" appears on both the front and back. Both the name and number are made of green tackle twill. Measurable game wear is evident. Another of the many distinctive footnotes to Russell's magnificent career occurred in 1967 when his role was expanded to player/coach for the Celtics. The move made him the first African American head coach in NBA history. LOAs from MEARS (A10) and Grey Flannel.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
Hammer price
Show price

George Mikan 1947-48 Minneapolis Lakers Road Jersey

George Mikan 1947-48 Minneapolis Lakers Road Jersey, The pioneering professional basketball career of George Lawrence Mikan, Jr., nicknamed “Mr. Basketball”, was spent with the Chicago American Gears of the NBL and the Minneapolis Lakers of the NBL, the BAA and the NBA. Playing with thick, round spectacles, the 6'10", 245 lbs. Mikan redefined his sport as a game of so-called big men with his prolific rebounding, shot blocking and his talent to shoot over smaller defenders with his ambidextrous hook shot. An indomitable force, whose game was ahead of it’s time, Mikan won seven NBL, BAA and NBA championships, an All-Star MVP trophy, three scoring titles and was a member of the first four NBA All-Star and the first six All-BAA and All-NBA Teams. Mikan’s level of dominance forced several rule changes in the NBA, among them widening the foul lane - known as the "Mikan Rule" - and introducing the shot clock. After his player career, Mikan became one of the founding fathers of the ABA, and was also vital for the forming of the Minnesota Timberwolves. In his later years, Mikan fought a long-standing legal battle against the NBA, fighting against the meager pensions for players who had retired before the league became lucrative. Mikan, who paved the way for the multi-million dollar contracts enjoyed by today’s NBA stars, tragically became a martyr of his own cause when he died in poverty after a long-standing battle against diabetes. For his feats, Mikan was declared "Greatest Basketballer in the First Half-Century" by the The Associated Press in 1950, was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1959, made the 25th and 35th NBA Anniversary Teams of 1970 and 1980 and was elected one of the NBA 50 Greatest Players in 1996. Mikan’s 1947-48 Minneapolis Lakers NBL road jersey features the team’s initials "MPLS." across the front. Mikan’s number "99" appears on both the front and back of the shirt. The letters and numbers are made of gold matte tackle twill with the body made of a blue wool material. Representing a season in which Mikan led the Lakers to the NBL Championship, the jersey originates from Mikan's daughter who received the jersey from her father. It shows evidence of game-use and appears to have no alterations of any kind. LOAs from MEARS (A8) and Grey Flannel.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
Hammer price
Show price

