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  • 23 Sep 1989— 4 Dec 2018

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A pair of meissen indian rose-ringed parrots circa 1741

Modelled by J. J. Kändler, one with a lump of sugar held in its raised claw, the other with a cherry in its beak, on tall rock and tree-stump bases (base of one reduced, some restoration) Kändler's work records, June 1741 : '17. Vor Ihro Excellenz die Frau Gräfin Von Moschinska einen Indianischen Vogel in Ziemlicher Größ in dero Logis nach dem Leben in Thon poussiret, und solche gestalt vorgestellet wie er auf einem Kirsch ast seitzet und ein Stücklein Zucker aus der Pfote frißt' [For her Excellency, the Countess von Moschinska modelled an Indian bird of suitable size in clay after life at her residence, and this figure is presented as if he is perched on a cherry branch and is eating a lump of sugar from his claw]. Similar pairs are illustrated by Dauterman (1970) Vol. IV, pp. 45, 47 and 49, cat nos. 16A, B and 17A, B, the first pair, later sold in the Safra sale, Sotheby's New York, 19th October 2011, lot 758. Another similar pair was sold at Sotheby's New York, 26th October 2012, lot 248 Examples of the parakeet with the lump of sugar are illustrated by Albiker (1959 edition), no. 101; by Karl Berling, Meissen China, An Illustrated History, Table 4, no. 2; and by Hackebroch (1966), pl. 8, fig. 7. Interestingly, the pair most commonly appearing includes a parrot without a cherry in its beak. However, figures with a cherry, similar to the present example, are illustrated in '77 Meissner Pozellanvögel und Franzosisches Kunstgewerbe aus einer Bekannten Privatsammlung', sold by Herman Ball and Paul Graupe in Berlin 15th March 1933, lot 24, pl. 11, and by Albiker (1935), pl. XXVI, no. 89; another example is in the Dresden State Art Collections, see Pietsch (2006), fig. 300.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-05-01
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A MEISSEN GARNITURE DE CHEMINEE OF FIVE MASSIVE VASES AND THREE COVERS

A MEISSEN GARNITURE DE CHEMINEE OF FIVE MASSIVE VASES AND THREE COVERS THREE VASES CIRCA 1735, BEAKER-VASES CIRCA 1740, THE DECORATION CIRCA 1740-50, ONE COVER 19TH CENTURY, BLUE CROSSED SWORDS MARKS, THE FIRST TWO WITH DREHER'S .. MARKS, CENTRAL VASE WITH DREHER'S IMPRESSED QUARTERED CIRCLE MARKS, BEAKER-VASES WITH PRESSNUMMER 21 Comprising three baluster vases with waisted lower parts and two flared beaker-vases with bulbous lower parts, each painted with chinoiserie scenes of Orientals at various pursuits on terraces, including brewing tea and playing backgammon, one vase with a dignitary and a canopied throne, within bold gilt and brown ombrierte cartouches, the front cartouches with diaper panels, scrolling foliage and with pendant sunflowers, the reverses with interwoven scrolling foliage and strapwork, diaper panels, pendant husks and tassels, each surrounded by scattered flower-sprays, the lower parts and domed covers similarly decorated, the three necks with Gitterwerk borders, the covers with gilt knop finials, gilt band rims (slight and minor wear to gilding, some sanding to borders, central cover with finial restuck, one baluster vase with restored rim chip to neck, other with minor minute frit to side of foot) Central vase 21¼ in. (54 cm.) high; baluster vases 18 in. (45.8 cm.) and 17½ in. (44.5 cm.) high; beaker-vases 16½ in. (42 cm.) and 16¼ in. (41.4 cm.) high (6)

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2005-11-21
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A gilt-bronze-mounted black and gilt chinese lacquer commode stamped

