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1955 mickey mantle new york yankees home flannel jersey – photo matched

The husky, blond, switch-hitting 19-year-old with blacksmith arms, sprinter speed and an unassuming, home-spun charm arrived in 1951 as their heir apparent to center fielder Joe DiMaggio, a New York idol who was playing his final season. In the Babe Ruth-Lou Gehrig-DiMaggio tradition that had helped the Yankees achieve baseball superiority for three decades, Mantle, 200 pounds of unprecedented power from both sides of the plate, eventually won over fans with his tape-measure home runs and an almost-mystical aura that would transcend his 18-year major league career. Mantle, who played in 16 All-Star games, was plagued by a series of knee problems that compromised his all-around skills and prematurely triggered a decline, but his power hitting feats remain legendary. Fans still talk about the myriad moon shot homers that cleared the most distant confines of American League ballparks. Of Mantle’s power, Casey Stengel once marveled, “That kid can hit balls over buildings”. And not only were his home runs long, they were frequent. Two times Mantle topped the 50 plateau-in 1956 when he won a Triple Crown (.353,52 homers, 130 RBI’s) and in 1961 when he hit 54 while joining teammate Roger Maris in the chase of Ruth’s single-season record- en route to a career total of 536. And 10 times he complemented that power with .300-plus averages that helped him earn three MVP awards. But Manlte’s greatest legacy was written in the 12 World Series in which he set numerous fall classic records, including home runs (18), RBIs (40), runs (42), extra- base hits (26) and total bases (123). Manufactured by Spalding, this Yankees home pinstriped jersey was issued to Mantle for the 1955 season. Tagged exclusively for Mantle, it features blue chain stitching on the front tail that reads “Mantle, 55-7” referencing the player, year of issue and uniform number. Every technical aspect of this uniform is as it was when Mantle wore it in 1955 with the exception of the number “7” on back having been professionally restored. The jersey retains superb visual appeal, demonstrating substantial, but not excessive usage wear. Mantle has signed the front of the jersey below the front tail tagging. In addition to the jersey’s outstanding physical traits, it is supported by no less than five different “photo matches“. Every Yankee pinstriped flannel garment of this era is as unique as a snowflake due to the variance of the pinstripe patterns each uniform featured. The alignment of the pinstripes on this jersey (most readily apparent at the seams of the shoulders, collar, and ‘NY’ logo on front) provide exact matches to numerous photos of Mantle from 1955, some of which are shown here (others included). The most significant of these photo matches is an image of Mantle in the Yankee Stadium locker room after a game in which he is presenting a fan with a signed baseball in exchange for a ball he had hit for a 486-foot home run that day (shown). This photo, catalogued by Corbis, was captured by legendary photographer Herb Scharfman, and confirms this to be the only documented Mantle “home run jersey” we are aware of. LOA from MEARS.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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TINTIN - N°17 ON A MARCHÉ SUR LA LUNE

TINTIN - N°17 ON A MARCHÉ SUR LA LUNE Casterman, 1954. Édition originale française, dos rouge, 4ème plat B11. Album exceptionnellement enrichi d'un dessin dédicace de Hergé représentant Tintin et Milou en buste, accompagné d'une dédicace de 5 lignes « à .... qui, elle, ira peut-être réellement un jour sur la lune. Avec les amitiés de Tintin, Milou et Hergé 31.3.57. ». Album agrémenté également du menu d'époque du Carlton pour un repas organisé par le Journal Tintin et le Club Tintin Aviation, ainsi que de l'invitation du Club Tintin aviation pour une séance de dédicace organisée le 31 mars 1957 à Lille. Cet album a de plus été exceptionnellement enrichi d'une dédicace de chacun des 6 astronautes qui ont réellement mis le pied sur la lune, à raison d'une dédicace d'un des astronautes de chacune des 6 expéditions qui ont atterri sur la lune. - Buzz Aldrin : Apollo 11 Commandant et pilote de « Eagle », premier engin habité à atterrir sur la lune, écrit : 'First moonwalker after Tintin' (Premier équipage à avoir marché sur la lune après Tintin). - Alan Bean : Apollo 12 'I might find steps of Neil's and Buzz's and Mike's, I don't know for sure about Tintin' (J'aurais pu trouver les traces de pas de Neil, de Buzz et de Mike, mais je ne suis pas sûr pour ce qui concerne Tintin). - Edgar Michell : Apollo 14 'Longest walk on the moon after Tintin' (J'ai réalisé la plus longue marche sur la lune... après Tintin). - Dave Scott : Apollo 15 'First to drive on the moon after Tintin' (Premier à avoir conduit sur la lune après Tintin). - Charlie Duke : Apollo 16 'Apollo 16 LPM' (Commandant d'Apollo 16). - Gene Cernan : Apollo 17 'I m not sure Tintin was the first moonwalker, but I am sure to be the latest (up to now)' (Je ne suis pas certains que Tintin ait été le premier à avoir marché sur la lune, mais je suis certain d'être le dernier... (jusqu'à présent). Est joint un document représentant la photo de chaque astronaute sur la lune et leur photo en 2010, dédicaçant cet album de Tintin. Un document exceptionnel et unique, tant d'un point de vue Historique que pour tout Tintinophile avertit. Estimation 9 000 - 11 000 € Sold for 100,003 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2011-11-26
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) L’ÉTOILE MYSTÉRIEUSE Copie dite

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) L'ÉTOILE MYSTÉRIEUSE Copie dite de sécurité d'une planche au format « à l'italienne », composée des strips 21, 22, 23 de l'Etoile Mystérieuse, publiés dans le journal « Le Soir » respectivement les 12, 14 et 15 novembre 1941. Encre de chine et crayon bleu. 35 x 46,5 cm. Encadrée. L'un des plus beaux passages de cette aventure. Exceptionnel. Pièce de musée. Une lettre explicative des Studios Hergé sera remise à l'acquéreur. Historique : Le 5 Février 1942, avant même d'employer Alice Devos le 15 Mars de la même année comme coloriste, Hergé se rend chez Casterman à Tournai. De grands projets innovants, boulversant sa façon de travailler, sont en route. En effet le passage à la couleur et la refonte en 62 pages de ses albums changent sa manière de travailler et notamment le format de ses planches. Hergé, travaillant seul, doit découper celles-ci au format rectangulaire en 4 strips. Il commence par « L'Etoile Mystérieuse ». Avant le découpage il réalise, vraisemblablement lui-même, une « copie de sécurité » à l'aide d'une table lumineuse à l'encre de Chine sur papier à dessin avant de découvrir le système des bromures ancêtre de la photocopie. Il se doit de garder une trace pour une éventuelle publication dans un quotidien étranger. Il est difficile pour un artiste d'effacer définitivement son travail et connaissant l'importance qu'Hergé accordait à ses propres dessins et sachant également, comme il le déclara et l'écrivit, qu'il n'autorisait jamais personne à encrer ses personnages sur ses planches, il y mit donc tout son talent et son habilité. Cette pièce représente une des rares opportunités d'acquérir une planche au format qu'Hergé utilisait pendant la guerre. So-called security copy for a page in landscape format, composed of strips 21, 22, 23 of " L'Etoile Mystérieuse ", respectively published in " Le Soir " journal of November 12th, 14th and 15th, 1941. Indian ink and blue pencil. 35 x 46,5 cm. Framed. One of the most beautiful sequences of this adventure. Exceptional. Museums quality. An explanatory letter of the Studios Hergé will be delivered to the purchaser. History: February 5th, 1942, even before employing Alice Devos as colourist on March 15th of the same year, Hergé went to Casterman in Tournai. Important projects of innovation reclaimed a change of his working manner. The upcoming colouration and the rewriting of his comic books on 62 pages changed his style and in particular the size of his works. Working alone, Hergé had to cut the works in rectangular format in 4 strips. He started with " L'Etoile Mystérieuse " Most probably by his own, he realized a " security copy " in Indian ink on drawing paper by using a light table before the cutting and before he discovers bromide methods, the precursor of the photocopy. To keep a copy is necessary for all eventual publication in foreign newspapers. Always difficult for an artist to delete definitely his own work and referring to the importance Hergé gave to his drawings as well as conscious of his declarations and writings, that he never authorized somebody to ink his features on his pages, here he used all his talent and ability. Therefore this item presents the rare opportunity to purchase a page with the format that Hergé used during the war. Estimation 70 000 - 80 000 € Sold for 98,407 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-03-13
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CAMELOT