JOHN LENNON NOT-HEARD-IN-TWENTY-NINE-YEARS RADIO RECORDING

JOHN LENNON NOT-HEARD-IN-TWENTY-NINE-YEARS RADIO RECORDING 1975 Four ten-inch reel-to-reel original broadcast tapes from Philadelphia radio station WFIL that record John Lennon's on-air time when he participated in the 'Helping Hand Marathon' fundraiser from Friday, May 16 to Sunday, May 18, 1975. Heard live only that week-end and only in Philadelphia twenty-nine years ago (and not accessible to anyone since), these recordings come from the personal possession of disc jockey 'Banana Joe' Montione who was the on-air host with Lennon during the whole three days. (Montione owns the intellectual property rights to this broadcast and they are being offered with the tapes.) Heard for approximately three hours (interspersed with songs, commercials and DJ banter), Lennon's voice now seems almost magical. At age thirty-four, he was in top form throughout the broadcast, making jokes, using funny accents, talking about the Beatles, discussing songs that influenced him and generally being witty, smart and sincere. Highlights from his three-day stint include: FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1975 - DAY ONE - Lennon mentions that "someone gave me a picture of Paul, isn't that cosmic? I just talked to him yesterday, he's rehearsing a band in Rye." - When told by 'Banana Joe' that a recent survey indicated that 98 of the public wanted the Beatles to get back together, Lennon says, "I'd like to meet the 2.." - When asked by 'Banana Joe' about the Beatles getting back together, Lennon replies, "we see each other every few months...if we felt like making music, we'd do it in the studio...we've never really sat down to discuss that subject...I always talk about 'them' (the Beatles) as 'them.'" - When learning that the radio station asked Yoko (who was four months pregnant with Sean at the time) to call John, he responds, "She surprised me by calling...you haven't got Paul and Ringo up your sleeve?" - When asked why he wanted to live in the U.S. (Lennon was having difficulties getting his green card at the time), he wholeheartedly responded, "Because I love it...that's why I became a Beatle, because of American music." He also mentions his love of New York City in particular. - Lennon reads pledges throughout; when one comes in from a former student challenging her old classmates from West Catholic Girls High School to donate, Lennon says, "All those West Catholic girls, get off your knees." SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1975 - DAY TWO - Lennon makes witticisms throughout like, "I need me green card!" and "Lift up your kilt and smile." - Lennon calls himself "Dr. Winston O' Reggae." - Lennon mentions that "Elton John is a good friend, a nice guy." - When reading a pledge from a listener who gave $5 to thank Lennon for all he's done for mankind, Lennon responds, "Five dollars? Is that all we can get for mankind?" - When 'Give Peace a Chance' is played, Lennon says, "Tommy Smothers, Timothy Leary...were there...and none of them can play!" - When 'Yellow Submarine' is played, Lennon and 'Banana Joe' sing along to it. When hearing a particular part of the song, Lennon says, "That was Paul with a bag on his head." - When 'Come Together' is played, Lennon says, "This one I can stand." - When "I Should Have Known Better" is played, Lennon plays 'Banana Joe's' harmonica (See Lot 179) live along with the now-famous harmonica intro of the song; afterwards, he says, "That's worth a few bucks." - When asked about his use of a melotron, Lennon replies that he uses one frequently, most famously on 'Strawberry Fields' and that he still has it (the melotron) in his possession. - Lennon reads the weather forecast and misspeaks saying, "May 17, 1985" (instead of 1975); sadly, a day he would never see. - When asked by 'Banana Joe' why he wrote 'Imagine,' Lennon replies, "I was just dreaming of utopia...was writing it down in airplanes...it was no big struggle." - When 'Love Train' by the O'Jays is played, Lennon sincerely calls it "one of the best records." SUNDAY, MAY 18, 1975 - DAY THREE - John explains in detail why he decided to do this particular fundraiser, noting that the money raised for this one "doesn't go to people in offices making $75,000 a year with gold rings on their fingers...it goes to the people...the people actually get the money." - When someone requests that 'Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds' be played, Lennon says, "We'll do it by Elton for a change." - Lennon waxes nostalgic about Elvis Presley and says after he came out of the army, he was "a little different" then says to the audience, "Send some money for an old man's memories." - When talking about 'Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,' Lennon says, "It just so happens I was on both versions (the Beatles' and Elton John's) and I don't regret one of them." - When hearing 'Whole Lot of Shaking Going On' by Jerry Lee Lewis, Lennon nostalgically enthuses, "one of the all great records of all time...I wouldn't be here (as a famous musician) if it weren't for this! Anyone over twenty-five who remembers that record, send in a donation on behalf of John Winston Lennon who loves it so much!" - Lennon's time on-air ends with him introducing the last song of the fundraiser, Elvis' 'Heartbreak Hotel,' and says definitively, "This is what did it" (influencing him and the Beatles to start a band). Accompanying the tapes is an original flyer advertising the fundraiser which reads in part "featuring special guest star John Lennon (in person)," eleven original negatives of snapshots taken during the event (eight of which show Lennon with 'Banana Joe'), a signed headshot of 'Banana Joe' and a signed 45 record of the song 'Cakewalk to the Cup' performed by the disc jockey. Also included is one other reel-to-reel tape of an interview 'Banana Joe' conducted with Paul McCartney after he and his then-band, Wings, performed in Philadelphia in 1976. Approximately twenty minutes long, Paul mentions that 'Band on the Run' is about his recent marijuana bust and he also addresses the issue of the Beatles getting back together: "No one really wants to close the door on it forever...obviously until it happens it's a definite no...but people keep asking about it...but everyone (John, George and Ringo) is still very friendly and cool." (5)

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-06-24
Hammer price
Show price