The molded Sarrancolin marble top above a bombé front containing two drawers sans traversé, the front and the sides decorated with Chinese lacquer representing figures in an architectural setting at the front and mountainous landscapes to the sides within a gilt-bronze border decorated with scrolls and flowerhead, raised on cabriole legs terminating in gilt-bronze sabots This magnificent commode is the quintessence of a lacquered French piece of furniture. Lacquered furniture by Parisian master cabinetmakers is definitely one of the most fascinating areas of luxury 18th century furniture, alongside with Boulle marquetry furniture with panels of pietre dure or plaques of Sèvres porcelain. Only a handful of other commodes of the same type by Macret are known. A related, although smaller, commode by Macret was sold Sotheby's Paris, 10th November 2009, lot 96 for 228,750 Euros. Another commode attributed to Macret, of smaller dimensions and less elaboretly decorated lacquer panels but enriched with bronzes of exactly the same model - not only chutes but also the encadrements and tablier - formerly in the collection of Dr. and Mrs. Judah was first sold Sotheby's London, 28th November 1988, lot 13 for £220,000 and subsequently sold again Christie's New York, 2nd November 2000, lot 54 for $941,000; see fig. 1. A further commode in red lacquer, unstamped and traditionally associated with the oeuvre of B.V.R.B. but now reattributed to Pierre Macret, is in the Musée du Louvre (donation M. et Mme. Grog, 1973, Inv. OA 10457). This latter commode was exhibited in Louis XV, Un Moment de Perfection de l'Art Français, hôtel de la Monnaie, Paris, 1974, no.434. The exceptional dimensions and quality of the offered commode leave no doubt that it must have been commissioned by a first-rate art lover. Perhaps the Marquis de Marigny or Dauphine Marie-Joséphe de Saxe, both loyal clients of him, were the commissioners of this piece.. Pierre Macret (1727-circa 1796): Macret married at the age of 20 and, in December 1756 became marchand-ébéniste privilégié du Roi suivant la cour et conseils de sa majesté, replacing the widow of Latz. The records of the marchand-mercier Lazare Duvaux reveal a debt of 1169 livres to Macret by December 1758. Newspaper advertisements reveal that he worked in the rue Saint Honoré in the hotel d'Auvergne, close to Saint Roch, in 1763. He made embroidery frames as well as small chiffonnières with floral marquetry. The marquis de Marigny, Directeur des Bâtiments, bought 1890 livres worth of furniture from him in 1770. In 1771 Macret changed his status and became marchand-mercier in Paris. He was fournisseur ordinaire des menus-plaisirs du Roi from 1764 to 1771. In accordance with his new status he chose a more comfortable house in the rue Saint-Honoré, in April 1772. It was a strategic choice, his new home being close to Dulac, Poirier and Granchez, which furthered his business. His son Pierre-François helped his father and in 1774, when he married the daughter of a fondeur, he also became a marchand-mercier. Shortly before 1772 he delivered 1222 livres worth of furniture to the Dauphine Marie-Antoinette, and the marquis de Monconseil, father of princesse d'Henin, had ordered furniture valued at 4690 livres. Many of the bronzes which enriched his furniture were cast and chased by Philippe Pajot who, in 1761, had his workshop in the same building as Macret. In December 1774 and May 1775 he sold his tools and stock to concentrate fully on the trade with objets de luxe. In 1781 he qualified as a bourgeois de Paris. Macret had three children and in 1777 bought a large property in the rue Moreau, in the faubourg Saint Antoine. He built several houses which he rented out on this property and he further bought a farm in Tournon, Brie. He seems to have retired in 1787, and was still alive when his wife died in 1798. His works are exhibited in many museums including the Nissim de Camondo, Paris; the Château de Versailles; the Cleveland Museum of Art; Hillwood House, Washington D.C.; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-07-03
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DESC-A fine and very rare copper-red-glazed Dish incised mark and

DESC-A fine and very rare copper-red-glazed Dish incised mark and period of Xuande with softly rounded sides enclosing the slightly sunken interior floor, applied overall leaving the lip white with a rich crushed strawberry glaze accented with minute darker speckles and transmuting to a 'chicken-liver' halo around the well, the tapered wedge-shaped footrim circling the base crisply incised with the mark within a double-circle beneath a blue-tinged transparent glaze 20.2 cm., 8 in. Provenance: Christie's London, 3rd December 1973, lot 407. Sotheby's London, 13th December 1977, lot 490. The creation of bright and even copper-red glazes was perfected during the Xuande period and Xuande red glazes were unequalled for almost three centuries thereafter, until the colour was revived again in the sang-de-boeuf glazes of the Kangxi reign. Although a whole range of different shapes was produced in copper-red during the Xuande period, successful examples remained very rare because of the difficulty to fire the copper pigment to a clear and even colour. A large number of Xuande copper-red wares discarded after firing, have been recovered from the Jingdezhen kiln site, a selection of which was included in the exhibition Yuan's and Ming's Imperial Porcelains Unearthed from Jingdezhen, Yan-Huang Art Museum, Beijing, 1999, cat.nos.213-228; among them are two dishes with an underglaze-blue reign mark, one with straight, the other with flared rim. A dish in the British Museum, similar to the present one in form and also with an incised reign mark, is illustrated in R.L. Hobson and A.L. Hetherington, The Art of the Chinese Potter, London, 1923, col.pl.CVIII, fig.2; and one or two similar examples have been offered for sale at auction, both in our London rooms, one from the collection of Enid and Brodie Lodge, sold on 14th March 1972, lot 146, the other from the Wu Lai Hsi collection, sold on 26th May 1937, lot 83; this latter dish was sold unillustrated and could be the present dish or that from the Lodge collection. Three smaller copper-red Xuande dishes are included in the Catalogue of the Special Exhibition of Selected Hsuan-te Imperial Porcelains of the Ming Dynasty, National Palace Museum, Taipei, 1998, two with incised reign mark but flared rim, pls.169 and 170, and one with an underglaze-blue mark, pl.168. A Kangxi copy of a Xuande dish in Beijing, with a spurious Xuande reign mark, is included in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum: Monochrome Porcelain, Hong Kong, 1999, pl.20, which does not include any copper-red piece of Xuande mark and period. Quantity: 1

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2001-05-01
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The schimmelmann service. an important meissen cased tea and coffee

