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1915 Boston Red Sox World Championship Pendant Presente

1915 Boston Red Sox World Championship Pendant Presented to Everett Scott. He was one of the most sure-handed middle infielders of the pre-war game, leading American League shortstops in fielding percentage every season between 1916 and 1922. But it is another streak for which Scott is best remembered, a string of 1,307 consecutive appearances that stood as a record until the noble Lou Gehrig knocked him from his perch. Scott's remains the third-longest consecutive games streak in Major League history. But those nine seasons of perfect attendance had not yet begun when this exceedingly rare symbol of achievement was issued to the twenty-two year old teammate of Babe Ruth, who rookied with Scott on the 1914 BoSox squad. The Babe's 1915 Championship medal has never surfaced in the hobby however, nor has any other example crossed the auction block in the past fifteen years of sales records. There is every reason to believe that the single opportunity at ownership of this third World Championship award in Red Sox franchise history is represented by this Platinum Night offering. Those experienced in the award collecting subgenre are well aware that the Championship ring for World Series victory first debuted in 1922 and became the standard format in 1926. Before that time, pendants and watch fobs were the most common player prize. This elegantly-crafted representation utilizes design features effectively identical to those found on the 1911 Athletics and 1914 Braves models, suggesting that all were crafted by the same jeweler in that era. A real diamond rests at the center of a figural baseball diamond on the face of the primary emblem, ringed by concentric circles of "World's Champions 1915" text and laurel wreath design respectively. Verso is artfully engraved "Everett Scott." This disc (1.25" diameter) dangles from an ornate golden link that is attached to another by means of a black leather ribbon. We have evidence of one other 1915 Championship medallion in the hobby, but this other model lacks one of the links and the leather. We believe this to be the only example that exists in as-issued format. Beyond light wear to the leather, the award survives in nearly pristine condition. Full length is five inches. Gold tests at fourteen karats. {br}{p}{div="center"} {iframe width="450" height="259" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Oa7vkhOTapU?wmode=transparent" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen}{/iframe}{br /} {/div}{/p}

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-02-22
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1947-48 Babe Ruth Single Signed Baseball, PSA/DNA NM-MT

1947-48 Babe Ruth Single Signed Baseball, PSA/DNA NM-MT+ 8.5. The specific stamping format of this Ford Frick-era Official National League baseball dates to the final two years of Babe Ruth's life, a period that saw the generous Bambino maintain his service to the sport and the youth who idolized him as his terminal cancer marched relentlessly toward its fatal conclusion. For all of his heroics on the field of play, one could make a convincing argument that, like Lou Gehrig before him, it was in his final years that Ruth most authentically earned his status as sports hero. Most of the finest Ruth singles in the hobby derive from these difficult final years as the Babe navigated an ever-increasing obstacle course of hospital visits between public appearances at banquets and ballparks, preaching the gospel of our National Pastime to all who would listen. Only in his very last days would Ruth surrender his quest to bring joy and inspiration to children through the sport that had defined him, surrendering to mortality, and to immortality. There is not the slightest hint of Ruth's inexorable decline in the blue fountain pen sweet spot autograph here, the confident script as smoothly rendered as any in his decades atop the sporting pantheon. The experts at PSA/DNA assign a rating of 8/10 to the application, a score likewise assessed for the quality of the baseball itself. A half-point "bump" for the particularly strong aesthetic appeal accounts for the final grade as listed. Full Grading LOA from PSA/DNA, NM-MT+ 8.5. Full LOA from James Spence Authentication. {br}{p}{div="center"} {iframe width="450" height="259" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MOt0Tmwc2Rk?wmode=transparent" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen}{/iframe}{br /} {/div}{/p}

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-02-22
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1921 Babe Ruth Personally Documented Home Run Bat Attri

1921 Babe Ruth Personally Documented Home Run Bat Attributed to Record 59th of the Season, PSA/DNA GU 10. "I wish him all the luck in the world," Yankees teammate Frank "Home Run" Baker told the press midway through the 1921 season. "He has everybody else, including myself, hopelessly outclassed." It's likely that the aging star of Connie Mack's "$100,000 Infield" felt a bit sheepish about his own moniker as he shared a dugout with Ruth, having never put more than a dozen into the seats during any season of his own career. It had taken the Babe just twenty-five games to match Baker's best during that spectacular 1921 season, one commonly considered the finest of Ruth's storied career. One of those early clouts, off inaugural Hall of Fame classmate Walter Johnson, cleared the high center field wall of Griffith Stadium, landing 520 feet from home plate. Two months later, Ruth escaped Navin Field with a shot estimated between 575 and 600 feet, the longest verified home run in Major League history. He'd clear the double-deck roof of the Polo Grounds two weeks after that. By season's end, the Babe would belt at least one 500-plus foot blast in each of the eight American League ballparks. And so it was not just the frequency but also the impossible trajectory of Ruth's home runs that etched his name ever more indelibly into living American folklore in 1921, and slammed the door forever on the Dead Ball Era. The decadent Roaring Twenties had found its perfect athletic representative, larger than life in every way. Few sporting relics are as instantly evocative of their original master as the presented signature model Hillerich & Bradsby R2, an impossibly heavy slab of ash just a quarter-inch shy of a yard in length (35.75") and an ounce shy of three pounds in weight (47 oz.). In the rudimentary physical equation of force equals mass times speed, we find the first clue to the puzzle in the bat's wrist-straining heft, at forty-seven ounces the weightiest Ruth gamer ever to cross the hobby's auction block. Leading bat expert John Taube assesses the game use as "excellent," noting several prominent ball marks on the left barrel, correct for Ruth's label-down batting stance, and cleat marks throughout. Defined lathe marks appear on knob and barrel end. Center brand and barrel stamping are deeply burned and flawless. The bat retains its original finish, which has aged beautifully and today exudes a rich mahogany tone. A rectangular area of pale shading is almost certainly the outline of the mailing label that directed this important relic to its second owner (after Ruth himself). While that purported label has been lost to history, we do have the original letter that accompanied the bat. It reads as follows: "October 13, 1921 To my Friend 'Fred P. Weber, Phoenix, Arizona It gives me great pleasure to present you with this-my trustworthy bat with which I batted out my 57th and 58th [corrected to 59th] home-runs at the Polo Grounds-New York City on September 26, 1921 and broke my own world's home run record. Yours in Baseball, [signed] 'Babe' Ruth." The letter is typed on the letterhead of the Hotel Ansonia on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the home of not just Ruth but also fellow Yankees Wally Schang, Lefty O'Doul and Bob Meusel. The hotel had a well-earned reputation in those days for hedonism, drawing a mix of gamblers, athletes and socialites from reigning Heavyweight Champion Jack Dempsey to Florenz Ziegfield, the biggest name in burlesque. It was in Chicago White Sox first baseman Chick Gandil's room at the Ansonia that the conspiracy to throw the 1919 World Series was born. And it was here that the Babe, who often roamed the corridors in a silk robe as if the entire building were merely an extension of his personal suite, made the acquaintance of brothers Harry and Fred Weber, the former serving as Ruth's booking agent for vaudeville engagements prior to the emergence of Christy Walsh. A New York Times article dated October 28, 1921 reports on the profitable relationship: "The home run king will take his first turn at bat as a thespian in the Keith Theatre in Boston on Monday, Nov. 7...Ruth's contract with the Keith organization calls for twenty weeks at the modest salary of $3,000 per week. At the signing of the contract Ruth was represented by Harry Weber, who will manage him during his theatrical career..." The closing line of the article states: "The Babe has turned over his treasured home run bats and balls to the Keith people for advertising purposes, and they will be featured in the lobbies of the theatres in which he is playing before and during the big league engagement." It is noteworthy that a nearly identical bat, with a nearly identical letter, resides in Cooperstown at the Baseball Hall of Fame. The small differences between the two letters further assist in identifying the presented model as the one used by Ruth to hit his 59th and final home run on October 2nd, the last day of the 1921 season. The letter accompanying the Hall of Fame bat is addressed to Harry Weber (rather than Fred), dated a day earlier, and signed secretarially. Otherwise the text and the letterhead are identical. Close inspection of the letter accompanying the offered bat suggests that the earlier letter was simply copied word for word by a far less skilled typist, then updated by hand. We see the numbers altered, and evidence that the date was partially erased. The reasonable conclusion is that instructions to change the letter appropriately during the typing phase were unheeded, leaving Ruth himself to alter the letter to brother Fred Weber himself. Both the offered original letter and a photocopy of the earlier letter sent to Harry Weber are posted on our website, and will be provided to the winning bidder. There are also photocopied letters from Weber's nephew Jerry Ball who inherited the bat from his uncle, and from the woman whose husband was given the bat shortly before Ball's passing in the 1980's. While any bat wielded by the greatest name in baseball history is properly considered an American treasure, it must be stressed that the listed representation finds itself in an elite class that could be enumerated on a single hand. It's unquestionably the most significant Ruth home run bat to cross the hobby's auction block since the one that launched the first home run at Yankee Stadium in 1923 commanded $1.3 million over a decade ago, the heaviest known, and the only example in private hands accompanied by the Babe's own signed letter of provenance. LOA from PSA/DNA, GU 10. LOA from MEARS, A10* (asterisk indicating elite status). Full LOA from PSA/DNA (autograph on Ruth letter of provenance). Full LOA from James Spence Authentication (autograph on Ruth letter of provenance). {br}{p}{div="center"} {iframe width="450" height="259" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/GtJ6ISp0hxU?wmode=transparent" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen}{/iframe}{br /} {/div}{/p}