Outstanding 1966 mickey mantle h&b game used bat (mears and psa/dna grade 10)

The greatest switch-hitter in history, Mantle combined power and speed unlike any other man before him in baseball annals. Following Joe DiMaggio in the procession of Yankee heroes, he overcame immense pressure and devastating injuries. Mantle played in more than 2,000 games and hit 536 home runs. He played in twelve World Series, won three MVP awards, a Triple Crown (1956), and became one of the most idolized men ever to don Yankee pinstripes. The offered bat is Mantle’s Hillerich & Bradsby signature model W215 (stamped on knob) used by the slugger to belt his titanic home runs near the end of his career. Every aspect of this Mantle gamer measures to the highest standards used to assess the quality of game used bats. Factory records pinpoint the bats period of service to 1966. Measuring 33 ¾" at a weight of 33.1 oz., it features distinctive usage characteristics tantamount to a thumbprint for known Mantle gamers from this era. This includes the perfect placement of pine tar, a fading #7 on the knob, deeply embedded ball stitch marks all over the barrel, and tremendous overall usage wear. In independent assessments conducted by MEARS and PSA/DNA (John Taube) this bat was deemed a perfect 10. Contributing to its status as one of the finest Mantle bats graded by these firms to date, is the bats documented provenance stating that it was originally sourced from a Cleveland Indians batboy who obtained it personally from Mantle. LOA from MEARS (Grade A10) and PSA/DNA (Grade GU10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
Hammer price
Show price

LENNON, John, and VERONA, Stephen.

LENNON, John, and VERONA, Stephen. SHE SAID SO -- I FEEL FINE -- Original artwork for the world's 1st music video 240 handcolored (some by John Lennon) paper cells for the short film "She Said So", 8 1/2 X 11 in., housed in a three-ring binder, and comprising the complete artwork for the film. A chance meeting in a London nightclub in 1966 between artist/film-maker Stephen Verona, and man of the hour John Lennon led to a friendship and artistic collaboration which resulted in this, the world's first rock music video. Stephen loved John's music and suggested the pairing of a Beatle's song with images he would create. John gave Stephen a new and soon to be hit record which arrived on an unlabelled disc. It sure sounded like the title was going to be "She Said So," not the next line in the song "I Feel Fine," hence the title of his film (the word video was not then in use) became "She Said So." Back in New York, Verona set to work drawing the pop-art cartoon images to fit the lyrics and follow the music. Lennon flew over and the two got together to measure the progress. By then Verona had drawn all the images in outline and John thought the concept was great. Stephen remembers the night that Lennon came over to his apartment and the two wiled away the hours the both of them sitting at the kitchen table, smoking, and coloring in the images with markers. And the rock music 'video' was born. And it was a hit. It was shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and went on to win awards in the Atlanta, San Francisco and Chicago film festivals. It won the CINE Golden Eagle and went from there to all the major foreign film festivals. The original print resides in the Library of Congress. With Lennon's initial push, Verona went on to make 100s of music videos. He was later nominated for an Academy Award for Best Short Film, and then made features, including Stallone's first film, "The Lords of Flatbush." Provenance: Stephen Verona

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-06-22
Hammer price
Show price

