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The finest exhibition quality 7 'bc inch gauge model of the Sir William Stan...

The finest exhibition quality 7 'bc inch gauge model of the Sir William Stanier London Midland and Scottish Railway Pacific 4-6-2 LMS Locomotive and Tender No 6230 Duchess of Buccleuch , an accurate replication of the original engine in every detail and was built according to the drawings of Crewe and took ten years and over 18,000 hours to build the model, it was built by the famous model engineer Mr Harry Powell of Crewe and his brother Norman,the paintwork and lettering by Louis Raper, this magnificent model is fitted with a fully brazed and riveted superheated copper boiler with Belpaire firebox and all normal fittings including safety valves, regulator, blower, whistle, brake, injector and blowdown valves, incorporating full external detailing and smoke deflectors, fine scale cab fittings include wheel reverse gear, lever operated sliding firedoors, draincocks and ejector levers, three pressure gauges, twin water sight gauges, mahogany planked floor with steel panel and scale checker-plate, a wealth of classic fittings. Chassis with twin outside cylinders fitted with Walschearts valve gear and two inside cylinders, scale twin ratchet lubricators, brass lubrication boxes, draincocks, sanding gear, working steam brakes, leaf springs and beautifully finished wheels, fluted motion, exceptional external detailing, smoke deflector plates,these were later fitted to all of the class. Tender details includes 4000 gallon Type II plaque,handbrake, water pick-up control, steam-driven mechanical coal pusher with cylinder guides and lifting eyes. The model finished in LMS maroon with yellow and black lining. Length 113 Cab Width 13 'bd The Stanier Duchess Class designated 7P operated throughout Great Britain and were ostensibly Princess Cornation Class Locomotives which were nicknamed Duchesses and many of both of the combined classes carried streamlining in the pre-and-immediately post-war period. They hauled the heaviest express trains from Euston through to Scotland including The Royal Scot and earlier Coronation services. One of the class was sent to the USA for the World Fair of 1939 in its streamlined form. All the class were withdrawn in 1965 and three remain in preservation. * Sir William Stanier FRS. Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS at the company Crewe works. * Harry Powell worked all his life at Crewe locomotive works, he was a Master Coppersmith and chief of the copper-shop at Crewe. This locomotive was delivered to Jack Salem in Switzerland by Harry Powell and Louis Raper. On arrival Harry Powell said to Jack Salem Well you wanted the finest piece that has ever been built and here it is .

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-04-25
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Carl Barks - Original Artwork to the Painting entitled "Hands Off My Playthings"

Carl Barks - Original Artwork to the Painting entitled "Hands Off My Playthings" 1975, Oil with brush applied to gessoed masonite, signed by the artist on the lower left margin with the Walt Disney copyright line, this is the sixteenth painting done by Carl Barks in 1975, it is the 106th painting of his career for his Walt Disney paintings, and it is the ninth money-bin painting. The money-bin paintings have always been at the top of the food-chain in the Carl Barks painting market from their very first inception, and it is well known that the artist did not want to do very many of them because of the tremendous labor involved in making every single gold coin look as realistic as possible. Carl was quoted in The Fine Art of Walt Disney's Donald Duck book as saying about the very first Money-Bin painting that he did…"Most people who see it sort of can't believe it's real." He went on to also say that another collector had seen the painting in his studio and said…"he would like very much to have it, and as asked me to ask you to put his name first on the list if you ever want to sell it. You can make a nice profit right away." Barks was commenting on the simple fact that as soon as these particular paintings were done there was an already existing market that far outstripped his ability to supply for the demand. Years later when Diamond Comic Gallery owner Steve Geppi hosted the first Retrospective Exhibit of Carl's paintings at the Diamond Comics Gallery in Baltimore Maryland with a lavish special dinner and opening to honor Carl, the artist found himself surrounded by a host of collectors. During the course of the evening one of those collectors asked Carl what were his favorite that he had done (for here he was surrounded by 90% of his entire output, which had never been seen at one time in one location before at any time). He commented that he had many favorites, but his favorite money-bin painting was "Hands Off My Playthings." This painting has changed hands between three collectors before coming to Bonham's & Butterfield's and it has never before been offered on the public market. In the opinion of the consultant this is the finest money-bin painting ever publicly offered at an auction house during the past twenty years. It is also one of the only money-bin paintings to ever enter the public market (usually they trade hands for thousands of dollars between private collectors), image size is 16 1/4 x 20 1/4", condition is Excellent, the margins have been cleaned by a professional restorer for Bonham's at the request of the client to remove some very small (1/16") sections of wood slivers that had adhered to the painting surface during the course of its time spent in the wooden gilt frame that it was put into by Carl Barks, there was no paint removed for this cleaning, matted and framed in its original wooden gold gilt painted frame.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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Circa 1933 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Road Jersey

Circa 1933 Lou Gehrig New York Yankees Road Jersey, Lou Gehrig will forever be cast in the glare of New York Yankees teammate Babe Ruth's vast spotlight. But nothing about Gehrig's accomplishments should be minimized, from the 2,130 consecutive games he once played as the "Iron Horse" to his longtime link with Ruth as the enforcer of baseball's most prolific slugging duo. Gehrig was a rock-solid 6-foot, 210-pound left-handed slasher who rocketed line drives to all sections of the park, unlike the towering, majestic home runs that endeared Ruth to adoring fans. And unlike the gregarious Ruth, Gehrig was withdrawn, modest and unassuming, happy to let his teammate drink the fruits of their tandem celebrity. But those who played with and against Gehrig understood the power he could exert over a game. As the Yankees' first baseman, cleanup hitter and lineup protection for Ruth, Gehrig was an RBI machine. He won four American League titles and tied for another and his 184-RBI explosion in 1931 is a still-standing A.L. record. His 13 consecutive 100-RBI seasons (he averaged an incredible 147 from 1926-38) were a byproduct of 493 career home runs and a not-so-modest .340 average. It's hard to overstate the havoc wreaked by Gehrig's bat. He topped 400 total bases in five seasons, topped 150 RBIs seven times, hit a record 23 grand slams, won a 1934 Triple Crown, hit four homers in one 1932 game and cranked out a World Series average of .361 with 10 homers and 34 RBIs. In 1927, when Ruth hit his record 60 home runs, Gehrig batted .373 with 47 homers and 175 RBIs winning the MVP award. The Ruth-Gehrig relationship powered the Yankees to three World Series championships, and when Ruth left New York after the 1934 season, Gehrig and young Joe DiMaggio powered the team to three more. But Gehrig is best remembered for the iron-man streak that lasted from 1925-39, when Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis' now known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, ended his career prematurely and tugged at the heart strings of a nation. Gehrig, finally accorded the recognition that long had eluded him, died two years later. The style of this road grey Yankees flannel jersey dates it to the pivotal 1933-34 period, when Ruth was in his final seasons in New York and the torch of Yankee greatness was being passed into a single hand. Manufactured by Spalding, this jersey is tagged exclusively for Gehrig featuring red chain stitching in the collar that reads "L. Gehrig." A "Spalding" manufacturer's tag resides to the right. Every technical aspect of the of this jersey appears as it was when last in the custody of Gehrig with the exception of the letters "YO" of "New York" on the front and Gehrig's number "4" on the back having been expertly restored. Each sleeve has been trimmed of approximately two inches of length, a customization attributed to Gehrig, and supported by numerous photographs from the era. Several small holes on the front and back have been patched on the interior with vintage material. The jersey shows signs of usage wear to an awe-inspiring degree, yet retains outstanding display quality and a sense of timelessness. In the pantheon of sports memorabilia a jersey worn by Lou Gehrig has few peers. Columnist Jim Murray called Gehrig "Gibraltar in cleats" and sportswriter John Kieran said of him, "His greatest record doesn't show in the book. It was the absolute reliability of Henry Louis Gehrig. He could be counted upon. He was there every day at the ballpark bending his back and ready to break his neck to win for his side. He was there day after day and year after year. He never sulked or whined or went into a pot or a huff". Gehrig was the same in baseball as he was when he faced a fatal disease that struck him in the prime of his life. Ruth may have been rightfully dubbed "The Sultan of Swat" or the "The Colossus of Clout" among other things, but Gehrig's acclaim as "The Pride of The Yankees" has never been disputed. LOA from Richard Russek/Andy Imperato.

