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Tod Browning's personal collection of photographs from his films

Tod Browning's personal collection of photographs from his films Approximately 1700 stills total from The Unholy Three, The Mystic, The Black Bird, The Unknown, London After Midnight, West of Zanzibar, The Big City, Where East is East, Iron Man, Dracula, Freaks, and Mark of the Vampire, with a group of special location and wardrobe reference photographs from Louisiana Lou (a.k.a. Lazy River), comprising forty 8x10 in photos and twenty-five 5x8 in photos; and a box of seventy-six 8x10 stills from Fast Workers (1933), housed in a Kodak box; photographs are housed in custom numbered leather folders stamped "Tod Browning" to front with maker's mark ("Landen") carved in under each upper flap. Together with a leather bound list of volumes. No photos present from The Show (1927) or The 13th Chair (1929) though those films are listed in the inventory; however The Big City and Mark of the Vampire are not listed (but are present). Director Tod Browning (1880-1962) remains one of the most popular and influential figures in horror film history. In the silent and early sound era, Browning worked in many genres, but he truly shone in directing a series of bizarre, intense, and dark films starring the legendary "Man of a Thousand Faces," Lon Chaney. Chaney usually played deeply scarred, vengeful characters in exotic locales in Browning productions like West of Zanzibar (1928) and Where East is East (1929) or gangsters, like in Browning's The Big City (1928) and The Blackbird (1926). But it was in thrillers like Browning's London After Midnight, The Unknown (both 1927) and The Unholy Three that the two truly excelled. After Chaney's death in 1930, Browning's mega-hit Dracula (1931) launched Universal Studios' 1930s golden age of monster movies, and also catapulted Bela Lugosi to movie stardom. Frequently imitated and parodied to this day, Dracula ranks among the greatest horror films of all time. In 1932, Browning drew on his background in the carnival world to create the notorious Freaks, his brilliant sideshow melodrama starring a cast of actual human oddities. Despite its luridness, the film was ultimately humane, presenting the sideshow freaks in a much kinder light than the film's "beautiful" leads. But Freaks was his downfall, its critical and popular reception beyond disastrous, all but ending his career. In 1933, Browning traveled to Louisiana to take special location and wardrobe photographs for Louisiana Lou and worked on a script for the film with authors William Faulkner and Erskine Caldwell. Browning did not direct the final film (released as Lazy River (1934)), and only made a few other films after Freaks, including Mark of the Vampire (1935) and Miracles for Sale (1939). This is Browning's massive personal archive of stills from his own films. An archive of this scope from a Golden Age Hollywood horror filmmaker of Browning's stature is virtually unheard-of. It is extraordinary in many ways, beginning with its sheer size: 103 stills from Dracula, including 36 featuring Lugosi; 151 from Freaks; 68 from Mark of the Vampire; 201 from The Unholy Three (including some extras); and 99 from The Unknown. Two of Browning's "lost" films with Lon Chaney are also thoroughly represented here: 159 from London After Midnight, and 364 from The Big City (including duplicates). Lon Chaney is thoroughly represented throughout the photographs from his films in many scene stills and behind-the-scenes images. Approximately 25 of the stills from Browning's Iron Man prominently feature Jean Harlow, and there are several portraits of her. A large portion of the photographs from Browning's years at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer are not standard "finished" publicity photos and have their individual filming dates printed into the photographs themselves, as was customary at the studio. Many others have various studio stamps, such as "Director Proof" and "Rush Proof." Also exceptional is the photographs' overall condition: many show very little wear and appear to have barely been handled in decades. (Please refer to condition report for further information.) This archive includes an assortment of extremely rare images, including 4 set stills from Dracula, along with an uncropped scene still of Lugosi and Helen Chandler revealing the top of a set; very rare images of Joan Crawford in Browning's The Unknown, along with unusual behind-the-scenes photographs from it and the other Chaney films; a series of three photographs from The Unholy Three of the deleted scene where little person Tweedledee (Harry Earles) attacks a little girl; and 8 photographs, including 2 featuring Browning, from West of Zanzibar's deleted "Human Duck" sequence depicting Lon Chaney in a costume later worn by Olga Baclanova in Freaks. Approximately thirty minutes of Freaks was cut after its dire initial preview. There are some very rare photographs of missing scenes from the film here, most notably two photos of Wallace Ford and other lead players in the original "Tetrallini's Freaks and Music Hall" ending. Two poignant behind-the-scenes images from Freaks show the film's cast of sideshow performers eating at a long outdoor table: they were ostracized from the M-G-M commissary because their presence was considered too horrific. Tod Browning bequeathed these photographs and other personal effects to his friend William S. Hart, Jr. and they have been in Hart's family ever since.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-11-30
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Lou Gehrig 1923-25 H&B Sidewritten Rookie-Era Professional Model Game Bat