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-02-22
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1909-11 t206 honus wagner psa 4 vg-ex

The period from 1909-1915 is regarded by many as the golden age of baseball cards. In order to capitalize on the burgeoning popularity of America’s National Pastime, cards once again, became a viable way for tobacco and candy companies to promote their products. In 1909 the American Tobacco Company issued its landmark T206 set of baseball cards. The set, issued over a three-year span from 1909-1911, featured virtually all of the baseball players of the day, and eventually included 523 different cards. The T206 set is the seminal issue from that era, containing some of the most beautiful, original and expensive cards ever produced. Numerous myths have been perpetuated with regard to the reason for the scarcity of the T206 Honus Wagner Card. One of the prevailing theories was that Wagner insisted that he be paid by the tobacco companies for the use of his image, causing the production of his card to be halted. Today, most knowledgeable collectors subscribe to the well-documented theory that Wagner simply did not want children to be influenced into buying cigarettes just to get a picture of him. Over the course of the last century, volumes have been written and countless tales have been spun about the T206 Wagner card. It has become an icon, and a part of classic American Folklore. To this day, it is estimated that only about 50 examples of the T206 Wagner have surfaced. Professional Sports Authenticators (PSA), the nations foremost third-party card grading service, has reviewed and encapsulated 25 known specimens. Of those, only two have earned grades greater than a 4, three examples earned 3 (VG) status, with the remainder (19) garnering either a 1 or 2 due to substantial creasing or other glaring physical imperfections. This card is deemed to be the third finest known example of the most desirable baseball card in the world. This specimen, which has not been previously offered at public auction, has been graded VG-EX 4 by PSA. Wagner’s instantly recognizable portrait remains sharply focused and crisp, rendered in rich color. The centering is near perfect and both surfaces are bright, clean and blemish free. Boldly printed on the reverse is the Sweet Caporal (150 series) branding surrounded by full margins. All four corners show even wear, but not to the point where one is distracted from the vivid image of the “Flying Dutchman."

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-02
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1939 Eddie Shore Game Worn Babe Siebert Memorial Jersey

1939 Eddie Shore Game Worn Babe Siebert Memorial Jersey. A native of Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan, Edward William Shore grew up on a horse ranch at Cupar, where years of hard work breaking in ponies, herding stock and hauling grain readied his body for the demands of professional ice hockey. After coming up the junior ranks as a member of the 1923-24 Melville Millionaires, Shore went on to star for the Regina Caps and the Edmonton Eskimos of the Western Canada Hockey League. Upon the league's folding at the end of the 1925-26 season, his rights were assumed by Charles Adams for his newly-formed NHL team -- the Boston Bruins. Beantown was lucky to have such a player among their ranks as Shore's devastating aggressive style of play ensured that pro hockey was in Boston to stay. Feared around the league for his intensity on the ice, Shore racked up a record 130 penalty minutes in his first season of NHL play. It should come as no surprise, then, that Shore was behind the first National Hockey League All-Star Game. On December 12, 1933, Shore was involved in a traumatic incident that ended the career of Maple Leafs hero Ace Bailey. Retaliating after he was tripped by Toronto's King Clancy, Shore delivered a crushing blindside blow to Bailey which sent him head-first to the ice. Bailey survived the gruesome attack, but would never play NHL hockey again. As a result a benefit game was held for Bailey and his family, the first of three tribute games in the decade to include NHL All-Stars. The garment that we present here comes from the third of those historic All-Star Games, this one held in October 1939, to memorialize the sudden passing of the named Montreal Canadiens head coach Babe Siebert. Shore donned this rarity during that game, making this one of the most desirable sweaters that we offer in this wool-heavy sale. This fantastic sweater presents with an attractive off-white color, trimmed by the NHL colors of orange and black. Chest insignia consists of a 9" star that reads "N.H.L. ALL STARS 1939," while the verso sports an 8" tall "2" in heavy black felt. Manufactured by McNiece's Sports in Montreal with tagging in the tail indicating that fact. Several small holes to the body and sleeves have gone understandably unrepaired since this shirt had only one game of use. After playing only four games with the Boston Bruins in the 1939-40 season during which the Siebert Memorial Game took place, Shore was traded to the New York Americans for Eddie Wiseman and $5,000. The ten games that Shore skated with the Amerks would be his last hurrah in the NHL as he dedicated his time and effort to the AHL's Springfield Indians, a team he bought in 1939. Apparently Shore left this very jersey in the New York locker room when his stint with the Americans was over, at which point it became the possession of Team President Red Dutton. Dutton in turn presented it to an NHL player as a gift. After many years, this player sold this historic shirt to our consignor. Perhaps the most-desirable Siebert Memorial sweater in the hobby and one of legendary Hall of Famer Eddie Shore's final NHL jerseys. LOA from MeiGray.

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-06
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1951 Jackie Robinson Brooklyn Dodgers Game-Used Home Flannel...

Jackie Robinson became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947, thanks to the help and courage of the Dodgers' Branch Rickey. While not the first African American professional baseball player in United States history, his Major League debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers ended approximately eighty years of baseball segregation, also known as the baseball color line. In the United States at this time, many white people believed that blacks and whites should be segregated or kept apart in many phases of life, including sport. A member of six World Series teams, he earned six consecutive All-Star Game nominations and won several awards during his career. In 1947, Robinson won The Sporting News Rookie of the Year Award and the first Rookie of the Year Award. Two years later, he was awarded the National League MVP Award. It was his aggressiveness on the basepaths that thrilled fans. It wasn't so much his two stolen-base titles or his 197 thefts, it was the way he was a disruptive force, dancing off the base, drawing every eye in the stadium, making the pitcher crazy, instilling the Dodgers with the spirit that would help them win six pennants in his 10 seasons. This incredible flannel jersey was worn by HOFer Jackie Robinson during the 1951 Brooklyn Dodgers season. It was "sent down" and worn for Spring Training/tryouts by another player in 1952. Whoever this lucky individual was, he was certainly shorter than Jackie; the tail of the jersey has been shortened and hemmed inwards, so the blue chain stitch year "51," which would normally be found on the outside bottom tail, now appears on the inside bottom tail. The sleeves have been shortened as well, and there is evidence on the sleeve that the 1951 National League 75th Anniversary patch, which was worn by all National League clubs for the 1951 season, has been removed. Comes with a copy of the letter from the memorabilia dealer who purchased the jersey from the estate of the minor league player that the jersey belonged to, who got to keep it after having the honor of wearing Jackie Robinson's jersey; a letter from the person who bought it from the abovementioned memorabilia dealer; a forensics letter that details the fiber analysis of the jersey; a Mears Letter of Opinion. A perfect path of pristine provenance! In the collar of this jersey is the "Rawlings St. Louis" manufacturer's tag. Below this is the wash instructions tag with the size 44 tag attached. Below these is a felt strip tag with "J Robinson" in blue chain stitch. Across the front of the jersey is "DODGERS" in blue felt. On the back is the player number "42" in the same blue felt. Inside the bottom left tail is the year "51" in blue chain stitch directly in the jersey. On the left sleeve is the outline of the "National League Anniversary" patch, which has been removed. Both the sleeves and the tail of the jersey have been professionally shortened and hemmed. The jersey shows good game-use and with the exception of the aforementioned alterations appears to have no other alterations of any kind.

  • USAUSA
  • 2007-12-05
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Complete 1952 topps baseball card set - graded entirely psa 8 nm-mt

Since its introduction more than 50 years ago, the 1952 Topps baseball card set has become an icon of baby boomer popular culture. The brainchild of Topps’ pioneers Sy Berger, and Woody Gelman, its beginning was both auspicious and humble. In designing the cards, Berger chose to play it safe with the information on the back. At the top of the column for the player's statistics from the previous season, he wrote "past year" instead of 1951. "We didn't know if these things would sell. We were neophytes," Berger recalls. "We put 'year' so if they didn't sell, maybe we could sell them the next year." If only he knew. The set became the prototype for billions of cards that would be produced in the latter half of the 20th century, and the little chewing gum company from Brooklyn, NY, laid the foundation upon which an industry was built. The enduring allure of the 1952 Topps baseball card set has been attributed to many factors, not the least of which is its inclusion of Topps' piece de resistance, the #311 card of Mickey Mantle. In addition to its unprecedented size and imagery, the issue features many nuances such as various back types, error cards, and the ever challenging high number series resulting from their infamous disposal reminiscent of the Boston Tea Party. The assembly of a truly high-grade complete 1952 Topps set is regarded as a tremendous achievement. Undertaking the task on a card-by-card basis, while abiding by stringent condition standards of PSA, renders it nearly impossible in today’s marketplace. This complete set of 407 cards was assembled, one card at a time over a period of fifteen years, by a noted collector. Each card has earned the same NM-MT 8 grade by PSA. Its grandeur is all encompassing, from #1 Pafko to #407 Mathews. In between are some of the greatest names in the game, as well “commons" with populations in single digits. This compilation stands as one of only four complete 1952 Topps sets in existence graded across the board in PSA NM-MT 8 condition or above.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-02
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Significant Lou Gehrig autographed and inscribed baseman?s mitt c.1935.

