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The extremely rare and important 'Gardiner' Märklin American-market Gauge V (120mm.) spirit-fired Steam Passenger Train, circa 1906

The extremely rare and important 'Gardiner' Märklin American-market Gauge V (120mm.) spirit-fired Steam Passenger Train, circa 1906 Comprising: 4025 'Mignon' Locomotive and six-wheel Tender 41A 1st and 3rd Class Corridor Car 42A 1st Class Dining Car with Verandah 44A Smoking Car with Luggage Compartment Track and Points Details: Locomotive and Tender Paintwork details: The locomotive hand-painted throughout in black with gold banding to boiler, side footboards, borders to cab sheets, windows and roof, smoke box saddle and horizontal dome straps, generally with straw lining above and red lining below, cab interior in terracotta and boiler frames and wheels in red, with black edging to driving wheel spokes. The tender with gold painted rivets, some also embossed, gold banding to tender base, horizontal banding under top flaring, side and rear sheets with juxtaposed wide and thin straw lining, the frames with red edging and silver details and wheels in red. Mechanical Details: The brass locomotive boiler with brazed and crimped end plates, domed fire box, single fire tube to chimney, transverse water tubes and 'U'-bend hot-steam boiler feed to cylinders. Fitted with safety-valve filler, pressure gauge, sight glass (glass missing) and fittings for cab-floor mounted feed-water pump (missing). Body of heavy gauge sheet steel. Chassis fitted with twin double-acting cylinders, each with two piston valves and pivoted rocker arms, reverse activated from cab or track through centrally-mounted steam reverse block. Cylinders, cylinder-lubricators, guides and motion all in nickel-plated brass, with cast iron locomotive wheels. The tender body of heavy gauge tinplate, with water tank and feed pipe and cast iron wheels and frames. --Locomotive and tender 52in. (132cm.) long overall (Locomotive structure generally sound, cab roof slightly dished, probablty from use a ride-on train. Paintwork original, surface rusting and paint loss to frames and some horizontal surfaces, fair to good on cab sheets, roof, lower half of boiler and domes. Lining still visible on corroded surfaces. Lacks cowcatcher (pilot), front bogie, vaporising spirit lamp, bell, whistle, sight-glass and feed-water pump. Boiler tubing repaired. Tender with paintwork dry-flaking and corrosion, rust to interior and water tank. Part of tender body coming loose from frames). Coaches: 41A bogie clerestorey 1st and 3rd Class Corridor Car Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in tuscan red panels including upper sides, doors and ends, all lined in gold and lower side panels bordered in black, the inset window frames with vermilion red edging. The roof, with five vents, painted in shades of tan brown with clerestorey sides in tuscan red, with ten hand-painted skylight panels edged in vermilion red. The coach side frame-boards and cast iron bogie side-frames in vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside with wall surfaces in light blue, the pressed tinplate button-back seats textured in bottle green, surmounted by ornate luggage racks, coat and hat hooks and ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The wash-room with lavatory, wash basin, tap and ledge, in ivory, simulated wood and gold. The windows with simulated curtains in shades of green painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (Paint flaking, some corrosion and paint loss, minor damage, some paint loss to interior and curtains, lacks two footsteps, one coupling, two vents and light bracket, sides and part of ends split at solder-join along base, one door window cracked) 42A bogie clerestorey 1st Class Dining Car with Verandah Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in light brown, with simulated match-board sides shaded in mid-brown and tangerine, with horizontal bands continuing across doors and over coach ends, with door panels and upper coach sides lined in straw, the inset window frames in brown, edged in vermilion red. The roof, with five roof vents, painted in shades of tan brown, with clerestorey sides in light brown, with ten painted skylight panels edged in vermilion red. The coach frame-boards in dark brown and cast iron bogie side-frames in vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside, with wall panels in light lime yellow, the pressed tinplate button-back seats textured in dark red with gilded ornamental finials, table tops in marbled white with ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The kitchen compartment fitted with cooking range with hinged lid, dresser, wash basin, tap, towel rail and etched glass sliding service hatch to dining area. The windows with simulated curtains in shades of green painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (General paint loss and surface corrosion, interior paint flaking and fragile paint loss to simulated curtains, lacks verandah structure, couplings and two vent tops, crease damage to one door, one side split from base, set of steps damaged and loose) 44A bogie clerestorey Smoking Car with Baggage Compartment Exterior Hand-painted tinplate in shades of green, with ivory lining on lower panels and simulated fielded rectangular panels on lower baggage compartment sides, doors and ends, the inset window frames in dark green edged in vermilion red, surrounded by ivory lining. The roof, with five vents, painted in shades of tan brown, with clerestorey sides in green, with ten painted skylight panels edged in vermilion. The coach side frame-boards in ivory-edged dark green, with the cast iron bogie side frames vermilion-lined black, with details picked out in silver. Interior The hinged roof in ivory inside, with wall surfaces in yellow ochre, furnished with individual tinplate wicker seats in tuscan red with green textured seats, two green textured sofas and ornately pressed lighting brackets in copper gilt. The baggage compartment fitted with two sets of double doors, wall desk, pigeon holes, table and lamp bracket. The coach windows with simulated curtains, the baggage compartment with blinds, all in shades of light green and ivory painted on glass. --Coach 31in. (79cm.) long (Some corrosion and wear to paint, some crease damage to baggage end door, clerestorey section rusty, some corrosion to interior and paint loss to floor, some splitting of solder joint to lower coach sides at base, minor damage, three door window glasses, two frames and one coupling missing) Overall length of train --12ft.1in. (369cm.) Track and Points (Gauge V - 4 3/4in./120mm. rail centre to rail centre, 4 5/8in./11.75cm. inside rails) Sturdy fabricated steel flat-bottom 'T'-section rail made to special order. Painted in grey, with outside flat-section fish-plates with bolt holes for each connection, five sleepers per rail, riveted through rail bottom. Points fitted with hinged blade sections, activated by lever mounted on solid elongated sleeper. With detachable lever-operated track ramp to engage locomotive track reverse mechanism. Thirty-six straight sections --each 39 1/2in. (100cm.) long Twenty-five curved sections --each 42in. (107cm.) long Two left-hand points --each 42in. (107cm.) long Two right-hand points --each 42in. (107cm.) long Total length of track, including points --220ft. (67m.) (Considerable paint loss and some rusting, some bending to fishplates)