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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Henry “hank” aaron 1954 milwaukee braves rookie road jersey

Henry Louis Aaron, born in 1934, grew up as one of eight children in Mobile, Alabama. As a youngster he worked hauling 25 pound blocks of ice, building strength in his wrists that would serve him well when he became a professional ball player. Like many resourceful children without money and material things, he did what he could do to hone his skills, including swatting bottle caps with a broomstick for hour on end. Though Hank never played for his high school baseball team (they did not have one), he participated in sandlot contests where he could, and by age 16 was good enough to join a semi pro club, the Mobile Black Bears. A year later in 1951, the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro Leagues signed Hank.  They put him at shortstop though they were sure he could play anywhere and signed him for $200 a month. Henry’s major league break came a year later when the Boston Braves signed him in 1952 and sent him to Eau Clair Wisconsin of the Northwest League. He hit an impressive .336 and was named to the Leagues All Star team as well as its Rookie of the Year. A year later, he was one of a trio of African Americans to break the color line in the South Atlantic “Sally” League. Racial animosity was constant on road trips through the South, but the baseball diamond proved to be Hank’s refuge from a sometime distressing life.  The game was his personal tonic and Hank led the circuit with a .362 batting average with 125 RBI and 115 runs scored. In 1954, fate pointed its finger Hank’s way when Bobby Thompson, the Braves starting left fielder broke his ankle. Even the gracious Thompson years later said “Magic is the only way to describe it” when recalling his raw 20 year old replacement. Hank’s Braves debut took place not in Boston, but in Milwaukee where the team had recently moved. For that 1954 season alone Aaron was assigned jersey number 5, which would later be changed to the number 44 he is most readily identified with. Hank’s .280 average, 13 homers and 69 RBI in 122 games in ’54 were impressive for any rookie, but for Aaron it was just an adjustment period. Soon, as history tells us, Hank became as formidable as any hitter in baseball, frustrating even the games most experienced pitchers. “Throwing a fastball past Henry Aaron is like tying to sneak the sun past a rooster”, said the St. Louis Cardinals fireballer Curt Simmons, speaking on behalf of shell shocked pitchers throughout the National League. Sheer ability, consistency and resilience were the earmarks of Aaron’s prolific career. For 20 consecutive seasons he totaled more than 20 home runs; 15 times topping the 30 homer mark, and eight times he walloped 40 or more home runs. As Aaron biographer Lonnie Wheeler wrote, "(Hank) Aaron's excellence was not expelled in blinding bursts of energy, but rather played out, patiently and inexorably, over a whole generation." It is from 1954, Hank’s rookie year that we offer one of the finest game used jerseys ever presented at auction. Manufactured by Wilson, the size 40, zip-front flannel survives in outstanding original condition, with solid evidence of game use. Tagging on the front tail includes Aaron’s name and year “’54” chain stitched on a felt backing. Among its superb design features are the team name and tomahawk logo embroidered on the front, and the colorful Braves patch on the left sleeve. Aaron’s number “44” adorns the front and back, which was changed by the team from his original 5 at the end of the 1954 season. A portion of the outline of the original number “5” is faintly visible behind the “44” on both sides of the jersey. As was common in this era, Aaron likely donned this jersey for spring training the following season in 1955, and perhaps a portion of that regular season as well. Aaron’s vintage signature and “Best Wishes” salutation appear on the left side of the front. LOAs from MEARS (Grade A9), PSA/DNA and JSA. NOTE: A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this jersey are being donated by consignor Steve Myland to the Big Brothers and Sisters of America, an organization for which both Mr. Myland and Hank Aaron have been longtime supporters through time and personal resources.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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Babe Ruth 1921-31 Louisville Slugger Professional Model Bat (Graded A10, GU10)

Babe Ruth 1921-31 Louisville Slugger Professional Model Bat (Graded A10, GU10), Babe Ruth played baseball like he lived life: with loud, gaudy, entertaining gusto. There was nothing subtle about the happy-go-lucky Sultan of Swat, who paraded through his career, forged an enduring relationship with adoring fans and then withstood the test of time as the greatest power hitter in baseball history. Ruth's legendary home run totals-714 in his career, 60 in 1927—are no longer records, but they still stand as milestone numbers by which all power hitters are judged. His legendary carousing still enhances the irascible image that colors his aura. More than anything, the magnetic Ruth is hailed as the savior of the game, the man who ushered in the longball era and revitalized baseball when it was mired in the bog of the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Ruth became a New York icon as he powered his way through the Roaring '20s and the Great Depression, posting shocking homer totals of 59 (1921), 60 (1927) and 54 (1928) while leading the Yankees to four World Series championships and anchoring one of the most devastating lineups in history. Lost in the fog of Ruth's 12 American League home run titles, 13 slugging championships, four 50-homer seasons and six RBI titles was a career .342 average that still ranks 10th all time. No single sports memorabilia item consistently inspires more awe than a bat used by Babe Ruth. For veteran hobbyists or casual fans, the allure of a bat wielded by Ruth in his prime, the ultimate tool of his trade, is unfailing. For many reasons this example is among the finest of known Ruth gamers. The first and most identifiable feature of this George "Babe" Ruth professional model bat is its rich, dark “Hornsby” finish, so described because it was a preferred finish on bats used by fellow batting legend Rogers Hornsby. Its usage characteristics are ideal. Manufactured during 1921-31 period, the uncracked 35 1/4", 40 oz. club shows many ball marks visible throughout the barrel. A close examination of the handle indicates there was once three rings of tape, of which the 'ghosts' are still visible. Available photos show Ruth holding a bat with similar tape present. All barrel brands are deeply burned with no visible flaws. Enhancing the considerable physical qualities of the bat is its spectacular provenance. This Ruth game used bat is accompanied by a letter from former Brooklyn Dodger, Tony Cuccinello, who was given the bat by the Babe when he was a coach for the Boston Braves in 1936. Cuccinello's letter of authenticity is dated November 21, 1981. We must note there are two typos in Cuccinello's letter, both of which are innocent in nature and in no way alter the spirit of the letter. In his letter Cuccinello mistakenly refers to Ruth being coach with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1936, as opposed to the correct year of 1938. Also, he erroneously refers to the 1938 Boston Bees as the "Braves." In a third party assessment conducted by both SCD Authentic (precursor to MEARS) and John Taube of PSA/DNA, it earned their highest marks of “A10” and “GU10” respectively. Its physical attributes notwithstanding, rarely do game bats of this importance include player provenance of this magnitude. A remarkable gift from the Babe to Tony. LOAs from David Bushing and Troy Kinunen of SCD Authentic (Grade A10), and John Taube and Vince Malta of PSA/DNA (Grade GU10) and Tony Cuccinello.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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FRANQUIN André (1924-1997) LE TROMBONE ILLUSTRÉ