Significant Lou Gehrig autographed and inscribed baseman?s mitt c.1935. Shortly after discovering he had been diagnosed with a terminal illness, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig removed himself from the Yankees lineup on May 2, 1939. On July 4th of that same year the Yankees honored Gehrig with an incredible on field celebration attended by teammates, former colleagues, and dignitaries alike. It was on this day that Gehrig delivered his famed ?Luckiest Man? speech. In his remarks, Gehrig expressed concern not for his own well-being, but for his team, his teammates, and his wife, concluding with, ?When you have a wife who has been a tower of strength and shown more courage than you dreamed existed - that?s the finest I know. So I close in saying that I might have been given a bad break, but I?ve got an awful lot to live for...? His humility in the face of such an insurmountable adversity was regarded by his peers as virtually immortal. Fitting for a man of Gehrig?s integrity, the ?Iron Horse? succumbed to the horrid disease on June 2, 1941, at 10:10 p.m., sixteen years to the day after he had first replaced Wally Pipp as first baseman for the New York Yankees. The model by which Gehrig played the game, and more importantly, lived his life, is a standard that even many of the greatest players in history have not achieved. It is for those reasons that treasured pieces of Lou Gehrig?s garner such passionate interest from the collecting public. As we recognize with great reverence the 75th anniversary of Gehrig?s iconic July 4th, 1939 address to the Yankees faithful we are honored to present one of the most significant pieces of Lou Gehrig related equipment to have been offered for public sale. Reach first baseman?s mitt of the highest professional quality retaining its original manufacturer?s labeling on the back of the thumb as well as finest quality reinforced leather backstrapping. Leather piping is of professional quality as well, retaining its original stitching with period lacings remaining intact between the thumb and body of glove. Additionally, the interior finger ?pockets? each feature individual dividing receptacles commonly found on professional model mitts of the period. The back panel of the mitt has been inscribed and autographed, ?To Howard, May you have as much luck with this glove as I did-Lou Gehrig?. Gehrig executed signature and inscription with an electric pyrography pen and present nicely against the dark patination of the leather not commonly found with a more typical fountain pen autograph. Both signature and inscription rate 7 out of 10 with some variation to a few words that were signed over a crease in the glove. Pyrography, sometimes referred to as ?pokework?, became extremely prolific in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Frequently used to decorate leather and wooden mediums pyrography pens were available in a wide variety of sizes and styles. The glove itself exhibits evident use most notably to the interior area with appropriate surface wear and pocket formation from repetitive use. The history of the glove traces its roots to a man by the name of Ray Brost who adopted the name Ray Henderson in 1920 as a young songwriter. Henderson gained prominence during the 1920-30s in tandem with co-writers Buddy DeSylva and Lew Brown. The trio earned fame as songwriters, publishers, creators, and producers of many hit Broadway shows as well as several early motion pictures. Along with Ray?s wife, Florence, the Hendersons became acquainted with numerous notables of the time in the New York area including Jimmy Durante, Bert Lahr, Bob Hope, and Mayor Jimmy Walker. In particular, through a mutual acquaintance with Fred Fisher (well know song writer), Ray and Florence Henderson were introduced to Lou and Eleanor Gehrig. Sharing German heritage and an affinity for the opera, the Fishers and Gehrigs would frequently attend functions at the Henderson home in Bronxville, NY, which was not far from New Rochelle where the Gehrigs resided. Fisher, in fact, co-authored ?I Can?t Get to First Base With You? with Eleanor Gehrig herself. According to family history they also attended the opera together on occasion. During a visit by Eleanor and Lou Gehrig in 1935 the Henderson?s son, Howard, enjoyed the incredible opportunity to have a catch with Gehrig in the front lawn of the family property. Howard Henderson, like Gehrig, was left handed and as such loaned Lou a fielder?s glove while Howard used a first baseman?s glove which he owned as well. During the catch Lou Gehrig noted to young Henderson that his glove was not in very good condition and that the next time he came to the Henderson home he would bring one of the gloves he had already used and broken in previously. True to his word, Gehrig did in fact bring one of his gloves and presented it to Howard Henderson on his next visit to the property. Howard had a catch with Gehrig again that day using the glove that Gehrig had presented to him. Upon Gehrig?s departure that day Henderson?s mother suggested that since Lou was a well known athlete that he should not use the glove again and in fact have Gehrig sign it for him when they next returned for a visit. Understandably enthused over the encounter with one of baseball?s greatest stars, Howard Henderson took his mother?s advice and had Gehrig inscribe the glove during his next visit on the table in the library of the family home. The scarcity of personal gloves with attribution to Hall of Fame player use is incredibly high. Gehrig is documented to have utilized Reach and Spalding baseman?s mitts of the nearly identical construction and manufacture quality during his career. A subsidiary of Spalding, the Reach company brand was fully enveloped in 1934 lending support to period images picturing Gehrig primarily wearing gloves with the Spalding label during the late 1930s. The offered mitt is extremely similar to one pictured being worn by Gehrig during opening day of the 1935 season with special note to the Reach brand label positioning on the back of thumb versus Spalding label positioning traditionally found on the back of the body of the mitt itself. Distinct pattern of the leather piping around hand area and the stitch patterns around the ?horseshoe? piping on back also mirror gloves worn by Gehrig in period imagery. Also accompanying the glove is a superb Lou Gehrig autographed original photograph personalized to Howard Henderson himself. Original 7?x9? sepia tone wire service photograph signed across the front in black fountain pen, ?To Howard, With My Kindest Personal Regards, Lou Gehrig.? Black ink signature and salutation remain in outstanding original condition rating 9/10 out of 10. According to Howard Henderson the offered photograph was obtained from Gehrig at a different date then the glove itself. Subsequent to Henderson?s original meeting with the Iron Horse he became very fond and appreciative of the time spent with Lou. Howard recalls two other specific recollections of meetings with Gehrig including a time whereas he visited with Gehrig in the dugout during a Yankees game and noticed a case of 6oz. Coca Cola bottles to which Lou was enjoying one of the same. Gehrig commented to Howard, possibly in jest, that ?by the time the game was over he?d finish the case.? The final recollection of Lou Gehrig by Henderson occurred in early 1941. Gehrig had long retired from baseball and was dealing with the catastrophic diagnosis he had received regarding his illness. Henderson visited him only once at his Riverdale, New York location at which point he was old enough to drive himself. Upon arrival, Henderson recalls Eleanor Gehrig taking him aside instructing him what not to say and to ?keep it cheerful, don?t mention his illness, and don?t stay too long.? Howard entered the dining room where Gehrig was seated in bathrobe and slippers. A comedian, Pitzy Katz, was also present (Gehrig?s acquaintance with Katz is documented within his own writings from 1941 including the referenced visit). Katz was telling jokes and eating flowers out of the table arrangement as if they were peanuts. It was at this point that Henderson recalls Gehrig laughing and then, sadly, remarking, ?stop making me laugh...it hurts too much.? Ideally, a period image would exist of this precise glove on Gehrig?s hand during game play but to date has not been located. Based on comparisons with other nearly identical professional model baseman?s mitts as worn by Gehrig in the 1930s era we are able to present a strongly based attribution as to the offered glove having been worn and used by Lou Gehrig. The comparison to other Gehrig gloves is also accompanied by the numerous pieces of supportive evidence referenced within the catalogue description including the autographed photograph of Gehrig to Henderson himself. The lot will also include a detailed notarized letter of provenance from Howard Henderson who today counts himself as 92 years young. Ironically, Howard Henderson was born on July 4th, 1922 the same date on which Gehrig delivered his famed farewell speech while Henderson was the turning the age of 19 years old. Monumentally significant Lou Gehrig related game equipment item with primary source being offered for the first time publicly. Includes LOA from Hunt Auctions (glove), LOA from JSA (signature and inscription), and letter of provenance from Ray Henderson: Glove: VG-EX, Signature/Inscription: EX

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-07-15
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[ Sporting Memorabilia - Autographs ] The Finest Known Joe DiMaggio

[ Sporting Memorabilia - Autographs ] The Finest Known Joe DiMaggio & Marilyn Monroe Signed Baseball. Though the marriage of Joe and Marilyn was troubled and very short, it remains to this day the ultimate celebrity pairing, the consummate sports legend and the definitive Hollywood star. It is well known that despite a lifelong affection for Miss Monroe that saw DiMaggio send flowers to Marilyn's grave until his own passing, Joe absolutely refused to sign any Monroe related material after her death, whether it be photographic images or pages already bearing her autograph. Any signed artifacts blessed by both legendary hands derive only from the brief periods that this couple spent together, literally only a span of months given the short length of their romance and the large percentage of that time that travel separated them. This tight rein that DiMaggio held upon supply after Marilyn's death, paired with the intense desirability of DiMaggio/Monroe material among autograph collectors, propels this remarkable sphere to the status of one of the most desirable and valuable signed baseballs ever offered for private sale. This pair of autographs was acquired by a New York area news photographer in the early 1960's as the couple was believed to be considering a reconciliation while on vacation together in Florida during baseball's Spring training. By a pure stroke of luck, the photographer happened to have access to a baseball when meeting the famous pair, providing the most desirable of media for this historic duet of signatures. The occasion was memorialized in a 1989 edition of Newsday, which devoted almost two pages to describe the event. A copy of that news article accompanies the ball. Speaking to the quality of the baseball, we can do nothing but heap praise upon yet more praise. Our catalog photography should aptly illustrate that the blue ballpoint signatures, placed in tandem upon a lightly toned side panel remain in the same 10/10 bold ink that was applied over four decades ago. Even the ball itself is the most appealing model, an Official American League (Cronin) model, remembering the league where Joltin' Joe earned his immortality. Heritage Auction Galleries is very proud and pleased to offer to the collecting public a piece that is as much a diamond as the gems Marilyn craved, and the ballfield that Joe dominated. Whether you foresee its future in a velvet lined case or a steel bank vault, we are certain that you will find that investment in a piece that epitomizes the American Dream is a solid one indeed. LOA from PSA/DNA.The current bid is

