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Outstanding 1966 mickey mantle h&b game used bat (mears and psa/dna grade 10)

The greatest switch-hitter in history, Mantle combined power and speed unlike any other man before him in baseball annals. Following Joe DiMaggio in the procession of Yankee heroes, he overcame immense pressure and devastating injuries. Mantle played in more than 2,000 games and hit 536 home runs. He played in twelve World Series, won three MVP awards, a Triple Crown (1956), and became one of the most idolized men ever to don Yankee pinstripes. The offered bat is Mantle’s Hillerich & Bradsby signature model W215 (stamped on knob) used by the slugger to belt his titanic home runs near the end of his career. Every aspect of this Mantle gamer measures to the highest standards used to assess the quality of game used bats. Factory records pinpoint the bats period of service to 1966. Measuring 33 ¾" at a weight of 33.1 oz., it features distinctive usage characteristics tantamount to a thumbprint for known Mantle gamers from this era. This includes the perfect placement of pine tar, a fading #7 on the knob, deeply embedded ball stitch marks all over the barrel, and tremendous overall usage wear. In independent assessments conducted by MEARS and PSA/DNA (John Taube) this bat was deemed a perfect 10. Contributing to its status as one of the finest Mantle bats graded by these firms to date, is the bats documented provenance stating that it was originally sourced from a Cleveland Indians batboy who obtained it personally from Mantle. LOA from MEARS (Grade A10) and PSA/DNA (Grade GU10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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LENNON, John, and VERONA, Stephen.

LENNON, John, and VERONA, Stephen. SHE SAID SO -- I FEEL FINE -- Original artwork for the world's 1st music video 240 handcolored (some by John Lennon) paper cells for the short film "She Said So", 8 1/2 X 11 in., housed in a three-ring binder, and comprising the complete artwork for the film. A chance meeting in a London nightclub in 1966 between artist/film-maker Stephen Verona, and man of the hour John Lennon led to a friendship and artistic collaboration which resulted in this, the world's first rock music video. Stephen loved John's music and suggested the pairing of a Beatle's song with images he would create. John gave Stephen a new and soon to be hit record which arrived on an unlabelled disc. It sure sounded like the title was going to be "She Said So," not the next line in the song "I Feel Fine," hence the title of his film (the word video was not then in use) became "She Said So." Back in New York, Verona set to work drawing the pop-art cartoon images to fit the lyrics and follow the music. Lennon flew over and the two got together to measure the progress. By then Verona had drawn all the images in outline and John thought the concept was great. Stephen remembers the night that Lennon came over to his apartment and the two wiled away the hours the both of them sitting at the kitchen table, smoking, and coloring in the images with markers. And the rock music 'video' was born. And it was a hit. It was shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and went on to win awards in the Atlanta, San Francisco and Chicago film festivals. It won the CINE Golden Eagle and went from there to all the major foreign film festivals. The original print resides in the Library of Congress. With Lennon's initial push, Verona went on to make 100s of music videos. He was later nominated for an Academy Award for Best Short Film, and then made features, including Stallone's first film, "The Lords of Flatbush." Provenance: Stephen Verona

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-06-22
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George mikan’s personal copy of the nba 50 greatest players signed