Lou Gehrig 1923-25 H&B Sidewritten Rookie-Era Professional Model Game Bat, Before he was the Iron Horse, Gehrig was known as Columbia Lou. He attended Columbia College from 1921 to 1923, playing both football and baseball. After his sophomore year, Gehrig signed with the Yankees for a $1500 bonus against the wishes of his beloved mother. In later years, Gehrig recalled why he had abandoned his intention to go on from Columbia to become an engineer: "There's no getting away from it," he told the New York Times in 1939, "a fellow has to eat. At the end of my sophomore year my father was taken ill and we had to have money. I had been playing on the college ball team and I had had eight offers to join professional clubs. So when there was no money coming in there was nothing for me to do but sign up." As first baseman for the New York Yankees for seventeen seasons, Gehrig played in 2,130 consecutive big league games (a record that would stand for more than fifty years), batted .361 in seven World Series, and broke many other major-league records. Known for his remarkable endurance, Gehrig was a four-time Most Valuable Player, earned a lifetime batting average of .340, and hit 493 home runs, including 23 grand slams, a record that still stands today. In 1939, stricken by a rare form of paralysis now widely known as Lou Gehrig's disease, he retired from the Yankees with the most graceful and moving speech ever uttered by an American athlete. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in a special election in 1939, and was the first baseball player ever to have his uniform number retired. This bat, one of the premier pieces in the esteemed Bill Nowlin Collection, dates from Gehrig's earliest seasons in the big leagues. Its 1923-25 labeling period coincides with the first chapter of a career that plays out like an epic novel. Manufactured by Hillerich & Bradsby, the 36 inch, 36.2 ounce war club shows evidence of outstanding use with a handle crack that has been repaired with one nail and some checking (grain separation) from repeated ball contact on the back barrel that has also been repaired with several nails. All of the manufacturers markings are quite pronounced, including Gehrig's facsimile signature on the barrel. Many ball marks are visible on the right, left and back barrel. Also visible on the bat are cleat marks on the handle and barrel and the remains of a shipping label. The handle had been taped with one tape ring, but the tape has been removed. Further enhancing the bats appeal is faint (illegible) side writing visible on the side of the barrel indicating that the bat was sent back to H&B for replication upon termination of use. Given the quality, appearance and era of this Lou Gehrig gamer, it would be a centerpiece in any baseball collection of any magnitude. LOA from John Taube of PSA/DNA (Graded GU6).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Joe DiMaggio H&B Professional Model Bat Used in The 1947 World Series (MEARS & PSA/DNA Graded 10)