  • USAUSA
  • 2006-05-07
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Mickey mantle’s first major league home run ball

By the time “The Mick" concluded his major league career, he would achieve the pinnacle of success both as an individual and as part of some of the greatest Yankees teams ever assembled. Mantle played in more games than any other Yankee, won three Most Valuable Player awards, won baseball’s Triple Crown in 1956, and hit 536 career home runs, including some of the longest in the history of the game. He also appeared in twelve World Series during his first fourteen years as a Yankee and led his team to seven World Championships. But, like everything else, superstardom has to begin somewhere. Growing up in the small coal mining town of Commerce, Oklahoma, his baseball prowess became evident early in his youth. By the late 1940’s, the “Commerce Comet," as he became known, because of his great speed and mammoth home runs, had developed a reputation for having “big league stuff." The professional ball teams began to take notice. In late April of 1951, the promising young prospect was called to New York to be tested in the major leagues, carrying with him the weight of unbridled expectations. Word had spread that this young phenom who hit those monster home runs would be able to actually replace the irreplaceable Joe DiMaggio as the “new” Yankee idol. So convinced of this were the Yankees that they assigned their young prodigy uniform number “6," the next in a sequence that included Ruth (“3"), Gehrig (“4"), and Joltin’ Joe (“5"). The New York press and some Yankee teammates were typically cynical. “He was a real country boy, all shy and embarrassed," pitcher and Yankee great Whitey Ford said. “He arrived in New York City with a straw suitcase, two pairs of slacks and one blue sports jacket that probably cost about $8.00." To Mickey, he may as well have been entering a foreign land. “I was a real country bumpkin," Mantle himself recalled later. “I had never seen buildings so tall and had never really experienced anything . . . I mean anything . . . like New York City!"  The pressure was more than the gifted slugger could bear at first. For several weeks Mantle struggled mightily, both at the plate as well as away from the game trying to adjust to life in an unfamiliar world. As the pressure mounted, the cynics turned smug believing Mantle’s scouting reports to be no more than hype. However, on May 1, 1951 the seed of Mickey Mantle’s legend would be planted. On that historic date, the New York Yankees arrived at Chicago’s Comiskey Park to take on the White Sox. Destiny would bring Mickey face to face with Randy Gumpert, a grizzled veteran who had pitched his first major league game some fifteen years earlier in 1936, when Mantle was just five-years old.   In subsequent interviews and articles conducted throughout the years Gumpert vividly recalls the game and his confrontation with Mickey. In facing the rookie, he was keenly aware of the press expectations and Mantle’s urgency to impress. Thinking he would fool the eager youngster, Gumpert opted for a change-up. Mantle was ready, and according to Gumpert, “Mickey smacked the ball to dead center field right into the bullpen . . . it must have traveled 450 feet in the air!"  It’s not often that a person who would eventually become a baseball legend, has the opportunity to collect his first home run baseball but, fortunately, as confirmed by Gumpert, Yankee catcher Charlie Silvera, warming up in the bullpen, retrieved the ball and gave it to his young teammate. Mantle inscribed the ball in his own hand. On two different panels it reads, “My first H.R. in the Majors, May 1, 1951, 4:50 p.m. Chicago" and “6th inning off Randy Gumpert." Fifty years after the event, this ball survives with a well documented legacy. It turns out that Mantle saved the ball and displayed it himself during the later part of his career when he opened a Holiday Inn restaurant in Joplin, Missouri. He was proud of many of his baseball awards but certainly regarded this little worn, yellowed baseball, the one representing the very beginning of his Hall of Fame career, with special fondness. Later, the ball joined several of Mickey’s artifacts, including his 500th home run ball, when they were donated to the Little League Museum in Baxter Springs, Kansas. Prior to its offering here, the ball has rested in the hands of a prominent collector who has owned it for many years.    The ball is accompanied by numerous articles of provenance including a signed LOA from the former President of the Baxter Springs Little League Museum, photos of the ball on display at the museum, and copies of past appraisals. Copies of several articles about the ball are included as well, including one written by Frank Ceresi of the museum consulting and appraisal firm FC Associates. A signed letter from Ceresi, former curator of the National Sports Gallery in Washington D.C., is also included acknowledging their two-year public exhibition of the ball. Together with copy of photograph shown. Having been displayed rather crudely at one point, the ball exhibits considerable toning and a large mark where a strip of tape was one used to secure it. Mantle's notation remains fully legible, averaging (6-7/10). Fair to good condition overall. Other LOA’s: SCD Authentic, PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-02
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1952 Mickey Mantle NY Yankees Game-Used & Autographed Home Pinstripe...

Mickey Charles Mantle arrived in the Bronx in 1951 and played alongside Joe DiMaggio that season. The following year, 1952, was Mickey’s first full year out of Joltin’ Joe’s shadow and was his time to shine. Mantle took over in centerfield and played the position from 1952 to 1966. In 1956, "The Mick" emerged as a superstar, becoming the greatest switch-hitter in the history of baseball and one of its biggest drawing cards. He hit .353 that year with 52 home runs and 130 RBI to win the Triple Crown. It was also the first of three straight years that he would lead the league in runs scored, beginning with 132 in 1956. Mantle capped the year with three homers in the World Series, including one in Don Larsen's perfect game in which he also made a great defensive play to keep the perfect game intact. He played on 12 pennant winners, seven World Championship clubs and holds World Series records for home runs (18), RBIs (40), runs scored (42), walks (43), extra-base hits (26), and total bases (123). Mantle was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974 in his first year of eligibility and his number “7” was retired by the Yankees. Inside the rear collar is the “Spalding & Bros” manufacturers tag. Attached is the size “44” tag. Below is a white felt strip tag with “M Mantle 52” embroidered in navy blue chain stitch. Inside the left front tail is a white tag with wash instructions. On the left breast is the interlocking “NY” logo embroidered in navy blue felt letters which has been professionally restored. On back is the Mick’s number “7” done in the same navy blue felt. On the left sleeve is the NY Yankees “1903-1952 50TH Year” embroidered patch which is very rare. Mickey has signed the left front tail in black marker which rates an 8-9 with slight foxing along the edges. The signature is vintage and quite large. The flannel jersey shows excellent game-use and except for the “NY” restoration, appears to have no other alterations of any kind. This magnificent shirt is the earliest known Mantle game-used pinstripe flannel jersey in the hobby. Accompanying this jersey is a 16” x 20” autographed photo of Mickey wearing this very shirt. Mantle signed the photo in bold blue marker inscribing “NO. 7” rating a near perfect 10. It is also accompanied by a LOA from JSA for the two signatures as well as a MEARS LOA. This shirt may be the most significant Mantle extant.

  • USAUSA
  • 2009-04-30
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1965 Mickey Mantle Game Used Bat from a New York Yankee

1965 Mickey Mantle Game Used Bat from a New York Yankees Bat Boy. Exceptional provenance and the most use you'll ever encounter on a Mantle bat elevate the presented representation to the pinnacle of collecting appeal, its MEARS A8.5 score hampered only by the handle crack and dead wood resulting from the punishment inflicted by the greatest switch-hitting slugger of them all. Earning top scores for fidelity to factory records, game use and verifiable history, the Hillerich & Bradsby signature model M110 made its transition from Mantle's arsenal to cherished collectible during a late July 1965 series in the Bronx against the visiting Detroit Tigers. The bat was the fulfillment of a promise made by Mantle to the bat boy, who had told the Yankee legend that his younger brother was the Mick's greatest fan. Mantle assured the boy that the next bat he cracked belonged to him. A photocopy of the bat boy's notarized letter is included. MEARS' detective work over four decades later proves the veracity of the tale, finding factory shipping records of nine ash bats measuring thirty-six inches in length and thirty-two ounces in weight shipped to Mantle on June 21, 1965. These bats, which match the presented specimen, were Mantle's only M110's ordered during the applicable Hillerich & Bradsby labeling period, leaving no question but that this is one of those nine bats from the June order. The bat remains solid and complete but has suffered a large and severe handle crack which could be restored by the bat's new owner if desired. Ball marks coat the barrel, and the experts at MEARS stress that all use appears to be Major League inflicted, with no subsequent playground shenanigans. A distinct area of deadwood indicates the sweet spot which almost certainly launched two or three pitches into the cheap seats. Four distinct cleat marks can be found toward the barrel end. It's definitely the most "pounded" Mantle bat we've ever seen, sure to turn the head of the sophisticated bat collector who knows that the best bats are never showroom fresh. LOA from MEARS.