Each piece superbly decorated in gilding, possibly in the worshop of Abraham Seuter, Augsburg, with hunting scenes mostly after engravings by Johann Elias Ridinger, depicting elegant courtly figures engaged in various stages of stag, boar and duck hunts, including a hunt breakfast, and vignettes of birds perched on branches, all below foliate C-scroll borders, comprising: a coffee pot and cover (the cover attached by a chain, 22cm., 8 5/8 in.), a teapot and cover with eagle spout (lustre mark "C.S", the cover attached by two chains, 14.5cm., 5 5/8in., one claw broken off), a milk jug and cover (lustre mark "C.S", the cover attached by a chain, 15.4cm., 6 1/16 in., small flat chip to tip of spout and two small flat chips to underside edge of finial), a tea caddy and cover (10.2cm., 4in., two tiny flat chips to rim of cover), an oval two-handled sugar box and cover (indistinct lustre mark "S(?)A...", 16.5cm., 6 1/2 in. across, finial restored), a slop bowl (lustre mark "C.S", 18.4cm., 7 1/4 in. diam., very minor wear to interior), six teabowls and saucers (lustre marks "C.S", one saucer with rim section restuck), with six silver-gilt bright-cut edge teaspoons, maker's mark E, Hamburg 1767-1772, all in a green-felt lined fitted calfskin case with tooled gilt foliate scrollwork borders, enclosing birds on the corners and cover, raised on four gilt-metal claw and ball feet, a carrying handle fixed to each side    Count Heinrich Carl von Schimmelmann: Collector and Entrepreneur Count Heinrich Carl von Schimmelmann (1724-82) was active as a merchant in Dresden from 1744 and was appointed Councillor to the Court of Saxony (Accisrat). He was also a supplier to the Prussian Court and responsible for grain deliveries during the Seven Years War (1756-63). In November 1756, he was appointed Prussian Privy Councillor, though he remained in Dresden until July 1757. He played an important role in the history of the Meissen manufactory during the war, when Saxony was occupied by the forces of Frederick the Great. In November 1756, he purchased the entire stock of Meissen porcelain in Meissen, Dresden and Leipzig, which Frederick the Great had confiscated as war booty. Though valued at 300,000 Talers, he managed to acquire it from the King for 120,000 Talers in cash. He then sold it on for 160,111 Talers to a consortium of three partners: the Privy Councillor Count Joseph von Bolza, Johann Friedrich Thielemann and the Saxon Commercial Councillor, Georg Helbig. Schimmelmann, acting as a representative for this consortium, then leased the Meissen manufactory from the beginning of March 1757 at an annual cost of 25,332 Talers. The manufactory was protected from plundering by Frederick the Great, who issued a "Salve Garde" order to that effect in 1756, to avoid a repeat of the damage suffered during the Second Silesian War. Numerous auctions of Meissen porcelain were held in Hamburg, where Schimmelmann established himself in 1760, following the withdrawal of the Prussians from Dresden that year. Schimmelmann's lease of the Meissen manufactory was dissolved by the Prussians in 1760. He was raised to the nobility in 1762 as Baron, and in 1779 as Count, and entered the service of the Danish Crown in 1761. In 1768 he was appointed Danish Finance Minister. He died in Copenhagen in 1782 and was laid to rest in a mausoleum designed by C.G. Horn in neo-classical style after plans by the Italian architect G.A. Antolini. Schloß Ahrensburg Heinrich Carl von Schimmelmann acquired Schloß Ahrensburg in Schleswig-Holstein in 1759. The original Renaissance castle was erected by Peter von Rantzau in 1595 on the site of a former Cistercian monastery. The castle was altered in the first half of the 18th century, and again from 1766, when Schimmelmann commissioned Carl Gottlob Horn to redesign it in the taste prevailing at the Danish Court. It was subsequently altered many times in the 19th century, and in the middle of the century, the Baroque gardens were replanted in English landscape style. The estate remained in the possession of the Schimmelmann family until the 1930s. In 1955 a museum was founded in the castle devoted to the cultural history of the aristocracy of Schleswig-Holstein. Gold Decoration on Early Meissen Porcelain This type of gilt decoration, which mostly features chinoiserie subjects as well as hunting scenes, has traditionally been attributed to Augsburg goldsmiths, and the Seuter workshop in particular. W.B. Honey first identified the signature "A.Seite" on a cup in the Victoria and Albert Museum, which he published in Pantheon in 1938 identifying it with the Augsburg painter Abraham Seuter. It was Siegfried Ducret, however, who published the comprehensive study of Augsburg-decorated porcelain in 1970, in which he identified several more signed pieces linking this style of gilt decoration to the Seuter workshop (see Literature). More recently, an increased understanding of the role of decorating workshops in Dresden, has raised the possibility that some of this style of gilt decoration may in fact have been executed in Dresden, and it may even have begun there (M. Cassidy-Geiger, "Graphic Sources for Meissen Porcelain: Origins of the Print Collection in the Meissen Archives", in Metropoitan Museum Journal, 31/1996, p.114, n.17). The Augsburg painter Abraham Seuter and his brother, the goldsmith Bartholomäus Seuter, are among the most celebrated of the Hausmaler, or outside decorators, of Meissen porcelain in the 18th century. Up to around 1730 or so, the Meissen manufactory appears to have sent most porcelain for gilding in Dresden or Augsburg - a city famed for its goldsmiths. The earliest mention in the Meissen manufactory archives of Seuter is at the end of September 1722, when Bartholomäus Seuter was paid "135 Taler and 12 Groschen" for gilding three services. He received a concession from the Augsburg Council in 1726 to "melt gold and silver on porcelain" and to sell it. He ran the decoration studio "Under the Laundry" until his death in 1747. Siegfried Ducret attributed the decoration on the service to Abraham Seuter. The Schimmelmann Service This exceptional service is distinguished by its size, quality and condition. The traditional description of these cased services as "travelling services" may not be entirely accurate: Meissen porcelain was considered in the 1720s to be so precious and rare that it is unlikely that such early sets were intended for everyday use. Such was the rarity and value of porcelain that Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, frequently presented it to fellow monarchs and princes as gifts, such as the Danish King in 1716, and the King of Sardinia in 1725, whose gift included an armorial tea and chocolate service in a fitted case  There is also some evidence that such cased services were destined for princely display cabinets, where they were shown together with silver, ivories and other precious objects to demonstrate to visitors the wealth and splendour of the princely owner. A comparable Meissen service, also decorated with gilt hunting scenes, is recorded, for example, in a 1733 inventory of the Durlach Residence, seat of the Margraves of Baden-Durlach. The set, which also included silver spoons, was displayed in the Audienz Zimmer (Audience Room), "in einem schwartz Cardobanenen gelb beschlagenem Küstlein mit grünem Tuch gefüttert" [in a black...box covered in yellow and lined with green cloth]. According to family anecdote, Schimmelmann acquired the service when he purchased from Frederick the Great the porcelain confiscated from Meissen, Leipzig and Dresden. At some point in the 19th century, the service left the possession of Schimmelmann's heirs and was for a time owned by the renowned Berlin porcelain collector, Dr. Fritz Clemm, from whose sale in 1907 the family may have bought back the service. While in the Clemm Collection, the service was exhibited in the renowned, ground-breaking exhibition of 18th century European porcelain held in 1904 in the Royal Museum of Decorative Arts in the Berlin Residence. This was the first major exhibition of 18th century European porcelain to be held in Germany: it included well over 1000 examples and generated enormous public interest and inspired many of the next generation of great collectors. Adolf Brüning, Director of the Museum, noted in the exhibition catalogue the rarity of a complete service from the early period of the manufactory. Interestingly, the involvement of Augsburg goldsmiths in decorating early Meissen porcelain was not yet understood in 1904. Brüning speculated that the lustre mark "C.S" on the base of several of the pieces might be the initials of the painter Johann Christoph Schäffler, who is listed as a "painter and lacquerer" as early as 1710  (R.Rückert,  Biographische Daten der Meißener Manufakturisten des 18. Jahrhunderts, p.86). The Augsburg painter and engraver, Johann Elias Ridinger, is probably the source for at least some of the scenes depicted on this service. A series of eight engravings by Georg Christoph Steudler, titled "Großer Herren Lust in allerhand Jagen", after drawings by Ridinger, was published in Ausgburg by Martin Engelbrecht in 1720, for which see Ducret, op.cit., ills.295 and 298. For a discussion of the hunt in the Electorate of Saxony in the 17th and 18th centuries, and depictions in the decorative arts, see Harriet Hauger & Hans-Christian Täubrich (eds.), Vom Jagen, exhibition catalogue, Schloß Moritzburg, 29th May to 30th August 1992. A magnificent mechanical table attributed to Jean-François Oeben, circa 1750-55, acquired by Count Heinrich Carl von Schimmelmann for Schloss Ahrensburg, will be offered in the sale of Fine French Furniture and Decorations to be held at Sotheby's Paris, 15th December 2003.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2003-12-02
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Bellissima specchiera manierista rettangolare in noce scolpito, seconda