Hall of Fame knuckelballer Waite Hoyt once said, “Every big leaguer and his wife should teach their children to pray, ‘God bless Mommy, God Bless Daddy, and God bless Babe Ruth’.” The same should be said of every player in the NBA with regard to the great George Mikan.  A superstar decades before the term existed, Mikan was the first big man to dominate the sport. No one before had seen a 6-foot-10 player with his agility, competitiveness and skill.  When the Minneapolis Lakers came to New York in December, 1949, the marquee at Madison Square Garden aptly read "Geo. Mikan vs. the Knicks."  Mikan literally carried the league in its formative years giving professional basketball recognition and acceptance when it was at the bottom of the totem pole in professional sports. He transcended the game. In conjunction with the NBA’s 50th anniversary in 1996, the NBA named its 50 greatest players. Remarkably, 49 of the 50 players selected were alive and present when they were honored as part of the 1996-97 All-Star festivitie, including the presentation of a series of 30" x25" lithographs. Printed on the highest quality acid-free paper, it holds the likeness of each of the 50 greatest players as has been selected by the NBA itself. Each player signed each of the lithos in pencil beneath their image. The edition was limited to 250 individually numbered pieces worldwide with only 50 numbered Legends editions offered to the public. Most significantly, each player was given their own personal copy that was numbered 1 of 1in exchange for their signatures. Offered here is the personal copy of George Mikan, numbered Mikan 1/1. All of his fellow greatest players in the game are featured including  Jordan, Russell, Chamberlain,  Erving, Johnson, Bird,  Abdul Jabbar, West, Robertson, O’Neal, etc. It is curious to note that while the player vignettes do not appear to reflect any particular order as to rank, a fitting homage has been paid to George Mikan with his placement in the premier position. No other professional league has been able to create a litho featuring the signatures of virtually every one of its most important players. The NBA was fortunate to have a league young enough where all of its superstars, save Maravich, were still living, yet established enough for its 50th anniversary to be a historic landmark. Since then, Mikan, DeBusschere and Chamberlain have passed away, making this impossible to ever recreate. Framed to museum standards and accompanied by a leatherbound certificate from the NBA signed by David Stern.  Additional LOAs from PSA/DNA and JSA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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1858 fashion race course original official handwritten scorers reports