CAMELOT Frederick Loewe, composer, and Alan Jay Lerner, lyricist. "CAMELOT, " based on T.H. White's The Once and Future King. Opened in New York, 3 December 1960. Production staged by Moss Hart Cinema version released 1967. "IN SHORT THERE'S SIMPLY NOT, A MORE CONDUCIVE SPOT FOR HAPPILY EVER- AFTERING, THAN HERE IN CAMELOT" Frederick Loewe's personal archive of manuscript music generated during the creation of this remarkable musical. Its admirers, it is well known, included President and Mrs. John F. Kennedy, whose White House circle was often likened to Camelot. This present group is the only surviving collection of manuscript music from the Lerner-Loewe collaboration on Camelot; the Library of Congress Music Division possesses a full fair copy manuscript of the work, given by the composer in the 1960s. This archive comprises working manuscripts: early drafts of melody and lyrics for key songs, plus several more fully realized piano-vocal sketches; all but these latter are entirely in the hand of Frederick Loewe. Totaling: 53 pages, folio, comprising 10 title-sheets on music staff paper, 43 pages of music in Loewe's hand and that of his principal arranger/copyist, many of the early melodic sketches with corrections and revisions. Contents: "Overture (beginning), manuscript piano short score, 2 pages, probably in hand of Lowe's copyist/arranger, Albert Sirmay "I Wonder what the King is Doing Tonight," (Arthur), autograph manuscript melody and lyrics, by Loewe, 2 pages, title sheet dated 24 January 1959 by Loewe "Camelot," (Arthur) autograph manuscript melody and lyrics, by Loewe, 2 pages. "C'est Moi," (Lancelot), autograph manuscript melody and lyrics, by Loewe, 2 pages "The Lusty Month of May" (Guinivere), autograph melody and lyrics, by Loewe, 2 pages, title sheet dated 16 February 1959 by Loewe "Then You May take me to the Fair" (Guinivere, men), autograph manuscript melody without lyrics, by Loewe, 2 pages "The Quests" (Lancelot, Prisoner, Sirens, Knights), autograph manuscript melody and lyrics, by Loewe, 3 pages "Fie on Goodness," autograph manuscript melody and lyrics, by Loewe, 3 pages "Fie on Goodness," manuscript piano-vocal score, 13 pages, probably in the hand of Loewe's copyist/arranger, Albert Sirmay "If Ever I Would Leave You" (Lancelot), autograph manuscript music and lyrics, by Loewe, 1 page "End of Act I Finale," manuscript piano short score, probably in the hand of Sirmay, 1 page "Overture (ending)," manuscript piano short score, probably in the hand of Sirmay, 2 pages "We All Had a Glorious Time," autograph manuscript melodic sketch, by Loewe, 1 = page [Fragment] Manuscript musical dialogue between Mordred and Morgan Le Fay, with transitional music, possibly in autograph of Sirmay, 1 page. "That's What Simple Folk Do," manuscript piano-vocal score, page 17-18 only, probably in the hand of Albert Sirmay. Camelot

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-11-18
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN VOL 714 POUR SYDNEY Mine

¤ HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN VOL 714 POUR SYDNEY Mine de plomb pour le crayonné de la planche 37 de cet album publié en 1968 aux éditions Casterman. Crayonnés dans les marges latérales. Au verso, 3 story-boards à la mine de plomb pour la planche 38 de l'album. Hergé faisait de nombreux essais d'enchaînement de séquences et de cases, de mise en page, avant de se lancer dans le crayonné définitif. Il s'agit donc ici de crayonnés préparatoires. Au verso également, dans la partie inférieure droite, 3 études de positions et un crayonné abouti représentant Allan tirant, pour la case 4 de la planche 38 de l'album. Les 3 études de positions ont été faites pour la réalisation de la case 12 de la planche 37 de l'album, représentant Rastapopoulos furieux se tenant la joue, ordonnant à Allan de reprendre la poursuite. 50,5 x 36,8 cm. Encadrée. Excellent état malgré une déchirure de 3,5 cm dans la marge droite, une autre de 1 cm dans la marge gauche, quasiment invisibles à l'œil nu. Papier très légèrement jauni, comme toujours. Superbe planche ou l'on voit 6 fois Tintin et autant de fois le capitaine Haddock. Allan retrouve Rastapopoulos et se lance à la poursuite de Tintin et ses amis. Célèbre passage du sparadrap, rappelant celui de L'Affaire Tournesol. HERGÉ – MARCEL STAL : UNE RENCONTRE LÉGENDAIRE De 1965 à 1970, l'actuel propriétaire de ces 2 planches (présentées sous les lots 98 et 99) vivait à Bruxelles, fréquentant assidûment la galerie Carrefour, alors dirigée par le grand marchand d'art Marcel Stal et située Galerie Louise à Bruxelles. Certains samedis, quelques passionnés, artistes et amateurs d'art se retrouvaient autour d'un verre de vin pour discuter de l'Art avec un grand « A » et de la création artistique. L'un de ces samedis, où Hergé était présent, il participa activement aux conversations. Ce jour-là, l'actuel propriétaire des œuvres ici présentées parla longuement avec Hergé de la place de la bande dessinée dans le monde de l'« Art ». Ce sujet passionnait Hergé qui, depuis quelques années, était également passé du statut d'artiste au statut complémentaire de collectionneur d'art contemporain. La discussion se focalisa sur l'idée que la bande dessinée était un « Art » à part entière, à élever au même rang que la peinture, le dessin ou la sculpture. Pour l'actuel propriétaire des œuvres présentées aujourd'hui, les planches de bandes dessinées n'étaient des œuvres d'art qu'à leur état de crayonné et perdaient ce statut à partir du moment où elles étaient encrées, le geste et l'expression de l'esprit s'en trouvant par là même gommés ; la mise en couleur ainsi que la publication ne faisant qu'altérer ce statut initial d'œuvre d'« Art ». À ce moment de la discussion, tous les gens de la réunion étant partis, Hergé proposa à notre vendeur de le revoir afin de lui montrer et de lui offrir un échantillon de son art « true art », et ce à la seule condition qu'il accepte d'aller le voir à son studio la semaine suivante. C'est au cours de cette seconde rencontre qu'Hergé lui offrit ces 2 planches. La galerie de Marcel Stal était située à deux pas des studios Hergé. Ce dernier la fréquentait souvent en tant qu'amateur et collectionneur. Autodidacte, Hergé est venu à l'art grâce à sa rencontre avec Marcel Stal, ancien colonel de l'armée belge et collectionneur des céramiques de Charles Catteau. « Stal était un gentleman plein d'humour et d'impertinence qui aurait pu jaillir d'un roman anglais », se rappelle Pierre Sterckx, ami de Stal et d'Hergé, professeur à l'Ecole nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris et critique d'art. C'était un gaffeur distrait comme Hergé les affectionnait. Le « mille sabords ! » serait de lui. Marcel Stal accueille dans sa galerie-forum tout le monde de l'art, y compris son voisin Hergé. Cette galerie inspira Hergé au point de devenir la « Galerie Fourcart » dans l'album inachevé « L'Alph-Art » ! Des rumeurs ont circulé selon lesquelles, à partir du Vol 714, Hergé se serait désengagé de son œuvre, laissant à Bob de Moor et au studio le soin de les réaliser. Ces deux crayonnés d'Hergé prouvent tout le contraire. Le trait y est incisif et bouillonnant. Les repentirs, ajouts, dérives en marges sont la preuve que le père de Tintin n'était pas fatigué de sa table à dessin ! Une des deux planches insiste sur l'expressivité des visages : Rastapopoulos est à la limite de l'explosion et le papier risque d'y être transpercé par le crayon ! L'autre donne à voir un petit chef-d'œuvre de motricité. Les déplacements rapides de Tintin flirtent avec l'art d'un montage cinématographique. Une petite merveille ! Pierre Sterckx Ces 2 planches se suivent. Très rare opportunité pour un collectionneur avisé de pouvoir acquérir 2 planches consécutives d'un album de Tintin !! Ces crayonnés, sommairement esquissés au verso, nous permettent de mieux appréhender la manière dont Hergé travaillait, de manière empirique, construisant ses planches au fur et à mesure de l'avancée du récit, sans carcan préétabli. La mise en page et la succession des cases et des strips pouvait être remise en question jusqu'au moment de la réalisation de la planche encrée. Estimation 60 000 - 70 000 € Sold for 94,044 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-10-09
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HERGÉ