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-06
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Historic 1905 Christy Mathewson Game Used World Series Bat Signed

Baseball at the turn-of-the-century was a rough game watched from the stands by rowdy fans. Typifying the gritty characters that played the game was John McGraw, manager of the New York Giants. Taking over the team in 1902, McGraw had one man on his club that not only stood out for his talent but also for the virtue and sportsmanship that differentiated him from the usual ball player. Christy Mathewson was a handsome, college educated pitcher from Factoryville, Pennsylvania. Dubbed "Matty" by his fans, Mathewson possessed a new type of pitch that quickly made him famous - the "Fadeaway". Today it's called the slider, but at the turn-of-the-century Matty was the first hurler to master the tricky pitch. From his debut in 1900 to 1905 Matty and his Fadeaway won 128 games for McGraw's Giants including 33 in 1904 and 31 in 1905. Mathewson's dominance on the mound combined with his educated and refined personality to single-handedly change the public's image of a professional baseball player and for the first time children had a respectable ballplayer to idolize. By 1905 there was no bigger baseball star than Christy Mathewson. That summer the Giants stormed to their second consecutive pennant but had yet to appear in a World Series. The National League, founded in 1876, was considered the better quality loop compared to the American League which was only three years old. Yet when the two league met for the first World Series in 1903, it was the American League who walked off the field victorious. It was an embarrassment the older league was still smarting from when the New York Giants won the 1904 National League pennant. Giants owner John T. Brush and manager John McGraw refused to play the American League pennant winner, stating that the Giants were already World Champions since the National League was the "only real major league". Despite pleas and outrage from the press and fans, there would be no World Series in 1904. 1905 would be different. Dogged all winter by accusations of cowardice and his own players lamenting the loss of a hefty World Series check, McGraw agreed to face the American League when the team won their second consecutive pennant. Their opponent for the second fall classic would be Connie Mack's Philadelphia Athletics. This A's team would, like the Giants they would face, go down as one of the greatest teams in the game's history. Both clubs were evenly matched: Philadelphia's pitching staff boasted future Hall of Famer Rube Waddell. The eccentric southpaw turned in one of the greatest single-season pitching records in history and his 27 wins, 287 strike outs and 1.48 ERA earned him the AL's Triple Crown. However, Rube was unavailable to pitch in the post season due to an injury. Philadelphia was still in good shape with 24 game winner Eddie Plank and 18 game winner Chief Bender - both future Hall of Famers. McGraw also had two future Hall of Famers in his rotation: 21 game winner Joe "Iron Man" McGinnity and Christy Mathewson. Matty's 31 wins, 206 strike outs and stingy 1.28 ERA won him the NL's Triple Crown. Even before the Series began, McGraw started a war of words against Philadelphia, famously telling sports writers that A's owner Ben Shibe had a "white elephant on his hands". The meaning of the insult being that the A's were a team hampered by high salaries all out of portion with its earning ability. Connie Mack, always a gentleman, held his tongue but playfully presented McGraw with a stuffed white elephant before the start of Game 1. The first three games were to be played in Philadelphia. Game 1 pitted Mathewson against Eddie Plank. The A's ace yielded three runs but Mathewson was simply brilliant that afternoon, shutting out Philly on four hits. The closest the A's came to scoring was a double by Ossie Schreckengost in the sixth. A wild pitch advanced him to third but Matty bore down and finished the inning unscathed. Little did anyone know it but Schreckengost would be the only A's player Mathewson would allow to reach scoring position the entire Series. Matty even helped out the Giants offense by hitting a single in the fifth. The next day Chief Bender turned the tables on the Giants and shut out New York in Game 2 on four hits to even up the series. McGraw went with Matty for Game 3 and was rewarded with another four hit shutout. New York scored nine runs on nine hits, including a single by Mathewson. For Game 4 the series switched to the Polo Grounds where Iron Joe McGinnity shut out the A's in a 1-0 nail biter. Now with the Giants up three games to one, John McGraw turned to Mathewson again to put the final nail in the A's coffin. With two masterful shut outs under his belt, Matty faced Chief Bender. The two Hall of Famers kept the game scoreless through four innings before the Giants finally scratched a run across in the bottom of the fifth. Bender bore down and kept the Giants bats at bay until Mathewson managed to get on base with a walk in the bottom of the 8th. His catcher Roger Bresnahan smashed a double that sent Matty to third where he scored on a grounder. Now up by two runs, Mathewson got the first two A's to ground back to him and then to his shortstop for the game and world championship. Mathewson's 1905 World Series dominance has to this day been unmatched: three complete game shut outs with 18 strike outs and a single walk. Matty collected two timely hits and scored twice for a .250 average. In the midst of what must have been a sweet championship celebration, Matty grabbed his game used bat and passed it around to a few of his teammates. Red Ames, a 22 game winner that summer for the Giants, signed his name in black steel-tipped fountain pen as did fellow hurler George "Hooks" Wiltse. Second baseman Billy Gilbert dipped the pen in ink and added the date of Matty's Game 5 victory "Oct 14 - 05" after his name. Finally John McGraw inscribed his signature along with the historic date he led his boys to the first National League's first World Championship: "Oct 14 - 05. After the celebrations died down Mathewson did what he did after every season - pack up his uniform and equipment and head home to his family in Factoryville, Pennsylvania. In what had become a fall tradition, Matty distributed his game used items to family members and young fans. This signed, World Series game used bat was among the priceless personal items Matty gave away and was kept as a treasured heirloom by a Chicago area family until 2013 when it was obtained by collector Terrence R. Zastrow. It goes without saying that game used bats from the turn-of-the-century are rare as hen's teeth - to find a one attributed to a Hall of Famer of Mathewson's status, used during the most impressive World Series pitching performance in the game's history and signed and dated by John McGraw is, well, dare we say unprecedented! Not only is this the only game used Christy Mathewson bat in existence, we believe it is the earliest World Series game used bat and represents the very first World Championship in the history of professional New York sports. The bat was manufactured before the advent of model numbers, but we can date this bat by the Victorian typeface used in the center brand as the one used by J.F. Hillerich from 1897 to 1911. Like most bats used during the "Dead Ball Era", this bat weights a hefty 46oz. As can be seen in contemporary photographs of Christy Mathewson, its thick handle and small knob matches the model favored by the great pitcher during this period. Made of white ash, it measures 33" in length and is un-cracked. From the barrel to the knob, this extraordinary bat displays heavy game use. The front barrel shows checking from repeated ball contact and century-old ball marks can still be seen on its surface. Two chips are missing from the bat's knob end. In order to enhance his grip, Mathewson has prepared the bat by heavily scoring the handle 3" from the knob and 8" up towards the center brand. Also visible are traces of a single tape ring winding up and around the handle. Both these characteristics are typical of the split-handed batting style Mathewson employed at the plate. A full board of comprehensive documentation from the hobby's leading experts completes this Hall of Fame-worthy Christy Mathewson World Series game used bat. Game used experts MEARS have thoroughly examined this incredible artifact and have given it their highest grade of A10 (314257). Likewise PSA/DNA have examined the bat and awarded it their highest mark of GU10 (1B01858) and the signatures have a certificate of authenticity from JSA (X56499) and PSA/DNA (U04226). A notarized letter from collector Terrence R. Zastrow documents the provenance of this historic piece of baseball history. Due to its unique position as 1) the ONLY game used Mathewson bat in existence, 2) One of the very few game used or worn items that exists from Mathewson's career, 3) The oldest certified game used item that was used in a World Series, 4) The earliest known team signed bat (By World Series Champions!), 5) The city of New York's first major professional championship in ANY SPORT, We feel this bat represents the single most important game used bat ever offered for public sale. For an image of all the LOA's please click here: Mathewson Bat LOA's This lot comes with 23 pages of research and documentation with the PSA/DNA and MEARS LOAs. Please email us at info@goldinauctions.com to have all 23 pages sent to you via email or Fedex.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-01
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1920's Lou Gehrig Game Worn New York Yankees Pants.

1920's Lou Gehrig Game Worn New York Yankees Pants. As the New York Yankees cut the ribbon on the greatest ballpark ever constructed on April 18, 1923, another paradigm-shifting event in the fortunes of the franchise was happening just a few miles away on the campus of Columbia University. Famed scout Paul Krichell had elected to forgo the pomp and circumstance of the Yankee Stadium grand opening to watch a young collegian set a school record by striking out seventeen Williams College batters. That young man was Lou Gehrig. In truth, Krichell was not overly impressed with the sturdy German's pitching, but rather the power of his left-handed slugging, the tape measure home runs unlike any he'd ever seen short of Babe Ruth himself. Within months, Krichell had the young Gehrig's autograph on a playing contract, a signature that would forever alter the course of Yankee history. Presented is one of the first garments issued to Lou Gehrig as a member of the New York Yankees, a determination we are able to make by the unique embroidered script that reports, "Gehrig HL" in heavily faded red embroidered script at interior waistband, the rather artful, looping style a perfect match to a pair of "circa 1925" pants worn by Yankee right fielder Bob Meusel, sold in a major competitor's auction in 2009. The particular format of "Spalding" label beside the embroidery is likewise a perfect match to the Meusel representation. The garment exhibits the manner of heavy wear one would expect from the game's most determined competitor, with a scattering of small holes and stains that may or may not be game related. A size "40" indicator is sewn into the fly button path. It appears that one of the buttons at the waist has been repositioned, and another added, strong Gehrig traits considering the narrowness of his waist relative to his famously large backside that earned the Iron Horse the considerably less regal secondary nickname of "Biscuit Pants." Included is a 1992 letter from renowned game used uniform pioneer Dick Dobbins, who estimates that "these pants are from the era of 1923 or 1924," a determination bolstered by the fact that "the pants were acquired with a shirt that appears to have come from these years," and due to the absence of a date indicator that later models would carry. They are the third pair of Gehrig pants Heritage has had the good fortune to offer, each of the others commanding just over, or just under, $50,000. But the exciting prospect that the presented pair may be the very first ever worn by Lou Gehrig in Major League competition, or to begin his fabled 2,130 consecutive game streak, supplies unique appeal to the offered model, as Platinum Night bidding is certain to confirm. LOA from Heritage Auctions. LOA from Dick Dobbins. {br}{p}{div="center"} {iframe width="450" height="259" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cNbH0ayi_5k?wmode=transparent" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen}{/iframe}{br /} {/div}{/p}

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-02-22
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1958 Yogi Berra Game Worn New York Yankees Jersey, MEAR