Coronata da cornice aggettante ungulata e da fascia con vaso tra leoni e girali, due figure virili ai lati sopra cartoccio, grembiale centrato da brucanio unito con pendenti di stoffa a mascheroni laterali, la cornice interna guilloché tra modanature a foglie, ovali e perlinatura Questo rarissimo esemplare di arredo manierista trova riscontri nelle idee ornamentali espresse da alcuni fra i piu' noti ornatisti e architetti attivi subito dopo la meta' del Cinquecento, il repertorio dei quali assume un carattere transregionale per connotarsi quasi come un gusto di portata europea. Se alcuni dei motivi decorativi sembrano imitare l'evidenza plastica data da architetti italiani quali Bartolomeo Ammannati, si vedano due sue opere fiorentine, Palazzo Giugni e Palazzo Grifoni, (M. Kiene, Bartolomeo Ammannati, Milano, 1995, pp. 80-86, 112, 117), andranno anche segnalate incisioni di artisti d'oltralpe influenzati dai lavori italiani. In due tavole eseguite da Jacques Androuet Ducerceau, pubblicate verso il 1760, si riscontrano somiglianze con gli stilemi qui espressi: in un gusto desunto, come accade apertamente nella grafica di Ducerceau, da prototipi non strettamente francesi. This very rare example of Mannerist furniture derives from the ideas of the most famous designers and architects active in the second half of 16th century, working in a fully European International style. Some of the decorative motives recall the work of the Italian architects such as Bartolomeo Ammanati  (Giugni and Grifoni Palace in Florence: M. Kiene, Bartolomeo Ammanati, Milano, 1995, p.s 80-86, 112,117). Two projects by Jacques Androuet Ducerceau, published in 1760 circa, show very close similarities with the decoration of  this mirror, emphasizing the Ducerceau's taste openly influenced by Italian prototypes.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2004-05-18
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A german parcel-gilt silver nef -form drinking cup, georg müllner