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2001-12-17
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SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, 1977

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER, 1977 The white suit worn by actor John Travolta as he portrayed "Tony Manero" in the classic film; one of the most instantly recognizable film costumes in history. The 1978 movie which so defined the disco decade, is still considered the standard of 1970s contemporary anthropology. John Travolta's portrayal of the dancing boy from Brooklyn remains a timeless classic, with the soundtrack from the film still on the best seller list. The film's plot revolves around the night of the eagerly anticipated dance contest at the 2001 Odyssey Discotheque. "Tony Manero" entered the competition with his dance partner "Stephanie" played by Karen Lynn Gorney. "Tony's" entrance onto the pulsating dance floor in his white polyester suit, established the tough and sensitive street kid as the ultimate Disco King. The three piece body-hugging white suit is made by LEADING MALE of Kings Highway, Brooklyn. The jacket is constructed with wide stitch trimmed lapels, two matching closure buttons, four sleeve buttons, satin interior lining with rear double vent and two oversized side pockets. Handwritten in blue ink on the interior lining To Gene, So here's to a classic, your friend, John Travolta. The vest and flare bottom trousers are of the same fabric as the jacket. The black polyester shirt with white stitching, made by PASCAL OF SPAIN, is attached to the waistband of the trousers with an elastic fabric; this allowed Mr. Travolta the freedom to dance and strike his now legendary poses. (4)

  • USAUSA
  • 1995-06-28
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CASABLANCA, 1942

CASABLANCA, 1942 BEST PICTURE ACADEMY AWARD PRESENTED TO HAL B. WALLIS The gold plated britannia statue with the front plaque on the base inscribed ACADEMY FIRST AWARD TO "CASABLANCA" BEST PICTURE OF 1943 WARNER BROS. HAL B. WALLIS, PRODUCER--12 in. high. The Academy Award for Best Picture of 1942 possessed all the elements of a true life Hollywood drama. The Academy had been formed in 1927 by the major studios, and back then there were no steadfast rules for receiving Awards, etc. The system almost always favored the Studios above the individuals, and the rules continued to change every year. While there were no real guidelines for the Award for Best Picture, a Studio head would pick up the Oscar, a practice that wouldn't change until 1948. When a producer would receive a Best Picture Oscar, it was usually someone on the level of David O. Selznick who also ran his own studio. In an odd turn of events, Mr. Wallis did not actually accept the Best Picture Oscar, even though his contribution was recognized by the Academy and he attended the event. When Casablanca was named the winner, Jack Warner, head of the Studio, ran up to receive the Oscar before anyone else could reach the podium. In his autobiography Mr. Wallis recalled the moment, "I started up the aisle to receive my Award. To my astonishment, Jack Warner leapt to his feet, ran to the stage, and received it ahead of me. Almost forty years later, I still haven't recovered from the shock of it." While Mr. Wallis did eventually receive a Best Picture Academy Award for Casablanca, the incident set in motion a chain of events which permanently severed his relationship with Jack Warner and the Studio. Mr. Wallis departed shortly thereafter, and relocated his production company to Paramount Pictures.

  • USAUSA
  • 1995-06-28
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CECIL BEATON TRYPTICH PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE

CECIL BEATON TRYPTICH PHOTOGRAPH OF MARILYN MONROE A 1956 photograph of Marilyn Monroe Miller taken by society photographer Cecil Beaton. In one of her most famous sittings, the actress is posed reclining, holding a rose. The photograph is signed on the mat Cecil Beaton and is accompanied by two page autograph letter signed from Beaton. He describes his fascination and perspective on his subject in detail, "Miss Marilyn Monroe calls to mind the bouquet of a fireworks display, eliciting from her awed spectators an open mouthed chorus of ohs and ahs... In her presence, you are startled, then disarmed, by her lack of inhibition. What might at first seem llike exhibitionism is yet counterbalanced by a wistful incertitude beneath the surface. If this star is an abandoned sprite, she touchingly looks to her audience for approval. She is strikingly like an overexcited child asked downstairs after tea. The initial shyness over, excitement has now gotten the better of her. She romps, she squeals with delight, she leaps onto the sofa. She puts a flower stem in her mouth, puffing on a daisy as though it were a cigarette. It is an artless, impromptu, high spirited, infectiously gay performance. It may end in tears. Equally impromptu is her general appearance. This canary blond nymph has been so sufficiently endowed by nature as to pay no attention to the way she looks. Her hair, her nails, her make-up, have a makeshift, spontaneous attractiveness. It is all very contemporary: Marilyn Monroe conjures up two straws in a single soda, juke-boxes, sheer nylons and drive- in movies for necking (does she not project a hynotized nymphomania?). This, then, is the wonder of the age - a dreaming somnabular, a composite of Alice in Wonderland, Trilby, or a Minsky artist. Perhaps she was born the post war day we had need of her. Certainly she has no knowledge of the past. Like Giraudoux's Ondine, she is only fifteen years old; and she will never die." Cecil Beaton, June 1956. Encased in a silver tryptich, engraved on the center panel To Marilyn Monroe Miller Love Nedda and Joshua Logan. Gelatine silver print. 1956. Signed "Cecil Beaton" in red pencil on the mount.

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-10-27
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Pair of 24k solid gold presentation trophy balls and gold plinths

In 1975, Arthur Ashe was awarded these 24 karat solid gold tennis balls for winning the World Championship of  Tennis. The WCT was founded in 1967 as a tour for professional male tennis players. In 1975, the tourney was played in May between the top eight ranking players. Ashe defeated Sweden's greatest player, Bjorn Borg, in four sets, 3-6, 6-4, 6-4, 6-0, a warmup for Ashe's sensational Wimbledon championship run later that summer. Both are solid gold and sculptured as tennis balls, slightly differing in size, engraved blue enamel label HAGGAR (the sponsor). Each ball is set on a solid gold dome-shaped plynth, one inscribed ARTHUR ASHE, the other inscribed in smaller text, 24 KT, MADE BY ADELSTEIN. Larger Ball  5308.9 grams/11.7 lbs     998.8 (Gold Part Per Thousand) Smaller Ball  4441.3 grams/9.79 lbs   998.1 (Gold Part Per Thousand)                                                                                                            Stand             1270.3 grams/ 2.8 lbs 997.9 (Gold Part  Per Thousand)          Stand 552.1 grams/ 1.217 lbs. 991.9 (Gold Part Per Thousand) Total Weight 11572.6 grams                                          Condition is excellent, with minor age wear. LOA: Jeanne Moutoussamy Ashe At the time of printing the melt value for gold was approximately $150,000 at  $13 per gram.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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Philippe DRUILLET Né en 1944