These two handwritten, signed and dated official score sheets, the Scorer's Report, date from the pivotal Game Two of  the 1858 Fashion Course Series. They are among the most important documents ever discovered relevant to the development of the early game of base ball. The beautiful hand scripted reports include their original inscribed envelope. Remarkably, the reports come directly from the family of one of the leading pitchers and baseball organizers during the games earliest era, Frank Pidgeon, founder of the famous Brooklyn Eckfords, and they are scored by pivitol men who helped fuse a bat and ball game into the fabric of America. In 1858 New York City was the center of baseball activity. Just a few years earlier the game initially began to take hold when, in 1845, Alexander Joy Cartwright, a young engineer and a ball playing enthusiast, proposed to other like minded young men to organize the game that they were already playing with some frequency. Calling their new club the New York Knickerbockers, that spring the boys found a "suitable playing ground" in the Elysian Fields, in Hoboken, New Jersey, where they enjoyed their ball game in the great outdoors. Then, on September 23, 1845, the first set of baseball rules were crafted and adopted. The following year, the first recorded base ball match known occurred between the Knickerbockers and another New York based club. Shortly other amateur clubs mushroomed throughout the New York City area. Soon the players wore colorful uniforms and doffed special caps to identify their local team. By the early 1850's the game was so popular that the New York press began to take regular notice. "Base Ball", the Sunday Mercury exclaimed in 1853 "is not only healthful but it is played in the great outdoors...and excellent games are now at hand". Baseball fever heightened as teams were being formed in pockets throughout the country. The national press, taking their cue from the New York City based papers, reported as base ball fans (short for "fanatics") avidly followed their favorite teams and those players who excelled. Soon base ball would become the number one spectator sport in America and called the National Pastime. A major catalyst occurred In January 1858 when some of the more prominent players and organizers in the New York City area decided that it was time for "all of the organized base ball clubs" to meet and take stock of the game that was now capturing the attention of men and women everywhere. In February, representatives from more than two dozen New York area clubs met. There was even a group from outside of the metropolitan area, the Liberty Club of New Brunswick, New Jersey. The meeting received exciting reports that organized base ball clubs were not confined only to New York and the immediate area but the game was being played as far away as in Boston, Maine, Detroit, Chicago and even San Francisco. Judge W.H Van Cott, a natural leader and ballplayer for the New York Gothams, was quickly elected President of the group. Also, equally important, one of the game's premier players, Frank Pidgeon, founder and pitcher for the Brooklyn Eckfords, was in attendance, lending to the gathering his considerable baseball and worldly prestige. On the diamond Pidgeon was known far and wide as a wizard, one of the greatest pitchers of the era. Historian John Thorn noted that the pitcher was known for his brains and "headwork" as he honed his baseball skills. Off the field he was an inventor, a painter, and engineer, and a successful businessman. The group decided two things at their meeting that proved to be of distinct historical consequence. First, after crafting and adopting rules and by-laws, the gentlemen officially organized as the "National Association of Ball Players". Thus, the organization became the very first "officially constituted" organized group of "national" base ball clubs. By unanimous vote and a stroke of Judge Van Cotts' pen, their action predated the formation of today's "senior circuit", the current major leagues National League, by almost two decades.  Further, the National Association united a good half century before the American League was even considered. It has been reported that the men also did something that perhaps had a more far reaching effect in the annals of baseball history. The gauntlet was dropped when the Brooklyn clubs challenged New York's Manhattan clubs to a series of contests where the "very best nine" would be decided on the baseball diamond. It was decided that each region was to "pick" their best nine to play against those "picked" from the other region. These were to be no ordinary games...they were to match the most skilled of the Brooklyn ball players against those from the New York City ball clubs. Essentially, it was baseball's very first organized All Star Game.  Better yet, there would not be just one game, there would be a "series" of three games. Significantly, over 50 years later, one of baseball's leading 19th century historians, Seymour Church, dubbed the fashion games the very first championship series. It was also decided at the Convention gathering or soon thereafter, that the fans would be required to pay a then hefty fifty cent admission. For the first time ever, money would be charged for fans to see the game, the proceeds to benefit New York area fire departments. The fact that a charge was levied and collected for fans to enjoy the contests was baseball's very first major step in its rapidly approaching status as a professional game. Heavy newspaper coverage led up to the 1858 Summer All Star series. The New York Clipper reported that the "Manhattan group" would consist of top players from the New York Knickerbockers, as well as the Gotham, Eagle, Empire, Harlem and Union Clubs. Their counterparts in Brooklyn would consist of the best from the Atlantics, Excelsior's, Putnam's and Frank Pidgeon's dominant Eckford club. The match would be staged in July at the famous Fashion Race Course near Flushing, in Queens, New York. Baseball fever spread as the All Star games were the most anticipated sporting event of the year. Because of the anticipated crowds, the New York Tribune even posted that steamer ships would be poised to leave the Fulton Market slip several times in the morning and afternoon of the days of the big games. Horse drawn carriages would meet the ships to take the throngs of men, women and children to witness the contests. The "Great Base Ball Match" lived up to its billing on each occasion.  The three separate games were spread over six weeks. Tens of thousands of men and women attended the series. Each game was a spectacular success and represented the pinnacle of baseball interest up to that time and for many years to come. The first game, held on July 20, 1858, was a scoring dandy as New York "edged" Brooklyn 22 to 18. On August 17, the return match was played again at the Fashion Race Course. Like the first game, this second game proved a popular and smashing success. These actual score sheets, fully filled out and signed by the official scorers from game two, the pivotal "middle game" in the series, are the earliest All-Star game official score sheets in existence. The two score sheets, and their identifying envelope, have been kept intact for almost a century, residing within the family of Frank Pidgeon. This game pitted Pidgeon, star pitcher and also the founder of Brooklyn's best team, the Eckfords, against the Gothams most dominant twirler, Tom Van Cott. Tom's older brother and teammate William H., the respected municipal Judge who only five months earlier had been elected the very first President of the National Association, would be the game's official scorer for the New York clubs. J.B. Leggett, star catcher of the Excelsior's and a man who played in the first match would serve in that same capacity for the Brooklyn All Stars. J.B. Bache, also of the Excelsior's, would be the umpire for the game. According to the New York Times, the contest itself was "a lively affair". The Times recorded that when Brooklyn led off the first inning at bat, Van Cott made the game's first out after a "speedy catch". However, Pidgeon scored the game's first run for the Brooklyn Nine. This would be the first of many runs his team would tally that day, all neatly noted in these score sheets, and in what would be the closest thing to a blowout in the three game series. The score sheets themselves, written in neat hand, delve deeply into the game, as the scorers virtually memorialize each and every at bat by both teams for the entire match. It is an amazing experience for any avid baseball fan or even those simply interested in American history to read of the plays as they occurred during a time period that scoring, as we know today, was being developed.   In the score sheet scripted at the top "All Brooklyn Nine" we see that the first run of the match was scored by Pidgeon, who also batted in three runs. Judge Van Cott documents that Brooklyn's legendary Dickie Pearce, who Albert Spalding would later call the greatest shortstop of the nineteenth century, would add four more runs for the Brooklyn Nine. The score sheet identified as the "All New York Nine" shows that the team's leading hitter and the New York's powerful "striker" the previous year, Eagles shortstop Gelston, managed three runs on his own. But the rest of the New York All Stars had a hard time solving Pidgeon's masterful pitching. Ultimately, Pidgeon's skills and talents as a batter, fielder and especially pitcher, plus the explosive bats of Pearce, J. Greene (who clobbered the ball and scored six runs), the Atlantics John Price (who led all Brooklyn batters in 1858 by socking in 32 runs for the season) and the others provided tonic for the Brooklyn All Stars. They evened the series by thrashing the New Yorkers, 29 to 8. This pivotal game, as The Times reported the very next day, set the stage for the series finale, the "the conquering game" to be played in September. History would show that New York won the series in the rubber match on September 10th, 29 to 18. Pidgeon lost that game but scored three runs in the process. The three All Star Games, pitting the Brooklyn Nine against the New York Nine, would be fondly remembered for some time. In 1866 it was stated that "This celebrated 'home and home' match at base ball between the best of the picked players of the two cities...excited the greatest enthusiasm and spirit amongst the lovers of the sport... ever known in this vicinity." These score sheets are the only ones in existence and they represent the only official documentation of this historical All Star match. They are fully filled out by hand, dated and the two official scorers are scripted and identified, Judge Van Cott and J.B. Leggett. As mentioned, they have resided solely within the family archives of Frank Pidgeon's ancestors since the 1858 games and have never been before offered for sale. The penmanship is beautiful and pleasing to the eye. Along with the two score sheets, this lot also contains the original envelope in which the following is neatly scripted: "Scorers Report of the 2nd Match of the Brooklyn Nine vs. New York @ Fashion Course Aug. 17th, 1838. Score 29 to 8". Condition is superb with only light folds. A letter of provenance is provided by the Pidgeon Family. 3 Items Scorecard sheets measure 10 3/4 in. by 8 1/2 in. Envelope measures 3 1/4 in. by 5 1/2 in.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN ET MILOU Encre de Chine