Joe DiMaggio H&B Professional Model Bat Used in The 1947 World Series (MEARS & PSA/DNA Graded 10), In 1947 the Yankees road to the World Championship went through Brooklyn. The subway series pitted New York led by MVP Joe DiMaggio against Brooklyn and a rookie named Jackie Robinson. The Yankees prevailed in seven games with DiMaggio hitting home runs in games 3 and 5. Offered here is Joe DiMaggio's beautiful Hillerich & Bradsby model D29L professional model bat from that historic series. Uncracked and showing evidence of light use (typical of bats made late in the season for World Series use), it exhibits ball marks visible on the left barrel and scuffing to the right, back and front barrels. The model number (D29L) is stamped into the knob. The bat is accompanied by two letters of provenance outlining the history of the bat. The first letter is dated Dec. 23, 1991, from Al Curcio of Center Field Collectibles; the second is from Mr. Joseph Cortese, nephew of Mr. Joseph Delle Fave, the original owner of the bat. Both letters recount how Mr. Delle Fave obtained the bat on Columbus Day, 1947. Mr. Delle Fave suffered a tragic accident in 1936 at the age of fourteen in a bakery shop explosion, which resulted in the loss of both of his arms. On Columbus Day, 1947, the town of Union City, New Jersey, sponsored a testimonial dinner on behalf of Mr. Delle Fave. Joe DiMaggio was scheduled to attend the dinner, but forced to cancel at the last minute. Mr. Jackie Farrell, who was employed in a public relations capacity with the New York Yankees, attended on Mr. DiMaggio's behalf. Mr. Farrell hand delivered this DiMaggio bat personally to Mr. Delle Fave and indicated that the bat had been used on the fourth day of October, 1947, a game in which Mr. DiMaggio homered at Ebbets Field in a 2-1 Yankees win over the Dodgers. Mr. Farrell, who was also a writer for the "Hudson Time Dispatch", authored an article pertaining to Mr. Delle Faves' accident in 1936, as well as the dinner in 1947. A critical factor in verifying that this Joe DiMaggio pro model bat could have been used in the 1947 World Series, is establishing the date the bat was manufactured. Specific attributes of this bat, including the oversized knob, length and weight, perfectly match bats ordered by DiMaggio on Sept 17th and Sept 25th 1947 according to H&B factory records. Although not noted on the manufacturer's ordering record, the Sept 25th order for 2 bats is DiMaggio's World Series order. Made of the finest quality ash, the bat has been immaculately preserved in virtually the same state as it was when it last left the hands of The Yankee Clipper after vanquishing their Brooklyn rivals. Length: 35.75 inches. Weight 34 ounces. Additional LOAs from MEARS (Graded A10) and John Taube of PSA/DNA (Graded A10), both of which support its use in the 1947 World Series.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, 1956

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS, 1956 A pair of "Tablets" from the Cecil B. deMille epic starring Charlton Heston. The Ten Commandments is arguably the ultimate Hollywood studio achievement. With a cast of thousands, including dozens of major stars and character actors, the four hour film was ten years in the planning and two years in actual production. The artistic design of The Ten Commandments was extravagant, even by Mr. deMille's exacting standards; instead of using the studio research department, respected egyptologist Henry Noerdlinger was hired. Based on his findings, thousands of drawings, sketches, costume designs, storyboards and, of course, the Tablets themselves were created. Their design was the focus of much pre-production attention. Traditional differences among the world's religions in the sequence of the Commandments were considered, as well as discrepancies in the number of Commandments on each Tablet. Research at the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago suggests that the lettering would have been of early Canaanite style developed during the late Bronze Age, the era of Moses. In a key moment in the film, when Moses comes down from the mountain carrying the Ten Commandments, and finds his people worshipping the Golden Calf, he throws the Tablets into the den of iniquity, which is swallowed up by the opening earth. Fiberglass Tablets, as well as Tablets carved from Mt. Sinai red granite, were used in the making of The Ten Commandments. The Tablets are made of thick, richly hewn fiberglass and are marked on the back Left side facing plaque and Right side facing plaque--24H x 11 3/4L x 1 1/4D in.

  • USAUSA
  • 1995-06-28
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Ted Williams 1955 All-Star H&B Game Bat (Graded A10)

Ted Williams 1955 All-Star H&B Game Bat (Graded A10), Nobody was more dedicated to the art of putting bat on ball than Ted Williams, a human hitting machine equipped with near-perfect eyesight, lightning reflexes, powerful forearms and unnerving patience. The "Splendid Splinter" also came with a heavy dose of arrogance and self-confidence, the most conspicuous traits of a baseball maverick who terrorized American League pitchers from 1939-60. If Williams wasn't the greatest pure hitter of all time, an acclaim which he fervently sought, he certainly was of his era. But the self-disci­pline that so defined Williams the hitter often was lost on Williams the man. His feud with the media might have cost him three MVP awards - in 1941 when he posted baseball's last .400 average (.406) but lost out to New York's Joe DiMaggio; in 1942 and '47 when he won two Triple Crowns but lost out in voting to Yankees Joe Gordon and DiMaggio. The Williams bottom line still is filled with superlatives - two MVPs, six batting crowns, 2,654 hits, a .344 average, 521 home runs, four homer titles and five RBI crowns - numbers that could have been considerably higher if he had not lost four prime seasons to military service during World War II and the Korean War. In eighteen of Ted Williams' nineteen major league seasons he was voted to the American League All-Star team. This bat, one of the finest examples known, All-Star Game or otherwise, was used by Williams during the 1955 mid-summer classic held in Milwaukee's County Stadium. According to H&B factory records, this bat is the only one of its kind, shipped to Williams for the event on July 8, 1955. Measuring 35" and weighing 31.5 oz., the signature model W166 is ideal by every measure collector's use in assessing the quality of game used bat. Its markings are pronounced, including William’s facsimile signature on the barrel and custom notation "All-Star Game Milwaukee 1955" in block letters. The usage wear is extraordinary for an All-Star bat, with distinct stitch marks and grain swelling on the barrel suggesting it likely saw service even after its use in that game. A heavy application of pine tar remains on the uncracked handle. Overall, the bat's visual presentation is superb, remaining exactly as it was the last time it was brought to the plate by arguably baseball's greatest pure hitter. LOA from MEARS (A10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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1887 n172 old judge advertising display featuring an uncut sheet