On revolving wheels, each side embossed with a dolphin in wavelets, winged scaly monster forming the spout with sails, ladders, rigging and defenders Nefs in precious metal have a long history, from the 13thcentury when possibly the earliest recorded example was presented to the shrine of St. Nicholas in thanks for the survival at sea of Louis IX (Saint Louis) and his wife Margaret of Provence. The French word Nef and that part of a church called the nave derive from the same Latin word for ship reflecting their early status which was both religious and secular.  As secular items they were even more important than the salt, being placed next to the prince at table and used to hold his napkin and eating implements. While their exalted status continued, for example Louis XIV’s gold and enamelled nef continued to be reverently bowed to it in the late 17th century1, elsewhere they were adopted as real (and surprisingly efficient) vessels for drinking or pouring wine as part of the theatrical table sculpture of a prince or patrician family. Specialization, including the art of nef making was an important feature of goldsmith’s workshops in 17th century Germany.  Amongst Nuremberg masters of the time, Esaias zur Linden (working years 1609-1632) lot 24 is probably most associated with the skill leaving a record of over 60 nefs in literature and in public and private collections.  The specialization was passed between families and generations. Georg Müllner (working years 1624-1659) lot 25 whose surviving work apart from diamond-decorated cups consists entirely of nefs, married Ursula Wolf, widow of Tobias, a specialist nef maker2; and Conrad Meyer of Ulm (master 1666) lot 23 was apprenticed to Hans Ludwig Kienlin the elder as his first master3, a nef maker whose work is in the Ulm Museum and elsewhere including the collection of Julius Goldschmidt, the Franfurt dealer who helped sort out Mayer Carl Rothschild’s vast collection of German silver after his death in 18864  1 `The Maître Hotel is directed to pause before the nef and bow “with all the reverence of a priest passing before the tabernacle”.’ Cyril G.E.Bunt, `The silver nef’, The Connoisseur, June 1943, pp 90-94 2Karin Tebbe et al. Nürnberger Goldschmidekunst  1541-1868, Nuremberg 2007, no. 597 3Adolf Häberle, Die Goldschmiede zu Ulm, Ulm, 1934, p.55 4Gerald Jasbar et al., Goldschmiedekunst in Ulm, Ulm, 1990, p. 56; Marc Rosenberg, Der Goldschmiede Merkzeichen, Frankfurt a.M., 1925, no. 4780

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-07-09
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A rare and large meissen 'schneeballen' vase, cover and stand late 19th century

After an eighteenth-century model by Johann Joachim Kändler, of inverted pear shape, the flower-encrusted body reserved on the front with a royal female portrait medallion in low relief, above a coat of arms of Saxony impaling Sweden within a rocaille-molded border, the handles in the form of gilt leafy branches emerging from clusters of mayflower blossoms and surmounted on one side with 'Flora' and on the other with 'Fame' as an angel with outstretched wings, crossed swords mark in underglaze-blue. The original undecorated version of this vase, currently in Staatliche Kunstsammlungen of Dresden (P.E. 112), was modelled by Johann Joachim Kändler, circa 1742, as a diplomatic gift for the French Court of 1742, as discussed in detail by Jeffrey Munger in Fragile Diplomacy, Meissen Porcelain for European Courts ca. 1710-63, ed. Maureen Cassidy-Geiger, pp.156-157, fig. 7-23. The central vase, after which the present example is modeled, belonged to a garniture of five vases and ewers and is described by Jefrrey Munger as "one of the most ambitious projects conceived as a diplomatic gift", ibid, p. 156. The present vase deviates from its 18th-century prototype in some of the decorative elements as well as the portrait medallion, coats of arms and the initials on the covers. Another version of this vase, without the applied flowerheads, was given as a wedding gift from Grand Duke Frederick Francis II of Mecklenburg-Schwerin to his daughter Marie, on her wedding to Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich in 1874, the son of Tsar Alexander II and brother of Tsar Alexander III.  The vase is preserved in the Vladimir Palace on the Palace Embankment, St. Petersburg and is illustrated in Galina Korneva and Tatiana Cheboksarova, Grand Duchess Marie Pavlovna, p. 17.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-04-22
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"DEJEUNER CHINOIS RETICULE" ROYAL EN PORCELAINE DURE DE SEVRES DU XIXEME SIECLE