Philippe DRUILLET Né en 1944 YRAGAËL Acrylique sur toile. Signé et daté « 93 » en bas à droite. Exposition galerie Loft en 1992. Une des pièces historiques emblématique de cet artiste. 257 x 160 cm. Philippe Druillet tel qu'en lui-même : nihiliste élégant et gothique, jetant sa vie sur la toile pour construire sa cathédrale, faite de blessures secrètes, de solitude et de transgression. Dripping sans concession, espace de couleurs infernales, enivré par les hallucinations des Haschichins. Une mystique et une énergie qui donnent sa cohérence à l'ensemble, une violence chromatique en perpétuelle effervescence, des formes qui s'entrechoquent, balayent les contours et déconstruisent les valeurs afin de permettre à l'artiste d'imposer les siennes. Tout commence par le sceptre. Primitif et brutal, sauvage et mimétique, conquérant comme la figure de proue d'un drakkar. Une tête de mort à dents de sabre, implacable chimère capable de pétrifier les mortels. Éclipses de Lune dans le ciel, noir comme les rêves, noir comme le destin et le regard. Les vagues hurlent et se déchaînent, partent à l'assaut d'un trône lourdement sculpté, attirées par les reflets bleutés et métalliques de l'épée, tandis qu'à l'opposé les rayons multicolores griffent la toile, courbes contre droites, Caliban contre Ariel, affrontement ultime entre la Terre et le Ciel sur les décombres de l'ordre ancien. Yragaël domine la tempête et son royaume tragique. Enveloppé de rouge, d'orgueil et de fureur, le feu et le sang, entre le monde des vivants et celui des morts. Chevelure incendiaire et visage taillé dans un bloc de marbre bleu turquin, figé à la manière du masque mortuaire d'un pharaon. Une créature fantastique à ses pieds, décorée aux couleurs des dieux, Léviathan harnaché d'or. L'art de Philippe Druillet est une expérience sensorielle, ses images nocturnes et ses états d'âme viennent se concrétiser avec une grande sincérité. Dessin et peinture sont pour lui des conjurations magiques : il désoriente le spectateur grâce à des figures sombres et fantastiques, à la démesure des formes qui brisent toutes les limites, à un univers rageur et exalté d'une grande puissance suggestive. Son approche graphique et picturale est un système nerveux qui fait converger des sentiments complexes, comme lorsqu'on regarde les visages poignants d'une Crucifixion d'un primitif italien. C'est un révolutionnaire, à la manière des peintres du Quattrocento : il exhorte au vertige, provoque le doute, ouvre des perspectives en recomposant la dominance de l'oeuvre et en entraînant le lecteur dans des profondeurs inattendues. Il aime à s'imprégner du travail d'artistes comme Gustave Doré ou Francis Bacon, avec lesquels il partage un instinct formel, une liberté complète et une capacité médiumnique propre à donner aux images une grande force dramatique. Porté par le cinéma expressionniste allemand des années 20 et 30, il ne cache pas non plus son admiration pour l'œuvre d'Hergé et celle d'Edgar P. Jacobs, alter ego de la ligne claire, auteurs les plus importants et les plus influents de la bande dessinée du XXe siècle. Artiste protéiforme, amoureux de la peinture et de la littérature, de Francisco Goya et de Gustave Flaubert, tourné vers la musique, l'opéra et évidemment le cinéma, domaine où il a réalisé de nombreux projets, concepteur de meubles et d'objets d'art, Philippe Druillet est un homme d'action, explorateur de la matière et du support pris dans un maelström permanent, sans lequel il ne pourrait ni créer, ni vivre. Et in Arcadia ego. Estimation 100 000 - 120 000 € Sold for 126,400 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-11-22
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Kwanon Prototype Camera

