All auctions in one place

  • Toys & Collectibles

    13 254 For sale

    249 750 Sold

  • 0—451 000 000 USD
  • 22 Mar 1989—14 Dec 2017

Filters

Clear all
- USD
Advert
Advert

MUHAMMAD ALI 1966 DRAFT BOARD LETTER

MUHAMMAD ALI 1966 DRAFT BOARD LETTER A significant six-page letter sent by Muhammad Ali on August 23, 1966 to the National and State Directors for the Selective Service, petitioning either one to exercise your jurisdiction in making Ali's local Draft Board re-open and consider anew my classification as it now stands...so that my claim for exemption as a Minister of Religion, which has never before been submitted to the Local Board may be determined. Ali had earlier that year been reclassified, his appeal had been declined, and he was now eligible for immediate induction. When this letter was written, Ali felt that his new request would not be properly considered because of great public pressure upon the Local Board to speedily induct me. Ali also believed that it would be in the best national interest and of justice to all concerned if this matter would be decided by the Selective Service and not by the judiciary. Signed Respectfully Submitted, Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr., A/K/A Muhammad Ali, Special Field Minister, The Lost Found Nation of Islam Based on this letter, Ali's local board did re-open his case, but his request for reclassification was declined. On April 28, 1967 in Houston, Texas, Muhammad Ali refused induction into the armed forces citing his conscientious objection to the war, claiming exemption through the fact that he was a Minister of Religion. Without due process, Ali was stripped of his title, and forced into boxing exile for three and a half years. He was eventually found guilty of draft evasion, sentenced to five years imprisonment and had his passport confiscated. Ali's stand served as a rallying point for anti-war groups. On June 28, 1971, the United States Supreme Court voted unanimously to reverse Ali's conviction. This letter served as a basis for that decision. Together with over twelve hundred pages from the National Archives on Ali's original trial, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals decision and a copy of the Supreme Court decision. Excellent condition. (4)

  • USAUSA
  • 1997-10-19
Hammer price
Show price
Advert

Winsor McCAY 1869 – 1934

Winsor McCAY 1869 – 1934 LITTLE NEMO IN SLUMBERLAND Encre de Chine et crayon bleu pour une pleine page de cette série représentant Little Nemo et un lion. Planche publiée en 1909. Historique ! Encadré. Traces d'adhésif et petites déchirures marginales. Petit manque coin 2ème case à droite. Petites salissures. Petits trous le long des marges et ne touchant pas le dessin. 72 x 57,5 cm. C'est en octobre 1905 que les lecteurs du New York Herald découvrent les aventures d'un jeune garçon aux prises avec ses songes extravagants et ses cauchemars, Little Nemo in Slumberland. Cette bande dessinée, qui succède à Dream of the Rarebit Fiend et Little Sammy Sneeze, met en avant toute l'étendue du talent de dessinateur et de conteur de Winsor McCay et assure sa renommée. Les planches, saisissantes dans leur esthétisme Art nouveau teinté de surréalisme, doublé d'un rythme cinématographique étonnamment moderne, associent une désarmante simplicité graphique, qui s'appuie souvent sur des arabesques donnant l'impression d'effleurer la feuille de papier, et une poésie inédite où se mêlent visions fantastiques, cadre et arrière?plan spectaculaires, personnages étranges. Ce qui frappe immédiatement les esprits est cet univers baroque sublimé par un décor architectural presque sans limites, merveilleusement complexe et métaphorique, aux perspectives originales exploitées dans toutes leurs possibilités afin d'exacerber le délire du héros et entretenir la narration, avec des lignes fantastiques et parfois organiques qui rappellent les influences ornementales d'Otto Wagner ou de Joseph Hoffmann. Winsor McCay part à la découverte du rêve, de sa logique, de sa cosmologie et de ses paysages illusionnistes. Il explore toutes les possibilités de la mise en page avec des effets de cadrage innovants et des bouleversements d'échelle. Son dessin s'amuse avec les apparences, brouille les références pour que la fable s'impose d'elle-même et participe à la création de la planche. Le trait, est le catalyseur des images mentales. Les personnages bougent à peine et se laissent porter par les ondulations de la surface : c'est l'environnement immédiat qui engendre une réaction en chaîne et anime le récit. Ainsi naissent et ressucitent les images, puzzles émotionnels qui se reconstituent avec une inlassable constance. Le rêve de Little Nemo, pris dans une dynamique cyclique, s'amplifie à chaque case et, invariablement, il se termine. Ultime métamorphose. Le réveil est brutal. Encre de Chine et nuit blanche ne font désormais plus qu'un. Estimation 35 000 - 45 000 € Sold for 56,880 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-11-22
Hammer price
Show price