"DEJEUNER CHINOIS RETICULE" ROYAL EN PORCELAINE DURE DE SEVRES DU XIXEME SIECLE MARQUES EN VERT ET EN BLEU AU DOUBLE CERCLE ENFERMANT LE CHIFFRE ROYAL LP COURONNE ET DATE 1837 POUR LA CAFETIERE ET 1841 POUR LES AUTRES PIECES, MARQUE DE DECORATEUR h...d POUR PIERRE HUARD, MARQUE DE DOREUR w PEUT-ETRE POUR WEYDINGER, DIVERSES MARQUES INCISEES A décor polychrome dans le goût chinois de cartouches polylobés représentant des personnages dans un paysage, des animaux, vases rituels et bouquets de fleurs, se détachant sur un fond rouge à décor de larges branchages fleuris or et blanc, comprenant: - un plateau à huit côtés polylobés et monture en métal reposant sur huit pieds, le bord, la colonne centrale et le support de la coupe à décor ajouré de treillage, croisillons et arabesques, quelques restaurations au bord - une cafetière et son couvercle de forme ovoïde, la panse à décor ajouré de treillage et fleurs, l'anse et le bec verseur modelés à l'imitation du bambou, restauration au bord du couvercle et fêlure à la base - un sucrier à deux anses et son couvercle, à décor similaire ajouré et anses en forme de bambou, petits manques au décor ajouré, et restauration au bord du couvercle - deux tasses et leurs sous-tasses, les bols et bords des sous-tasses à décor ajouré de treillage et fleurs, petit manque à l'ajourage d'un bol - un bol octogonal polylobé, fêlure restaurée au bord Diamètre du plateau: 50 cm. (19¾ in.) (10)

  • FRAFrance
  • 2009-06-24
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Octagonal wall mirror decorated with winged genii

The reverse inscribed: Embriachi Venedig and numbered: 09989 6914 2865 and: No 309 and with labels numbered: W.309 and 67941 This beautifully carved wall mirror is one of only a handful of its kind known to be in existence. Although the North Italian ivory carving workshops referred to as Embriachi produced a vast number of secular objects, mirror frames are extremely rare. The few surviving examples correspond to the present mirror in both form and decorative scheme: octagonal in shape with a pointed pinnacle containing three ivory plaques with varying motifs, each frame includes plaques depicting winged genii that surround the mirror itself. Like the example in the Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence (inv. no. 125C), the present frame’s crowning panels depict a naked youth, probably the God of Love, and two women in long dresses as worshippers. These mirrors would have been given as luxurious wedding gifts to young couples, whose family arms were then painted on the blank shields at the top of the hexagonal section. Tomasi (op. cit. 2010, p. 89) attributes only two complete mirrors to the workshop of Baldassare Ubriachi (see note for lot 34); those in the Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore (inv. no. 71.92) and in the Kunstgewerbemuseum Museum, Berlin (inv. no. K 9164). The mirror in the Bargello, which is arguably closest in style and iconography to the present example, has been ascribed by Tomasi (op. cit. 2001, p. 28) to the so-called 'Susanna workshop'. However, it has recently been argued (Williamson and Davies op. cit. p. 752) that the existence of the 'Susanna workshop' may be doubted due to its overlaps with the characteristics of pieces attributed to the Ubriachi workshop. A comparison between the present mirror and those in Baltimore and Berlin, which feature almost identical motifs, strengthens this hypothesis. Stylistic similarities and the quality of the carving indicate a common origin from the workshop of Baldassare Ubriachi. The polished steel mirror in the present piece appears to be unique in being octagonal rather than round and is possibly original. RELATED LITERATURE M. Tomasi, La Bottega degli Embriachi, cat. Museo Nazionale del Bargello, Florence, 2001; M. Tomasi, Monumenti d'avorio: I dossali degli Embriachi e i loro committenti, Pisa and Paris, 2010; P. Williamson and G. Davies, Medieval Ivory Carvings. 1200-1550. Part II, cat. Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2014

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-09
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An impressive bohemian five-light silver chandelier, michael josef