Kwanon Prototype Camera, numbered 2 on inside of base plate, black paint, with nickel-plated fittings, pop-up viewfinder, shutter speeds 2, 25, 40, 60, 100, 200, 500, rewind knob, exposure counter on the front, central tripod bush on the base plate, and un-numbered screw-fit KasyaPa f/3.5 50 mm. lens in nickel-plated mount, (brassing on the edges, optics cracked, shutter defective, mechanical condition and completeness not guaranteed). Provenance: From information supplied by the consignor, the camera was acquired ten years ago from the daughter of a real estate agent in the Bronx, New York, along with a Contax I and a Leica II, who reported that all three cameras had been in the family since the early 1950s. Note: The Kwanon is the earliest, pre-production form of the Canon camera. Its designer, GoroYoshida, was born in Hiroshima in 1900 and spent his early career repairing and modifying motion picture cameras and projection equipment, with trips to Shanghai in the late 1920s to procure parts. His skills, combined with the perception that the Leica and Contax Model I were "takane no hana" (beyond the reach) of most people, inspired Yoshida to design the first quality Japanese 35 mm. camera. Yoshida's task was made more difficult by the fact that, before 1945, Leitz held all of the major patents for 35 mm. camera production. The Leica's patented coupled rangefinder and viewfinder under one roof presented a particular problem. As Zeiss discovered with the Contax, anyone wishing to market a new 35 mm. camera, had to come up with a completely new design that was different from the Leica. (After the war, with Germany defeated, this was no longer a problem). However, Yoshida did dismantle a Leica for inspiration, reporting that" I just dissasembled the camera without any specific plan, but simply to take a look at each part. I found that there were no special items like diamonds inside the camera. The parts were made from brass, aluminum, iron and rubber." With this in mind, Yoshida enlisted the financial backing of his brother-in-law, Saburu Ochida, and formed Seiki-Kogaku (which became the Precision Optical Works) in 1933 for the development of his idea. He named his prototype "Kwanon" after the Buddhist Goddess of Mercy, and the lens "Kasyapa" after one of Buddha's disciples. Although Yoshida claimed to have completed ten Kwanon cameras, the camera was apparently never put on the market, although not through want of advertising. A picture in the June 1934 issue of Asahi Camera magazine showed a black 35 mm. camera, with elements from both the Leica and the Contax, and the enthusiastic claim that 'the best submarine is the Igo. The best airplane is the Model 92. The best camera is the Kwanon. They are all the best in the world'. Although three variations of the Kwanon were advertised, all were apparently non-functional wooden dummies, which varied from advert to advert. This may have been because Yoshida was ultimately unable to circumvent Leica's rangefinder-coupling patents; he was subsequently "fired" from Seiki Kogaku in 1934, and apparently played no subsequent part in the development of the Kwanon. In 1934, Seiki Kogaku approached Nippon Kogaku, the largest manufacturer of optics in Japan, in the hope of finding a method of rangefinder coupling that would avoid the Leica patents on this feature. Eiichi Yamanaka was the Nippon Kogaku technician who was primarily responsible for developing what became the new Hansa lens-mount; by contrast, the Kwanon here still retains a disc and lever assembly that couples with the lens Leica-style. With Nippon Kogaku supplying the optical system and Seiki Kogaku responsible for the chassis, the new design was ready for production before the end of 1935. The name was changed from 'Kwanon' to 'Canon', and the resulting design – designated the 'Hansa Canon' after the trademark of its retailer, the Omiya Shashin Yohin Co. – was the first true production Canon camera. Thanks in part to their experience with the Hansa and the Kwanon, Nippon Kogaku introduced their own first 35 mm. camera, the Nikon I, in 1948. The leagcy of this landmark collaboration was the development of both Canon and Nikon into the two largest camera manufacturers today. As Seiki-Kogaku had already planned for the production of the Kwanon, spare Kwanon parts (such as the base plate with centered tripod bush) that were in stock may have been used on the early Hansa Canon models. There is a story that only one actual Kwanon camera was finally sold, in a Tokyo camera store .The incorporation of a folding viewfinder on the top plate, the advance / rewind knob (which does not appear in the advertised cameras) and the spindle-disengagement were the semi-final modifications of the Kwanon's body design, and suggest that the camera here probably dates from late 1934 or early 1935. . The number "2" stamped into the inner surface of the base plate raises the possibility that this is the second operable Kwanon made, and possibly the only on to have survived. Thanks to Peter Dechert for his assistance in researching the catalogue notes.

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-07-29
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GIGI

GIGI Frederick Loewe, composer, Alan Jay Lerner, lyricist, screenwriter. "GIGI." Based on the novel by Collette. Cinema presented by Metro Goldwyn Mayer, Produced by Alan Freed, Directed by Vincente Minelli. 1957. "THANK HEAVEN FOR LITTLE GIRLS" After My Fair Lady Lerner and Loewe turned their attentions to Gigi, Colette's charming story of a young girl in turn-of-the-century France, raised by her aunts to be a courtesan to a family friend, Gaston. When Gaston falls in love with Gigi and proposes to her, the older women are appalled; no one in the family had imagined anything so bourgeois. Gigi produced some of the duo's most famous songs, including "I Remember it Well," "The Night They Invented Champagne," and the delightfully naughty "Thank Heaven for Little Girls" (immortalized on film by Maurice Chevalier). The film version of "Gigi" was nominated for 9 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and is justly celebrated as one of the greatest musicals of all time. Totaling: 163 pages music (89 pages in manuscript, others in mechanical copies for working purposes), some with revisions and notes, 15 hand-labelled foders or cover sheets (mostly in the hand of Loewe), two bound typescripts, a photographic copy of the MGM contract for the Gigi. Contents: "Girl's Gossip, Interlude I Need Air," autograph manuscript piano-vocal score with lyrics, by Loewe, cover sheet titled by Loewe in large red letters "GIGI," 1 page. "All About Gaston," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, Loewe's principal copyist/arranger, 5 pages, cover sheet titled by Loewe, initialed "F.L." and with bold note "Original" "All About Gaston," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, titled in pencil by Loewe AND WITH NEW LYRICS ADDED IN LOEWE'S HAND, 2 pages "Everything French is Better," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, cover labeled "Original" by Loewe, 8 pages "Everything French Is Better," mechanical copy of the same ms., 8 pages "Thank Heaven For Little Girls," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, the lyrics in Loewe's hand, 12 pages, with new dialogue (spoken by Maurice Chevalier) added in pencil at top of page 6 and bottom page 9, short note at bottom page 10 "The Contract," autograph manuscript melody and lyrics sketch, by Loewe, 11 pages, with many deletions and new text added by Loewe "The Contract," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 29 pages "In This Wide, Wide World," manuscript piano-vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 6 pages "In This Wide, Wide World," manuscript melody and lyrics sketch, Loewe's hand, cover boldly titled by Lowe, 4 pages, with deleted draft of another song "There's Always One You Can't Forget" on verso of last page "In This Wide, Wide World," autograph manuscript melody and lyrics sketch, by Loewe, 3 pages, with deleted draft of another song "I've Been Thinking," on verso page 1 "The Parisians," manuscript piano-vocal score, music probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 7 pages, page 2-4 WITH TEXT IN HAND OF LOEWE, paginated 1-4,6-8, no page 5 present, some stage notations ("Scrim lights up revealing lovers") "The Parisians," piano-vocal score, mechanical copy, 8 pages, A WORKING MANUSCRIPT, with cut-outs, bars numbered in pencil, some pencilled lyrics in an unknown hand, page three with note "New lyrics." page 7 with note "Insert dance interlude." "I Never Want To Go Home Again," manuscript piano vocal score, probably in hand of Albert Sirmay, 9 pages "I Never Want To Go Home Again," mechanical copy of same ms., 2 copies, each 9 pages, plus 3 pages of additional copies of different ms. of same number "Gigi 'Never' Verse," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, 1 page "I Remember It Well," mechanical copy of printed lead sheet with copyright notice at bottom, 5 pages, cover titled by Loewe, bold pencil alterations in first six bars (piano lead-in) "I'm Glad I'm Not Young Anymore," mechanical copy of printed lead-sheet with copyright notice at bottom, 4 pages, a few pencil markings "Da, Da, Da, Da, Da," mechanical copy of piano-vocal score, 7 pages. "At Maxims," mechanical copy of working piano-vocal score in Loewe's hand, 4 pages, WITH REVISIONS AND SEVERAL DELETIONS IN PENCIL BY LOEWE, page 1 marked "Obsolete." "New Maxim's," mechanical copy of revised piano-vocal score, possibly in Sirmay's hand, 9 pages. {With:] 1. Photographic negative copy of typescript contract between Arthur Freed of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Frederick Loewe for "Gigi." FREDERICK LOEWE'S COPY. 17 pages, stapled. 2. Typescript of the screenplay "Gigi," "Book and Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. 109 pages, spiral bound, FREDERICK LOEWE'S COPY with note "original" on front cover. Probably prepared during preparation of German version of Gigi, 1973 3. Typescript of the German-language "Gigi." 91 pages. Spiral bound. FREDERICK LOEWE'S COPY, initialed "FL" on titlepage. Gigi