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN ET MILOU Encre de Chine et de couleur pour une illustration. Dédicacée, signée et datée « 17.VI.48 » à l'encre brune. Représente Tintin menotté et Milou tenu en laisse, cerné de 2 policiers syldaves, en arrière plan un village duquel pointe un minaret. Cette illustration est donc à mettre en relation avec l'aventure de Tintin « Le sceptre d'Ottokar ». 21 x 18 cm. Encadrée. Superbe. Excellent état. Un certificat d'authenticité de la fondation Hergé, signé par Philippe Goddin, sera remis à l'acquéreur. Cette illustration est à interpréter de manière autobiographique. En 1948, Hergé se repose en Suisse et traverse une période de doutes existentiels, notamment vis-à-vis de sa femme Germaine, et de remises en questions concernant son œuvre, notamment son personnage principal et alter ego : Tintin. Il a alors du mal à reprendre une nouvelle aventure de Tintin et bloque sur le scénario d'Objectif Lune. Tintin est ici représenté menotté et encadré par 2 policiers syldaves ; tout comme Hergé, contraint à adapter un scénario qu'il n'affectionne ni ne maîtrise. Il s'agit donc d'une véritable représentation allégorique de l'état mental du père de Tintin. L'aventure Objectif Lune se déroule en Syldavie, pays qui est également une transposition imagée de la Suisse. Cette illustration est donc particulièrement touchante et riche de sens ! Comme le dit Hergé en juillet 1948, « Tintin est las de ses aventures » et son créateur en est « à l'aventure intérieure ». Estimation 20 000 - 25 000 € Sold for 52,549 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-10-09
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Jean-pierre gibrat