1923 world series ball signed by yankees/giants incl. ruth & stengel

Upon the completion of the palatial Yankee Stadium in 1923 the Giants, who in 1913 had no qualms about asking the struggling Highlanders/Yankees franchise to come in out of the cold and join them as Polo Grounds tenants, had more than a few qualms now. Once considered the "only game in town," despite the presence of two other New York clubs, the Giants had become the second game in town. While the Yankees had yet to win baseball's biggest prize, the World Series, the Yankees clearly were winning the battle for fans. After all, they had the game's top drawing card -- Babe Ruth. And now they had the game's finest park. Soon, the Yankees demonstrated they had major-league baseball's best team, too. A 16-game victory margin in the AL pennant race was an indication of this club's capabilities. Ironically, the player who proved the biggest obstacle in the Yankees' path to World Series supremacy was Casey Stengel, who more than a quarter-century later won lasting fame as manager of the Bronx Bombers. A 34-year-old Giants outfielder, Stengel was the hero of the first Series game at Yankee Stadium and delivered the big blow in the second game there. The Yankees had now gone winless in their last nine Series games against the Giants, losing eight and tying the other. Babe Ruth would put an end to this streak.  In helping his club reach the pinnacle of the baseball world, Ruth had a marvelous Series. He slugged three homers, a triple, a double and two singles, drew eight walks and batted .368. The Giants did thwart the Yankees on one front. When Yanks first baseman Wally Pipp was injured late in the season, the AL club sought permission to use a late-season call-up from Hartford in his place. Giants manager John McGraw blocked the request, and Pipp started all six games. Who was the youngster? A 20-year-old named Lou Gehrig. The 1923 World Series -- which featured two Yankee Stadium crowds in excess of 62,000 and another surpassing 55,000 -- was the first to hit the $1 million figure in gate receipts. More significant, though, was the fact this fall classic was the first won by the New York Yankees. This official AL ball features a combination of 27 signatures from the 1923 World Series combatants. Included are Yankees; Ruth (7/10), Meusel, Bengough, Dugan, Ward, Schang, Shawkey, Bush, and others.  Giants include; Stengel, Meusel, Groh, Youngs, Cunningham, Gowdy, and more.  Signatures of Nick Altrock and Harry Heilmann also appear on the ball. The period notation “1923 World Series” appears above Ruth’s signature. The ball is heavily shellacked and darkly toned while the signatures remain in the 6/10 range on average. Very good to excellent condition overall.  LOA: PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
Hammer price
Show price

Bill Russell 1967-68 Boston Celtics Home Jersey

Bill Russell 1967-68 Boston Celtics Home Jersey, An Olympic gold medalist in 1956, and a twelve-time NBA All-Star, the aloof, introspective Russell was always more concerned with winning than personal stats or individual recognition. If any player in the history of the game could be defined by the single word "winner" it was Russell. The 6' 10" center out of the University of San Francisco was the cornerstone of the Boston Celtics' dynasty of the 1960's. An uncanny shot blocker, Russell revolutionized NBA defensive concepts. A five-time NBA Most Valuable Player and a 12-time All-Star, the angular center amassed 21,620 career rebounds, an average of 22.5 per game and led the league in rebounding four times. He had 51 boards in one game, 49 in two others and a dozen consecutive seasons of 1,000 or more rebounds. His many individual accolades were well deserved, but they were only products of Russell's philosophy of team play. His greatest accomplishment was bringing the storied Celtics 11 championships in his 13 seasons, a record of success that is seemingly unfathomable in team sports today. Until the ascent of Michael Jordan in the 1980's, Russell was acclaimed by many as the greatest player in the history of the NBA. Some consider the issue still worth debating. This Boston Celtics home dureen jersey was worn by the Hall of Fame great during the World Championship season of 1967-68. It can be pinpointed to this specific year based on the fact that this was the last year the Celtics used dureen jerseys and it was also the last year that this style "Wilson" label was used. On the left tail is the "Wilson" label with the size tag "46" adjacent. Across the front of the jersey is the name "Celtics." The player number "6" appears on both the front and back. Both the name and number are made of green tackle twill. Measurable game wear is evident. Another of the many distinctive footnotes to Russell's magnificent career occurred in 1967 when his role was expanded to player/coach for the Celtics. The move made him the first African American head coach in NBA history. LOAs from MEARS (A10) and Grey Flannel.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
Hammer price
Show price