Of baluster form, in several sections, all richly embossed, chased and engraved with Baroque ornament including husked garlands, lambrequins and scale-work on a matted ground, further embellished with bolted silver sheet decoration in form of leaves and floral garlands, the five plaques on the main body representing the life of a Saint, probably Saint Walburga, surmounted by a waisted bowl on five scrolling supports, the branches in the form of caryatids, the spherical terminal with alternating panels of lambrequins on a matted ground, all hanging from five chains interrupted by similar spherical ornament, surmounted by an upper section representing Christ in clouds with angels' heads The year 1723 was important for Prague as the Bohemian capital was preparing to celebrate the coronation of Emperor Charles VI as King. It was most likely in preparation of this royal event that Michael Josef Cocsell, one of Prague’s most eminent goldsmiths, received a surge of private commissions over this period.1 According to legend, Prague had been founded in the 8th century by the Duchess Libuse and her husband, Přemysl; they identified the cliff above the river Vltava as ‘a great city whose glory will touch the stars.’ They laid the foundations of Prague Castle, which is the largest ancient castle in the world and also those St. Vitus Cathedral, still the largest and most important church in the country. Their descendants acquired monarchial power of Bohemia in 1085, with the Kingdom absorbed into the Holy Roman Empire upon the accession in 1346 of Charles IV (1316-1378) to the Imperial Throne. He transformed Prague into a stately capital which became Europe’s third largest city after Rome and Constantinople. The city was again chosen to host the imperial court during the reign of Rudolf II (1555-1612), who, as an insatiable collector, furnished Prague castle with the most impressive Kunstkammer and art collection of the time. Progressively in the 17th century the Baroque had become the standard and dominant style across Europe. Heavily aligned with the Counter-Reformation, a movement lead by the Catholic Church to challenge the wave of Protestant power surging across Europe, Nigel Llewellyn explains that ‘its luxurious complexity and psychological impact was a potent aid to piety.’2 Although Prague lost its political prominence and religious autonomy at time it gained an exquisite Baroque architecture, probably one of the most distinguished in Europe. The movement was enthusiastically supported by the Bohemian Catholic Church and nobility. In 1621 Albert von Wallenstein, Duke of Mecklenburg (1583-1634), General of the Imperial army, commissioned the Italian architects Giovanni Pieroni and Andrea Spezza to build the first Baroque palace in Prague. Following the Duke’s example, Bohemia’s wealthy Catholic patrons and religious orders initiated magnificent construction projects of churches and palaces, including the important St Nicholas Church and the Clam-Gallas Palace. The Charles Bridge, perhaps Prague’s most famous landmark, was considered ‘an apt symbol of faith that had been under siege for nearly three centuries’3  and underwent extensive reconstruction whereby 28 statues of saints were erected, the first being of St. John Nepomuk in 1683. A grandiose silver tomb, stylistically similar to this chandelier, was created by the goldsmith J. Wurth in 1733 when the body of St. John was removed from the Vltava and transported to St. Vitus Cathedral. This Baroque fever transformed the city of Prague into one of the leading artistic centres in Europe, attracting Italian, German and French artists to compete with native Bohemians for the most ambitious projects. In 1723 the City was also preparing for the Coronation of Emperor Charles VI as well as the birthday of the Empress Elizabeth. A memorable Baroque extravaganza ensued. The court of the Castle was transformed into an operatic stage presenting the opening performance of Johann Joseph Fux’s opera, Constanza e Fortezza, composed for the occasion. Furthermore, The High Chancellor of Bohemia, Count František Ferdinand Kinský (1668-1741) converted his family castle into a splendid Baroque palace in order to welcome the King during his visit, naming it Karlova Koruna (Charles's crown). Originally from Vienna, Michael Josef Cocsell obtained citizenship in 1717, was one of the leading Baroque goldsmiths, employing four apprentices. Cocsell was commissioned to create this extraordinary chandelier probably in preparation for the Royal visit, either for an individual or one of Prague’s churches, possibly St. Havel, the construction of whose Baroque façade was begun that year. One of Cocsell’s recorded patrons was the Abbot Konrad Proche (1664 or 1669-1727) who commissioned a silver-gilt and enamel chalice made with his arms for Neuzell Abbey (now in the Münster Cathedral). Born in the Bohemian town of Lipa, Proche joined the Cistercian order in his youth. He studied theology in Prague, became ordained as a priest and joined the Cistercian abbey of Neuzell in Lower Lusatia (Brandeburg) in 1695. He became abbot in 1703 and began the reconstruction of the entire monastery, now considered as one of the most exceptional Baroque constructions in North Germany. Given its date and religious significance, Cocsell’s chandelier may have been part of this ambitious project. The scenes on the body of the chandelier probably represent the life of St. Walburga (circa 710-circa 777), an English missionary born into an aristocratic Devonshire family. She and her brothers subsequently assisted St. Boniface in evangelizing the Pagan Germans. She also joined the monastery of Heidenheim am Hahnenkamm where she became abbess. Upon St. Walburga’s death in 777 her remains were transferred to Eichstatt, 40 km from Neuzell and she was canonised in 870. In the 14th century the miracle of the tempest-tossed boat, as represented on the chandelier, was introduced, as also depicted by Peter Paul Rubens in 1610 for the Church altarpiece of St. Walpurgis, Antwerp. The story St. Walburga had certainly inspired Abbot Konrad Proche who actively sought for the conversion of Protestant souls in Brandebourg and built this Baroque gem, Neuzell Abbey, as a symbol of the Catholic Church. 1. He admitted annually 1500 zl, one of the largest incomes for a Prague goldsmith. L. Urešová, Barokní zlatnictví..., Prague, 1974. 2. Nigel Lewellyn, Power and Piety, Baroque, p. 204. 3. Howard Louthan, ‘Religious Art and the Formation of a Catholic identity in Baroque Prague’, Embodiement of power, 2008, p. 53-79.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
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An italian antique marble and pietre dure table top, granducal workshops