FRANQUIN André (1924-1997) LE TROMBONE ILLUSTRÉ Encre de Chine pour la couverture du recueil de cette revue, publié en 1980 aux éditions Dupuis. Signée et datée « 1980 » à l'encre de Chine, dédicacée à l'encre bleue par Franquin et sa femme Liliane. 49,8 x 39,7 cm. Est joint le calque de mise en couleur aux crayons. 44 x 32,7 cm. Exceptionnelle illustration résumant tout l'univers de Franquin. Les mots « Le » et « Illustré » sont imprimés. Pièce de musée. Ce recueil reprenait les 30 numéros de Trombone Illustré parus dans Spirou en 1977. Au début des années 70, Franquin regardait du côté des revues Charlie Hebdo et Hara-Kiri. « Nous aurions aimé trouver dans Spirou d'autres choses amusantes et nous aurions voulu le voir s'adapter à notre temps ». Fidèle à Spirou, il va tenter de bâtir quelque chose de nouveau à l'intérieur même du journal. Il fait alors appel à Delporte pour l'aider dans ce projet. L'objectif était de faire rentrer l'actualité dans le journal et d'adopter un ton plus irrévérencieux. C'est sous la forme d'un supplément pirate que le Trombone Illustré voit le jour dans le journal Spirou. Franquin y créé sa première Idées Noires. Franquin réalisera 26 des 30 bandeaux titres du Trombone Illustré qui sont autant de miniatures d'une extrême précision et splendeur graphiques. « C'est un truc fait avec patience. Nous avions fait imprimer les lettres, mais c'est tout de même un sacré travail, car lorsque je voulais dessiner un personnage devant une lettre, je devais gratter puis reconstituer ce qui manquait ». Franquin entoura les lettres du logo titre d'une foule de personnages « Les couvertures du Trombone Illustré, c'était habituer les gens à une famille de personnages. Il y a une foule de choses intéressantes à faire avec cela ». Dans cette couverture, on retrouve un couple d'amoureux, la famille Marsupilami ou encore l'évêque peu orthodoxe qui deviendra la Mitre Railleuse. Les éditions Dupuis décideront en 1980 d'en faire un recueil qui s'épuisera très rapidement. En voici la couverture. Estimation 30 000 - 40 000 € Sold for 145,259 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2012-03-31
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NAT NEUJEAN (né en 1923) SCULPTURE EN BRONZE REPRÉSENTANT TINTIN ET MILOU

NAT NEUJEAN (né en 1923) SCULPTURE EN BRONZE REPRÉSENTANT TINTIN ET MILOU Sculpture en bronze réalisée en 1976 selon la technique dite « à la cire perdue », signée Nat Neujean. Cachet de la fonderie Pinella de Andreïs et Figli à Milan sur le socle. Hauteur : 180 cm. En 1947, «Les Amitiés Belgo - Françaises» firent appel à Nat Neujean pour réaliser un buste d'André Malraux. Connaissant l'admiration de Malraux pour Tintin, l'Ambassade de France conseilla à Neujean de se rendre chez Hergé. C'est à partir de cette date que se nouera entre le sculpteur et Hergé une amitié réciproque. Vers 1951, Hergé et les «Éditions du Lombard» eurent l'idée de commercialiser des figurines en vinyle des personnages de Tintin avec la société de jouets pour enfants MIRIM. Ils proposèrent à Nat Neujean de réaliser les modèles en plâtre. Le sculpteur se montra réticent, étant donné que les personnages n'étaient pas sa propre création. Finalement, à partir de dessins qu'Hergé lui avait fournis et après de nombreuses entrevues, Nat Neujean modela la première sculpture de Tintin de 20 cm de haut. Le père de Tintin et Milou fut très surpris du résultat: il découvrait pour la première fois son héros en trois dimensions! Suivront Haddock, Tournesol et les Dupondt. Peu de temps après, Hergé commanda à Nat Neujean un buste de Tintin de 40 cm de haut, taillé en pierre de France. Celle-ci trônera fièrement sur le bureau d'Hergé à partir de 1954. En 1958 toujours à la demande d'Hergé, Nat Neujean réalisa son portrait en bronze. Malheureusement pris par le temps, Hergé ne posa que très rarement pour le sculpteur, néanmoins Nat Neujean en fit un portrait saisissant de ressemblance. En 1975, à l'occasion du 30ème anniversaire du Journal Tintin, Raymond Leblanc (Directeur des Éditions du Lombard) et Guy Dessicy (Publiart) ont l'idée de faire une surprise de taille à Hergé: une statue en pied de Tintin et Milou de plus d'un mètre quatre vingt! Et c'est tout naturellement que sa réalisation fut confiée à Nat Neujean. Il commença par entreprendre une première étude préliminaire en terre de 70 cm de haut, d'abord sans Milou (il l'intégrera par la suite quand l'œuvre sera plus aboutie). Un mois sera nécessaire à Neujean pour réaliser l'œuvre finale de 180 cm de haut. Celui-ci confronté à divers problèmes de proportions fera appel à son fils Bertrand, alors âgé de 8 ans pour prendre la pose. Quant à Milou l'entreprise fut plus complexe, le modèle (le chien d'Alain Baran, secrétaire particulier d'Hergé) ne se montra pas très docile, mais Neujean tenait à avoir un vrai chien en face de lui, afin de donner à Milou une touche plus personnelle. Le compagnon de Tintin sera placé à coté de lui, mais tournera le dos à son maître témoignant de sa propre existence et de son indépendance. Inauguré le 29 septembre 1976, en présence d'Hergé et de Nat Neujean (ainsi que de nombreux invités de marque), au parc du Wolvendael à Uccle, le monument sera faute de temps présenté en plâtre patiné et coulé par après en bronze à la Fonderie Milanaise de Nat Neujean (De Andreis & Figli) selon la technique de la «cire perdue». Après plusieurs tentatives de vol et de dégradations, le monument fut placé momentanément en lieu sûr au Centre Culturel d'Uccle, où l'œuvre peut toujours être admirée aujourd'hui. Nat NEUJEAN (de son vrai nom Nathanaël Neuman) est né à Anvers le 5 janvier 1923. À 14 ans, il quitte son milieu familial, occupe un atelier à Anvers où il s'initie à la sculpture. Il est accepté comme élève libre à l'Académie des Beaux-Arts de cette ville, durant les années 1939 à 1942. En 1942, les autorités allemandes exigent l'expulsion des étudiants Belges d'origine juive des lieux d'enseignement. Nat Neujean quitte Anvers et réside à Bruxelles où il travaille tout en vivant dans la clandestinité. Après la guerre, il s'établit à Paris pendant les années 1946 et 1947, puis retourne à Bruxelles où il s'installe définitivement. C'est de cette époque que datent ses premières commandes et ses premiers portraits, parmi lesquels ceux d'Hergé, André Malraux et Ben Gourion. Il réalise à partir de 1950 ses premières expositions de groupe et une série de commandes officielles pour les villes de Namur (La Sambre et La Meuse en 1950), de Charleroi, de Bruxelles («L'Âme Sentinelle» 1982-84). Fortement éprouvé par les horreurs de la deuxième guerre mondiale, il commence les études préliminaires à «la Mémoire de la Déportation» à laquelle il consacrera une grande partie de son œuvre. Les victimes de l'Holocauste resteront omniprésentes dans son travail, offrant une image bouleversante de ces figures fantomatiques, destinées à la destruction totale. Une première exposition à New York (1964) est suivie d'une rétrospective au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Boston (1964) et d'une invitation à enseigner comme professeur étranger à la Fine Art School de l'Université de Boston. Par la suite, les sculptures de Nat Neujean seront exposées tout au long de la deuxième moitié du XXème siècle à Washington, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Palm Beach, Detroit, (États-Unis), à Toronto, Montréal (Canada), en Australie. La Belgique, les Pays-Bas, la France, l'Italie, l'Angleterre lui ont consacré à de nombreuses reprises, des expositions personnelles, ainsi que collectives avec des artistes de renom. Neujean est reconnu également comme portraitiste de personnalités tels que Paul Delvaux, Robert Schuman, Trammell Crow, Frank Stanton (Président de la Croix Rouge) M.Mannilow (Président des hôtels Sheraton), Giacomo Manzu, Henri Moore. Il est élu membre de l'Académie Royale de Belgique en 1972, et directeur de sa classe en 1978. Il est élu membre correspondant de l'Accademia Nazionale di San Luca di Roma en 1995. Nat Neujean travaille exclusivement depuis 1955 avec la Fonderie De Andreis à Milan. Estimation 125 000 - 150 000 € Sold for 143,883 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2011-11-26
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1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Card Complete Set of (176) In Original Cracker Jack Album