Tintin - Tintin et le Temple du soleil Cette exceptionnelle suite de 6 cases à l'encre de Chine (11x64 cm, encadrée) est tirée du "Temple du Soleil", la première aventure du héros dans le journal Tintin de 1946 à 1948. Elle est publiée, à cheval, sur les pages 8 et 9 du numéro 19 du 8 mai 1947. On y retrouve Tintin, Milou et Haddock au prise avec le mystérieux indien qui tente de les décourager de poursuivre leur voyage. C'est Zorrino qui les appelle dans la dernière case. Si de nombreuses cases ont été écartées lors de la refonte en 2 albums comme nous les connaissons maintenant des pages publiées "à l'italienne" de cette aventure, la petite histoire veut qu'une des raisons qui aurait poussé Hergé à écarter celles-ci vient du fait que Jacques Van Melkebeke, son ami et collaborateur, avait écrit une fausse lettre d'un père outragé par l'utilisation du mot clysopompe, "terme hautement inconvenant", comme insulte. Tout le monde sait que clysopompe est le mot savant pour une pompe à lavement... Ce strip original de Tintin et le Temple du soleil est une chute de la première aventure du petit reporter publiée dans le journal Tintin entre 1946 et 1948. Hergé avait dessiné l'histoire dans un format à l'italienne. Plusieurs séquences de toute beauté seront coupées lors du montage de l'album. Ce passage de la rencontre avec l'Indien Huascar au pont de l'Inca est un témoignage rare de l'une de ces scènes coupées

  • FRAFrance
  • 2013-12-08
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HERGÉ

Tintin - Tintin et le Temple du soleil Cette exceptionnelle suite de 6 cases à l'encre de Chine (11x64 cm, encadrée) est tirée du "Temple du Soleil", la première aventure du héros dans le journal Tintin de 1946 à 1948. Elle est publiée, à cheval, sur les pages 8 et 9 du numéro 19 du 8 mai 1947. On y retrouve Tintin, Milou et Haddock au prise avec le mystérieux indien qui tente de les décourager de poursuivre leur voyage. C'est Zorrino qui les appelle dans la dernière case. Si de nombreuses cases ont été écartées lors de la refonte en 2 albums comme nous les connaissons maintenant des pages publiées "à l'italienne" de cette aventure, la petite histoire veut qu'une des raisons qui aurait poussé Hergé à écarter celles-ci vient du fait que Jacques Van Melkebeke, son ami et collaborateur, avait écrit une fausse lettre d'un père outragé par l'utilisation du mot clysopompe, "terme hautement inconvenant", comme insulte. Tout le monde sait que clysopompe est le mot savant pour une pompe à lavement... Ce strip original de Tintin et le Temple du soleil est une chute de la première aventure du petit reporter publiée dans le journal Tintin entre 1946 et 1948. Hergé avait dessiné l'histoire dans un format à l'italienne. Plusieurs séquences de toute beauté seront coupées lors du montage de l'album. Ce passage de la rencontre avec l'Indien Huascar au pont de l'Inca est un témoignage rare de l'une de ces scènes coupées

  • FRAFrance
  • 2013-12-08
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LENNON, John, Winston (1940-1980).

LENNON, John, Winston (1940-1980). Poet, prophet, singer, songwriter. THE PLASTIC ONO BAND ALBUM IN ITS ENTIRETY Autograph and typed manuscript with autograph edits and annotations, inscribed and signed "to art with love from John 6/8/70", for Dr. Arthur Janov, London, August 6, 1970. The manuscript consists of 12 pages, quarto, with one page for each track on the album plus an additional autograph note signed "John and Yoko" [all in the former's hand]. The first page is an autograph manuscript for the final track on "Plastic Ono Band," "Mummy's Dead," a small self-portrait with tears coming from Lennon's left eye, also graces the page. Four of the 11 tracks present are original typed pages and would have been typed by Lennon as he developed the songs. On "God", he initially types i-Ching, and then correction-strikes to a lower case 'c'. The other 7 tracks appear to be very good secondary carbon copies. In addition to the one full autograph manuscript, 6 of the pages, therefore 6 of the tracks have some autograph annotations, corrections and edits in Lennon's hand. The manuscript is in excellent condition, and is stapled between two bond pages, thus we know the initial order Lennon was planning. The autograph note reads "to Art and Vivian and all at number nine from John and Yoko and all at number 3". Dr Janov is the author of 1970's Primal Scream which kicked off a small revolution in psychotherapy. In this same year, Lennon contacted Janov at his Venice, California clinic and arranged for him to come to London for the summer to conduct one-on-one primal therapy. The good Doctor found Lennon in a ragged state. But over the sessions, he started to come around, and would go on to become an influential exponent of Primal therapy. "The Plastic Ono Band" was John Lennon's first non-Beatles record following as it did the beautiful swan song that was the White Album. Released on December 11, 1970, 4 months after Lennon compiles this manuscript, it rose as high as number 6 on the charts. It was a definitive departure from what had come before and 'fans' found it hard to adjust. It was brutally honest, razor edged, angry, witness the track "Working Class Hero". Lennon alone with acoustic guitar, stripped down, like a demo from some uncivilized year before, "Keep you doped with religion and sex and TV And you think you're so clever and classless and free but you're still f--king peasants as far as I can see /a working class hero is something to be there's room at the top they are telling you still but first you must learn to smile as you kill if you want to be like the folks on the hill." Lennon makes two autograph edits to "Working Class Hero." But then there's the preceeding track, the ballad "Love." No more beautiful and positive piece of music easily comes to mind. "Love is real real is love love is feeling, feeling love Love is wanting to be loved Love is touch, touch is love, Love is reaching, reaching love Love is asking to be loved Love is free, free is love Love is giving, giving love Love is needing to be loved Love is you love is me Love is knowing we can be". There is one track present which did not appear on the album entitled "How," and one track, "Well Well Well", which is on the album, is not present. A number of the songs vary from the final, published versions. One track, published as "Hold On" appears as "Hold on John" in the manuscript. Lennon's holograph overwrites his typing in a passage "Hold on Yoko, Yoko hold on It's gonna be alright You gonna make it fly" changing it to "You gonna make the flight", which is how the song is published. In "God", "God is a concept by which we measure our pain", after "I don't believe in Beatles" [the conclusion of a long list], Lennon adds an asterisk, and writes below "add your own heroes", basically indicating the point is just don't believe in heroes, believe in yourself. On "Look at Me", with lyrics like "Look at me who am I supposed to be", he writes at the top of the page "(pre-Janov!)". The manuscript was enclosed in a white envelope upon which Dr. Janov has written "John's Lyrics". (2)

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-11-15
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1909-11 T206 WHITE BORDER Eddie Plank PSA 6 (MC) EX-MT

1909-11 T206 WHITE BORDER Eddie Plank PSA 6 (MC) EX-MT, Next to the T206 Wagner card, the T206 representation of Eddie Plank is the most valuable and revered card in collecting circles. Like the Wagner, the reason for its scarcity has long been debated. A fabled broken printing plate is the widely accepted theory as to why only a miniscule number of examples are known to exist today. Also, like Wagner the man, Plank was among the most gifted players of their era. A finesse pitcher with a sidearm sweeping curveball, Plank never played baseball before prep school and joined the Athletics after graduating from Gettysburg College in 1901. He went on to pitch in the majors for 17 seasons, winning 20 games eight times and helping the A's to six pennants in the new American League. Plank's 326 victories rank third-most all-time among lefties, and he posted more shutouts and completed more games than any other left-hander. The overall eye appeal of this extreme rarity is exceptional. Set off by the classic blue background, Plank's portrait is crisply focused and perfectly printed. The card has even margins on both sides, but is centered towards toward the bottom to a degree that garnered an "MC" qualifier from PSA. Free from substantial corner wear and surface wear, it has been graded EX-MT 6 (MC) by PSA. Only five examples of the T206 Plank card have been graded higher by that firm.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN VOL 714 POUR SYDNEY Mine