JEAN-PIERRE GIBRAT GARE D’AUSTERLITZ Illustration originale, 2015. Signée. Encre de Chine, encres acryliques de couleur, aquarelle, rehauts de gouache sur papier aquarelle. 41,5 × 54 cm (16,34 × 21,26 in.) C’est ici le contrepoint de la grande scène de départ de la gare d’Austerlitz, vue de l’intérieur du train. Remarquable dans sa gestion des différents plans, dans le rendu des matières, des drapés, des détails… Voici une image qui parle, où chacun des personnages suit sa propre trajectoire : le soldat allemand qui essaie de se frayer un passage avec arrogance, Jeanne encore imprégnée de bonheur… À ses côtés, une femme bien mise qui prend le départ avec appréhension, un jeune homme qui en a vu d’autres et que d’autres combats attendent, et puis ce poulbot au bord des larmes… « Partir, c’est mourir un peu » disait le poète. « Figurez-vous que je les ai connus, ces wagons, enfin les rescapés, en fin de carrière, avec des rhumatismes dans les essieux, douloureux aux aiguillages, et je les aimais bien, malgré leur odeur poisseuse de tabac froid, malgré leurs couloirs étroits où les bagages se tamponnaient à qui mieux-mieux. Mais sous l’Occupation, c’était pas la même limonade, les trains étaient rares, et les couloirs, alliage compact d’hommes-valises, devenaient impraticables, enfin c’était bien compliqué d’y circuler, sous l’Occupation tout était compliqué. Enfin, c’est l’idée que je m’en fais. » J-P G.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-11-19
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Rare Circa 1910-15 Ty Cobb H&B (Early Signature Model) Game Bat

Rare Circa 1910-15 Ty Cobb H&B (Early Signature Model) Game Bat, Ty Cobb's compulsion to succeed on the diamond prompted one sportswriter to record his belief that he was "possessed by the furies." Cobb broke into the majors in 1905 after being purchased from the minor leagues for $750. Manager Hugh Jennings made him a regular outfielder in 1907 and Cobb became the youngest player to win the batting title. It was the first of 12 batting crowns, including nine in a row, both still records today. When he retired from the game of baseball in 1928 he held 90 major league records, most of these achieved with his bat. Most telling of his superiority is his .367 lifetime average. Accomplished over a 24-year career, it is a daunting mark that will likely never be approached. This bat, demonstrating one of the earliest signature brand styles used by then JF Hillerich & Son Co., is documented by the most renowned independent bat experts as one of the finest examples among the scarce population of Cobb game bats known. Used during the height of his reign as baseball's most feared and dominant competitor, the 34.5 inch, 38 ounce JF Hillerich & Son Co. double "dash-dot-dash" bat is composed of the finest ash and features Cobb's facsimile signature stamped on the barrel directly adjacent to the centerbrand. In addition to being among the earliest Cobb gamers we've encountered, its usage characteristics are sublime.  Most likely appearing just as it did when it last left Cobb's hands, this bat exhibits evidence of tremendous use with a handle crack and slight checking (grain separation) from repeated ball contact on the back barrel. Many ball marks are visible on the right and left barrel. Also visible on the bat are cleat marks on the right, left and back barrel and a 1 inch chip on the knob. The handle has been taped on a wide spiral pattern to enhance the grip, a common trait for early Cobb bats. Cobb's use of this rare, early signature brand style is photo documented in Richard Bak's book "Ty Cobb, His Tumultuous Life and Times". A detailed photo on page 70 of that book shows Cobb holding a similar bat with the same barrel brand. The era of this bat, distinctive labeling characteristics, and its sheer beauty contribute to its status as one of the finest Cobb bats ever to have surfaced. LOA from John Taube of PSA/DNA (Grade A8.5).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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A fine exhibition quality model of a 10 'bc inch gauge Royal Scot 4-6-0 Loc...