George Mikan 1947-48 Minneapolis Lakers Road Jersey

George Mikan 1947-48 Minneapolis Lakers Road Jersey, The pioneering professional basketball career of George Lawrence Mikan, Jr., nicknamed “Mr. Basketball”, was spent with the Chicago American Gears of the NBL and the Minneapolis Lakers of the NBL, the BAA and the NBA. Playing with thick, round spectacles, the 6'10", 245 lbs. Mikan redefined his sport as a game of so-called big men with his prolific rebounding, shot blocking and his talent to shoot over smaller defenders with his ambidextrous hook shot. An indomitable force, whose game was ahead of it’s time, Mikan won seven NBL, BAA and NBA championships, an All-Star MVP trophy, three scoring titles and was a member of the first four NBA All-Star and the first six All-BAA and All-NBA Teams. Mikan’s level of dominance forced several rule changes in the NBA, among them widening the foul lane - known as the "Mikan Rule" - and introducing the shot clock. After his player career, Mikan became one of the founding fathers of the ABA, and was also vital for the forming of the Minnesota Timberwolves. In his later years, Mikan fought a long-standing legal battle against the NBA, fighting against the meager pensions for players who had retired before the league became lucrative. Mikan, who paved the way for the multi-million dollar contracts enjoyed by today’s NBA stars, tragically became a martyr of his own cause when he died in poverty after a long-standing battle against diabetes. For his feats, Mikan was declared "Greatest Basketballer in the First Half-Century" by the The Associated Press in 1950, was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1959, made the 25th and 35th NBA Anniversary Teams of 1970 and 1980 and was elected one of the NBA 50 Greatest Players in 1996. Mikan’s 1947-48 Minneapolis Lakers NBL road jersey features the team’s initials "MPLS." across the front. Mikan’s number "99" appears on both the front and back of the shirt. The letters and numbers are made of gold matte tackle twill with the body made of a blue wool material. Representing a season in which Mikan led the Lakers to the NBL Championship, the jersey originates from Mikan's daughter who received the jersey from her father. It shows evidence of game-use and appears to have no alterations of any kind. LOAs from MEARS (A8) and Grey Flannel.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
Hammer price
Show price