Made from a single slab of white marble,  inlaid with antique marbles and hard stones, the outer border with Spanish broccatello and cartouches of Belgian black marble, these reserves in sequence, the lower border from left to right include: Bigio antico, Coral, Lapislazuli, Giallo antico, Alabaster, Breccia quintilina, Alabastro fiorito, Breccia corallina, Alabastro listato and Aquitania marble, each corner with an oval of Diaspro di Barga, the inner border inlaid with Gabbro dell’ Impruneta, at each corner a section of Aquitania marble surrounded by Rosso antico, addorsed peltae motifs in Alabastro listato, with semi-circles in Alabastro cotognino and Rosso antico, the middle of each side with an oval in Diaspro di Barga, similar to the outer corners, the Belgian black marble frieze surrounding the central green slab of Verde Genova inlaid with Lapislazuli, mother of pearl, Semesanto, Rosso antico, the coat-of-arms inlaid in Giallo antico, Rosso antico and Lapislazuli Similar table tops inlaid with antique marbles excavated from archaeological sites and displayed with geometrical or abstract motifs have been not only very popular in Rome where they were produced since the 16th century, but they also immediately caught the attention of the Medici in Florence, who encouraged their production. A letter written by Vasari in 1567 exists, where he explains to Francesco I de Medici (1541-1587) the technique employed by the Roman craftsmen in laying down the variegated and striated stones (González-Palacios, op.cit, p.47). Ferdinando I de Medici (1549-1609)  in particular, Cardinal in Rome for a considerable time, familiarized himself with the Roman models during that time, which he then championed in Florence, alongside the more typical production which included naturalistic representations of flowers and birds which in turn became the trademark of the Granducal workshops. However, it is not easy to ascertain the place of manufacture for these pieces alla maniera di Roma, knowing that Florentine mosaicists were working in Rome around 1570-1580. The taste for these tops is still evidenced in public Florentine collections today, where mosaics ‘in the Roman style’ exist, but with attribution remaining uncertain. A table designed in the same spirit to the current mosaic, now at Museo degli Argenti, Florence, is a good example of the difficulties of attribution to one of the two cities (fig. 1). Nevertheless, the presence on the current example of certain peculiar stones and of the coat-of-arms of the Cavalli family from Pontremoli in Tuscany make the Florentine origin of this table undisputed. In particular, the eight ovals (four on the corners of the outer border, and four disposed at cardinal points in the inner border) are made of a kind of jasper (Diaspro di Barga), a red silicean stone with white patches, which is found in the town of Barga (Garfagnana, Tuscany) a territory that at that time was under the dominion of the Medici family, and which was used exclusively by the court in Florence.  Large blocks of this stone arrived in Florence between the end of the 16th century and beginning of the 17th century to be used in the vast project of the Cappella dei Principi, promoted by Ferdinando I. This stone was already used under the dukedom of Francesco I, as documented by the great connoisseur Agostino del Riccio in 1597, who, in his Istoria delle Pietre writes: ‘’si trovano pezzi grandi, come si vede quelli che faceva condurre il Gran Duca Francesco in Firenze, e pigliano gran lustro e son sodissimi; e detti diaspri gli trovo’ maestro Frqncesco Mazzeranghi da Barga, semplicista del Gran Duca Francesco’’ (Agostino del Riccio, Istoria delle pietre, ed. by R. Gnoli and A. Sironi, Torino, 1996, page 236). Furthermore, the presence in the inner border of  Gabbro d’ Impruneta, excavated South of Florence and only used locally, confirms the Tuscan manufacture for this fine table top. The Cavalli Family The coat-of-arms in the centre of the table refers to the Cavalli family of Pontremoli, a medieval town in the province of Massa Carrara (Tuscany). Aptly, two horses (cavalli in Italian), flank the family emblem. The Cavalli arrived in Pontemoli in 1446 from the nearby Mulazzo, which was under the dominion of the Malaspina family. The increasing wealth of the family (politically linked to the Ghibellines) is documented in the local archival papers of 1508, 1533, 1559 and 1588, with the name of Pietro Cavallo (d. 1615) appearing in the latter. It was Pietro Cavallo who was indeed responsible for the family fortunes and he was kept in high esteem by the Grandukes of Tuscany who addressed him as ‘ Molto magnifico  et Eccellentissimo Messer Pietro Cavallo da Pontremoli’. Amongst other important engagements, (fiscal matters, criminal law, etc.)  in the shadow of Medici family, he was summoned to the Florentine court to educate Cosimo II (1590-1621). In between the dukedom of Ferdinando I (1549-1609) and his son Cosimo II, the Cavalli family was ennobled by the Order of the Cavalieri di Santo Stefano. Examples of marble coat-of-arms of the Cavalli family survive locally, amongst other places, in the local church of San Francesco (fig. 2) and on the wall of the Castle of Pontremoli, the latter most probably removed from the doorway of the family palace in the town centre. Considering the link between Pietro Cavallo and the Medici court, it seems highly plausible that the present very fine table could have been a tribute gift to Messer Pietro. Nonetheless, the lesser quality of inlay of the coat-of-arms, inset in a square of the Ligurian Verde Genova (as a stone not in use in the granducal Workshops, and on the contrary excavated in the nearby Liguria ) could imply that the arms as well as the centre of the table were added locally and commissioned by the proud receiver of the gift and, due to the lack of the elm above the arms, before the family was ennobled.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Porcelain & Pottery

Items made of porcelain, earthenware, stoneware and faience from every country are found under the category Porcelain & Pottery. Plates, cups, antique vases, tableware, china figurines and Chinese serving dishes are just some of the items that can be found up for auction under this heading.