When most collectors think of 19th Century baseball cards, the N172 Old Judge series is generally the first that comes to mind. The seminal issue is not only the first major set of baseball cards ever produced, but also the most challenging to complete. Issued one to a pack of Old Judge brand cigarettes beginning in 1887, the catalogue of known examples recorded to date includes over 500 different players in a variety of nearly 2,000 poses. Original uncut advertising sheets for the issue, such as that offered here, are considered to be the pinnacle of baseball card related display pieces. As a whole, the existence of N172 advertising sheets is extremely limited, included a few that reside in the Smithsonian. The offered example is a point of purchase enticement consisting of an uncut sheet of 24 player images mounted on a thick, rigid cardboard backing. Printed advertising on the mount appears in red. Among the subjects featured are “Smiling Mickey” Welch, Ned Hanlon, Doc Bushong, Mike “$10,000 Kelly” and Jack Glasscock. The photo portion is in remarkable EX-MT to NM condition with outstanding contrast and only a few minor scratches and light foxing. The red beveled border of the mount is like new with the original hanging cord intact at the top. The field of baseball card collecting can trace it’s origin to the N172 Old Judge set, and as such the offered piece is a monument to the hobby. It has been archivally framed using corner mounts.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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Nat NEUJAN Né en 1923

Nat NEUJAN Né en 1923 TINTIN ET MILOU Sculpture en bronze représentant Tintin et Milou réalisée en 1976 selon la technique dite « à la cire perdue », signée Nat Neujean. Cachet de la fonderie Pinella de Andreïs et Figli à Milan sur le socle. 70 cm. En 1947, « Les Amitiés Belgo - Françaises » firent appel à Nat Neujean pour réaliser un buste d'André Malraux. Connaissant l'admiration de Malraux pour Tintin, l'Ambassade de France conseilla à Neujean de se rendre chez Hergé. C'est à partir de cette date que se nouera entre le sculpteur et Hergé une amitié réciproque. Vers 1951, Hergé et les « Éditions du Lombard » eurent l'idée de commercialiser des figurines en vinyle des personnages de Tintin avec la société de jouets pour enfants MIRIM. Ils proposèrent à Nat Neujean de réaliser les modèles en plâtre. Le sculpteur se montra réticent, étant donné que les personnages n'étaient pas sa propre création. Finalement, à partir de dessins qu'Hergé lui avait fournis et après de nombreuses entrevues, Nat Neujean modela la première sculpture de Tintin de 20 cm de haut. Le père de Tintin et Milou fut très surpris du résultat : il découvrait pour la première fois son héros en trois dimensions ! Suivront Haddock, Tournesol et les Dupondt. Peu de temps après, Hergé commanda à Nat Neujean un buste de Tintin de 40 cm de haut, taillé en pierre de France. Celle-ci trônera fièrement sur le bureau d'Hergé à partir de 1954. En 1958 toujours à la demande d'Hergé, Nat Neujean réalisa son portrait en bronze. Malheureusement pris par le temps, Hergé ne posa que très rarement pour le sculpteur, néanmoins Nat Neujean en fit un portrait saisissant de ressemblance. En 1975, à l'occasion du 30ème anniversaire du Journal Tintin, Raymond Leblanc (Directeur des Éditions du Lombard) et Guy Dessicy (Publiart) ont l'idée de faire une surprise de taille à Hergé : une statue en pied de Tintin et Milou de plus d'un mètre quatre vingt ! Et c'est tout naturellement que sa réalisation fut confiée à Nat Neujean. Il commença par entreprendre une première étude préliminaire en terre de 70 cm de haut, d'abord sans Milou (il l'intégrera par la suite quand l'œuvre sera plus aboutie). Un mois sera nécessaire à Neujean pour réaliser l'œuvre finale de 180 cm de haut. Celui-ci confronté à divers problèmes de proportions fera appel à son fils Bertrand, alors âgé de 8 ans pour prendre la pose. Quant à Milou l'entreprise fut plus complexe, le modèle (le chien d'Alain Baran, secrétaire particulier d'Hergé) ne se montra pas très docile, mais Neujean tenait à avoir un vrai chien en face de lui, afin de donner à Milou une touche plus personnelle. Le compagnon de Tintin sera placé à coté de lui, mais tournera le dos à son maître témoignant de sa propre existence et de son indépendance. Inauguré le 29 septembre 1976, en présence d'Hergé et de Nat Neujean (ainsi que de nombreux invités de marque), au parc du Wolvendael à Uccle, le monument sera faute de temps présenté en plâtre patiné et coulé par après en bronze à la Fonderie Milanaise de Nat Neujean (De Andreis & Figli) selon la technique de la « cire perdue ». Après plusieurs tentatives de vol et de dégradations, le monument fut placé momentanément en lieu sûr au Centre Culturel d'Uccle, où l'œuvre peut toujours être admirée aujourd'hui. Estimation 50 000 - 60 000 € Sold for 63,200 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-11-22
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Circa 1917-21 ty cobb h&b game used bat (mears a9)