¤ HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907 - 1983) TINTIN VOL 714 POUR SYDNEY Mine de plomb pour le crayonné de la planche 38 de cet album publié en 1968 aux éditions Casterman. Crayonnés dans la marge inférieure. Dans la marge supérieure, 2 crayonnés à la mine de plomb représentant Tintin courant. Au verso, plusieurs story-boards très sommaires à la mine de plomb pour la planche 39 de cet album. Tintin y est représenté de nombreuses fois même si de manière très sommaire. 54,4 x 36,6 cm. Encadrée. Excellent état, le papier légèrement jauni. Superbe planche d'action où Tintin, Milou, Haddock, le docteur Krollspell et Carreidas fuient Allan et ses sbires et découvrent l'entrée du passage souterrain, guidés par une voix encore mystérieuse qui est celle du télépathe Mik Ezdanitoff. Exceptionnelle planche où Tintin apparaît quasiment sur chaque case ! HERGÉ – MARCEL STAL : UNE RENCONTRE LÉGENDAIRE De 1965 à 1970, l'actuel propriétaire de ces 2 planches (présentées sous les lots 98 et 99) vivait à Bruxelles, fréquentant assidûment la galerie Carrefour, alors dirigée par le grand marchand d'art Marcel Stal et située Galerie Louise à Bruxelles. Certains samedis, quelques passionnés, artistes et amateurs d'art se retrouvaient autour d'un verre de vin pour discuter de l'Art avec un grand « A » et de la création artistique. L'un de ces samedis, où Hergé était présent, il participa activement aux conversations. Ce jour-là, l'actuel propriétaire des œuvres ici présentées parla longuement avec Hergé de la place de la bande dessinée dans le monde de l'« Art ». Ce sujet passionnait Hergé qui, depuis quelques années, était également passé du statut d'artiste au statut complémentaire de collectionneur d'art contemporain. La discussion se focalisa sur l'idée que la bande dessinée était un « Art » à part entière, à élever au même rang que la peinture, le dessin ou la sculpture. Pour l'actuel propriétaire des œuvres présentées aujourd'hui, les planches de bandes dessinées n'étaient des œuvres d'art qu'à leur état de crayonné et perdaient ce statut à partir du moment où elles étaient encrées, le geste et l'expression de l'esprit s'en trouvant par là même gommés ; la mise en couleur ainsi que la publication ne faisant qu'altérer ce statut initial d'œuvre d'« Art ». À ce moment de la discussion, tous les gens de la réunion étant partis, Hergé proposa à notre vendeur de le revoir afin de lui montrer et de lui offrir un échantillon de son art « true art », et ce à la seule condition qu'il accepte d'aller le voir à son studio la semaine suivante. C'est au cours de cette seconde rencontre qu'Hergé lui offrit ces 2 planches. La galerie de Marcel Stal était située à deux pas des studios Hergé. Ce dernier la fréquentait souvent en tant qu'amateur et collectionneur. Autodidacte, Hergé est venu à l'art grâce à sa rencontre avec Marcel Stal, ancien colonel de l'armée belge et collectionneur des céramiques de Charles Catteau. « Stal était un gentleman plein d'humour et d'impertinence qui aurait pu jaillir d'un roman anglais », se rappelle Pierre Sterckx, ami de Stal et d'Hergé, professeur à l'Ecole nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris et critique d'art. C'était un gaffeur distrait comme Hergé les affectionnait. Le « mille sabords ! » serait de lui. Marcel Stal accueille dans sa galerie-forum tout le monde de l'art, y compris son voisin Hergé. Cette galerie inspira Hergé au point de devenir la « Galerie Fourcart » dans l'album inachevé « L'Alph-Art » ! Des rumeurs ont circulé selon lesquelles, à partir du Vol 714, Hergé se serait désengagé de son œuvre, laissant à Bob de Moor et au studio le soin de les réaliser. Ces deux crayonnés d'Hergé prouvent tout le contraire. Le trait y est incisif et bouillonnant. Les repentirs, ajouts, dérives en marges sont la preuve que le père de Tintin n'était pas fatigué de sa table à dessin ! Une des deux planches insiste sur l'expressivité des visages : Rastapopoulos est à la limite de l'explosion et le papier risque d'y être transpercé par le crayon ! L'autre donne à voir un petit chef-d'œuvre de motricité. Les déplacements rapides de Tintin flirtent avec l'art d'un montage cinématographique. Une petite merveille ! Pierre Sterckx Estimation 60 000 - 70 000 € Sold for 91,431 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-10-09
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Ball hit by barry bond’s for his 700th career home run

There are a few numbers in baseball that have come to define greatness – 300, 3,000, 500, and so on. For those elite few who achieve them, a key to baseball’s Hall of Fame awaits, for those who don’t, they are the standard by which their careers are measured. While membership in these “clubs” will secure a players legacy among the all-time greats, there is one club, which for thirty-one years counted its members at two, whose membership beckons only those mortals capable of a seemingly immortal feat of power and endurance. It is baseball’s 700 Home Run Club. Babe Ruth was the first to reach the mark in 1934, and it wasn’t until Hank Aaron gained entry in 1973 that it officially became a club. For decades historians believed that its doors may remained forever locked, until Barry Bonds came knocking late in the 2004 season. Bonds, undisputedly the greatest slugger of his generation, stepped to the plate in the third inning of a game versus the San Diego Padres at San Francisco's SBC Park, with 699 homers to his credit, and the eyes and weight of the world upon him, as it had been for months. Like so many pitchers before, San Diego’s Jake Peavy, knew to avoid any portion of the plate when facing him. But like so many before, he found himself overmatched. Bonds launched Peavy's Pitch 392 feet into the left-center field bleachers. As the ball bounded and rolled its way into the hands of a fortunate fan, Bonds rounded second base, amidst a shower of streamers and fireworks emitting from the scoreboard and light towers in center field. He pointed skyward as he crossed home plate, then took a curtain call demanded by the home crowd’s relentless ovation. Two enormous banners on the light towers were immediately unveiled: One featuring Bonds with "700" below him, and another featuring Ruth and Aaron and their corresponding totals. The historic ball, pre-marked for identification in anticipation of the event, was immediately tagged with a hologram, and authenticated by Major League Baseball officials. It is offered here as the ultimate symbol of baseball’s most extraordinary milestone. Its enduring importance lies not only in the magnitude of the feat it represents, but also that the feat itself is an indiminishable achievement, not a record held out to be broken. As Bonds' marches toward Ruth's once-unthinkable 714 and Aaron's 755, the blast that gained him entry into the 700 Club will always stand as one of the most historic and important home runs in the history of baseball. LOA: PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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Babe ruth circa 1917-21 h&b model 125 h&b 'dash-dot-dash' game used bat

The prototype of the modern superstar, George Herman "Babe" Ruth was an American original, baseball’s first great slugger and the most celebrated athlete of all-time. Ruth’s unparalleled feats on the field were only equaled by his enormous charisma, and appetite for life away from it. His abilities and personality made him a tremendous drawing card throughout the league and by far the highest-paid player of his era. As the National Game was rocked by the revelation of the 1919 World Series fix, the future of the sport was in jeopardy. The emergence of the dyanamic Ruth and his slugging exploits would lift the game from its ugly depths and raise it to America's Pastime. He was the first player to hit 30, 40, 50, and 60 home runs in a big league season, and his slugging style forever changed the way baseball was played. Babe Ruth is also credited with the invention of the modern baseball bat. He was the first player to order a bat with a knob on the end of the handle. Louisville Slugger produced the revolutionary style bat, which he then used to hit 29 home runs in 1919. This is a game used Babe Ruth Hillerich & Bradsby professional model 125 bat that dates from the most pivotal era in his career. Based on factory records, the bat's service coincided with Ruth’s transition from Boston to New York, and his meteoric rise to the top of the sports world. Measuring a “Ruthian” 35 ¾” in length and weighing 43.8 oz., the uncracked bat shows evidence of tremendous game use including numerous ball marks and cleat marks. Lathe marks appear at both ends, and the burned in markings are strong. Made of the finest quality ash, the bat retains rich color, giving it a look and feel that reaches back to the golden years of baseball, when Ruth claimed his throne as King of the Diamond. LOA from MEARS (Grade A9.5)

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-12-10
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Only Known Walter Johnson H&B 1921-31 Script Signature Game Bat