1958 Yogi Berra Game Worn New York Yankees Jersey, MEARS A9.5. Sabermetrics calculates him to be the greatest catcher of all time, and his thirteen World Championship rings, including a record ten as a player, commemorate a record as untouchable as any in the sport. Berra was notorious for being one of the toughest outs in the Major Leagues when at the plate, five times recording more home runs than strikeouts in a season. But in his defensive role Berra was arguably even better, topping the Junior Circut eight times in putouts as catcher, three times in assists, and once in fielding percentage. That campaign of 1958, during which the Hall of Fame backstop sported these flannel pinstripes, Berra labored eighty-eight games behind home plate without a single error, becoming one of just four catchers in history to post a 1.000 fielding percentage for a complete Major League season. A single replaced button is the only deviation from perfection on this otherwise 100% original and unaltered beauty, exhibiting wear characterized as "Moderate to Heavy" by the experts at MEARS. Cultured collectors are well aware that Major Leaguers were issued two home and two road jerseys each season, so with 122 appearances during the 1958 campaign, Berra likely donned the presented jersey approximately thirty times. A photographic image of Berra joking around with Milwaukee Braves star Johnny Logan at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium tacks at least one more contest onto that tally, as the image was snapped at Berra's eleventh of fifteen consecutive All-Star Game appearances. We can see that the unique pattern of pinstripes--like fingerprints and snowflakes, no two home Yankees jerseys are identical--matches the offered jersey perfectly. The timeless design features the logo "NY" over the heart and the long-retired number "8" on verso. "Berra" appears upon an embroidered swatch inside the collar, with "58" embroidered directly into the jersey body below "Spalding [size] 44" tagging at lower left front tail. A flawless blue sharpie signature adorns the chest. Any minor staining is too insignificant to merit either a mention or a MEARS point deduction, and no tearing or other damage is present whatsoever. It is, quite simply, one of the finest representations known from the wardrobe of one of the greatest Yankees of all time. LOA from MEARS, A9.5. LOA from Heritage Auctions. Full LOA from PSA/DNA. Full LOA from James Spence Authentication. {br}{p}{div="center"} {iframe width="450" height="259" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Ufx5ObhwDlI?wmode=transparent" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen}{/iframe}{br /} {/div}{/p}

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-02-22
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1953 Mickey Mantle New York Yankees Game-Used & Autographed Road...

During his 18-year career with the New York Yankees, Mickey Mantle became arguably the best hitting outfielder in Major League Baseball history and did it from both sides of the plate. A 20-time All-Star, Mantle won seven World Series championships, was a three-time American League MVP, led the AL in home runs four times and earned the Triple Crown in 1956. Mantle has his No. 7 retired by the Yankees franchise, was named to the MLB All-Century Team and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974 on the first ballot. Mantle earned one of those 20 All-Stars in 1953, hitting .295 with 21 home runs and 92 RBI. In the Yankees victory over the Dodgers in the 1953 World Series, Mantle first established his reputation for dominance in the Fall Classic, clouting two homers (including a grand slam) and posting seven RBI in the six game series. On the inside rear collar fold is an, “A.G. Spalding & Bros” manufacturer’s tag with a size “44” flag tag attached below. On the front left tail reads, “MMantle 53X” in navy blue chain-stitching. Supplemental "Dry Clean Only” tagging for the laundry instructions is located on the inner left front tail. Across the chest reads, “NEW YORK” and the player number “7” appears on the back. These are done in navy blue felt lettering sewn directly onto the grey flannel jersey. Mantle signed the left chest area in blue pen and in our opinion, rates a 7 overall. The top button is missing and the remaining buttons have been reinforced. There is some felt loss on the original "N" in the New York and a tiny piece missing on the “W”. There is a number change on the back and the number "7" has been professionally restored. The "X" in "MMantle 53X" likely denotes a set made specifically for use in 1953 MLB All-Star Game. Typically an “X” may indicate an additional or extra jersey but this is not the case for '53 Spalding manufactured jerseys. It was common for a minor league call up or mid-season acquisition player's shirt to have the full word "EXTRA" sewn in the tail as opposed to just the “X”. Pee Wee Reese and Phil Rizzuto are two documented ASG examples marked with “X” in their respectively correct home/road issue jerseys for the 1953 ASG. The National League hosted the MLB All-Star Game at Crosley Field in Cincinnati, OH which validates why Reese (playing for the NL Dodgers) had the “X” tagged on only his home white jersey and why Rizzuto and Mantle (playing for the AL Yankees) have the “X” tagged only on their road greys. Conclusively Photo-Matched to Mantle in the Spring of 1955 and progressively matched to the 1953 MLB All-Star game by the configuration and orientation of how high the "NEW" sits in relation to "YORK". The Photo-Match in spring of '55 validates that much of the use seen on this shirt can be positively attributed to Mantle himself, staying within the organization for multiple season at the pro level. A far cry from the superstars of today who are issued multiple sets per homestand. This jersey is properly tagged, was presented to us as game-used and in our opinion shows outstanding extended organizational use. Accompanied by a full JSA & PSA/DNA LOA, a letter from MEARS, and a letter from PM&G grading it a 6. First entering the hobby from the gentleman who received it from a former major league scout during a Yankees tryout in the 1950s. He did not make the team, but held onto this historic piece treasuring it for 50+ years before finally letting it go. This museum level piece is being offered for only the second time publicly, standing as the hobby's earliest known road Photo-Matched jersey of Yankee great Mickey Mantle. Please note that the photo-matching and grading authentication work on this jersey was performed by a new hobby service for game-used material PM&G. More information can be found at Photo-Match.com

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-06-22
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JOHN LENNON AUSTIN PRINCESS FROM "IMAGINE"

A black 1956 Austin Princess Limousine Hearse owned and used by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in "Imagine" (Joko, 1973). The interior features a black leather front bench seat; four custom airline seats (two rows of two, later mounted in back); steering wheel having coat-of-arms logo at center; odometer reading: "41158"; finished burl wood dash board; silver plaque reading: "Arthur Mulliner Ltd./North Hampton." Exterior having black finish (most likely original); front and rear English and American license plates; English reading: "GNH 240," Californian reading: "EMAJIN," chrome fenders, luggage rack and hardware throughout. Also present is the London registration form having Lennon's signature as registered owner, stamped August 3rd and 26th, 1971 and a facsimile copy of a letter of authenticity. This modified Limousine Hearse can prominently be seen in "Imagine" (Joko, 1973); a film created to promote Lennon's Capitol Records LP (having the same name). The surreal, half-fiction footage features a day in the life of Lennon and Ono, composed to music of Lennon's "Imagine" LP as well as Ono's avant garde "Fly" LP (Rykodisc, 1971). Lennon co-directed the film with Steve Gebhardt, who previously worked with he and Yoko on "Ten for Two" (Vaughan Films, 1971) and the short film "Fly." During the opening scene of the film, the hearse can be seen in an Ariel view as John and Yoko drive to their Tittenhurst Park residence in England. Shortly after the filming was completed they moved to New York.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-10-29
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1955 Mickey Mantle New York Yankees Game-Used & Autographed Home...

Mantle was a multi-talented offensive threat, driving in runs with enormous power from either side of the plate. He arrived in New York and played alongside the soon-to-retire Joe DiMaggio, and ended up with a respectable rookie season. When Joe retired Mantle took over in centerfield, and he played the position from 1952 to 1966. In 1956, "The Mick" emerged as a superstar, the greatest switch-hitter in the history of baseball and one of its biggest drawing cards. He hit .353 that year with 52 home runs and 130 RBI to win the Triple Crown. It was the first of three straight years that he led the league in runs scored (132). Mantle capped the year with three homers in the World Series, one in Don Larsen's perfect game, in which he also made a saving defensive play. Mantle the first power-hitting switch-hitter, and although always a better hitter from the right side, was capable enough from the left to hit 373 of his 536 career homers. When slugging outfielder Roger Maris joined the Yankees, he and Mickey became known as the "M & M Boys." Mantle played on 12 pennant winners and seven World Championship clubs, and holds World Series records for home runs (18), RBI (40), runs (42), walks (43), extra-base hits (26), and total bases (123). In his final World Series in 1964 he had three homers and eight RBIs and batted .333. Mantle was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1974 in his first year of eligibility. This jersey has been in a private collection since 1981. On the inside back of the collar is the "Spalding" manufacturers tag. Adjacent to that is an additional tag with the jersey size "44" on it. On the front left tail of the jersey is "Mantle 55 -7" embroidered directly on the jersey. On the inside left front tail is the wash instructions tag with a "SET 1 1955" flag tag attached. On the left breast is the "NY" logo. On the back is the player number "7." All lettering and numbering is done in blue felt. There is an autograph in blue maker rating an 9 on the front of the jersey. The jersey shows game use. The player number "7" on the back has been professionally restored. Aside from the number restoration, there appears to be no alterations of any kind. Accompanied by a LOA from James Spence Authentication.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-12-31
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Sandy koufax 1963 no-hitter game worn spalding frank bolling model 42-212 glove