Ty Cobb's compulsion to succeed on the diamond prompted one sportswriter to record his belief that he was “possessed by the furies.” Cobb broke into the majors in 1905 after being purchased from the minor leagues for $750. Manager Hugh Jennings made him a regular outfielder in 1907 and Cobb became the youngest player to win the batting title. It was the first of 12 batting crowns, including nine in a row, both still records today. When he retired from the game of baseball in 1928 he held 90 major league records, most of these achieved with his bat. Most telling of his superiority is his .367 lifetime average. Accomplished over a 24-year career, it is a daunting mark that will likely never be approached. This bat was one of Cobb’s, used during the height of his reign as baseball’s most feared and dominant competitor. Never before seen in the marketplace, this recently discovered example has been documented by the most renowned independent bat experts as one of the finest examples among the scarce population of Cobb game bats known. The 34 1/2 in., 35.4-oz. H&B signature model “dash-dot-dash” bat is composed of white ash and features Cobb's facsimile signature stamped along the barrel. Most likely appearing just as it did when it last left Cobb’s hands, this bat displays all of his trademark customizations, including his unique wood treatment process. Cobb was known to "season" his bats with tobacco juice, a process by which Cobb would take a "wad of chew" and copiously apply the saliva/tobacco mix along the surface of the wood. This bat appears to have been treated in just that manner, as evidenced by the darkening of the wood on the barrel. Remnants of Cobb’s customary taping appears along the handle. A number of cleat marks born from the work of Cobb cleaning his spikes can be found on the end of the barrel. These distinctive characteristics are such that one can envision it still wrapped in the calloused hands of Cobb while standing ready at the plate. LOA from MEARS (Grade A9).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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1957-58 wilt chamberlain kansas jayhawks home jersey worn during his