A fine exhibition quality model of a 10 'bc inch gauge Royal Scot 4-6-0 Locomotive and Tender No 46139 The Welch Regiment , built by Mr Louis Raper of Failsworth to the design by Sir William Stanier in 1943, the steel and copper boiler having fittings including safety valves, regulator, blower,whistle, steam brakes, injectors and blow down valves, incorporating fully external detailing and smoke deflectors, fine quality cab with twin sight glasses, drain cocks, regulator, lever operated sliding doors to firebox, reverse control, steam brake control, drivers seat and oak planked floor. Chassis with three cylinders fitted and Walschaerts valve gear, fine lubricating system, draincocks, sanding gear,steam brakes, vacuum pipes,leaf springs and quality finished wheels, fluted motion and smoke deflector plates as fitted to this later example. The tender with water scoop, hand feed pump, brakes to all wheels and fitted steps, handrails and lamp irons. The model finished in British Railways Brunswick Green Livery with lining and polished brightwork.. Length 146 Cab Width 19 'bd The original Scot Class was designed and built by Sir Henry Fowler and rebuilt by Sir William Stanier FRS of which this is an example.Often refered to as the Rebuilt Scot being derived from the LMS Royal Scot class introduced in 1927 with parallel boiler and single chimneys. The original locomotives of this design were finally withdrawn from service in December 1962. * Sir William Stanier FRS. Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS at the companies Crewe works. * Louis Raper of Failsworth, Lancashire was regarded by Jack Salem as possibly the finest all round locomotive builder of his time.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-04-25
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Charlie Chaplin/Wheeler Dryden

Charlie Chaplin/Wheeler DrydenA glass fronted display cabinet -- 36x22 1/8in. (91.4x56.2cm.) containing: -- A bowler hat and cane used by Chaplin in many films from 1916 onwards, the hat ink-stamped on the inside leather hatband Charles Chaplin Film Corporation, Alfred Reeves, General Manager and additionally stamped with manufacturer's details Walter Langdon Hat M'F'G Co. Philadelphia, U.S.A. and original studio label blindstamped The Chaplin Studios Inc. California -- Size 6 7/8; the bamboo cane -- 33¾in. long, similarly with original studio label; -- A cast iron lever-operated office die-stamp for the Chaplin Studio blindstamp - The Chaplin Studios Inc, California, Incorporated, March 1916 -- 9¾in. high; -- A publicity photograph of Charlie Chaplin circa 1915, signed and inscribed Faithfully, Chas Chaplin -- 7x5in. (17.8x12.7cm.) framed; -- A postcard of Sydney Chaplin, circa early 1920s, signed and inscribed in black ink Good Luck & best of success from your loving brother Syd -- 3½x5½in. (8.9x14cm.); a postcard of a London pub The Lord Clyde and its publican Spencer Chaplin, [Charles and Sydney Chaplin's grandfather] -- 3½x5½in. (8.9x14cm.) and photograph and postcard of Wheeler Dryden imitating Charlie Chaplin in tramp guise taken in India, circa 1915 -- 5½x3½in. (8.9x14cm.) [postcard mounted over the photograph] in common frame; -- A publisher's mock-up CHAPLIN, Charles "The Kid" (The Film) While In The Making, the fly leaf signed and inscribed With compliments Arthur W. Kelly, 19 printed pages followed by blanks, original cloth-backed boards with design by Chaplin on upper cover, [n.d. but 1920?] -- A walking stick of turned wood simulating ratan with Indian white metal knob engraved W.D. Bombay, India, 1918 -- 35in. (88.9cm.) long

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 1995-12-14
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907?1983)