  • USAUSA
  • 1999-11-18
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T206 honus wagner psa 1 fr-gd

Over the course of the last century, volumes have been written and countless tales have been spun about the T206 Wagner card. It has become an icon, and a part of classic American Folklore. Owing “a Wagner” is a dream for every collector in America familiar with its legend. Among the privileged fraternity of collectors who are able to fulfill their dream of owning a T206 Wagner in any grade, it has become exceedingly rare that one is willing to part with what is looked upon as a crowning achievement in the filed of card collecting. To date, it is estimated that only about 50-60 examples of the T206 Wagner are known to exist. At the time of this writing, Professional Sports Authenticators (PSA), the nations foremost third-party card grading service, has reviewed and encapsulated 25 specimens. Of those, only two have earned grades greater than a 4, with most (19) garnering either a 1 or 2. The eye appeal demonstrated by the example offered here is better that the vast majority of its peers encapsulated with the PSA 1 designation. Honest corner wear and multiple creases have not diminished the impact of Wagner’s regal portrait. The viewer’s concentration on the image is enhanced by near perfect centering. The instantly recognizable image remains sharply focused, rendered in rich color that rivals any of its brethren. The supply of T206 Wagner’s will never begin to quench the exceeding collector demand for the most famous baseball card in the world.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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1912 fenway park grand opening day first pitched ball in first american

When I was seven years old, my father took me to Fenway Park for the first time, and as I grew up I knew that as a building it was on the level of Mount Olympus, the Pyramid at Giza, the nation's Capitol, the Czar's Winter Palace, and the Louvre - except, of course, that it was better than all those inconsequential places. - A. Bartlett Giammati, Baseball Commissioner   Since its Grand Opening in 1912, Fenway Park has become the mecca of baseball park lore. The oldest ballpark in the major leagues, every sellout game plays host to Red Sox fans as well as fans of Ghosts of Baseball Past and Present who adore the beauty of its asymmetrical lines, its quirky nooks and crannies, its intimate Sunday picnic atmosphere and its never ending stream of drama. Fenway has hosted some of the most theatrical and exciting, as well as excruciating, and now ultimately glorious moments in baseball history, not to mention a stage to sport's greatest rivalry. Open the Landsdowne gate and enjoy the flood of so many bittersweet stories that the park has to tell, from the highs of the 1915, 1916 and 1918 World Series Championships starring a young left-handed pitcher and slugger, Babe Ruth; the heartbreak of the 1946 World Series, when a split second hesitation by Johnny Pesky allowed Enos Slaughter to score in Game 7 of the World Series; Bob Gibson’s Game 7 victory over Jim Longborg to pierce the Impossible Dream; the image of Carlton Fisk willing his fly ball into a sixth game, 11-inning walk-off homer; the promise of the 1986 World Series with two wins; more and more heartbreak in the only two one-game playoffs, both losses to the Yankee in 1949 and 1978 (Bucky Bleeping Dent’s homer off of Mike Torrez); and, best of all, the stage to one of the greatest comebacks ever, Games 4 and 5 of 2004 ALCS, which will forever force long suffering and now grateful Red Sox fans chills to keep pinching themselves that it is indeed true, that they beat the Yankees after being down 3-0 and down to their last out in Game 4 against the game's premier reliever, Mariano Rivera. Sit in the bleachers, listen carefully and you just might hear the echoes of some of baseball’s greatest players and seasons: Cy Young, Babe Ruth, Jimmy Collins, Duffy Lewis, Tris Speaker, Harry Hooper, Joe Cronin, Bobby Doerr, Johnny Pesky, Ted Williams (last player to hit .400, in 1941), Jimmie Foxx, Carlton Fisk, Jim Rice and Carl Yastrzemski (last player to win the Triple Crown, 1967), Nomar Garciaparra, Manny Ramirez, Pedro Martinez and Curt Schilling, just to name a few. Fenway Park is actually the second home for the Sox. In 1901, the Boston Pilgrims became one of the charter members of the fledgling American League. The Pilgrims played ball at the Huntington Avenue Grounds, now a part of Northeastern University's campus. Boston Globe owner General Charles Henry Taylor, a Civil War veteran, bought the team for his son John I. Taylor in 1904. In 1907, owner Taylor changed the club's name from the Pilgrims to the Red Sox. In 1910, tired of the leasing arrangement for the Huntington Avenue Grounds, Taylor made a big announcement: he would build a new ballpark for his Red Sox. Taylor dubbed the new ballpark Fenway Park because of its location in the Fenway section of Boston, home to marshes, or "fens".  As the first two games at Fenway Park were rained out,  the new 35,000 seat ballpark opened its major league career on April 20, 1912 just five days after the sinking of the Titanic. On Grand Opening Day, future grandfather of President John F. Kennedy, Boston Mayor John "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald, one of the many thousands in attendance,  threw out the first ball in the park that was built at a cost of $350,000 and that would come to be known as "Boston's Sistine Chapel." This offered ball, as noted by Tom Connolly, in his writing, was the "First Ball Pitched - Grand Opening Day, Fenway Park, April 20, 1912".  As an umpire to the grand openings of Fenway, Shibe, Comiskey and Yankee Stadium, as well as numerous Opening Day Games, Connolly enjoyed marking the landmarks with balls as souvenirs, such as the Woodrow Wilson, Calvin Coolidge and General John Pershing, as well as the first Sunday game ever played in Washington, DC. Connolly has also written  "Batteries - O’Brien – Pat Caldwell, Numaker and Sterret”, “Umpires TH Connolly & Bob Hart” , and “Attendance, 25,000”” on various panels. On another panel Connolly penned the final score, "Boston 7, New York 6, 11= Innings” . Years before the most famous rivalry in sport began, the Red Sox opened the season playing the second division New York Highlanders, often known as the Yanks. Sox pitcher Buck O'Brien was knocked out of the box, but saved by a Tris Speaker RBI in the bottom of the 11th inning. The Boston Herald noted in its report of the game that the overflow crowd featured "1000 fans that were standing in center field. The ground rules robbed Speaker, Stahl, Hall and Yerkes of home runs."   Opening Day turned out to be a portent of the season's fortunes for both Boston and New York. The Red Sox took the American League pennant in 1912 with a 105-47 record, good for a winning percentage of .691, and went on to beat the New York Giants in the World Series, the Sox’s second title. The Highlanders, suffering their 6th straight loss, went 50-102 (.329), finishing in last place, a whopping 55 games behind the Red Sox. Fenway continued to enjoy the good fortune of three titles in the teens. However, when Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth in 1919, both the Red Sox and Fenway deteriorated rapidly. Frazee sold the team to Bob Quinn in 1924 and the team spent the Roaring 20's drowning in the cellar while the Yanks, fortified with 11 former Red Sox players, were drinking champagne, winning their first three championships. When Tom Yawkey bought the Red Sox and Fenway in 1934 and the left field bleachers and 25-foot wall were partially destroyed by fire, he spent more than $1 million to restore it, adding the now most famous wall in sport, the “Green Monster”, which got its nickname in 1947 when it received its first coat of green paint. Ubiquitous at 37 feet tall, with a manually operated scoreboard that displays the line score and scores of other American League games, it regularly turns line drive homers into hard singles and lazy pop flies into roundtrippers, testing the handball skills of every leftfielder it meets. Today the park resounds with the unbridled joy of some of the greatest moments in the history of Fenway, the fourth and fifth games of the 2004 ALCS. Who can forget when Dave Roberts, with two outs in the ninth inning and facing a sweep by the Yankees, stole second base and scored on Bill Mueller's single? Or, when hero David Ortiz slammed his walk-off homerun in the eleventh inning of Game 4, followed the next night his bloop single in the fourteenth inning of Game 5? And, on Opening Day this year, the green of Fenway and red of fans' jerseys created one giant Christmas colored scene for all of those parishioners in Red Sox Nation, a joyous unwrapping of the 2004 World Series Championship banner and the presentation of the rings.   In the end, Bill "Spaceman" Lee, no stranger to the park's sense of magic and mayhem, has said it best. "Fenway Park is a shrine.  People go there to worship."