George mikan’s personal copy of the nba 50 greatest players signed

Hall of Fame knuckelballer Waite Hoyt once said, “Every big leaguer and his wife should teach their children to pray, ‘God bless Mommy, God Bless Daddy, and God bless Babe Ruth’.” The same should be said of every player in the NBA with regard to the great George Mikan.  A superstar decades before the term existed, Mikan was the first big man to dominate the sport. No one before had seen a 6-foot-10 player with his agility, competitiveness and skill.  When the Minneapolis Lakers came to New York in December, 1949, the marquee at Madison Square Garden aptly read "Geo. Mikan vs. the Knicks."  Mikan literally carried the league in its formative years giving professional basketball recognition and acceptance when it was at the bottom of the totem pole in professional sports. He transcended the game. In conjunction with the NBA’s 50th anniversary in 1996, the NBA named its 50 greatest players. Remarkably, 49 of the 50 players selected were alive and present when they were honored as part of the 1996-97 All-Star festivitie, including the presentation of a series of 30" x25" lithographs. Printed on the highest quality acid-free paper, it holds the likeness of each of the 50 greatest players as has been selected by the NBA itself. Each player signed each of the lithos in pencil beneath their image. The edition was limited to 250 individually numbered pieces worldwide with only 50 numbered Legends editions offered to the public. Most significantly, each player was given their own personal copy that was numbered 1 of 1in exchange for their signatures. Offered here is the personal copy of George Mikan, numbered Mikan 1/1. All of his fellow greatest players in the game are featured including  Jordan, Russell, Chamberlain,  Erving, Johnson, Bird,  Abdul Jabbar, West, Robertson, O’Neal, etc. It is curious to note that while the player vignettes do not appear to reflect any particular order as to rank, a fitting homage has been paid to George Mikan with his placement in the premier position. No other professional league has been able to create a litho featuring the signatures of virtually every one of its most important players. The NBA was fortunate to have a league young enough where all of its superstars, save Maravich, were still living, yet established enough for its 50th anniversary to be a historic landmark. Since then, Mikan, DeBusschere and Chamberlain have passed away, making this impossible to ever recreate. Framed to museum standards and accompanied by a leatherbound certificate from the NBA signed by David Stern.  Additional LOAs from PSA/DNA and JSA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
Hammer price
Show price