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907?1983) LA FRESQUE DU CENTRE WALLONIE-BRUXELLES À PARIS Ensemble de 2 panneaux à l'encre de Chine pour le dessin ayant servi à la réalisation de la fresque se trouvant dans l'escalier du centre Wallonie-Bruxelles à Paris. Ensemble réalisé en 1979. 51,5 x 73 cm l'un. On y joint la mise en couleur sur 2 panneaux de même format. Un certificat des Studios Hergé sera remis à l'acquéreur. Superbe, très décoratif. Ce 26 septembre 1979, Hergé avait tout lieu d'être heureux : non seulement, on inaugurait dans le Centre Wallonie-Bruxelles de Paris une fresque tout à la gloire de la série des aventures de Tintin, mais de plus, on proposait au public de découvrir au même endroit Le Musée imaginaire de Tintin, une exposition aussi belle qu'instructive. La conception de cette fresque, qui devait venir prendre place sur le mur d'un escalier menant du hall d'entrée au foyer du Centre Wallonie-Bruxelles, ne fut pas une mince affaire. Il fallait non seulement tenir compte de la configuration particulière de cet escalier – ses déclivités spécifiques – mais aussi veiller à bien répartir les différents personnages retenus pour y figurer en grandeur nature et cela, sur une dizaine de petits murs répartis en accordéon sur toute la surface concernée. Si le résultat fut à la hauteur des espérances, il en alla tout autrement pour l'escalier qui devait être construit au pied de la fresque : il ne vit jamais le jour ! La fresque réalisée par Hergé et ses collaborateurs se voulait témoigner de l'univers fascinant des aventures de Tintin, à travers quelques-uns de ses personnages les plus emblématiques, nonobstant la présence de plusieurs seconds rôles, toutefois tout aussi importants dans la conduite de l'action que les « vedettes » comme Bianca Castafiore, Tchang, Séraphin Lampion ou Nestor. Par certains objets, elle évoque aussi la pluralité des mondes visités par Tintin et les continents traversés : fusée lunaire, bouteille de Loch Lomond, champignon de L'Étoile Mystérieuse, totem du chevalier de Hadoque, perroquet des îles lointaines, idéogrammes chinois ou yéti des sommets himalayens, tout est là pour nous ramener à ces milliers de pages des récits imaginés par le maître de la Ligne Claire. Une telle réalisation ne s'improvise pas, raison pour laquelle Hergé prit son temps de dessiner avec soin l'ensemble de la composition ; un ensemble très attrayant qui fut reproduit sous forme d'une sérigraphie offerte aux invités de l'inauguration du Centre Wallonie-Bruxelles à Paris, le 26 septembre 1979. Limitée à 300 exemplaires, signée par Hergé, elle fut encartée dans un portfolio dans lequel figuraient d'autres reproductions de grands artistes belges. Le dessin d'origine, de 420 sur 200 mm, avait été réalisé à l'encre de Chine et colorié à la gouache, à l'aquarelle et à l'écoline. C'est à partir de ce travail que furent ensuite réalisés les croquis définitifs qui allaient être reproduits dans la fresque. On notera au passage les modifications, les différences et les nuances apportées à la création de départ. On notera surtout la perfection du trait et le soin mis à colorier les surfaces dans ces quatre originaux, produits exemplaires de la petite fabrique de rêves des Studios Hergé ! Estimation 35 000 - 45 000 € Sold for 50,525 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2012-11-23
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Christy mathewson signed 1900 first major league (rookie) contract

No one American athlete, in any sport, has ever summed up the values of his era more than the pitcher Christy Mathewson. This “Greek God in flannels,” as the publicists liked to call him, appeared on the major-league diamond, during the first years of the 20th century, as if in answer to the national yearning for a gentleman-hero. Baseball gloried in its rough-necked, hard-drinking, roustabout spirit when Mathewson first stepped upon its muddy fields. “He handed the game,” wrote dean of sportswriters Grantland Rice, “a certain… indefinable lift in culture, brains, personality.” Mathewson would be remembered today even if he had lacked those golden attributes of body and spirit. At a point when baseball was a pitcher’s game, dominated by such immortals as Walter Johnson, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Chief Bender, and Rube Waddell, Mathewson’s strong right arm made him a star second to none. Over a period of sixteen full seasons of play with the New York Giants, he won twenty or more game thirteen years and thirty or more games four years. In 1908 he pitched his team to victory a record making thirty seven times. But Christy would be on the books for no other reason than his performance at the legendary World Series of 1905 against the Philadelphia Athletics. All five games pitched were shutouts, three of them Mathewson’s. In his first victory, 3-0, he allowed only four hits; his second 9-0, he allowed four again; his third, 2-0 he gave six outs. Throughout all three games, only one man walked, and only one man reached third. It would be counted the greatest World Series pitching ever seen. Surprisingly, however, the golden boy of baseball developed a reputation for hard luck. Fred Merkle’s infamous baserunning blunder cost Matty and the Giants a pennant in 1908 that would have capped off his greatest season, and “Snodgrass’s Muff” lost a World Series for Mathewson when the outfielder failed to catch an easy fly. These disappointments were minor, however, next to the central tragedy of his life. One of a number of baseball players who volunteered for service in World War I, he returned from France with his lungs weakened by poison gas and then came down with tuberculosis. After recuperation in a sanitarium, he decided to return to baseball as president of the Boston Braves. That decision cost him his life. After a relapse brought on by being overworked, he was dead at forty five. This is Christy Mathewson’s own copy of his first major league baseball contract. At the time it was signed, Matty, at age 19, was fresh off the campus of Bucknell, and the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity house. In a handwritten letter (sold in our Dec. 2, 2004 auction, copies of which are included), Mathewson weighs his prospects as a big leaguer and alludes to the possibility of him signing this very contract. The letter dated July 26th, 1900 reads in part; {…When the Virginia League collapsed, as it did about ten days ago, the owners of the Norfolk and Portsmouth teams decided to hold men, playing games with each other and teams from North Carolina. By doing this they could ‘hold’ their men, and sell any of them if possible. I was one of those marked for the auctioneer and was sent here to the New York team for a trial. If the mgr. here wants me after three or four weeks trial, the New York Club will buy me, in which case I would get a better salary. At present I have a lame shoulder and don’t care a rap whether they buy me or not. I have finished a couple of games, after the other teams – Pittsburgh and Brooklyn - had ‘knocked’ out our pitcher. I have not made a very brilliant success in these two games. …} In the season that followed (1901), the fair haired and handsome Mathewson won 20 games with a miniscule 2.41 ERA, and was well on his way to becoming one of the most respected athletes of his time. He would continue his pitching virtuosity for 17 more summers, and in the process became the idol of millions – the first great sports celebrity of the 20th Century. Provenance: Ex - Barry Halper Collection. Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Mr. Halper on his Yankees letterhead explaining that he obtained this from Christy Mathewson’s daughter-in-law who was bequeathed some of his effects when her husband, Christy Mathewson Jr. passed away. Additional LOAs from JSA and PSA/DNA. Condition: The contract has typical folds and shows minor soiling and is overall excellent condition. Mathewson’s fountain pen signature is a 9/10.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-12-10
Hammer price
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PROMPTBOOK FOR "LET'S MAKE LOVE"