1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Card Complete Set of (176) In Original Cracker Jack Album, The Gill Collection - 1915 Cracker Jack Baseball Cards As an eleven year-old in Kingston, Ontario, Canada in 1914, young Ernie Gill pulled his first few Cracker Jack cards out of boxes of his favorite caramel coated popcorn treat. As with many young boys of the period who nurtured both a sweet tooth and love of baseball, he was captivated. The next year, inspired by the offer printed on the back of each card, he scraped together the requisite 25 cents to mail away for the entire 1915 set of Cracker Jack baseball cards and the additional 10 cents for the "Handsome Album" to keep them in. A keen collector, he carefully recorded the name and card number of each player in the album beneath their card. The set stayed with Ernie through several moves through the years, including his first move from Kingston to a boarding house in Toronto in the early 1920s. After graduating from Queen's University in Kingston, a gold medalist in mathematics, Ernest moved to Toronto to work for the Canada Life Assurance Company and to write his actuarial exams. He eventually became CEO and Chairman of the Board of Canada Life. In his spare time, he maintained his boyhood interest in baseball, playing the same position of catcher for Canada Life in the insurance league in Toronto that he had for the local Kingston area league teams of his youth. In the late 1980s, Ernie's cards came to light again with his final move and were subsequently passed down first to his daughter, Mary Byers, and then to his grandson, Christopher Byers, in whose care they have remained until being offered here publicly for the first time. The Cracker Jack baseball card series of 1914 and 1915 are the most popular caramel cards ever produced. Accurate player depictions replicated from photographic images set against a brilliant red background is the hallmark of the series. Their timeless design and ideal player selection has made the issue a favorite among collectors since the earliest beginnings of the hobby of card collecting. In 1914, cards from the series could only be obtained as inserted "surprises", one per every box of Cracker Jack. As a result, most of the Cracker Jack cards retrieved from boxes were already affected by some degree of staining even prior to being subjected to handling by sticky fingered children. The same one per box distribution method was employed in 1915, however, the newly established redemption offer for a complete set, gave ambitious kids like Ernie Gill the opportunity to get a complete series of 176 pristine cards that never had to be subjected to contact with the caramel coated product. This complete set of (176) 1915 Cracker Jack Baseball cards appears in predominantly the same uncirculated condition in which it was received and placed in its paper album by Ernie Gill in 1915. The whiteness of the white borders and redness of the red backgrounds are as vibrant as if time stood still. Typical of the issue, centering varies somewhat throughout, but is better than average overall. It is important to note, that the album was designed to secure the cards on its pages through paper corner mounts (tabs) and no adhesives have been utilized. The cards were inserted in two different ways, one way in which the corners of a card were slid behind the tabs, showing the corner tips. The other way was to insert the cards over the corner tabs, hiding the corner tips. In many cases, mostly when the corners were slid behind the tabs, faint marks and even line impressions appear on the cards. A more complete technical description of this set is available online. It is our pleasure to offer this heirloom on behalf of the family of the late Ernest Clark Gill (1903-1992).

  • USAUSA
  • 2008-04-24
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DINGLEY HALL

DINGLEY HALL a painted wooden dolls' house of five bays and three storeys with roof balustrade, pediment with clock and finial, double steps with four bronze Gryphon on plinths, each bay with hinged door, the central section with oriel window above an Italianate balcony, above a 16th century style Flemish strap-work scroll, carved with intials L I C 1877, --113¾in. (289cm.) wide, 77¼in. (196cm.) high and 20in. (51cm.) deep (for condition report and full inventory please contact the department) THE INTERIOR The little red sitting room (AT) Painted pink with a dark blue felt carpet, furnishings include a Rock and Graner painted wood grain day bed, upholstered in original buttoned red silk with gilt and chenille braid; an unusual large scale Gothic eight piece set of Waltershausen drawing room furniture, upholstered in red ribbed paper 'leather', printed in gold; a Waltershausen buffet printed with landscapes; an early simulated rosewood wall clock; a painted tinplate fireplace with 'smoking fire', gilded soft metal decoration and firearms; four wood grain Waltershausen items; a quantity of milk glass jugs, cups and saucers, painted with pink rosebuds and green leaves; a lobster; gilt-metal ornaments; a bisque headed doll with moulded blonde hair in original 18th century style frock coat; and ten gilt framed pictures The Drawing Room (AM) the walls hung with maroon cloth the floor with dark blue felt carpet; furniture includes a rare set of white and gold Rock and Graner upholstered in red silk; a pair of unusual Waltershausen four-tier corner shelves and five other Waltershausen pieces including a side table with heraldic devices; a miniature model of a Royal Naval frigate; a pinperle doll dressed as a Zoave with moulded composition turban; gilt-metal items; china and glass including bisque ornaments and a Chamberlains Worcester cat on grass The Kitchen (AB) The cream paper with printed blue borders and fitted bell-board, containing a painted tinplate 'Ice-Box' and cupboard; five bisque headed servants including a page in 18th century-style costume and chef with jointed wood body; a large wood grain painted dresser; copper and tinplate cooking pans; a boot brush; wooden bottles; a bone coffee grinder; cat and mouse; a boars head and a silver cup The Nursery (BT) The deep red flock paper printed with a gold diaper pattern, the carpet of green cloth, with six all-bisque children jointed at shoulder and hip, moulded blonde curls and painted features, in original clothes, two all-bisque dolls' house dolls jointed at neck and shoulder with moulded brown and grey boots and elaborate original clothes; a soft metal sewing basket, canopied bed and music stand; a Waltershausen globe; a Rock and Graner yellow 'bentwood' rocking chair, half-tester bed and side chair; a bone sailing boat, a painted bone Pantin and cup and ball; a cheval mirror; tinplate fireplace and bath The Study (BM) The paper with yellow stripe and carpet of green cross stitch, with elaborate tinplate fireplace; a wood day bed with original blue silk hangings surmounted by an eagle; four chairs and footstool upholstered in blue silk; a wood grain book case containing six miniature Latin books; other miniature books; a gilt metal pier glass with H.W. Morrell's sticker; a quantity of gilt metal framed pictures; a carved bone firescreen of a hunter; a cross-stitched hearth rug embroidered 'L.C.'; flagons, bottles and glasses; and a pinperle man with original top hat, red tail cot, blue waistcoat and breeches with gilt paper bands The Oriental Room (BB) Hung with Japanese prints, the carpet of red, blue and green cross-stitch with a very rare soft-metal hanging lantern containing four lithophanes of children; seven pieces of Japanese furniture with painted decoration, one drawer raises the curtain of a shrine when opened; eight German bisque figures of Chinese acrobats; a South German carved bone cupboard containing vessels, a chess set, ink stand and hand screen; a gilt fish bowl and stand; and a pinperle officer (See back cover for lantern) The Music Room (CT) Pink paint to side walls with a Waltershausen working square piano, an extending stool, a chair, an extending table, a sofa and a chess table with stained bone pieces; three Avery chairs upholstered in velvet; a soft metal plant stand, a small table, a magazine rack, a fire screen and pictures; silver lustre lamp and flagons; a pair of clear glass six-light chandeliers; and two pinperle gentleman in original clothes The Landing (CM) The panelled walls and battoned ceiling with turned wood banisters; a large elaborate pink, blue, yellow and clear Murano glass chandelier; two carved ivory heads of Baccus; two velvet coloured sheilds, one with original miniature musical instruments, the other with arms and armour, both with shop labels from London and Paris; two pinperle military gentleman; a Westacre red lacquer longcase clock and a pair of late 17th century portrait miniatures of a lady, and gentleman on ivory, gilt-metal frame ovals, approx --3 5/8in. (9.2cm.) The Hall (CB) Panelled, the central staircase carpeted in blue and flanked by doors, with elaborate soft-metal chairs, key cupboard, wall clock and corner shelves, the chairs and shelves brightly painted with tassels and cords; three varnished wood plant stands with original pots painted with flowers; a hall stand; four pieces of luggage including a travelling bath, two with Cremer labels; three pinperle men including a jockey; and a china headed doll wearing Alsatian costume The Chapel (DT) Panelled back and sides, furnishings including turned oak pillars and blue carpet with alter; rare Waltershausen prie-Dieu; Florentine paintings of angels on gilt-wood; soft-metal mass toys; miniature books; hand embroidered vestments and alter clothes; three bisque-headed dolls wearing red and white livery; and other worshippers Visitor's Bedroom (DM) The walls with striped green wallpaper, the carpet of mauve cross-stitch with a Rock and Graner cheval mirror; a table Lithophane; a set of pink upholstered drawing room furniture with gilt embossed paper decoration including piano, bookcase and day bed; soft metal firescreen, fire surround and letter holder; gilt metal framed prints and mirrors; and a clear glass four-light chandelier The Cabinet Room (DB) The walls with striped green wallpaper, the coloured crossed stitched carpet with key pattern border; furnishings include a rare set of large scale drawing room furniture, the backs upholstered with shell designs in green and pink brocade; a Waltershausen large scale break-front china cabinet containing a quantity of milk glass painted with flowers and a bonheur du jeur with soft-metal furniture; a six-light clear glass chandelier; a purple lustre decanter; a soft-metal magazine holder painted with a squirrel, belows and a fireplace; a pack of cards and gilt-metal framed pictures The Pink Bedroom (ET) Papered in pink with blue cloth carpet; furnishings include a set of 'satinwood' bedroom furniture hung and upholstered in pink silk; an Avery work table; a soft-metal towel horse, firescreen, fire surround and hanging what-not; two of Mon. Simone photographs of dolls; a copper coal scuttle; a carved bone hand mirror; glass candlesticks; two pinperle puppets and bisque headed doll dressed in green satin The Yellow Bedroom (EM) The walls with yellow striped paper with two glazed windows hung with original blue silk curtains over gauze, the carpet with green and blue cross-stitch; furnishings include a part set of 'rosewood' bedroom furniture upholstered in pale blue silk with lace edging; a gilt-metal birdcage, lorgnettes, picture and mirror frames; an elaborate pier glass decorated with gilt paper; a pair of German bisque figures of an 18th century style couple; a clear glass six-light chandelier and a pinperle puppet The Grand Salon (EB) The walls with yellow striped paper and carpets with green and blue cross-stitch; furnishings include a set of unusual drawing room furniture, the shaped backs with pale blue buttoned silk, the serpentine fronts with ribbed gilt paper; a Walterhausen bureau, octagonal table with shaped sides, two bookcases and matching sofa tables; a German bisque Chinese couple; a paraffin lamp; a turned wood teaset on tray; soft metal fire screen and five pinperle figures