1858 fashion race course original official handwritten scorers reports

These two handwritten, signed and dated official score sheets, the Scorer's Report, date from the pivotal Game Two of  the 1858 Fashion Course Series. They are among the most important documents ever discovered relevant to the development of the early game of base ball. The beautiful hand scripted reports include their original inscribed envelope. Remarkably, the reports come directly from the family of one of the leading pitchers and baseball organizers during the games earliest era, Frank Pidgeon, founder of the famous Brooklyn Eckfords, and they are scored by pivitol men who helped fuse a bat and ball game into the fabric of America. In 1858 New York City was the center of baseball activity. Just a few years earlier the game initially began to take hold when, in 1845, Alexander Joy Cartwright, a young engineer and a ball playing enthusiast, proposed to other like minded young men to organize the game that they were already playing with some frequency. Calling their new club the New York Knickerbockers, that spring the boys found a "suitable playing ground" in the Elysian Fields, in Hoboken, New Jersey, where they enjoyed their ball game in the great outdoors. Then, on September 23, 1845, the first set of baseball rules were crafted and adopted. The following year, the first recorded base ball match known occurred between the Knickerbockers and another New York based club. Shortly other amateur clubs mushroomed throughout the New York City area. Soon the players wore colorful uniforms and doffed special caps to identify their local team. By the early 1850's the game was so popular that the New York press began to take regular notice. "Base Ball", the Sunday Mercury exclaimed in 1853 "is not only healthful but it is played in the great outdoors...and excellent games are now at hand". Baseball fever heightened as teams were being formed in pockets throughout the country. The national press, taking their cue from the New York City based papers, reported as base ball fans (short for "fanatics") avidly followed their favorite teams and those players who excelled. Soon base ball would become the number one spectator sport in America and called the National Pastime. A major catalyst occurred In January 1858 when some of the more prominent players and organizers in the New York City area decided that it was time for "all of the organized base ball clubs" to meet and take stock of the game that was now capturing the attention of men and women everywhere. In February, representatives from more than two dozen New York area clubs met. There was even a group from outside of the metropolitan area, the Liberty Club of New Brunswick, New Jersey. The meeting received exciting reports that organized base ball clubs were not confined only to New York and the immediate area but the game was being played as far away as in Boston, Maine, Detroit, Chicago and even San Francisco. Judge W.H Van Cott, a natural leader and ballplayer for the New York Gothams, was quickly elected President of the group. Also, equally important, one of the game's premier players, Frank Pidgeon, founder and pitcher for the Brooklyn Eckfords, was in attendance, lending to the gathering his considerable baseball and worldly prestige. On the diamond Pidgeon was known far and wide as a wizard, one of the greatest pitchers of the era. Historian John Thorn noted that the pitcher was known for his brains and "headwork" as he honed his baseball skills. Off the field he was an inventor, a painter, and engineer, and a successful businessman. The group decided two things at their meeting that proved to be of distinct historical consequence. First, after crafting and adopting rules and by-laws, the gentlemen officially organized as the "National Association of Ball Players". Thus, the organization became the very first "officially constituted" organized group of "national" base ball clubs. By unanimous vote and a stroke of Judge Van Cotts' pen, their action predated the formation of today's "senior circuit", the current major leagues National League, by almost two decades.  Further, the National Association united a good half century before the American League was even considered. It has been reported that the men also did something that perhaps had a more far reaching effect in the annals of baseball history. The gauntlet was dropped when the Brooklyn clubs challenged New York's Manhattan clubs to a series of contests where the "very best nine" would be decided on the baseball diamond. It was decided that each region was to "pick" their best nine to play against those "picked" from the other region. These were to be no ordinary games...they were to match the most skilled of the Brooklyn ball players against those from the New York City ball clubs. Essentially, it was baseball's very first organized All Star Game.  Better yet, there would not be just one game, there would be a "series" of three games. Significantly, over 50 years later, one of baseball's leading 19th century historians, Seymour Church, dubbed the fashion games the very first championship series. It was also decided at the Convention gathering or soon thereafter, that the fans would be required to pay a then hefty fifty cent admission. For the first time ever, money would be charged for fans to see the game, the proceeds to benefit New York area fire departments. The fact that a charge was levied and collected for fans to enjoy the contests was baseball's very first major step in its rapidly approaching status as a professional game. Heavy newspaper coverage led up to the 1858 Summer All Star series. The New York Clipper reported that the "Manhattan group" would consist of top players from the New York Knickerbockers, as well as the Gotham, Eagle, Empire, Harlem and Union Clubs. Their counterparts in Brooklyn would consist of the best from the Atlantics, Excelsior's, Putnam's and Frank Pidgeon's dominant Eckford club. The match would be staged in July at the famous Fashion Race Course near Flushing, in Queens, New York. Baseball fever spread as the All Star games were the most anticipated sporting event of the year. Because of the anticipated crowds, the New York Tribune even posted that steamer ships would be poised to leave the Fulton Market slip several times in the morning and afternoon of the days of the big games. Horse drawn carriages would meet the ships to take the throngs of men, women and children to witness the contests. The "Great Base Ball Match" lived up to its billing on each occasion.  The three separate games were spread over six weeks. Tens of thousands of men and women attended the series. Each game was a spectacular success and represented the pinnacle of baseball interest up to that time and for many years to come. The first game, held on July 20, 1858, was a scoring dandy as New York "edged" Brooklyn 22 to 18. On August 17, the return match was played again at the Fashion Race Course. Like the first game, this second game proved a popular and smashing success. These actual score sheets, fully filled out and signed by the official scorers from game two, the pivotal "middle game" in the series, are the earliest All-Star game official score sheets in existence. The two score sheets, and their identifying envelope, have been kept intact for almost a century, residing within the family of Frank Pidgeon. This game pitted Pidgeon, star pitcher and also the founder of Brooklyn's best team, the Eckfords, against the Gothams most dominant twirler, Tom Van Cott. Tom's older brother and teammate William H., the respected municipal Judge who only five months earlier had been elected the very first President of the National Association, would be the game's official scorer for the New York clubs. J.B. Leggett, star catcher of the Excelsior's and a man who played in the first match would serve in that same capacity for the Brooklyn All Stars. J.B. Bache, also of the Excelsior's, would be the umpire for the game. According to the New York Times, the contest itself was "a lively affair". The Times recorded that when Brooklyn led off the first inning at bat, Van Cott made the game's first out after a "speedy catch". However, Pidgeon scored the game's first run for the Brooklyn Nine. This would be the first of many runs his team would tally that day, all neatly noted in these score sheets, and in what would be the closest thing to a blowout in the three game series. The score sheets themselves, written in neat hand, delve deeply into the game, as the scorers virtually memorialize each and every at bat by both teams for the entire match. It is an amazing experience for any avid baseball fan or even those simply interested in American history to read of the plays as they occurred during a time period that scoring, as we know today, was being developed.   In the score sheet scripted at the top "All Brooklyn Nine" we see that the first run of the match was scored by Pidgeon, who also batted in three runs. Judge Van Cott documents that Brooklyn's legendary Dickie Pearce, who Albert Spalding would later call the greatest shortstop of the nineteenth century, would add four more runs for the Brooklyn Nine. The score sheet identified as the "All New York Nine" shows that the team's leading hitter and the New York's powerful "striker" the previous year, Eagles shortstop Gelston, managed three runs on his own. But the rest of the New York All Stars had a hard time solving Pidgeon's masterful pitching. Ultimately, Pidgeon's skills and talents as a batter, fielder and especially pitcher, plus the explosive bats of Pearce, J. Greene (who clobbered the ball and scored six runs), the Atlantics John Price (who led all Brooklyn batters in 1858 by socking in 32 runs for the season) and the others provided tonic for the Brooklyn All Stars. They evened the series by thrashing the New Yorkers, 29 to 8. This pivotal game, as The Times reported the very next day, set the stage for the series finale, the "the conquering game" to be played in September. History would show that New York won the series in the rubber match on September 10th, 29 to 18. Pidgeon lost that game but scored three runs in the process. The three All Star Games, pitting the Brooklyn Nine against the New York Nine, would be fondly remembered for some time. In 1866 it was stated that "This celebrated 'home and home' match at base ball between the best of the picked players of the two cities...excited the greatest enthusiasm and spirit amongst the lovers of the sport... ever known in this vicinity." These score sheets are the only ones in existence and they represent the only official documentation of this historical All Star match. They are fully filled out by hand, dated and the two official scorers are scripted and identified, Judge Van Cott and J.B. Leggett. As mentioned, they have resided solely within the family archives of Frank Pidgeon's ancestors since the 1858 games and have never been before offered for sale. The penmanship is beautiful and pleasing to the eye. Along with the two score sheets, this lot also contains the original envelope in which the following is neatly scripted: "Scorers Report of the 2nd Match of the Brooklyn Nine vs. New York @ Fashion Course Aug. 17th, 1838. Score 29 to 8". Condition is superb with only light folds. A letter of provenance is provided by the Pidgeon Family. 3 Items Scorecard sheets measure 10 3/4 in. by 8 1/2 in. Envelope measures 3 1/4 in. by 5 1/2 in.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
Hammer price
Show price