PROMPTBOOK FOR "LET'S MAKE LOVE" Typescript, 33 pages (of 35, without pages 23 and 25, typed on rectos only). Bound in yellow wrappers (several pages detached and loosely inserted, some pages with creases and other signs of use, covers worn). MARILYN MONROE'S COPY, evidently used in the filming, with her lines circled in red crayon on many pages, and with very extensive notes in pencil and ink on inside wrappers and throughout the text. Random notes on the front cover include "The situation," "enjoy,""just work for the situation," and "dream sequence:everything you do-do more/Amanda in a dream." On the inside front cover are a number interesting inscriptions, including "using my intelligence [sic]/am not a baby any longer," "she's a person/I am playing her," and (possibly referring to her character, Amanda) "For the theatre/she'll do anything." The inside back cover too contains some interesting self-admonitory notes: "Accept it, summon all strength needed - save myself for other things/don't fight/enjoy when I can," and "Not intense/leads to only tension/relax." Every page of the promptbook is marked up, with Marilyn's lines underlined or bracketed in bright red ink, there are numerous changes in the lines and cues noted, and the margins of each page contain notes in ink and in pencil, evidently made at different times during the filming. Her extensive notes - which reveal Monroe's very serious and meticulous efforts to perfect her role as "Amanda Dell," the showgirl being romanced by an incognito billionaire - are too numerous to do more than briefly sample here. At the bottom of page 3, she writes "what a small world only theatre"; on page 4, where she is describing the attitudes toward women in the theatre, she writes "types like J. Gould," and reminds herself to say certain lines "like a child." National politics are the subject on a note on page 9, where she has written: "What's wrong with the Democratic party letting Nixon win" (the filming took place during the Presidential contest between Nixon and Kennedy). At page 8, she writes "Joan of Arc" at the top of the page, and, in the margin: "Joan of Arc [sic] hears voices - sound the wind makes in Roxbury around the corner of the house- like a human whistle." At the top of page 14, in bold letters, she writes "don't rush" and "scene made by the silences/don't rush on the silences on the lines rush if necessary." At the top of page 33 appear several provocative inscriptions: "If I have to kill myself I must do it," and "acting must/occur not be made/use something to make/this possible" At the end of her lines, on the last page, she records the final moments of the film: "he kisses her vastly." On the inside back wrapper she has written several telephone numbers including that of Dr. Greenson, her Beverly Hills psychiatrist.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-10-27
Hammer price
Show price

* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.

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