"If there was ever a better pitcher, it was before my time," Dodger manager Walter Alston said of Koufax. Southpaw Sandy Koufax earned a place among baseball's greatest pitchers with his major league dominating performance between 1962 and 1966. During that span, he won 111 games and lost 34, led the league in ERA each season, paced the NL in strikeouts (1963, 1965, and 1966) and shutouts (three times), and pitched four no-hitters, including a perfect game in 1965.  At the height of his career in 1963, Koufax won his first Cy Young Award and was named the NL's Most Valuable Player and the Associated Press Male Athlete Of The Year, all while leading the Dodgers to a World Championship. Perhaps Koufax’s greatest performance from his greatest season came on May 11, 1963. In a masterful outing he baffled the visiting Giants at Dodger Stadium pitching his second career no-hitter in the 8–0 victory.  There to capture the moment, as he was for nearly 50 years, was legendary sports photographer Herb Scharfman. In his prolific career, Scharfman shot some of the most poignant images in sports for the Intenational News Photo agency, Sports Illustrated, and also served as the longtime Dodgers team photographer. During their time together with the Dodgers, Scharfman formed a deep and lasting friendship with Sandy Koufax that is well documented. As a token of that friendship, Koufax presented Scarfman with this game used glove from his no-hitter, in the Dodgers locker room immediately following the game.   The glove is a Spalding Frank Bolling model 42-212. Koufax’s uniform number “32" is written on the thumb and pinky in vintage marker. A faint Koufax signature is also visible on the pinky, covered by a clear protective coating. Its impeccable provenance includes numerous photographs, including one of Koufax on the mound during the May 11, 1963 no-hitter, showing him wearing this very glove with the scoreboard visible in the background. A separate posed photograph of Koufax wearing the glove is detailed enough to match the model number and markings in the palm. For the past several years the glove has been prominently displayed at Dodger Stadium where it has been admired by millions of fans. Accompanying the glove are copies of the aforementioned photos, photos of the glove on display, as well as a detailed two-page handwritten letter of provenance from Herb Scharfman’s daughter, Loretta Scharfman. LOA’s: Loretta Scharfman, SCD Authentic, PSA/DNA, Mike Gutierrez.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-02
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Historic Rudy Ruettiger game worn Notre Dame Fighting Irish helmet c.1974-75.

Historic Rudy Ruettiger game worn Notre Dame Fighting Irish helmet c.1974-75. Original Notre Dame Fighting Irish football helmet as issued to and worn by Rudy Ruettiger during the 1974 and 1975 seasons. Riddell helmet with period appropriate impressed markings on back including the Company logo and ÐKra-Lite IIÓ model. Suspension interior remains intact with size Ð7Ó stamped on. There are several vintage marker player number and name notations written inside with Rudys name partially visible (ÐReutÓ) below a reconditioning label. The ear pads appear original to the period however the rubber bumper which was affixed to the interior has hardened and come loose (included but separate from helmet). The helmet has been reconditioned twice with the first label a vintage example that dates to the time of use. The latter was applied when Rudy had Schutt Sports perform some minor cosmetic improvements for display purposed only including few paint touch ups and the ÐIrishÓ nameplate decal applied over a Wilson rubber guard between the front anchors. Strong usage wear evident throughout which is consistent with the well documented re-issue of previously used helmets by Notre Dame and other collegiate programs during the period. Rudy vividly recalls the issuance of the helmet for his Junior season of 1974 having been named to the Notre Dame scout team by coach Ara Parseghian. ÐIt was one of the greatest accomplishments of my life and truly made me feel like a Notre Dame man.Ó Includes LOA from Hunt Auctions and Notarized Letter of Provenance from Rudy Ruettiger certifying this was the actual Notre Dame helmet he wore during the November 8, 1975 game: EX

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-02-04
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1903 Breisch-Williams E107 Christy Mathewson SGC 30 Goo

1903 Breisch-Williams E107 Christy Mathewson SGC 30 Good 2. "He was an inspiration to everybody and may we have more of his kind," spoke a doleful Kenesaw Mountain Landis at the 1925 memorial service for the future posthumous Hall of Fame inductee. "His sense of justice, his integrity, and sportsmanship made him far greater than Christy Mathewson the pitcher." Though baseball's first Commissioner had been recruited by Major League Baseball to ferret out its worst in the midst of the 1919 Black Sox scandal, Landis was able to recognize the game's best as well, properly honoring this shimmering diamond in the Dead Ball Era rough. It was a sentiment shared by essentially every player, teammate or adversary, which ever encountered Big Six on the playing field. The presented unassuming slab of cardboard could be similarly praised, rating as one of the most desirable rarities in the trading card collecting hobby. While we cannot state definitively the precise population of surviving examples, it is telling that just four have ever passed through the grading services of PSA or SGC, making even the famed Honus Wagner card seem downright common by comparison. The card serves as a defining moment in the hobby, due perhaps most notably to the fact that the E107 Breisch-Williams issue is widely considered to be the first major baseball set of the twentieth century. Mathewson serves not only as its most desirable and elusive component, but also makes his appearance here with the all-important rookie designation. One could count on a single hand the Hall of Fame rookies which compete with the Breisch-Williams Mathewson for rarity, and this represents just the second auction block appearance of a specimen in the past dozen years, according to our comprehensive database. It is likewise the superior representation. The assigned grade of SGC 30 Good 2 belies the card's enormous eye appeal, which provides the visuals of an example two levels higher except upon the closest of inspection. Magnification indicates a mild degree of surface scratching to account for the SGC assessment, though we must stress again that the fine registration, minimal eastward centering shift and lack of significant corner wear are far more typical of a VG-EX card. Truthfully, the tremendous scarcity of this special offering should dismiss petty condition concerns anyhow. It's entirely possible that the opportunity to own another will never arise.

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-06
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Lou gehrig's 1936 new york yankees signed contract (mvp season)

Perhaps second only to 1927 in the legacy of Gehrig's great career, his 1936 campaign was a landmark year for several reasons. Individually, he achieved baseball's highest honor, capturing the league MVP award for his .354 average, 49 home runs, 152 RBI and career-high 167 runs. Collectively, Gehrig's Yanks won 102 ballgames and took their first of four consecutive world championships. It was the beginning of the Yankees' next great dynasty, and the ushering in of a new generation for the franchise. Unbeknownst to Gehrig and the rest of the world in 1936, “The Iron Horse" was only two short years from being compelled to retire by the insidious disease that now bears his name. This Uniform Player's Contract, dated January 15, 1936, is signed by Gehrig, Ed Barrow (General Manager), Jacob Ruppert (Owner) and William Harridge (AL President). It entitles Lou to an annual salary of $31,000, which, although assuredly a king's ransom in the scope of Depression-era America, still paled in comparison to the $80,000 per year demanded by Ruth as early as 1930. Gehrig’s full name "Henry L. Gehrig" and address "5 Circuit Rd - New Rochelle, NY" are gracefully inscribed in bold black fountain pen. Matted and framed, it is displayed for viewing with its reverse (Gehrig’s signature side) visible below photocopies of the verso. This historically significant contract represents the apex for the immortal Yankees captain - before his play would be noticeably affected by the onset of ALS. Together with copy of photograph shown. Near mint condition, with strong signatures each grading a 10. LOA: PSA/DNA.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-02
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Home plate from yankee stadium, circa 1923-1973

By the late 1960’s, Yankee Stadium, the nation's most historical sports palace, was in desperate need of repair. The toll of 80 million people who had passed through its gates to witness baseball’s greatest dynasty, and various other events in the previous half-century, had begun to show. In the winter of 1966-67 the Stadium was given a $1.5 million facelift, the most complete since its construction in 1923. Cosmetic improvements included the application of ninety tons of paint and the wood bleacher benches became fiberglass. These improvements notwithstanding, rumors circulated that that the Yankees were being enticed to follow the lead of the pro-football Giants to occupy a proposed new stadium across the Hudson in New Jersey. But the tradition of the Yankees prevailed – their roots dug too deep in New York City and The House That Ruth Built. An extensive renovation began immediately after the 1973 season, with the project contracted to the firm Invirex Demolition, Inc. Invirex workmen occupied Yankee Stadium for more than two years as the grand structure was renewed piece by piece. While the work proceeded, the Yankees played their home games in the 1974 and 1975 season in the ballpark of the New York Mets, Shea Stadium. Throughout the project, numerous pieces of the stadium, deemed obsolete, were disposed of in various ways. Some, including a limited selection of seats, were retailed through department store catalogs such as Sears. Other items were given away to insiders, or simply thrown out. Today, these original artifacts obtained during this period are considered by collectors to be among the most prized Stadium artifacts. Among the most extaordinary items ever to surface from this revitalization period is the original home plate offered here. Manufactured by The Seamless Rubber Co.of New Haven Connecticut, the plate is affixed to its original base of layered wood, with five iron spikes protruding from the bottom. It was removed from the bull pen by Invirex, with an accompanying letter of provenance from the firm's President indicating that it had been moved there after being used previously "in the Stadium." The surface and perimeter of the plate show extensive usage wear, with cracking and loss of rubber having occurred in a few areas. Based on the physical characteristics of this stadium relic (extent of wear) and the accompanying source documentation, it is likely that this plate once served as ground zero for some of baseball's defining moments, beginning with Ruth's epic home run on the Stadium's grand opening.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-12-02
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1964 Sandy Koufax Los Angeles Dodgers Game-Used & Autographed...