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN ET MILOU Encre de Chine

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN ET MILOU Encre de Chine et de couleur pour une illustration. Dédicacée, signée et datée « 17.VI.48 » à l'encre brune. Représente Tintin menotté et Milou tenu en laisse, cerné de 2 policiers syldaves, en arrière plan un village duquel pointe un minaret. Cette illustration est donc à mettre en relation avec l'aventure de Tintin « Le sceptre d'Ottokar ». 21 x 18 cm. Encadrée. Superbe. Excellent état. Un certificat d'authenticité de la fondation Hergé, signé par Philippe Goddin, sera remis à l'acquéreur. Cette illustration est à interpréter de manière autobiographique. En 1948, Hergé se repose en Suisse et traverse une période de doutes existentiels, notamment vis-à-vis de sa femme Germaine, et de remises en questions concernant son œuvre, notamment son personnage principal et alter ego : Tintin. Il a alors du mal à reprendre une nouvelle aventure de Tintin et bloque sur le scénario d'Objectif Lune. Tintin est ici représenté menotté et encadré par 2 policiers syldaves ; tout comme Hergé, contraint à adapter un scénario qu'il n'affectionne ni ne maîtrise. Il s'agit donc d'une véritable représentation allégorique de l'état mental du père de Tintin. L'aventure Objectif Lune se déroule en Syldavie, pays qui est également une transposition imagée de la Suisse. Cette illustration est donc particulièrement touchante et riche de sens ! Comme le dit Hergé en juillet 1948, « Tintin est las de ses aventures » et son créateur en est « à l'aventure intérieure ». Estimation 20 000 - 25 000 € Sold for 52,549 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-10-09
Hammer price
Show price

* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.