Only Known Walter Johnson H&B 1921-31 Script Signature Game Bat, Kansas-born Walter Johnson was the AL’s premier pitcher in his day, although he played the whole of his career for the lowly Senators. In 21 seasons he won 416 games, amassing a record 110 shutouts and 38 victories in 1-0 games. In the days before electronic speed guns, Johnson was believed to throw the fastest ball in the game, forcing the coined explanation “you can’t hit what you can’t see” from more than one opponent. Johnson’s own experience and adeptness in the batter’s box may have garnered little sympathy for those he faced on the mound. Though justifiably overshadowed by his pitching prowess, Johnson was known as the best hitting pitcher of his era. He was so effective with the bat that the Senators frequently called upon him to pinch hit. The “Big Train” clouted 21 homers during his storied career and in 1925 he batted .433, the highest average ever attained by any pitcher. Game used bats from pitchers are understandably rare, particularly from the pre-war era. Pitchers typically placed only sparse orders for bats, and those few that were ordered generally lasted much longer than those used by their slugging contemporaries. This is the only known example of a Walter Johnson H&B “script signature” game bat, and one of only two known Walter Johnson game bats period (the other is a “block letter”). Hand turned by H&B, its labeling dates the bat to the 1920’s. Heavy use is apparent including grain swelling, stitch marks, slight dead wood and cleat marks on the barrel. Strong manufacturer’s markings include Walter Johnson’s facsimile signature on the barrel, a trait unseen on any other game model bat. Measuring 34 3/4” and weighing 38.9 ozs., it remains uncracked with ideal display quality. To the left of the centerbrand, a small degree of restoration was performed to eliminate some initials that were carved into the barrel. This extraordinary Walter Johnson game bat has never before been offered publicly, having long resided in the collection of Allan Schwartz just outside of the Nation’s Capital. LOA from MEARS (A8).

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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ACADEMY AWARD FOR BEST PICTURE FOR HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY

ACADEMY AWARD FOR BEST PICTURE FOR HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY 1941 Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Best Picture, Oscar presented to Darryl F. Zanuck for the film How Green Was My Valley (20th Century Fox). The gold plated Oscar statuette stands on a reel of film atop a circular black lacquered base. The rectangular brass plaque on base reads, "Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences First Award 1941" the rear plaque reads "ACADEMY FIRST AWARD TO TWENTIETH CENTURY FOX FILM CORPORATION FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY." Zanuck founded Twentieth Century Films in 1933, with the help of Louis B. Mayer and Joseph M. Schenk, later absorbing the bankrupt Fox studio. Zanuck reigned over Twentieth Century Fox for decades and became known as on of the most "hands on" of the studio bosses. Deftly adapted to the screen by writer Philip Dunne, Ford commented that Dunne's screenplay adaptation was, "nearly perfect a script as could be possible." This intense human drama story faced tough competition that year as it was up against both John Huston's The Maltese Falcon (Warner Bros.) and Orson Welles' Citizen Kane (RKO). Citizen Kane was nominated for an impressive nine Academy Awards, receiving only one, for Best Original Screenplay, considered by many to be one of the biggest upsets in Oscar history. Ironically sixty-three years since the release of both films, Citizen Kane is now ranked at number one on the American Film Institute's top one hundred films of all time, while How Green Was My Valley failed to make the list. Zanuck produced this masterpiece directed by fellow Academy Award winner John Ford. This was Ford's third Academy Award for Best Director with his wins for The Grapes of Wrath (20th Century Fox) in 1940 and The Informer (RKO) in 1935. How Green Was My Valley was nominated for a remarkable ten Oscars, winning five for: Best Director, John Ford; Best Supporting Actor, Donald Crisp; Best Art Direction-Interior; Best Cinematography, Black and White, Arthur C. Miller; and Best Picture. Although How Green Was My Valley was shot in black and white, runs for a total of 118 minutes, and was shot on an eighty acre set in the Santa Monica mountains; it was originally intended to be a four hour Technicolor epic, filmed on location in South Wales. The film had to be re-located to southern California with the outbreak of WWII. The film was shot in black and white, abandoning the idea of creating a Technicolor epic to rival Gone With the Wind (MGM) because the Californian terrain did not match the color of the Welsh countryside.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-17
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1927 lou gehrig side written, vault marked louisville slugger bat

This is one of two Lou Gehrig bats that was extracted from their vaults in the 1950’s and displayed in the offices of their Louisville headquarters. The history of this special bat is well known to experts in the field of game used bats, who have had access to the H&B factory and its archives. The unique features of this bat confirm that it was wielded by the hands of Lou Gehrig during the Yankees magical year of 1927. This includes vault marks “G-76” on both the knob and barrel end, as well as period sidewriting that reads “Lou Gehrig 4-16-27”. These H&B factory markings, supported by company records, prove that this bat was sent to H&B after being used by Gehrig, for the purpose of having similar bats made for him. At the time it was used by Gehrig, and returned to the factory, it was a “blank” bat that bore no factory markings of any kind. The practice of sending blank bats to teams or players was common. Players would test these blank bats of different sizes and styles, most likely during spring training, ultimately selecting the ones that suited them best. Gehrig clearly took a liking to this particular model after using it early in 1927. It shows appropriate use including numerous ball marks and cleat marks on the barrel. For years after this bat had outlived its usefulness as a model for reproducing additional game bats for Lou Gehrig, it rested in the H&B vault. Some time in the 1950’s, this bat along with a similar Gehrig example (not sidewritten), were taken from the vault and marked with the centerbrand and facsimile signature it now bears. These bats were then displayed at the corporate offices for decades. This bat is being offered publicly for the first time. Although its labeling post dates its period of use, it survives as one of two known vault marked, sidewritten Lou Gehrig game used bats dating from 1927, the greatest season in Yankees history. LOA from MEARS (Grade A8.5).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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Withdrawal

Babe Ruth 1932 H&B White Hickory Professional Model Game Bat

Babe Ruth 1932 H&B White Hickory Professional Model Game Bat, Babe Ruth was the ultimate hero of a sport with more than its fair share of heroes- a giant of monumental swagger and breathtaking talent who set the standard by which all others would be judged. Sportswriters competed to glorify his name. He was "The Sultan of Swat," "The Colossus of Clout," "The Behemoth of Bust," "The Bambino," and the "Slambino." To find his like, writers reached back into myth. Grantland Rice called his achievement "Homeric, no pun intended." Paul Gallico pronounced him "an American Porthos, a swashbuckler built on gigantic and heroic lines." His position atop baseball in general is rightly proportionate with his position in the field of baseball collectibles. In the latter field, no object is a greater embodiment of his persona than a bat he personally used, the ultimate tool of his trade. The offered example is a superior specimen, dated according to factory records to 1932, a season that brought Ruth his seventh World Championship (fourth with the Yankees) and the baseball history books a piece of its greatest lore, the infamous "Called Shot". Manufactured by Hillerich & Bradsby, the distinctive white hickory model 125 Babe Ruth professional model bat is uncracked and shows evidence of excellent use. Several ball marks are visible on the left barrel. This area of the bat also shows other indications of wear as do the back barrel, right barrel and handle. All barrel brands are deeply burned and appear flawless. The white hickory finish has matured to a warm golden patina. Ruth's factory ordering record indicated the Babe ordered 12 hickory bats of this kind in 1932, two of which were for the World Series. The model is referred to as "his 4-26-28". Measuring 34.75 inches in length and weighing 35.8 ounces, this example possesses ideal usage characteristics and display quality. As such, it has earned high praise from the industry's foremost third party bat authenticators. LOAs from John Taube of PSA/DNA (Graded GU8) and MEARS (Graded A8).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Mickey Mantle Signed H&B 1958 World Series Model Game Bat

Mickey Mantle Signed H&B 1958 World Series Model Game Bat, In the 1958 World Series, the defending champion Milwaukee Braves and perennial champion New York Yankees met again for the second time in as many years. The National League champions had surprised everyone the previous year after overcoming an early deficit to dominate their American League rivals for the remainder of the Series. For the first time, (in a long time) the Bronx Bombers were not the heavy favorites after losing two of the last three Fall Classics. It was new territory for Casey Stengel's Yankees and they were determined to even it up. Many New York sports writers had already turned on their home team and several quoted predictions of the end of baseball's greatest dynasty. The dire predictions looked valid after the first four games left the Braves with a commanding 3-1 lead. But the never say die Yankees stormed back to win three straight, beating the defending champion Milwaukee Braves in seven games for their 18th title, and their seventh in ten years. With that victory, the Yankees became only the second team in Major League Baseball to come back from a 3-1 deficit to win a best-of-seven World Series. Mickey Mantle, the Yankees offensive lightning rod, belted two homers in Game one. Over the course of his career "The Mick" would go on to set the all-time World Series home run record that still stands to this day. Specially manufactured for Mickey Mantle for that epic Series, this Hillerich & Bradsby model T89 bat is uncracked and shows evidence of outstanding use. Many ball marks and ball stitch impressions are visible on the right, left and back barrel. In addition to Mantle's facsimile signature branding on the barrel, the custom designation "World Series 1952 New York Yankees" is also present. Also visible on the bat are blue bat rack streaks. Mantle's number "7" is on the knob in black marker and Mickey Mantle has added his signature to the right barrel in black marker. World Series models, such as this, are highly prized among collectors for their scarcity and historical significance. Given the magnitude of Mantle's collector appeal and the fact that he owned the World Series over the course of his 18-year career, this bat is among the finest World Series model bats ever offered publicly. LOAs from David Bushing and John Taube of PSA/DNA (GU10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Walter Johnson’s Single Signed Ball Attributed to the Last Out of the 1924 World Series With LOA From Johnson's Grandson