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-06-10
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Jackie robinson’s game used 1949 all star bat from the robinson estate

Segregation and its virulent reach permeated our country during the first half of the 20th century in many of the most important facets of American life, from education in the public schools to simply having the ability to enjoy our public parks and entertainment venues. It is noteworthy, however, that the very first high profile integration in American life did not occur in the halls of Congress or within statehouses, but it came on the baseball diamond. On April 15, 1947, in one of the most anticipated events in baseball history, Jackie Robinson donned his Brooklyn Dodger uniform, trotted out to the field against the Boston Braves and, in one fell swoop, obliterated the color line that had barred black players from playing major league baseball. Much has been written about the impact of that day and Jackie’s role in everything from sports in America to the dawning of the civil rights era, but suffice it say that no single baseball player in our history had as much impact in our country and in our culture than Jackie Robinson.  Jackie made an immediate and lasting mark on the field by introducing to America an aggressive, daring and selfless style of play that made him a terror on the base paths. “It is all about winning”, he said and his team loved him for it. That very first year Jackie Robinson won Rookie of the Year. But it was Jackie’s bat, the very tool of his trade that did the most damage to opposing teams. The first two years that Robinson was in the league he batted a shade under .300 each year, scored well over 100 runs per year and had cemented his reputation as a dangerous and professional batsman.  But the year 1949 was truly his break out year for during that season he not only led his Brooklyn Dodgers to the National League Pennant, but he also won the batting title with a .342 average and was named the leagues Most Valuable Player. Jackie set a torrid pace offensively right from opening day in ’49. By July 1st, as the fan voting for that years All Star Game was taking place,  Jackie’s average had ballooned to .361.  It was not Jackie’s style to publicly campaign for the honor of being named to play in the Midsummer Classic, but 1949 was different due to the fact that Brooklyn was hosting the 16th All Star Game.  To his great satisfaction, Robinson sailed into the 1949 All Star Game staring lineup with an astounding 1,891,212 votes, second in the Majors only to Ted Williams, the games finest batter. We are proud to offer Jackie Robinson’s actual game All Star bat, the one that he carried into the game and used at his home park, Ebbetts Field, on July 13, 1949. When Jackie, took his position at second base right next to his close friend and teammate Pee Wee Reese, stationed at short stop, the atmosphere in Brooklyn was electric. In the very first inning Jackie doubled of the Red Sox pitching ace Mel Parnell, knocking in two runs for his National League team. Although the American League won, 11 to 7, the event made a lasting impression on Robinson. He would later fondly recall the 1949 All Star Game as his chance to prove himself against some of the biggest names ever to play the game—Stan Musial, Ted Williams, “Rapid” Bob Feller and his personal favorite, the majestic Joe DiMaggio. He was also vitally proud of one other footnote in baseball lore that represents a shining moment not only for America’s Game but for basic human rights as well. For on the field that day in July of 1949, some 57 years ago,  was not only Jackie, the very first black man to break the color barrier,  but also his two good friends and teammates,  African American catcher Roy Campanella and the young and tough pitcher Don Newcombe. The presence on the field of all three Dodger pioneers was yet another sweet vindication of Branch Rickey’s daring gambit. This historic bat is accompanied by a letter of provenance from Jackie’s widow Rachel Robinson. Additional documentation includes four separate testimonial letters from the hobby’s foremost authorities on bats, each proclaiming this to be the finest Jackie Robinson game used bat ever seen by each.   The 35”, 35 ounce H&B model S100 bat is uncracked, and in exceptional original condition. LOAs from Rachel Robinson, David Bushing (MEARS, Grade A10) and John Taube (PSA/DNA, Grade GU10).