Wilt Chamberlain’s enormous impact on Kansas was immediately established on the KU basketball court and spilled over to the bus seats and lunch counters of the white campus and community. A high school All-American who led Overbrook, PA High School to two City Championships and scored 2,252 points, including 90 in one game and measuring a lengthy seven feet tall, Chamberlain was by far the most coveted schoolboy recruit in the country. Surprising many, he opted for Kansas and its basketball tradition set by its legendary coach, “Phog” Allen. However, in his freshman year in 1955, upon entering a Kansas City restaurant that refused to seat him after he had driven all night from hometown Philadelphia, Wilt found out quickly that much of this area was still segregated. Three years later, Wilt gave up his senior season and joined the Harlem Globetrotters. By then, thanks to Chamberlain’s presence, many of the segregation barriers in the Kansas City area were beginning to come down.  "He was instrumental in helping to integrate public facilities around here in the late '50s," said Bob Billings, a Lawrence, KS, businessman and former Kansas teammate, in a 1999 AP article. Chamberlain’s impact was felt immediately on the court where, as part of the”frosh” team, he scored an incredible 42 points in the annual freshmen/varsity game, scoring an upset of 81-71over the senior squad in front of a near capacity crowd of 14,000. That season the Kansas varsity, without Wilt, finished fifth in its conference, Allen was forced into mandatory retirement and KU looked to Chamberlain to restore the team to glory in the 1956-57 season. Chamberlain did not disappoint. In his sophomore season, wearing number 13, he was the nation’s fourth leading scorer (29.6 ppg) and fourth-best rebounder. The Jayhawks won the Big Seven Championship and made the NCAA tournament. On the eve of the tournament, Allen announced to the national press that his former team would coast to an NCAA trophy with “Wilt, two sorority girls, and two Phi Beta Kappas” in the lineup.” Wilt and Kansas breezed through the field until they met the undefeated North Carolina Tar Heels in the NCAA Finals in Kansas City. UNC, coached by Hall of Famer Frank McGuire, sought to neutralize Chamberlain and used the NCAA rules to their utmost effect. Without a shot clock, the Carolina team ran a slow down offense. In a triple-overtime game, Wilt put up only 14 shots against the Carolina zone and its slowdown tactics. In the first overtime, each team scored one basket. The second overtime featured both teams going scoreless. In the third overtime, down a point, KU set up a play to Chamberlain. Unfortunately, the Kansas player who took the ball out of bounds, Ron Loneski, threw the ball (and the national championship) away in the waning seconds (can anyone say Fred Brown?), and the game, 54-53. Despite losing, Chamberlain was named the tournament MVP and was a unanimous first team All-American. Chamberlain’s skills were so far advanced than his competitors that several rule changes were enacted to harness his awesome ability and level the playing field. These rules changed included widening the lane and instituting offensive goaltending. In his junior season, Wilt found he was constantly double and triple teamed by opponents when he played offense and the stall strategy employed when he played defense to deny him a chance to block or rebound for long stretches. Despite these tactics, Chamberlain still excelled and dominated. During this season he changed his number from 13 to 12, the only year in his high school, college, Globetrotters and NBA career that he wore a different number from 13. Wearing this number 12 home jersey, Wilt was named to the Sporting News First Team All-America and once again a unanimous choice First Team All-America, despite being injured for part of the season. In his two varsity seasons at Kansas, Chamberlain scored 1,433 points, average of 29.9 per game, and grabbed 877 rebounds, an average of 18.3 per game, in 48 varsity games, including 36 rebounds in one game against. Iowa. Chamberlain decided to turn pro after his junior season. He was frustrated that his team didn’t make the NCAA tournament and even more so by the tactics employed against him, citing that he wanted to be paid for being double and triple teamed every night. The Philadelphia Warriors had picked him in 1955 as a territorial pick, but he was ineligible to play in the NBA until his college class graduated in 1959. So, in the 1958-59 season, Wilt played a season with the Harlem Globetrotters for a salary estimated to be $50,000, an astronomical sum for the era. The seven-foot-one “Big Dipper” joined the NBA's Philadelphia Warriors in the 1959-60 season and was an immediate attention grabber and dominating force. Chamberlain became the first player in NBA history named MVP and Rookie of the Year in the same season, and along the way set eight NBA season records. Even through his Hall of Fame career, his time at Kansas was dear to Wilt. In 1998, KU invited Chamberlain to return to celebrate the school's 100th anniversary of basketball. When Wilt entered, 16,000 fans gave him a standing ovation. “When he came off the court,” his friend and teammate Billings remembered, “He said ‘Bob, I've had a lot of great days in my life, but this is the greatest day of my life.' " Wilt Chamberlain has autographed this Kansas junior year game worn home jersey in black sharpie on the front panel under the number 12 and added “12” in sharpie. Also included is the 1957 NCAA Final Four Basketball Championship Program listing all four teams, 28 pages, in excellent condition; 12 issues of the “Jayhawker” Kansas State student magazines yearbooks, bound in three years, from 1956-1958, the 1957 binder is autographed by Chamberlain in blue sharpie. All are in overall excellent condition, binders have some foxing and age wear. This jersey was originally obtained directly from Wilt Chamberlain by SCP Auctions President David Kohler. An LOA from Mr. Kohler is provided. Additional LOAs from MEARS (Grade A10) and PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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Collection of (48) early autographed hall of fame postcards