Walter Johnson's Single Signed Ball Attributed to the Last Out of the 1924 World Series With LOA From Johnson's Grandson, To this day, the seven-game World Series victory of Walter Johnson's Washington Senators over the powerhouse New York Giants in 1924 represents the pinnacle of baseball in the Capital City. This baseball is attributed as the ball that was used for the last out of the seventh and deciding game of that historic "Fall Classic" played in Griffith Stadium. It marks the Senators first and only World Championship. It has been consigned by Walter Johnson’s grandson, and was passed down to him by his mother, Johnson’s daughter. Before the 1924 season, Johnson announced that he would be winding down after seventeen years as the major league's premier pitcher. At age 37 "The Big Train's" engine was finally slowing. Despite routinely winning more than 20 games and leading the league in strikeouts and ERA throughout his career the "Nats" could only manage to win 90 games twice, and finished within 10 games of the pennant only twice. In 1923, under manager Donie Bush, the Nats couldn't even break .500, going 75-78 despite Johnson’s 17-12 record. So, no one, least of all Washington's long suffering fans, thought that the Senators could even compete for the 1924 American League pennant - particularly with Ruth’s defending champion Yankees and Cobb's Detroit Tigers playing tough ball. However, Nats owner Clark Griffith named 28-year old second baseman Bucky Harris as the fourth Senators manager in four years. "I liked his Harris' cockiness," Griffith said. "He told me he thought he knew as much baseball 'as that old buzzard (John) McGraw,' even if it was his first year as a manager." Infused by Harris’ confidence and Johnson's turn-back-time season where he once again won the pitcher's Triple Crown, the Senators found themselves still in the race in September of 1924. Shocking all of baseball, the Nats then swept the Yanks in a late series to win their first ever pennant by two games, with a 92-62 record.  Posting a 23-7 record, Johnson was unquestionably the year's most dominant pitcher. He was also the sentimental favorite entering the World Series prompting Will Rogers to devote an entire newspaper column to the Nation's love affair with the "Big Train", simply entitled "Everyone's Pulling for Walter." However, it appeared that fate would deliver a cruel blow to the hopes of millions when McGraw's Giants, winners of four straight pennants and two World Series, sent Johnson down to defeat in his first two Series starts. But the Washington club fought back to tie the series, setting the stage for a seventh and deciding game on October 10, 1924. President Coolidge was just one in a packed house of 31,000 that would see one of the greatest games in baseball history. In a dramatic twist no novelist would ever dare try to put over, the final game went into the ninth inning tied and the Senators were out of available pitchers. The tense crowd roared in disbelief upon seeing Johnson, their greatest star for two decades, stroll to the mound. The "Big Train" promptly revved up his engines and held the Giants powerful lineup in check for four nerve wracking innings. Finally, in the bottom of the 12th, Nats catcher Muddy Ruel slapped a single with one out. Up next, Johnson himself hit a single as well. With runners on first and second Senators rookie Earl McNeeley (who has batted .330 in 43 regular season games) stepped up to the plate. McNeely hit a grounder that caromed off a pebble right over the leaping arms of third baseman Freddie Lindstrom and into left field. Ruel, the Nats slowest runner, somehow lumbered around third and scored the winning run. Washington won their one and only World Series. Even Walter Johnson could not contain himself, failing to hold back tears on the field amidst the celebration that ensued. The following day the Nats were greeted with a hero's parade down Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House where they were hailed by President Coolidge and 100,000 ecstatic fans. This ball is signed by Johnson on the sweet spot and notated "World Series 1924" in his hand as well. It is further distinguished by an "X" mark on a side panel. According to Johnson's heirs, the "X" was added as a means to unmistakably distinguish this ball from any other. This keepsake, one of only three balls personally saved by the Washington Senators pitcher, is being offered for the very first time. As though the historical importance and lineage of this treasure were not enough, the vigor of Johnson’s handwriting upon it gives it a presentation quality that is beyond reproach. In addition to authenticating the penmanship PSA/DNA has assigned the writing a grade of 9. Additional LOAs from JSA and a detailed letter of provenance from Hank Thomas, Walter Johnson's grandson, accompany the ball.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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Willis Reed New York Knicks Home Jersey From Historic Performance in Final Game of the 1969-70 Championship Series

Willis Reed New York Knicks Home Jersey From Historic Performance in Final Game of the 1969-70 Championship Series (Knicks First Title), An air of uncertainty filled Madison Square Garden moments before tip-off of Game 7 of the 1970 NBA Finals. "Will he or won't he?" was the question as fans anxiously awaited the fate of Willis Reed, who missed Game 6 with a torn right thigh muscle. Pre-game warm-ups were already underway when suddenly a 6-10 figure emerged from the darkness, limping his way onto the court. The sold­ out Garden crowd erupted as "The Captain" made his way to join his teammates. "I saw the whole Lakers team standing around and staring at this man," said Clyde Frazier, who recorded 36 points, 19 assists, and 7 rebounds in that game. Reed’s valiant return not only shocked the Lakers but set the tempo, energizing his team to victory. Reed won the opening tip from Wilt Chamberlain and scored the team’s first two baskets; both from the perimeter. He never scored again. The Knicks ran the devastated Lakers out of the building, winning 113-99. Said Frazier, "Willis provided inspiration and I provided the devastation." Reeds' inspiring performance in leading the Knicks to their first NBA Championship is the defining moment in the history of that franchise. In a national poll, it was recently voted as the most dramatic sports moment in the history of Madison Square Garden. The epic game seven finale capped a phenomenal season that saw the Knicks win a franchise record 60 games and set a then-NBA record 18 game win streak. Reed played an important role all season in the Knick success, and in 1970 he became the first player in NBA history to be named the NBA All-Star Game MVP, the NBA regular season MVP, and the NBA Playoff MVP in the same season. That same year, he was named to the All-NBA first team and NBA All-Defensive first team, as well as being named as ABC's Wide World of Sports Athlete of the Year. This jersey is not only from Reed's most prolific season, but specifically from his most famous performance on May 8, 1970, during Game 7 at Madison Square Garden. On the left tail of the 1969-70 New York Knicks home jersey is the size tag "48," though the manufacturer's label is missing. Across the front of the jersey is the name "New York" in orange tackle twill on a blue tackle twill backing. On the back is the name "Reed" in blue tackle twill. His player number "19" appears on both the front and back of the shirt also made of orange tackle twill on a blue tackle twill backing. Included are three letters. Two of them are from former Knicks trainer Danny Whelan. In one of the two, written 1992 on Knicks letterhead, Whelan states that this jersey was worn by Reed during the 1969-70 Championship final game. The third letter is from the director of athletics of the Bishop Ford Central Catholic High School who states that this jersey was donated to the school by Roger McCann who worked for Madison Square Garden. The jersey shows great game-use and with the exception of the missing manufacturer's label, appears to have no alterations of any kind. Many specific physical characteristics of the jersey, including puckering on the numbers, can be seen in several photographs of Reed shot during that famous game. Additional LOAs from MEARS (A8) and Grey Flannel.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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K.S. RANJITSINHJI