Sandy Koufax became the first ever three-time Cy Young Award winner in an era when Major League Baseball only handed out one award for both leagues. Koufax had a completely dominant run from 1961-66, winning the National League Triple Crown. Koufax was a first ballot Hall of Fame inductee in 1972 and the first major league pitcher to pitch four no-hitters. He was a four-time World Series champion and has his No. 32 retired by the Dodgers franchise. Koufax started 28 games in the 1964 season going 19-5. He threw his third career no-hitter on June 4th in a 3-0 victory over the Phillies. On the front left tail is a “Wilson” size “40” manufacturer’s tag with washing instructions. Below is a white strip tag with, “Koufax - 1964” embroidered in blue chain-stitching. Across the chest reads, “Dodgers” in traditional underscored script done in blue felt lettering. Player number “32” appears below in red felt lettering. Across the back is “32” done in the same blue felt. The logo and numbers are all original to the garment, affixed with a straight in-line stitch. Period correct adhesive backing appears on both sets of numbers. The sleeves are the abbreviated styling favored by Koufax on his 1960s flannels. The jersey body itself is an off white cotton flannel devoid of any significant wool content with 7 original buttons down the front. This jersey is in pristine, all-original condition. Koufax signed below the front player number in black pen and in our opinion, rates a 7 overall. This jersey was originally offered in a Richard Wolffers sale in the early 1990s. At that time it was accompanied by documentation from Koufax himself. The letter has been lost overtime but given the fact that this shirt was sourced from Koufax, the level of use is right in line with what we would expect to see from a superstar pitcher who retained possession of the shirt after the season. Dave Grobe of MEARS originally dismissed this shirt due to the size 40 tag without measuring it, stating it did not match any known exemplars. This jersey is tagged size "40" but actually measures much larger. MEARS has since authenticated an identical 1964 Wally Moon home Dodgers jersey manufactured by Wilson with the same style application of Player ID and tagging. The rectangular player ID swatch is a canvas whipcord material which matches Wilson’s style of player ID application for this timeframe. The Moon was re-used by the Dodgers for multiple seasons and features the same mismarked size "40" Wilson tag, but measures out much larger. Correctly sized for Moon and the exact same as the offered Koufax. Major League uniforms from this period were made to order products as opposed to stock sized garments which would require that a size tag be present and accurate. It is a hobby accepted norm that shirts were created specifically for athletes to fit their body's as opposed to fitting the exact size as tagged. Flannels from this era are somewhat inconsistent with actual measurements as they were worn more loosely as opposed to a tapered fit evidenced by the double knit era. 1964 exemplars for the Dodgers of Wally Moon, Charles Bohling a non-roster ST invitee and Johnny Podres prove that Wilson manufactured a set of jerseys for use. While there is not enough definition in the available period imagery of Koufax wearing a home uniform in ‘64 we are able to determine that Koufax did in fact wear a Wilson manufactured product and that there were multiple sets of home uniforms issued to the Dodgers from different suppliers. This jersey is properly tagged, was presented to us as game-used and in our opinion shows appropriate use. Accompanied by a LOA from PM&G grading the jersey an 8, a Full JSA LOA and a plethora of examples verifying its validity. A museum level relic emanating directly from Koufax in 100% original and unaltered condition. Please note that the photo-matching and grading authentication work on this jersey was performed by a new hobby service for game-used material PM&G. More information can be found at Photo-Match.com

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-06-22
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1962-64 Y.A. Tittle Game Worn New York Giants Helmet.

1962-64 Y.A. Tittle Game Worn New York Giants Helmet. In his younger years, photographer Morris Berman had served with the Army Pictorial Service in Africa and Italy during the Second World War, he and his camera bearing witness to the brutal end of Benito Mussolini and his mistress on April 29, 1945, their battered and bullet-riddled bodies hung from the heels in a Milan square. But Berman's professional legacy remains a single photo snapped nearly two decades later, a stirring image of another once-powerful leader at his end entitled "The Fallen Giant." That photograph finds a dazed and bloodied Y.A. Tittle kneeling in the end zone of the old Pitt Stadium on September 20, 1964, badly rattled by a vicious hit from Steelers defensive lineman "Big John" Baker. Though Tittle would bravely finish out the season with a cracked sternum and torn rib muscles, it was clear that the Big Apple glory days over which Tittle had presided had ended, and the Giants finished the 1964 season at an NFL-worst record of 2-10-2. Tittle limped into retirement and turned his attentions to his eponymous insurance company, answering the call from Canton in 1971. Though the photo was never published in the newspaper and thus ineligible for the Pulitzer Prize, it is credited with changing the landscape of sports photography, and even Tittle himself came to embrace the image, putting it on the back cover of his 2009 autobiography. "That was the end of the road," he told reporters. "It was the end of my dream. It was over." The helmet that rests on its side several feet behind Tittle in that famous shot is almost certainly the example we present here, a picture-perfect representation sporting a vinyl (rather than painted) red center stripe that dates the relic to the final seasons of Tittle's Hall of Fame career. All visible details, from the formation of the numerical decals to the style of face mask, are a perfect match to Berman's masterpiece, and the standard NFL practice of reconditioning helmets for multiple seasons of wear in those days suggests strongly that this was Tittle's only headgear for the period in which his career intersected with the style format. The shell is a "Riddell" RK2 in the highly coveted "bubble ear" style, with twelve-point suspension properly labeled (for Tittle) to size "7 1/8." Both leather jaw pads, commonly lost from helmets of this era, are present here, and all numerical and team decals are original and correct in format. Concussion padding between the shell and suspension, common in 1960's Giants helmets, is likewise in place. Both interior and exterior exhibit solid and consistent game wear. Only a scant few articles of Tittle game used gear have survived to participate in the collectibles hobby, and few Giants suspension helmets from any player are known to exist today. This specimen was sourced from the Moran family of New Orleans restaurant fame. "Diamond Jim" Moran and his sons had one of the nation's finest collections of game worn jerseys and helmets, with a concentration in LSU players and alumni, a brotherhood that includes Tittle. LOA from Heritage Auctions. {br}{p}{div="center"} {iframe width="450" height="259" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/3jCru3rEapI?wmode=transparent" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen}{/iframe}{br /} {/div}{/p}

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-02-22
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2005-06 Sidney Crosby Game Worn Rookie Jersey with Phot

2005-06 Sidney Crosby Game Worn Rookie Jersey with Photo Match. Matched in pre-NHL debut hype only by Bobby Orr and Wayne Gretzky, Sidney Crosby was such a clear first choice for the 2005 NHL draft that the lottery to determine the team picking order was widely called "The Sidney Crosby Sweepstakes." Much to the joy of Penguins fans, Pittsburgh emerged with the coveted first draft spot, bringing Crosby onto the ice with the legendary veteran Mario Lemieux for what would prove to be the latter's final twenty-six games of his career. And the torch was passed. Presented is a road white sweater worn during the most anticipated rookie season in three decades, specifically photo-matched to the January 11, 2006 contest against the Columbus Blue Jackets. The jersey sports a large logo patch at the chest, and the alternate captain's letter "A" just below the left shoulder. Number "87" appears at each bicep and on verso, where it is placed beneath a boldly lettered "Crosby" on the rear nameplate. "Cutting Edge Sports" maker's label appears at interior rear hem, noting the Penguins exclusivity and "Set #1 2005-2006." Fight strap remains affixed just above. Several stick and board marks decorate the jersey front and sleeves, supplying the details which make a photo match possible. Crosby's rookie campaign would end with sixty-three assists and 102 points, each new records for a Penguins debut season topping tallies registered by Lemieux. This proved to be only a small taste of what was yet to come, as Crosby would hoist the 2009 Stanley Cup as team captain, and soon after earn a Gold Medal for Canada with his sudden-death goal against the United States. Already well on his way to hockey immortality with just a quarter of his career in the books, Crosby serves as one of the safest bets in the sports collecting hobby for investors looking for a piece with potential to appreciate in value. Just four Crosby rookie jerseys are known to the hobby. Should Crosby's brilliance continue for fifteen seasons, the owner of this one will look back upon the purchase as a tactic of pure genius.

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-06
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1974-75 Johnny Bucyk Game Worn Boston Bruins Jersey.

1974-75 Johnny Bucyk Game Worn Boston Bruins Jersey. Having celebrated a half century with the Bruins franchise in 2008, "Chief" Bucyk remains one of the most beloved sports figures in a city whose history is overflowing with legends. After a rookie and sophomore season with the Detroit Red Wings, Bucyk came to Boston Garden in 1957, hanging up his skates twenty-one seasons later as the fourth leading point scorer of all time, including a franchise record 545 goals as a Bruin. The Bruins quickly and properly retired his number nine jersey from further use. Here we present one of the last such jerseys worn on the ice by the superstar left winger, exhibiting solid wear from the Bruins' Golden Anniversary season, a milestone recognized by a pair of fantastic patches applied above the tri-color tackle twill number "9" affixed to each sleeve. The classic spoked-B Bruins logo patch is centered on the jersey chest below the distinctive crossover v-neck, with the captain's "C" patch appearing at left shoulder. A large number "9" commands the verso. A proper "Wilson" manufacturer's label is applied at interior collar, a markered notation lost to history through sweaty use. Several team repairs attest to the hard-nosed play of this notorious hip-checker, most notably at the five o'clock position of the Bruins logo patch. Close inspection will reveal the stitching pattern of a removed nameplate on verso, having been applied for early NBC hockey broadcasts in the United States. Some minor staining on verso is noted for the sake of full disclosure, and causes little distraction. This 1981 Hockey Hall of Fame inductee remains one of the most elusive for collectors of 500 Goal Club jerseys, so we expect a great deal of excitement when this top-quality specimen gets its moment on the auction block. The jersey derives from the famous Harvey McKenney collection, and includes a letter of authenticity from this respected hobby icon.

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-08-06
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Sports & Leisure

This category includes a wide variety of antique and vintage sporting equipment, including golf clubs, cricket bats, autographed footballs and soccer balls, team jerseys, fishing poles, parlor games, riding accessories, and skis. It also incorporates sporting memorabilia and collectables.