Originating from a Cooperstown, New York family, these postcards have never before been offered publicly, having only recently emerged from a safe deposit box, where they’ve laid dormant for most of the 65 years that have passed since they were signed. These postcards are the earliest of several versions produced by the Hall of Fame throughout the years and were initially sold exclusively through the museum gift shop. They were obtained by an usher at the Hall of Fame during its inaugural year of operation in 1939. Thrilled by the baseball legends that passed through the doors during Cooperstown’s Baseball Centennial Celebration that year, he purchased these cards on the spot and gathered as many of their autographs as he could.   The subject categories of the postcards, relative quantities, and signatures offered in this group breakdown as follows; (16) Hall of Fame player plaques (signature matches plaque): Cy Young, Tris Speaker, Walter Johnson, Babe Ruth (extraordinarily rare), Honus Wagner, Connie Mack, Grover Cleveland Alexander, Ty Cobb, and Larry Lajoie.  The following are all signed on Mathewson HoF plaque postcards; Eddie Collins, George Sisler, Arky Vaughan/Lloyd Waner, Ford Frick/W.J. Slocum,  Lefty Grove (on back), McConnell (on back, possibly George) and Dom DiMaggio/Joe Glenn (back of Keeler postcard). (4) exterior shots of the Hall of Fame: Earle Mack/Charlie Berry/Sam Chapman/Earle Bruckner (back), Jim Tadley/Joe Gantenbein/Bill Nagel (back), Dee Miles/D. Lodegraw (back), Arthur James (back). (19) exterior shots of Doubleday Field (all signed on back): Wayne Ambler/Chubby Dean/George Caster, Tom Henrich, Joe Biggs, Steve Sunden, Frank Crosetti, Bill Dickey, Joe Gordon, John Schulte, Bump Hadley, Tim Sullivan, Babe Dahlgren, Atley Donald, Paul Schriber, Charlie Keller/Red Rolfe, Johnny Murphy, Eric Tipton, Buddy Rosar, Monte Pearson, Oral Hildebrand.  (5) Christy Mathewson busts: Walt Yaeger, Mel Ott/Bill Jurges, Doc Prothro/Moe Arnovich/Syl Johnson, William Harridge, and one unidentified. (2) Abner Doubleday Bbaseball: L.H. Addington, one unidentified. (1) Hall of Fame façade: Casey Stengel. (1) Doubleday portrait: John J. Evers/William McKechnie. The signatures are generally quite bold, averaging 8-10/10. Cards vary from VG-EX/MT, with most being about EX. LOA’s from JSA and PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-12-10
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Jean-pierre gibrat

JEAN-PIERRE GIBRAT LES CONGÉS RÊVÉS Illustration originale, 2015. Signée. Encre de Chine, encres acryliques de couleur, aquarelle, rehauts de gouache sur papier aquarelle. 97 × 57 cm (38,19 × 22,44 in.) C’est un chant du départ qu’entonne ici Gibrat. Il célèbre le mouvement de tout un peuple en vacances profitant des premiers congés payés de l’Histoire. Ce qui frappe dans la joyeuse description de cette multitude, c’est l’harmonieux balancement entre la rigoureuse composition de l’image, campée sur sa ligne de fuite et son point de vue en surplomb, et l’anecdote : ces avancées sociales saluées en manchette d’un quotidien alors que la guerre menace en Europe, le chef de train scrutant l’heure en sifflant, sans oublier le croisement improbable de Jeanne et Mattéo, deux personnages emblématiques de Gibrat qui ne s’étaient jamais rencontrés jusqu’ici. « C’était la première fois qu’ils allaient voir la mer. Peut-être même la première fois qu’ils prenaient le train, le vrai, l’ambitieux qui ne se contente pas de la banlieue, et pas un vicieux qui vous trimballe jusqu’au front, non, un bienveillant qui emmène les pâlichons au soleil ou vers les grands-parents, les cousins qui prêteront pour les campeurs un bout de terrain sans cabinets. Alors, tu parles s’ils étaient joyeux, c’était une belle foire de départ vers une petite éclaircie d’existence. Deux semaines, pas plus, alors fallait pas gaspiller, mais c’était pas dans leurs habitudes. Depuis toujours, les trains roulaient à gauche. En 36, ça ne faisait aucun doute. » J-P G.

  • FRAFrance
  • 2016-11-19
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Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.