K.S. RANJITSINHJI The Jubilee Book of Cricket Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1897. 1 vol. extended to 6 vols., 4to., photogravure and half tone plates, the majority signed, margins extensively signed at start of each chapter, extra-illustrated with handwritten letters, signed cabinet cards and signed photographs, many window mounted, contemporary half vellum, flat spines with black morocco labels, decorated in gilt with an art nouveau design, top edge gilt, others uncut. Provenance: William Clafton (bookplates in each volume) - Yorkshire Cricket Club Archives. NO. 50 OF 350 COPIES, signed by the author. Volume I (preliminary leaves, i-xvi, pp. 1-264) contains approximately 135 signatures including W.L. Murdoch, Hugh Trumble, F.R. Spofforth, William Gunn, W.G. Grace (twice), Lord Hawke (twice), W.L. Murdoch, F.S. Jackson, A.C. MacLaren, Lord Harris, a collection of 54 umpires' signatures (1920s), a signed cabinet card from the umpire, Robert Thoms, and approximately 20 handwritten letters including those from S.E. Gregory, G.H. Hirst, R. Peel and W.G. Grace. Volume II (pp. 265-368) contains approximately 680 signatures of players from fifteen various public schools and colleges including Chaterhouse, Clifton, Eton, Harrow, Marlborough, Rugby, Wellington, Westminster and Winchester, also signed by players from Oxford and Cambridge and from The M.C.C., also with approximately 110 handwritten letters including those from F.S. Jackson and C.B. Fry. Volume III (pp. 369-404) contains approximately 435 signatures including A.J. Webbe, the M.C.C. team 1924-25, and signatures of players from Derbyshire, Essex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Kent and Lancashire, also with approximately 80 handwritten letters, one from W.G. Grace. Volume IV (pp. 405-428) contains approximately 380 signatures including Richard Daft, H.B. Daft and William Caffyn, and signatures of players from Leicestershire, Middlesex, Nottinghamshire, Somersetshire and Surrey, also with approximately 70 handwritten letters, including those from A. Lyttelton, P.F. Warner, D.L.A. Jephson, Maurice Reed, and Tom Richardson. Vol. V (pp. 429-454) contains approximately 330 signatures including Ranjitsinhji, A.F. Somerset, signatures of players from Sussex, Warwickshire and Yorkshire, The South African Team, 1907, and The Philadelphians' Team, 1903, also with approximately 50 handwritten letters, including those from James Lillywhite, Lord Hawke, G.H. Hirst, and Herbert Sutcliffe. Vol. VI (pp. 455-474) contains approximately 240 signatures including George Giffen, Walter Giffen, J. McCarthy Blackham (signed cabinet card), A.H. Jarvis, J.J. Lyons, S.E. Gregory, J.J. Kelly (twice), Joe Darling (twice), Clem Hill (twice), W.W. Armstrong (three signatures), M.A. Noble, J.M. Gregory, a signed Australia 1921 team postcard, signatures of the Australia team 1926, the New Zealand team 1927, the West Indies team 1928, the South Africa team 1929, the Australia team 1930, the New Zealand team 1931, the "All India" team 1932, also with approximately 70 letters, including those from Charles Bannerman, S.P. Jones, W.H. Moule, George Alexander, W.H. Cooper, W. Trumble, S.P. Jones, P.C. Charlton and H. Donnan, and an original Arthur Mailey ink cartoon, signed by Mailey, dated Australia 1925. A REMARKABLE COLLECTION OF AUTOGRAPHS compiled by William Clafton in the mid-1920s. Correspondance inside the book shows that Clafton wrote to individual players requesting their autographs. In some cases, sections from the book were sent to players, who duly signed on the relevant plates, or in the relevant margins. Almost twenty five years since Ranjitsinhji's book was published many of these players considered it an honour to contribute to Clafton's collection - as L.H. Gay writes in his reply, dated January 5 1925, "I am delighted to send you my signature though I am afraid I am very much of a has-been" (Vol. IV). Clafton was not alone in compiling the collection. Many of the letters are addressed to J.J. Reid, a sports equipment supplier - one letter from W.G. Grace reads "I am sending the bat back, the piece [?] came out the second time used, it is too dry I think, will you get the maker to send me another" dated July 2 1912 (Vol. II). One can only assume Reid gifted Clafton such letters to insert inside his book. The Australian cricketer, John McIlwraith, also assisted Clafton by collecting those more elusive autographs in Australia and sending them to London - the correspondance between McIlwraith and Clafton is inserted throughout the volumes. The culmination of Reid's letters, McIlwraith's Australian contacts and Clafton's obsession in collecting approximately 2,200 autographs, has resulted in a truly remarkable set of volumes. As Hugh Bromley-Davenport writes in his letter to Clafton, dated 24 January 1926, "You are indeed an enthusiast, but your book, when complete, will be of immense interest to all cricket lovers" (Vol. III). In June 1934 Clafton offered to present the volumes to Yorkshire Cricket Club, much to the delight of Lord Hawke, who writes "It is indeed most thoughtful of you to leave to your old County Cricket Club what truly must be a wonderful copy of Ranji's Jubilee Book of Cricket with your own illustrations and 3000 autographs" (Vol. V). The volumes are now being sold by Yorkshire Cricket Club. (6)

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2006-06-27
Hammer price
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Complete collection of (9) los angeles lakers world championship rings