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2003-10-29
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A Jerry Garcia electric guitar custom-made by Doug Irwin, 1971

A Jerry Garcia electric guitar custom-made for him by Doug Irwin, 1971 The body made of curly maple (and other exotic woods) with a purple heart center and stained sides; two black plastic pick-ups noting "Hi-A;" between the pick-ups, there is a slot that Ram Rod routed out to insert an additional pick up that was never installed. Garcia's slide from the late 1960s is inside the electronics compartment to add weight, per Garcia's instructions, along with a few of Ram Rod’s son, Rudson’s, fishing weights. (When the guitar is picked up, these weights can still be heard, moving around inside); the fretboard made of ebony with ten iridescent mother-of-pearl inlays depicting Sanskrit symbols; the headstock with an iridescent mother-of-pearl inlay depicting an eagle in flight; small brass placard on back of headstock reads "D. Irwin 025;" back body panel has three inlays (two silver symbols plus the Alembic Studios logo) as well as the serial number which reads "GD [Grateful Dead] 025;" original strings from the last time Garcia played it (even the High E string that he broke) are still attached. In fact, Garcia was the last person to ever play this guitar, circa 1973. This was the first guitar completed by Doug Irwin, who states that the "GD025" serial number is indeed his first complete guitar. Included is the guitar's original case with a circular sticker on it reading "Manor Downs." Length: 40in

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-05-09
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Rare lou gehrig 1934-36 h&b "small signature" game bat

Lou Gehrig was the greatest player who was rarely considered the best player on his team. For more than a decade he shared the spotlight with Babe Ruth and then Joe DiMaggio, unable to match their flare or popularity. Asked about toiling alongside Ruth, Gehrig responded with typical modesty, "It's a pretty big shadow. It gives me lots of room to spread myself." Gehrig played the game in a machine-like fashion, pounding out home runs and driving in piles of runs year after year in that shadow. However, as Gehrig's consecutive games played streak mounted, it clearly set him apart from the other superstars in the game. But the modest Gehrig even shunned the attention that the streak brought him, all the while letting his performance speak for itself, earning deeper admiration from both fans and peers alike. Lefty Grove was one such peer who seemingly admired the humble Gehrig. This assumption is based on the offered bat, which was kept amongst his collection of career mementos. Gehrig and Grove were teammates on several All-Star teams beginning in 1933, and even toured Japan together during the famous off-season. Hillerich & Bradsby factory records indicate that the bat was produced for Gehrig between 1934-36. By every measure used in evaluating game used bats it is simply extraordinary. Measuring 34 ½ inches and weighing 36 ounces, its pronounced manufacturer’s markings include Gehrig’s facsimile signature stamped on the barrel in a form identifying the bat as a rare “small signature” style. Residue of a pine tar like substance appears on the barrel and heavy game use is apparent. In a third party assessment conducted by SCD Authentic, it was designated as the first Lou Gehrig bat ever to earn their highest mark of “A10”. Its physical attributes notwithstanding, rarely do game bats of this importance include player provenance of this magnitude. A remarkable gift from Lou to Lefty. LOA’s: SCD Authentic (A10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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The extremely rare and important 'Gardiner' Märklin American-market Gauge V (120mm.) spirit-fired Steam Passenger Train, circa 1906