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-06-24
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HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) TINTIN AU TIBET Crayonné à la mine

HERGÉ Georges Remi dit (1907-1983) TINTIN AU TIBET Crayonné à la mine de plomb pour la planche 13 de l'album ' Tintin au Tibet ', 20ème album de la série, publié en 1960 aux éditions Casterman. Signé, daté ' 7.8.71 ' et dédicacé à l'encre brune. Nombreux croquis et études de visages à la mine de plomb dans les marges. Crayonnés et études de positions et d'attitudes au verso. Tintin est notamment représenté 3 fois, 2 fois assis, une fois courant. 54 x 36,5 cm. Encadré. C'est un crayonné tout en dialogues. On y appréciera la tenue rythmée des figures, l'alternance de gros-plans et de vues globales. Les marges, qui grouillent de visages et de silhouettes, montrent à quel point Hergé travaillait ses planches avec imagination. On pourrait même parler ici « d'écriture automatique ». Un décryptage attentif de cette zone parergonale de l'œuvre révélerait à coup sûr les mini-récits d'un inconscient libéré. Entretemps, Tintin doit palabrer avec persévérance pour entreprendre le sauvetage de Tchang… Pierre Sterckx Rough drawing in pencil for the plate 13 of the comic book " Tintin au Tibet ", 20th comic book of this series, published in 1960 by Casterman. Signed, dated " 7.8.71 " and dedicated in brown ink. Numberous sketches and studies of the faces in pencil in the margins. Rough drawing and study positions and attitudes on the reverse. Tintin in particular is represented in 3 ways, twice sitting, once running. 54 x 36,5 cm. Framed. Estimation 60 000 - 70 000 € Sold for 115,107 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2010-06-05
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Enki BILAL Né 1951

Enki BILAL Né 1951 BLEU SANG Acrylique sur toile. Signé et daté « 94 ». Présenté en 1994 lors de l'exposition « Bleu Sang » à la galerie Christian Desbois. Reproduite en page 32 du catalogue de cette exposition. Encadré. 98,5 x 79 cm. Alliance de peintures et de dessins au crayon sur calque inspirée par la romance entre Jill Bioskop et Alcide Nikopol, prolongement de La Femme Piège, Bleu Sang fut une remarquable expérimentation, un coup d'audace sans précédent pour montrer que la bande dessinée pouvait se libérer de son cadre coutumier, oublier un temps les cases à l'encre de Chine et prendre de l'ampleur, sans pour autant renier son héritage. Horus, le dieu faucon, s'est envolé. De retour sur les rives du Nil, dans son sanctuaire. Tête à tête avec le chat, divinité protectrice, figure bienveillante et sauvage. Hiératique et statufié, qui impose sa présence et ses certitudes. Noir, avec des reflets bleutés, révélateur des fissures. Dialogue imaginaire ou hallucination, nul doute que l'animal baudelairien a lu dans les pensées de Nikopol, qui finira peut-être par retrouver la mémoire. Le chat, seul maître en ces lieux, occupe la place centrale, et il nous rappelle que le pouvoir de séduction des apparences se marie très bien avec les ambivalences du désir : Nikopol se voit dans un miroir absolu. Bastet a vaincu Horus. L'œil inquiet du rhinocéros, point blanc et rouge perdu dans une volumineuse masse colorée, attire l'attention du spectateur et donne de la profondeur à l'ensemble, mais c'est aussi pour que nous nous attardions sur les regards échangés entre l'animal et l'homme, entre le dieu et le mortel. Nikopol hypnotisé, perdu dans ses rêves et hanté par la figure de Jill. Incapable de vivre et d'oublier. Vous, mon ange et ma passion. Une surface rouge, quelques touches de bleu éparses. Une meuble à la géométrie Art déco, emprunté au Savoy ou au Mauer Palast et entouré de brouillard. Couleur impressionnante mais nécessaire, attirante mais sans nuance, presque aussi obsédante que le bleu — le « bleu Bioskop » — qui met en relief la beauté troublante et les contradictions fatales de l'héroïne. La bouteille se substitue aux paradis artificiels. Ivresse ou vertige des sentiments, visions illuminées pour se délivrer du présent et transgresser les règles. Affaire de lignes et de couleurs, la peinture porte les traces du combat de l'artiste. Une présence double : celle de l'œuvre et du peintre, qui projette sa conception du monde. La couleur primordiale s'est accaparé le dessin, la mémoire et le sommeil, miroir reflétant une vérité neuve. À l'écoute des pulsations de l'histoire et de la tragédie. Comme une invocation. Par Horus, demeure ! Estimation 100 000 - 150 000 € Sold for 113,760 €

  • FRAFrance
  • 2014-11-22
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Withdrawal

Leroy Neiman 1988 Original Oil Painting of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird

Leroy Neiman 1988 Original Oil Painting of Magic Johnson and Larry Bird, Best known for his brilliantly colored, stunningly energetic images, LeRoy Neiman is probably the most popular living sports artist in the United States. Over the last five decades he has painted such illustrious athletes as Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Joe Namath, Sandy Koufax, Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods and many others. His work has been displayed in the Baseball, Basketball, Football, Boxing and Tennis Halls of Fame. Additionally, Neiman's paintings and drawings are in more than 40 museums around the world, including the Smithsonian, the Chicago Art Institute and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia. While the market for Neiman serigraphs bustles, opportunities to acquire his original paintings from which they are produced are infrequent. This is Neiman’s original painting, entitled “Magic,” painted by the artist in 1988. Executed at the apex of one of the most compelling personal and team rivalries in sports history, the work depicts legendary combatants Magic Johnson and Larry Bird in action. Purchased by our consignor in Neiman’s presence on the night of it’s 1988 unveilling at the Upstairs Gallery in Orange County, California, it is arguably Neiman’s most important work on the subject of basketball. In August of 2002, the painting was placed on loan to the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts. The painting made its debut there on September 5, 2002 on the historic night of Earvin “Magic” Johnson’s induction, and resided there until March 2007. Measuring 34 ½” by 51 ½”, the oil on canvas painting is artist signed in the lower left and framed. Notations on the back of the canvas include “Best of The West vs. The Beast of The East," the names of the subjects depicted, “Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Abdul-Jabbar, McHale”, and the signature of Abdul-Jabbar. Neiman’s stature in the genre of modern sports art, and the subject, quality, and provenance of this work make it one of the most significant basketball paintings known.Letter of provenance from the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame accompanies.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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Rare Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth Dual Signed Photo From 1939 Lou Gerhig Appreciation Day