JOHN LENNON NOT-HEARD-IN-TWENTY-NINE-YEARS RADIO RECORDING

JOHN LENNON NOT-HEARD-IN-TWENTY-NINE-YEARS RADIO RECORDING 1975 Four ten-inch reel-to-reel original broadcast tapes from Philadelphia radio station WFIL that record John Lennon's on-air time when he participated in the 'Helping Hand Marathon' fundraiser from Friday, May 16 to Sunday, May 18, 1975. Heard live only that week-end and only in Philadelphia twenty-nine years ago (and not accessible to anyone since), these recordings come from the personal possession of disc jockey 'Banana Joe' Montione who was the on-air host with Lennon during the whole three days. (Montione owns the intellectual property rights to this broadcast and they are being offered with the tapes.) Heard for approximately three hours (interspersed with songs, commercials and DJ banter), Lennon's voice now seems almost magical. At age thirty-four, he was in top form throughout the broadcast, making jokes, using funny accents, talking about the Beatles, discussing songs that influenced him and generally being witty, smart and sincere. Highlights from his three-day stint include: FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1975 - DAY ONE - Lennon mentions that "someone gave me a picture of Paul, isn't that cosmic? I just talked to him yesterday, he's rehearsing a band in Rye." - When told by 'Banana Joe' that a recent survey indicated that 98 of the public wanted the Beatles to get back together, Lennon says, "I'd like to meet the 2.." - When asked by 'Banana Joe' about the Beatles getting back together, Lennon replies, "we see each other every few months...if we felt like making music, we'd do it in the studio...we've never really sat down to discuss that subject...I always talk about 'them' (the Beatles) as 'them.'" - When learning that the radio station asked Yoko (who was four months pregnant with Sean at the time) to call John, he responds, "She surprised me by calling...you haven't got Paul and Ringo up your sleeve?" - When asked why he wanted to live in the U.S. (Lennon was having difficulties getting his green card at the time), he wholeheartedly responded, "Because I love it...that's why I became a Beatle, because of American music." He also mentions his love of New York City in particular. - Lennon reads pledges throughout; when one comes in from a former student challenging her old classmates from West Catholic Girls High School to donate, Lennon says, "All those West Catholic girls, get off your knees." SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1975 - DAY TWO - Lennon makes witticisms throughout like, "I need me green card!" and "Lift up your kilt and smile." - Lennon calls himself "Dr. Winston O' Reggae." - Lennon mentions that "Elton John is a good friend, a nice guy." - When reading a pledge from a listener who gave $5 to thank Lennon for all he's done for mankind, Lennon responds, "Five dollars? Is that all we can get for mankind?" - When 'Give Peace a Chance' is played, Lennon says, "Tommy Smothers, Timothy Leary...were there...and none of them can play!" - When 'Yellow Submarine' is played, Lennon and 'Banana Joe' sing along to it. When hearing a particular part of the song, Lennon says, "That was Paul with a bag on his head." - When 'Come Together' is played, Lennon says, "This one I can stand." - When "I Should Have Known Better" is played, Lennon plays 'Banana Joe's' harmonica (See Lot 179) live along with the now-famous harmonica intro of the song; afterwards, he says, "That's worth a few bucks." - When asked about his use of a melotron, Lennon replies that he uses one frequently, most famously on 'Strawberry Fields' and that he still has it (the melotron) in his possession. - Lennon reads the weather forecast and misspeaks saying, "May 17, 1985" (instead of 1975); sadly, a day he would never see. - When asked by 'Banana Joe' why he wrote 'Imagine,' Lennon replies, "I was just dreaming of utopia...was writing it down in airplanes...it was no big struggle." - When 'Love Train' by the O'Jays is played, Lennon sincerely calls it "one of the best records." SUNDAY, MAY 18, 1975 - DAY THREE - John explains in detail why he decided to do this particular fundraiser, noting that the money raised for this one "doesn't go to people in offices making $75,000 a year with gold rings on their fingers...it goes to the people...the people actually get the money." - When someone requests that 'Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds' be played, Lennon says, "We'll do it by Elton for a change." - Lennon waxes nostalgic about Elvis Presley and says after he came out of the army, he was "a little different" then says to the audience, "Send some money for an old man's memories." - When talking about 'Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,' Lennon says, "It just so happens I was on both versions (the Beatles' and Elton John's) and I don't regret one of them." - When hearing 'Whole Lot of Shaking Going On' by Jerry Lee Lewis, Lennon nostalgically enthuses, "one of the all great records of all time...I wouldn't be here (as a famous musician) if it weren't for this! Anyone over twenty-five who remembers that record, send in a donation on behalf of John Winston Lennon who loves it so much!" - Lennon's time on-air ends with him introducing the last song of the fundraiser, Elvis' 'Heartbreak Hotel,' and says definitively, "This is what did it" (influencing him and the Beatles to start a band). Accompanying the tapes is an original flyer advertising the fundraiser which reads in part "featuring special guest star John Lennon (in person)," eleven original negatives of snapshots taken during the event (eight of which show Lennon with 'Banana Joe'), a signed headshot of 'Banana Joe' and a signed 45 record of the song 'Cakewalk to the Cup' performed by the disc jockey. Also included is one other reel-to-reel tape of an interview 'Banana Joe' conducted with Paul McCartney after he and his then-band, Wings, performed in Philadelphia in 1976. Approximately twenty minutes long, Paul mentions that 'Band on the Run' is about his recent marijuana bust and he also addresses the issue of the Beatles getting back together: "No one really wants to close the door on it forever...obviously until it happens it's a definite no...but people keep asking about it...but everyone (John, George and Ringo) is still very friendly and cool." (5)

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-06-24
Hammer price
Show price

* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.

Advert