The extremely rare and important 'Gardiner' Märklin American-market Gauge V (120mm.) spirit-fired Steam Passenger Train, circa 1906 Comprising: 4025 'Mignon' Locomotive and six-wheel Tender 41A 1st and 3rd Class Corridor Car 42A 1st Class Dining Car with Verandah 44A Smoking Car with Luggage Compartment Track and Points Details: Locomotive and Tender Paintwork details: The locomotive hand-painted throughout in black with gold banding to boiler, side footboards, borders to cab sheets, windows and roof, smoke box saddle and horizontal dome straps, generally with straw lining above and red lining below, cab interior in terracotta and boiler frames and wheels in red, with black edging to driving wheel spokes. The tender with gold painted rivets, some also embossed, gold banding to tender base, horizontal banding under top flaring, side and rear sheets with juxtaposed wide and thin straw lining, the frames with red edging and silver details and wheels in red. Mechanical Details: The brass locomotive boiler with brazed and crimped end plates, domed fire box, single fire tube to chimney, transverse water tubes and 'U'-bend hot-steam boiler feed to cylinders. Fitted with safety-valve filler, pressure gauge, sight glass (glass missing) and fittings for cab-floor mounted feed-water pump (missing). Body of heavy gauge sheet steel. Chassis fitted with twin double-acting cylinders, each with two piston valves and pivoted rocker arms, reverse activated from cab or track through centrally-mounted steam reverse block. Cylinders, cylinder-lubricators, guides and motion all in nickel-plated brass, with cast iron locomotive wheels. The tender body of heavy gauge tinplate, with water tank and feed pipe and cast iron wheels and frames. --Locomotive and tender 52in. (132cm.) long overall (Locomotive structure generally sound, cab roof slightly dished, probablty from use a ride-on train. Paintwork original, surface rusting and paint loss to frames and some horizontal surfaces, fair to good on cab sheets, roof, lower half of boiler and domes. Lining still visible on corroded surfaces. Lacks cowcatcher (pilot), front bogie, vaporising spirit lamp, bell, whistle, sight-glass and feed-water pump. Boiler tubing repaired. Tender with paintwork dry-flaking and corrosion, rust to interior and water tank. Part of tender body coming loose from frames). Coaches: 41A bogie clerestorey 1st and 3rd Class Corridor Car Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in tuscan red panels including upper sides, doors and ends, all lined in gold and lower side panels bordered in black, the inset window frames with vermilion red edging. The roof, with five vents, painted in shades of tan brown with clerestorey sides in tuscan red, with ten hand-painted skylight panels edged in vermilion red. The coach side frame-boards and cast iron bogie side-frames in vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside with wall surfaces in light blue, the pressed tinplate button-back seats textured in bottle green, surmounted by ornate luggage racks, coat and hat hooks and ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The wash-room with lavatory, wash basin, tap and ledge, in ivory, simulated wood and gold. The windows with simulated curtains in shades of green painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (Paint flaking, some corrosion and paint loss, minor damage, some paint loss to interior and curtains, lacks two footsteps, one coupling, two vents and light bracket, sides and part of ends split at solder-join along base, one door window cracked) 42A bogie clerestorey 1st Class Dining Car with Verandah Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in light brown, with simulated match-board sides shaded in mid-brown and tangerine, with horizontal bands continuing across doors and over coach ends, with door panels and upper coach sides lined in straw, the inset window frames in brown, edged in vermilion red. The roof, with five roof vents, painted in shades of tan brown, with clerestorey sides in light brown, with ten painted skylight panels edged in vermilion red. The coach frame-boards in dark brown and cast iron bogie side-frames in vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside, with wall panels in light lime yellow, the pressed tinplate button-back seats textured in dark red with gilded ornamental finials, table tops in marbled white with ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The kitchen compartment fitted with cooking range with hinged lid, dresser, wash basin, tap, towel rail and etched glass sliding service hatch to dining area. The windows with simulated curtains in shades of green painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (General paint loss and surface corrosion, interior paint flaking and fragile paint loss to simulated curtains, lacks verandah structure, couplings and two vent tops, crease damage to one door, one side split from base, set of steps damaged and loose) 44A bogie clerestorey Smoking Car with Baggage Compartment Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in shades of green, with ivory lining on lower panels and simulated fielded rectangular panels on lower baggage compartment sides, doors and ends, the inset window frames in dark green edged in vermilion red, surrounded by ivory lining. The roof, with five vents, painted in shades of tan brown, with clerestorey sides in green, with ten painted skylight panels edged in vermilion. The coach side frame-boards in ivory-edged dark green, with the cast iron bogie side frames vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside, with wall surfaces in yellow ochre, furnished with individual tinplate wicker seats in tuscan red with green textured seats, two green textured sofas and ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The baggage compartment fitted with two sets of double doors, wall desk, pigeon holes, table and lamp bracket. The coach windows with simulated curtains, the baggage compartment with blinds, all in shades of light green and ivory painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (Some corrosion and wear to paint, some crease damage to baggage end door, clerestorey section rusty, some corrosion to interior and paint loss to floor, some splitting of solder joint to lower coach sides at base, minor damage, three door window glasses, two frames and one coupling missing) Overall length of train --12ft.1in. (369cm.) Track and Points (Gauge V - 4 3/4in./120mm. rail centre to rail centre, 4 5/8in./11.75cm. inside rails) Sturdy fabricated steel flat-bottom 'T'-section rail made to special order. Painted in grey, with outside flat-section fish-plates with bolt holes for each connection, five sleepers per rail, riveted through rail bottom. Points fitted with hinged blade sections, activated by lever mounted on solid elongated sleeper. With detachable lever-operated track ramp to engage locomotive track reverse mechanism. Thirty-six straight sections --each 39 1/2in. (100cm.) long Twenty-five curved sections --each 42in. (107cm.) long Two left-hand points --each 42in. (107cm.) long Two right-hand points --each 42in. (107cm.) long Total length of track, including points --220ft. (67m.) (Considerable paint loss and some rusting, some bending to fishplates)

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2001-12-17
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SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, 1977

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, 1977 The white suit worn by actor John Travolta as he portrayed "Tony Manero" in the classic film; one of the most instantly recognizable film costumes in history. The 1978 movie which so defined the disco decade, is still considered the standard of 1970s contemporary anthropology. John Travolta's portrayal of the dancing boy from Brooklyn remains a timeless classic, with the soundtrack from the film still on the best seller list. The film's plot revolves around the night of the eagerly anticipated dance contest at the 2001 Odyssey Discotheque. "Tony Manero" entered the competition with his dance partner "Stephanie" played by Karen Lynn Gorney. "Tony's" entrance onto the pulsating dance floor in his white polyester suit, established the tough and sensitive street kid as the ultimate Disco King. The three piece body-hugging white suit is made by LEADING MALE of Kings Highway, Brooklyn. The jacket is constructed with wide stitch trimmed lapels, two matching closure buttons, four sleeve buttons, satin interior lining with rear double vent and two oversized side pockets. Handwritten in blue ink on the interior lining To Gene, So here's to a classic, your friend, John Travolta. The vest and flare bottom trousers are of the same fabric as the jacket. The black polyester shirt with white stitching, made by PASCAL OF SPAIN, is attached to the waistband of the trousers with an elastic fabric; this allowed Mr. Travolta the freedom to dance and strike his now legendary poses. (4)

  • USAUSA
  • 1995-06-28
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CASABLANCA, 1942

CASABLANCA, 1942 BEST PICTURE ACADEMY AWARD PRESENTED TO HAL B. WALLIS The gold plated britannia statue with the front plaque on the base inscribed ACADEMY FIRST AWARD TO "CASABLANCA" BEST PICTURE OF 1943 WARNER BROS. HAL B. WALLIS, PRODUCER--12 in. high. The Academy Award for Best Picture of 1942 possessed all the elements of a true life Hollywood drama. The Academy had been formed in 1927 by the major studios, and back then there were no steadfast rules for receiving Awards, etc. The system almost always favored the Studios above the individuals, and the rules continued to change every year. While there were no real guidelines for the Award for Best Picture, a Studio head would pick up the Oscar, a practice that wouldn't change until 1948. When a producer would receive a Best Picture Oscar, it was usually someone on the level of David O. Selznick who also ran his own studio. In an odd turn of events, Mr. Wallis did not actually accept the Best Picture Oscar, even though his contribution was recognized by the Academy and he attended the event. When Casablanca was named the winner, Jack Warner, head of the Studio, ran up to receive the Oscar before anyone else could reach the podium. In his autobiography Mr. Wallis recalled the moment, "I started up the aisle to receive my Award. To my astonishment, Jack Warner leapt to his feet, ran to the stage, and received it ahead of me. Almost forty years later, I still haven't recovered from the shock of it." While Mr. Wallis did eventually receive a Best Picture Academy Award for Casablanca, the incident set in motion a chain of events which permanently severed his relationship with Jack Warner and the Studio. Mr. Wallis departed shortly thereafter, and relocated his production company to Paramount Pictures.