Rare Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth Dual Signed Photo From 1939 Lou Gerhig Appreciation Day, On May 1, 1939 Yankee first baseman Lou Gehrig sat out a game for the first time since 1925, thus ending his streak of playing in 2,130 consecutive games. Doctors soon discovered that the "Iron Horse" was the victim of a rare and incurable illness, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, now called Lou Gehrig's disease. A special Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day was held at Yankee Stadium less than two months later on July 4 with many of Lou's old teammates being invited. Gehrig and his slugging mate Babe Ruth had been close friends for many years but since 1934 they had gone their separate ways. The events surrounding the rupture of their friendship involved a comment Gehrig's mother made in reference to Ruth's daughter, which, when repeated to his wife Clair and thus relayed to the Babe, was construed as a slight. Ruth confronted Gehrig and reportedly spoke harshly about Gehrig's beloved mother. The exchange led to rift that would be sustained for five long years with the two Yankee sluggers barely speaking to or even acknowledging one another. The rift came to an end on Independence Day in 1939 at Yankee Stadium. In front of 70,000 emotional fans, teammates and friends including Ruth, an ailing Lou Gehrig delivered one of the most famous speeches ever uttered by an American athlete. In the course of his deeply moving address, Gehrig, in his unerring humility, thanked his teammates graciously for their support, saying to the crowd, "Look at these grand men. Which of you wouldn't consider it the highlight of his career just to associate with them for even one day?" Babe Ruth tearfully embraced his dying teammate and would later say "I put my arms around him and though I tried to smile and cheer him up, I wound up crying like a baby." Gerhig's health deteriorated and he died two years later. This extraordinary 8" by 10" clear photograph is among only a handful of such images, dual signed by the two Yankee icons, known to exist. It has resided within the family of our consignor for generations. According to our consignor, the photo was originally obtained by her uncle Billy Jones who was half of the well-know radio duo "The Happiness Boys". Jones and his partner Ernie Hare were immensely popular New York based performers over a nineteen year period and were fixtures among New York's high society throughout the 1930's. Detailed provenance documentation accompanies the photograph including a notarized letter from our consignor. The condition of the photograph itself is excellent. Gehrig's signature "Sincerely Lou Gehrig" rates 8/10, while Ruth's "Sincerely Babe Ruth" inscription rates 9/10 in boldness with a very slight smudge. There is a small ink spot on the left margin and a tiny remnant of a fingerprint (possibly Ruth's) on the Babe's face. Additional LOA from JSA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-06-05
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Autographed group of (8) 1871/72 boston red stockings cabinet cards

In 1869, led by visionary Harry Wright, the Cincinnati Red Stockings took the field as baseball’s first all-professional team. Drawn to Cincinnati from cities far and wide to play for pay, the team included many of the most talented ball players of the day.  To facilitate the compensation of his players, Wright began the unprecedented practice of charging admission to home games. Fans turned out in droves in support of their local professional nine. That summer the Red Stockings delivered 65 wins without losing a game and the team managed to eek out a tiny profit. In an instant, baseball had become a business. The team built a 92 game winning streak into the middle of the 1870 season until they suffered a heartbreaking defeat by the Brooklyn Atlantics. The team soon after fell out of favor with the fickle patrons of Cincinnati and an undaunted Wright brought his team east to Boston. In the following spring of 1871 Harry Wright helped form the National Association of Professional Baseball Players comprised of nine teams including the Boston Red Stockings. The pioneering Red Stockings dominated the first professional league in 1871, led by stars like A.G. Spalding and Harry’s brother George Wright. Boston would go on to win the league’s championship in four out of the Associations five seasons of existence. Their roots firmly planted in the history of America’s national pastime, the Red Stockings continued to thrive their new city. In 1876, the team was among the founding members of the National League. Eventually they changed their name to the Beaneaters (and later the Braves), and in 1907, John I. Taylor, owner of the American League's Boston Pilgrims, used the old Red Stockings name as inspiration when he changed his team's name to the Red Sox. This group of eight (8) 1871/72 Boston Red Stockings autographed cabinet cards have only recently been discovered in the New England family home in which they’ve descended.  Produced by Warren Studios of Boston, they are a scarcely-known cousin to the rare (and smaller) Warren CDVs (carte de vistes). Unlike their CDV relatives, these cabinet cards are currently uncatalogued, with only a handful of scattered examples rumored to exist. It is conceivable that several of the cards within this group are unique. Amazingly, the back of each card also reveals each player's signature. Appearing with vivid clarity and vitality are original Boston Red Stockings members Cal McVey, David Birdsall, John Ryan, Al Spalding (HOF), Andy Leonard, Harry Wright (HOF), Ross Barnes, and Harry Schafer. Their survival together gives an almost familial perception. Five of the players even added date notations to their signatures, each within a span of three days from July 22nd 1872 to July 24th, 1872, suggesting that the team was together in one location when each man was presented his photograph for consideration. Many of these Boston Red Stockings signatures are among just a handful of known examples on any medium. Harry Wright, dubbed “the father of professional baseball”, Al Spalding, and the rest of the early Boston Red Stockings players are early baseball royalty. No finer representation of these pioneering players is known to exist. Condition: Each card has a single tack hole near the top edge with the exception of Ryan which has one near the bottom as well. The image quality is consistent and outstanding, with exceptional clarity and contrast. All of the mounts are free from significant edge wear, demonstrating only light to moderate soiling. With the exception of Wright, all have the Warren Studios Stamp on the reverse. The backs are uniform with the fronts in terms of condition. All signatures are in dark fountain pen, neatly rendered, averaging 9/10. Overall the group averages excellent condition with note to tack holes. LOAs from JSA and PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-12-10
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Toys & Collectible Items

Both the young and the young at heart will delight in the toys and collectables at auction here. There is a wide variety of dolls, doll’s houses, toy cars, toy soldiers, robots and trains, representing the finest and most collectable makers. Vintage collectables such as film memorabilia can also be found in this section. Under this heading, we have also collected autographs of actors, artists, sportsmen, and politicians amongst other popular collectables.

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