West coast basketball was born when Minneapolis Lakers owner Bob Short packed up the club and moved it to Los Angeles before the 1960-61 season. Laker center George Mikan, the games first true superstar, had already laid the foundation for one of the most successful franchises in team sports history. It has been a storied history starring such legendary Hall of Famers as Wilt Chamberlain, Jerry West, Elgin Baylor, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, James Worthy and Magic Johnson. Today the legacy lives on, recently carried on the broad shoulders of Shaquille O’Neal and still infused by the raw talent and charisma of Kobe Bryant. Basketball, Los Angeles style, is more than a game. It’s an event, a social experience, a run and gun theatrical production that mirrors a city known as the entertainment capital of the world. But beyond the glitz and glamour is a Los Angeles basketball tradition that has endured for more than three decades, that of Winning. That tradition includes a string of Championships that has scarcely been rivaled in the history of American sports.   The legacy of the great Los Angeles Lakers Championship teams can still be heard ringing in the rafters of the Great Western Forum and felt in the electrified atmosphere within the palatial Staples Center. Offered here is the fruit of that legacy…       1972 – 33 In a Row! Owner Jack Kent Cooke brought in former USC star and Celtics standout Bill Sharman as coach. The team had to make do without Baylor, who retired early in the season, but they did have a balanced, mature, and experienced team with Hairston and Jim McMillian as forwards, Chamberlain in the pivot, and West and Goodrich at the guard spots. The Lakers started strong. Beginning on November 5th and ending on January 9th, the Lakers strung together a 33-game winning streak, an American professional sports record. The team rolled on to a 69-win year, setting a new NBA record for victories in a season. The team paced the league in points, rebounds, and assists. At season's end, Bill Sharman was named NBA Coach of the Year. The Lakers breezed right through the playoffs, sweeping the Chicago Bulls in the conference semifinals, ousting the Bucks in six games in the conference finals, and then zipping by the Knicks in the Finals, four games to one. After years of frustration the Lakers had finally earned an NBA Championship, the team's first in Los Angeles and the first for the franchise since 1954. Chamberlain was named Finals MVP.     1979-80 – Showtime Arrives Through a unique set of circumstances related to the departure of Gail Goodrich three seasons earlier, the Lakers found themselves holding the No. 1 overall pick in the 1979 NBA Draft. Los Angeles picked Earvin "Magic" Johnson, an electrifying 6-9 point guard who had led Michigan State to the 1979 NCAA Championship. "Showtime" had arrived, and a dynasty was established almost overnight. Inspired by the enigmatic rookie, Abdul-Jabbar turned in the best all-around performance of his career and earned his sixth and final Most Valuable Player Award. The Lakers were talented and deep-Jamaal Wilkes, Jim Chones, and Abdul-Jabbar made for an intimidating front line, and the backcourt of Johnson and Nixon were unrivaled. The Lakers' bench included Michael Cooper and Spencer Haywood. Los Angeles walked through the playoffs, taking each series in five games. The NBA Finals pitted the club against the Julius Erving-led Philadelphia 76ers, and the two teams split four close games to start the series. Abdul-Jabbar sprained his ankle in Game 5 but still scored 40 points to give the Lakers a 108-103 win. Abdul-Jabbar was unable to play in Game 6, but Johnson stepped up to turn in one of the most remarkable performances in NBA Finals history. Still just a 20-year-old rookie, Johnson moved from guard to center and tallied 42 points, 15 rebounds, and 7 assists, single-handedly carrying the Lakers to a 123-107 victory and the NBA Championship. Johnson earned the first of three NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Awards.   1981-82 – The Riley Era Dawns Owner Jerry Buss fired coach Paul Westhead after the Lakers went 7-4 to start the 1981-82 season. Buss promoted Assistant Coach Pat Riley, a former Lakers backup point guard, to head coach on November 19, and the team won 17 of its next 20 games. The Lakers took the Pacific Division title and then embarked on one of the most impressive playoff journeys in NBA history. They swept both Phoenix and the San Antonio Spurs with an average margin of victory of 11 points. Los Angeles then stretched its postseason winning streak to nine games by taking the first contest of the NBA Finals from the 76ers. Philadelphia came back to win Game 2, but the Lakers prevailed in the series, four games to two, to win their second title in three years. The team's playoff record that year was 12-2.   1984-85: Finally! Lakers Beat Celtics In Finals The Lakers cruised to a fourth straight Pacific Division title in 1984-1985 despite losing Jamaal Wilkes for the season in mid-February because of torn knee ligaments. Los Angeles (62-20) took the division by an NBA-record 20 games. The club, at the height of its "Showtime" era, set two other NBA marks by posting a phenomenal .545 team field-goal percentage and handing out 2,575 assists. Los Angeles reached the NBA Finals after eliminating Phoenix, Portland, and the Denver Nuggets, chalking up an 11-2 record on the way. Facing Boston again in the championship round, the Lakers were humiliated in the first game, 148-114, a contest remembered as the "Memorial Day Massacre." But Los Angeles bounced back to take four of the next five games, led by 38-year-old series MVP Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The 1985 series marked the ninth time that Los Angeles and Boston had met in the NBA Finals but the first time that the Lakers had come away with the crown.   1986-87: A Magic Season Magic Johnson won his first career NBA Most Valuable Player Award while leading the Lakers to a 65-17 record, the second-best mark in franchise history. Abdul-Jabbar, now 39 years old, chipped in 17.5 points per game, and Michael Cooper was named NBA Defensive Player of the Year. The Lakers earned another matchup with the Celtics in the NBA Finals by sweeping Denver, losing just one game to Golden State, and then sweeping Seattle. Los Angeles routed Boston in the first two games of the Finals, and the teams then split the next four contests, giving the Lakers their second championship in three seasons. Johnson earned the NBA Finals MVP Award to go with his regular-season MVP trophy. At the Lakers' championship celebration in Los Angeles, Coach Riley brashly declared that the Lakers would repeat as NBA champions in 1987-88. It was a bold statement that served to motivate the team throughout the next season.   1987-88: Lakers Fulfill Riley's Prophecy The club finished with a 62-20 record that included a 15-game winning streak, the second longest in franchise history, and a seventh consecutive Pacific Division title. After sweeping San Antonio in the first round of the playoffs, Los Angeles was forced to the limit in each of the next two series. The Lakers struggled against both the Utah Jazz and the Dallas Mavericks before winning each series in seven games. In the NBA Finals the Lakers had a new opponent in the Detroit Pistons. The Pistons had grown into an Eastern Conference power thanks to Isiah Thomas, Joe Dumars, Bill Laimbeer, and Dennis Rodman. Detroit had managed to unseat the Celtics in six games in the Eastern Conference Finals. The NBA Finals represented a clash of styles, with the run-and-gun Lakers battling the physical Pistons. The series went a grueling seven games, with players on both sides turning in heroic performances. The most heroic of all was turned in by James Worthy, who had a triple-double in Game 7 to lead the Lakers to a 108-105 victory. Worthy was named Finals MVP, and Los Angeles became the first club to repeat as NBA champions since the Boston Celtics in 1968-69.   1999-2000: Return to Dominance The 1999-2000 season was the beginning of a new era in Los Angeles Lakers basketball. The team hired a new head coach in former Chicago Bulls lead man Phil Jackson, and for the first time in 31 years the Lakers would play their home games somewhere other than the Great Western Forum, as the club moved into the brand new 18,997-seat STAPLES Center in Downtown Los Angeles. Reminiscent of Magic/Jabaar, the Lakers possessed the leagues most dominant 1-2 punch in Shaquille O'Neal and young Kobe Bryant. Not limited to individual efforts, the new coaching staff, the veteran additions, and the returning players all meshed incredibly well as the club got off to a fast start, registering wins in 25 of their first 30 games and reeling off a 16-game winning streak in the first half of the season. The Lakers stormed though the remainder of the regular season achieving the best record in the league (67-15) and earning homecourt advantage throughout the playoffs. The Western Conference Finals against the Portland Trail Blazers went to seven games, as the Lakers staged a miraculous comeback. Trailing by 13 points entering the fourth quarter of Game Seven, the Lakers fought back to win the game and the Western Conference Championship. Boosted by their improbable comeback, the Lakers went on to defeat the Indiana Pacers in six games, earning their first NBA Championship since 1988. O'Neal became only the third player to be named Most Valuable Player of the regular season, All-Star Game and the NBA Finals.   2000-01: Back to Back-to-Back With a nucleus that included two of the NBA's best players in Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant and a head coach that has won seven NBA titles in Phil Jackson, the Lakers began the season with aspirations of winning a second consecutive NBA Championship. However the injury ridden team limped to a mere 31-16 record at the All-Star break, already picking up one more loss than during the entire 1999-2000 campaign. The Lakers battled through injuries to Fisher, O'Neal and Bryant, but as the club returned to full health, the Lakers began to pick up steam heading into the postseason. After a 96-88 win over the Utah Jazz at the Delta Center on April 3, the Lakers ran off eight consecutive victories, their longest winning streak of the season, and were able to claim their second consecutive Pacific Division title, edging out the Sacramento Kings in the last week of the season. Los Angeles would not lose another contest until Game 1 of the NBA Finals against the Philadelphia 76ers, sweeping Portland, Sacramento and San Antonio. Philadelphia surprised the Lakers with a 107-101 overtime victory at STAPLES Center, but Los Angeles went on to victories in each of the next four games to claim a second consecutive NBA title.   2001-02: Thrice as Nice With a third consecutive NBA Championship squarely in their sights, the Los Angeles Lakers opened the 2001-02 regular season much like they ended the 2000-01 campaign, with a flourish. Despite some key injuries, the team registered victories in their first seven games and 16-of-17 to start the season. The Lakers became only the 11th team to start a season with wins in 16 of their first 17 games and the first since the 1996-97 Chicago Bulls. The Lakers entered the postseason as the number three seed in the Western Conference and met up with the Portland Trail Blazers for the third consecutive season. Up two games to zero, Robert Horry connected on a three-pointer with 2.1 seconds remaining to give the Lakers a three-game sweep. In the Western Conference Semifinals, Los Angeles defeated the San Antonio Spurs 4-1 to set up a series between the teams with the league’s two best regular season records, the Lakers and the Pacific Division Champion Sacramento Kings. In one of the most exciting playoff series in recent memory, the Lakers emerged victorious, 4-3, after a 112-106 overtime victory at ARCO Arena in game seven.  Los Angeles faced the New Jersey Nets in the 2002 NBA Finals and won the series in four games. Averaging 36.3 points and 12.3 rebounds, O’Neal was named NBA Finals MVP for the third consecutive season, joining Michael Jordan as the only players to have accomplished that feat.  Phil Jackson earned his ninth NBA Championship as a head coach and surpassed Pat Riley for most playoff wins all-time.   On behalf of the Los Angeles Lakers, we are pleased to present this offering that is unprecedented in the field of professional sports; an original World Championship ring from each of the Lakers nine NBA titles in Los Angeles. The winner of this group will become one of only two individuals to lay claim to all nine Los Angeles Lakers Championship rings, the other being Hall of Fame legend Jerry West. Each 14k gold and diamond ring, produced by the Lakers exclusive jeweler Howard Kaplan of Henry Kay jewelers is exact in every respect to those awarded to the players and top team officials. Prior to delivery, each ring will be customized with the addition of the winning bidder’s last name. A letter of authenticity from the Lakers and Howard Kaplan will accompany each ring, as will a fine wood presentation box for each.   In sports, the word “ring” is used in both a figurative and literal sense to describe the ultimate achievement – winning a Championship. Most professional athletes and coaches dedicate their lives to the pursuit of just one, yet most careers end with that quest unfulfilled. The offered collection of rings symbolizes the Lakers greatest seasons, seasons in which the quest was fulfilled for a select few. Presented on behalf of the franchise, this once in a lifetime offer (not to be repeated) will afford one collector the opportunity to own a tangible link to the Los Angeles Lakers basketball dynasty.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
Hammer price
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.

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