  • USAUSA
  • 1995-06-28
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CECIL BEATON TRYPTICH PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE

CECIL BEATON TRYPTICH PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE A 1956 photograph of Marilyn Monroe Miller taken by society photographer Cecil Beaton. In one of her most famous sittings, the actress is posed reclining, holding a rose. The photograph is signed on the mat Cecil Beaton and is accompanied by two page autograph letter signed from Beaton. He describes his fascination and perspective on his subject in detail, "Miss Marilyn Monroe calls to mind the bouquet of a fireworks display, eliciting from her awed spectators an open mouthed chorus of ohs and ahs... In her presence, you are startled, then disarmed, by her lack of inhibition. What might at first seem llike exhibitionism is yet counterbalanced by a wistful incertitude beneath the surface. If this star is an abandoned sprite, she touchingly looks to her audience for approval. She is strikingly like an overexcited child asked downstairs after tea. The initial shyness over, excitement has now gotten the better of her. She romps, she squeals with delight, she leaps onto the sofa. She puts a flower stem in her mouth, puffing on a daisy as though it were a cigarette. It is an artless, impromptu, high spirited, infectiously gay performance. It may end in tears. Equally impromptu is her general appearance. This canary blond nymph has been so sufficiently endowed by nature as to pay no attention to the way she looks. Her hair, her nails, her make-up, have a makeshift, spontaneous attractiveness. It is all very contemporary: Marilyn Monroe conjures up two straws in a single soda, juke-boxes, sheer nylons and drive- in movies for necking (does she not project a hynotized nymphomania?). This, then, is the wonder of the age - a dreaming somnabular, a composite of Alice in Wonderland, Trilby, or a Minsky artist. Perhaps she was born the post war day we had need of her. Certainly she has no knowledge of the past. Like Giraudoux's Ondine, she is only fifteen years old; and she will never die." Cecil Beaton, June 1956. Encased in a silver tryptich, engraved on the center panel To Marilyn Monroe Miller Love Nedda and Joshua Logan. Gelatine silver print. 1956. Signed "Cecil Beaton" in red pencil on the mount.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-10-27
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Pair of 24k solid gold presentation trophy balls and gold plinths

In 1975, Arthur Ashe was awarded these 24 karat solid gold tennis balls for winning the World Championship of  Tennis. The WCT was founded in 1967 as a tour for professional male tennis players. In 1975, the tourney was played in May between the top eight ranking players. Ashe defeated Sweden's greatest player, Bjorn Borg, in four sets, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-0, a warmup for Ashe's sensational Wimbledon championship run later that summer. Both are solid gold and sculptured as tennis balls, slightly differing in size, engraved blue enamel label HAGGAR (the sponsor). Each ball is set on a solid gold dome-shaped plynth, one inscribed ARTHUR ASHE, the other inscribed in smaller text, 24 KT, MADE BY ADELSTEIN. Larger Ball  5308.9 grams/11.7 lbs     998.8 (Gold Part Per Thousand) Smaller Ball  4441.3 grams/9.79 lbs   998.1 (Gold Part Per Thousand)                                                                                                            Stand             1270.3 grams/ 2.8 lbs 997.9 (Gold Part  Per Thousand)          Stand 552.1 grams/ 1.217 lbs. 991.9 (Gold Part Per Thousand) Total Weight 11572.6 grams                                          Condition is excellent, with minor age wear. LOA: Jeanne Moutoussamy Ashe At the time of printing the melt value for gold was approximately $150,000 at  $13 per gram.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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Philippe DRUILLET Né en 1944

Philippe DRUILLET Né en 1944 YRAGAËL Acrylique sur toile. Signé et daté « 93 » en bas à droite. Exposition galerie Loft en 1992. Une des pièces historiques emblématique de cet artiste. 257 x 160 cm. Philippe Druillet tel qu'en lui-même : nihiliste élégant et gothique, jetant sa vie sur la toile pour construire sa cathédrale, faite de blessures secrètes, de solitude et de transgression. Dripping sans concession, espace de couleurs infernales, enivré par les hallucinations des Haschichins. Une mystique et une énergie qui donnent sa cohérence à l'ensemble, une violence chromatique en perpétuelle effervescence, des formes qui s'entrechoquent, balayent les contours et déconstruisent les valeurs afin de permettre à l'artiste d'imposer les siennes. Tout commence par le sceptre. Primitif et brutal, sauvage et mimétique, conquérant comme la figure de proue d'un drakkar. Une tête de mort à dents de sabre, implacable chimère capable de pétrifier les mortels. Éclipses de Lune dans le ciel, noir comme les rêves, noir comme le destin et le regard. Les vagues hurlent et se déchaînent, partent à l'assaut d'un trône lourdement sculpté, attirées par les reflets bleutés et métalliques de l'épée, tandis qu'à l'opposé les rayons multicolores griffent la toile, courbes contre droites, Caliban contre Ariel, affrontement ultime entre la Terre et le Ciel sur les décombres de l'ordre ancien. Yragaël domine la tempête et son royaume tragique. Enveloppé de rouge, d'orgueil et de fureur, le feu et le sang, entre le monde des vivants et celui des morts. Chevelure incendiaire et visage taillé dans un bloc de marbre bleu turquin, figé à la manière du masque mortuaire d'un pharaon. Une créature fantastique à ses pieds, décorée aux couleurs des dieux, Léviathan harnaché d'or. L'art de Philippe Druillet est une expérience sensorielle, ses images nocturnes et ses états d'âme viennent se concrétiser avec une grande sincérité. Dessin et peinture sont pour lui des conjurations magiques : il désoriente le spectateur grâce à des figures sombres et fantastiques, à la démesure des formes qui brisent toutes les limites, à un univers rageur et exalté d'une grande puissance suggestive. Son approche graphique et picturale est un système nerveux qui fait converger des sentiments complexes, comme lorsqu'on regarde les visages poignants d'une Crucifixion d'un primitif italien. C'est un révolutionnaire, à la manière des peintres du Quattrocento : il exhorte au vertige, provoque le doute, ouvre des perspectives en recomposant la dominance de l'oeuvre et en entraînant le lecteur dans des profondeurs inattendues. Il aime à s'imprégner du travail d'artistes comme Gustave Doré ou Francis Bacon, avec lesquels il partage un instinct formel, une liberté complète et une capacité médiumnique propre à donner aux images une grande force dramatique. Porté par le cinéma expressionniste allemand des années 20 et 30, il ne cache pas non plus son admiration pour l'œuvre d'Hergé et celle d'Edgar P. Jacobs, alter ego de la ligne claire, auteurs les plus importants et les plus influents de la bande dessinée du XXe siècle. Artiste protéiforme, amoureux de la peinture et de la littérature, de Francisco Goya et de Gustave Flaubert, tourné vers la musique, l'opéra et évidemment le cinéma, domaine où il a réalisé de nombreux projets, concepteur de meubles et d'objets d'art, Philippe Druillet est un homme d'action, explorateur de la matière et du support pris dans un maelström permanent, sans lequel il ne pourrait ni créer, ni vivre. Et in Arcadia ego. Estimation 100 000 - 120 000 € Sold for 126,400 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-11-22
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Kwanon Prototype Camera

Kwanon Prototype Camera, numbered 2 on inside of base plate, black paint, with nickel-plated fittings, pop-up viewfinder, shutter speeds 2, 25, 40, 60, 100, 200, 500, rewind knob, exposure counter on the front, central tripod bush on the base plate, and un-numbered screw-fit KasyaPa f/3.5 50 mm. lens in nickel-plated mount, (brassing on the edges, optics cracked, shutter defective, mechanical condition and completeness not guaranteed). Provenance: From information supplied by the consignor, the camera was acquired ten years ago from the daughter of a real estate agent in the Bronx, New York, along with a Contax I and a Leica II, who reported that all three cameras had been in the family since the early 1950s. Note: The Kwanon is the earliest, pre-production form of the Canon camera. Its designer, GoroYoshida, was born in Hiroshima in 1900 and spent his early career repairing and modifying motion picture cameras and projection equipment, with trips to Shanghai in the late 1920s to procure parts. His skills, combined with the perception that the Leica and Contax Model I were "takane no hana" (beyond the reach) of most people, inspired Yoshida to design the first quality Japanese 35 mm. camera. Yoshida's task was made more difficult by the fact that, before 1945, Leitz held all of the major patents for 35 mm. camera production. The Leica's patented coupled rangefinder and viewfinder under one roof presented a particular problem. As Zeiss discovered with the Contax, anyone wishing to market a new 35 mm. camera, had to come up with a completely new design that was different from the Leica. (After the war, with Germany defeated, this was no longer a problem). However, Yoshida did dismantle a Leica for inspiration, reporting that" I just dissasembled the camera without any specific plan, but simply to take a look at each part. I found that there were no special items like diamonds inside the camera. The parts were made from brass, aluminum, iron and rubber." With this in mind, Yoshida enlisted the financial backing of his brother-in-law, Saburu Ochida, and formed Seiki-Kogaku (which became the Precision Optical Works) in 1933 for the development of his idea. He named his prototype "Kwanon" after the Buddhist Goddess of Mercy, and the lens "Kasyapa" after one of Buddha's disciples. Although Yoshida claimed to have completed ten Kwanon cameras, the camera was apparently never put on the market, although not through want of advertising. A picture in the June 1934 issue of Asahi Camera magazine showed a black 35 mm. camera, with elements from both the Leica and the Contax, and the enthusiastic claim that 'the best submarine is the Igo. The best airplane is the Model 92. The best camera is the Kwanon. They are all the best in the world'. Although three variations of the Kwanon were advertised, all were apparently non-functional wooden dummies, which varied from advert to advert. This may have been because Yoshida was ultimately unable to circumvent Leica's rangefinder-coupling patents; he was subsequently "fired" from Seiki Kogaku in 1934, and apparently played no subsequent part in the development of the Kwanon. In 1934, Seiki Kogaku approached Nippon Kogaku, the largest manufacturer of optics in Japan, in the hope of finding a method of rangefinder coupling that would avoid the Leica patents on this feature. Eiichi Yamanaka was the Nippon Kogaku technician who was primarily responsible for developing what became the new Hansa lens-mount; by contrast, the Kwanon here still retains a disc and lever assembly that couples with the lens Leica-style. With Nippon Kogaku supplying the optical system and Seiki Kogaku responsible for the chassis, the new design was ready for production before the end of 1935. The name was changed from 'Kwanon' to 'Canon', and the resulting design – designated the 'Hansa Canon' after the trademark of its retailer, the Omiya Shashin Yohin Co. – was the first true production Canon camera. Thanks in part to their experience with the Hansa and the Kwanon, Nippon Kogaku introduced their own first 35 mm. camera, the Nikon I, in 1948. The leagcy of this landmark collaboration was the development of both Canon and Nikon into the two largest camera manufacturers today. As Seiki-Kogaku had already planned for the production of the Kwanon, spare Kwanon parts (such as the base plate with centered tripod bush) that were in stock may have been used on the early Hansa Canon models. There is a story that only one actual Kwanon camera was finally sold, in a Tokyo camera store .The incorporation of a folding viewfinder on the top plate, the advance / rewind knob (which does not appear in the advertised cameras) and the spindle-disengagement were the semi-final modifications of the Kwanon's body design, and suggest that the camera here probably dates from late 1934 or early 1935. . The number "2" stamped into the inner surface of the base plate raises the possibility that this is the second operable Kwanon made, and possibly the only on to have survived. Thanks to Peter Dechert for his assistance in researching the catalogue notes.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-07-29
Hammer price
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GIGI

GIGI Frederick Loewe, composer, Alan Jay Lerner, lyricist, screenwriter. "GIGI." Based on the novel by Collette. Cinema presented by Metro Goldwyn Mayer, Produced by Alan Freed, Directed by Vincente Minelli. 1957. "THANK HEAVEN FOR LITTLE GIRLS" After My Fair Lady Lerner and Loewe turned their attentions to Gigi, Colette's charming story of a young girl in turn-of-the-century France, raised by her aunts to be a courtesan to a family friend, Gaston. When Gaston falls in love with Gigi and proposes to her, the older women are appalled; no one in the family had imagined anything so bourgeois. Gigi produced some of the duo's most famous songs, including "I Remember it Well," "The Night They Invented Champagne," and the delightfully naughty "Thank Heaven for Little Girls" (immortalized on film by Maurice Chevalier). The film version of "Gigi" was nominated for 9 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and is justly celebrated as one of the greatest musicals of all time. Totaling: 163 pages music (89 pages in manuscript, others in mechanical copies for working purposes), some with revisions and notes, 15 hand-labelled foders or cover sheets (mostly in the hand of Loewe), two bound typescripts, a photographic copy of the MGM contract for the Gigi. Contents: "Girl's Gossip, Interlude I Need Air," autograph manuscript piano-vocal score with lyrics, by Loewe, cover sheet titled by Loewe in large red letters "GIGI," 1 page. "All About Gaston," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, Loewe's principal copyist/arranger, 5 pages, cover sheet titled by Loewe, initialed "F.L." and with bold note "Original" "All About Gaston," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, titled in pencil by Loewe AND WITH NEW LYRICS ADDED IN LOEWE'S HAND, 2 pages "Everything French is Better," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, cover labeled "Original" by Loewe, 8 pages "Everything French Is Better," mechanical copy of the same ms., 8 pages "Thank Heaven For Little Girls," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, the lyrics in Loewe's hand, 12 pages, with new dialogue (spoken by Maurice Chevalier) added in pencil at top of page 6 and bottom page 9, short note at bottom page 10 "The Contract," autograph manuscript melody and lyrics sketch, by Loewe, 11 pages, with many deletions and new text added by Loewe "The Contract," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 29 pages "In This Wide, Wide World," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 6 pages "In This Wide, Wide World," manuscript melody and lyrics sketch, Loewe's hand, cover boldly titled by Lowe, 4 pages, with deleted draft of another song "There's Always One You Can't Forget" on verso of last page "In This Wide, Wide World," autograph manuscript melody and lyrics sketch, by Loewe, 3 pages, with deleted draft of another song "I've Been Thinking," on verso page 1 "The Parisians," manuscript piano-vocal score, music probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 7 pages, page 2-4 WITH TEXT IN HAND OF LOEWE, paginated 1-4,6-8, no page 5 present, some stage notations ("Scrim lights up revealing lovers") "The Parisians," piano-vocal score, mechanical copy, 8 pages, A WORKING MANUSCRIPT, with cut-outs, bars numbered in pencil, some pencilled lyrics in an unknown hand, page three with note "New lyrics." page 7 with note "Insert dance interlude." "I Never Want To Go Home Again," manuscript piano vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 9 pages "I Never Want To Go Home Again," mechanical copy of same ms., 2 copies, each 9 pages, plus 3 pages of additional copies of different ms. of same number "Gigi 'Never' Verse," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, 1 page "I Remember It Well," mechanical copy of printed lead sheet with copyright notice at bottom, 5 pages, cover titled by Loewe, bold pencil alterations in first six bars (piano lead-in) "I'm Glad I'm Not Young Anymore," mechanical copy of printed lead-sheet with copyright notice at bottom, 4 pages, a few pencil markings "Da, Da, Da, Da, Da," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, 7 pages. "At Maxims," mechanical copy of working piano-vocal score in Loewe's hand, 4 pages, WITH REVISIONS AND SEVERAL DELETIONS IN PENCIL BY LOEWE, page 1 marked "Obsolete." "New Maxim's," mechanical copy of revised piano-vocal score, possibly in Sirmay's hand, 9 pages. {With:] 1. Photographic negative copy of typescript contract between Arthur Freed of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Frederick Loewe for "Gigi." FREDERICK LOEWE'S COPY. 17 pages, stapled. 2. Typescript of the screenplay "Gigi," "Book and Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. 109 pages, spiral bound, FREDERICK LOEWE'S COPY with note "original" on front cover. Probably prepared during preparation of German version of Gigi, 1973 3. Typescript of the German-language "Gigi." 91 pages. Spiral bound. FREDERICK LOEWE'S COPY, initialed "FL" on titlepage. Gigi

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-11-18
Hammer price
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Toys & Collectible Items

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