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An important sèvres porcelain 'beau bleu' armorial and ornithological

Each piece finely painted, after F. N. Martinet, with a brightly colored bird subject in a landscape setting, the dark blue border or ground richly decorated with tooled gilt foliate scrollwork suspending floral garlands and reserved with gilt-edged oval panels each painted with a further bird and one with the arms of Sudell in tooled gilding, script ornithological identifications, interlaced L's, date letters pp or qq for 1792 or 1793, various painters'  and gilders' marks in blue enamel or gilding, and various incised marks. One tureen with a riveted crack and restored chip to the foot, some other very minor restoration. 92 pieces.  Comprising: Two oval soup tureens and covers 'Terrines', one with painter's mark for Massy, both with gilder's marks for Le Guay; Two salad bowls 'Saladieres unis 1e', both with painter's marks for Bouillat père and gilder's marks for Vincent; Four double-handled sauceboats 'Saucières', three with painters' marks for Evans, Bouillat père or Rosset, all with gilder's marks for Le Guay; Three 23¼-inch oval platters 'Plats ovales de 22 p[ouces]', one with crowned interlaced L's, one with date letters qq for 1793, painters' marks for Massy, Castel or Bouillat père, two with gilders' marks for Vincent or Le Guay, one with marks for Vincent and Prévost, incised 22 or 22 p; Four 21¾-inch oval platters 'Plats ovales de 21 p[ouces], two with date letters qq for 1793, two with painters' marks for Massy, two with marks for Drouet or Bouillat père, two with gilders' marks for Vincent and one with mark for Le Guay, incised 21; Four 20½-inch oval platters 'Plats ovales de 19 p[ouces], one with painter's mark for Massy and three with marks for Drouet, two with gilder's marks for Vincent and two with marks for Prèvost, incised 19; Three 18½-inch oval platters 'Grandes plats ovales de 18 p[ouces]', with lobed and barbed rims, two with painter's marks for Le Bel, one with gilder's mark for Vincent and two with marks for Le Guay, incised Dt or dt; Three 18¼-inch oval platters 'Plats ovales de 17 p[ouces], two with date letters qq, one with painter's mark for Massey and two with marks for Barratt, one with gilder's mark for Prévost and two with marks for Vincent, incised 17; Four 17-inch oval platters 'Plats ovales de 16 p[ouces], one with crowned interlaced L's, two with painter's marks for Bouillat fils and two with marks for Drouet, three with gilder's marks for Prévost and one with mark for Le Guay, incised 16; Two 15¼-inch oval platters 'Plats ovales de 14 p[ouces], both with crowned interlaced L's, painters' marks for Barrat or Castel and gilders' marks for Prévost or Vincent, incised 14 or 14 p; Thirteen soup plates 'Assiettes à potage', seven with painter's marks for Castel and two with marks for Massy, nine with gilder's marks for La France and four with marks for Vincent; Forty-five dinner plates 'Assiettes unies', fifteen with painter's marks for Evans, nine with marks for Vielliard fils, seven with marks for Barrat, three with marks for Drouet, one with mark for Bouillat pere, one with mark for Castel and nine with an unidentified mark of an arrangement of dots at the junctures of the factory mark, twelve with gilder's marks for Prévost, sixteen with marks for Vincent, three with marks for Girard, one with mark for L'Écot, one with mark for Chauvaux, one with mark for La France and one with marks for both Vincent and L'Écot. Together with a Continental porcelain reproduction plate made for the 'Nelson Rockefeller Collection.' Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon, was an important 18th century French naturalist, whose book, Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux, has been described by Sacheverell Sitwell as “certainly the most ambitious and comprehensive bird book which had appeared at the time of its publication” and “still…one of the most important bird books”, Fine Bird Books 1700-1900, p. 83. The 1,008 plates, of which 973 are of birds, were originally drawn and engraved by François Nicolas Martinet for the nine bird volumes of Buffon’s earlier massive undertaking, Histoire Naturelle, Générale et Particulière, avec la Description du Cabinet du Roi and then subsequently published separately in ten volumes as the Histoire Naturelle des Oiseaux from 1770 to 1786. Such was the significance of their contribution to a growing interest in the study of natural history in 18th century Europe, that the engravings also provided a secondary contribution as a source for the decoration of porcelain wares at the Sèvres manufactory, which included the celebrated Eden service with a green-ground oeil-de-perdrix border, the similar service ordered by the Parisian banker, le Baron de Kendal and the present beau bleu-ground service ordered on behalf of an Englishman, M. Sudell. The gilt coat-of-arms included as part of the decoration of the present service has been identified as that of the Lancashire Sudell family and it has been suggested by Sir Geoffrey de Bellaigue that the arms may be specifically those of Henry Sudell of Ashley House, Box, Wiltshire. Although actually delivered to Messieurs Lanos and Perregaux, as agents, reference is made to a "Mr Suduell"  in connection with this service in correspondence now preserved in the archives of the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres. Further archival information relating to the service, including its mention the Sèvres sales registers, artists’ ledgers and kiln books of the period has been compiled and is reproduced by David Peters, Sèvres Plates and Services of the 18th Century, Vol. IV, pp. 1003-05, Vol. VI, p. 1470 and Vol. VII, pp. 1721-32, where the author also provides a fuller discussion of the service and its component elements, its commission, delivery and subsequent sale “in a relatively complete state” in 1889 at Christie’s in London. Fifteen dinner plates and a hard-paste porcelain oval platter from the Sudell service were sold at Sotheby's New York, November 11, 2000, lot 46. Additionally, various other pieces from the service have been sold at auction since the first Christie’s sale and are now in private or museum collections, listed by Peters, ibid.

  • USAUSA
  • 2005-10-12
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Andrea spadini (1912-1983) fountain in the form of a dancing elephant

Signed, bronze, hollow cast This bronze sculpture is a unique version of the elephant with an accordion that is part of the Delacorte Musical Clock in Central Park, New York City. Both works were cast from the same mold, which was subsequently destroyed. The Delacorte Musical Clock The clock, which is also included in the Smithsonian’s inventory, was a gift of the publisher and philanthropist George T. Delacorte (1894-1991) and dedicated in 1965. Delacorte was one of Central Park’s most generous benefactors as his donations ensured many of the park’s landmarks to be realized; the Delacorte Theater, the Alice in Wonderland statue, the fountains in Bowling Green Park and Columbus Circle were all financed by Delacorte. The Delacorte clock is located on top of a brick archway between the main Central Park Children's Zoo quadrangle and the Wildlife Center (previously the Monkey House). This brick archway itself was conceived by designer Fernando Texidor and architect Edward Coe Embury, who was the son of the Zoo’s original designer Aymar Embury II. Andrea Spadini created the animals that comprise the whimsical carousel that surrounds the clock: a penguin, kangaroo, bear, elephant, goat, and hippopotamus parading with a variety of musical instruments as well as two monkeys with mallets that strike the bell. Even today, the clock plays one of thirty-two children's nursery rhymes on the hour between 8:00 AM and 6:00 PM, during which each animal can spin on its own axis as well as rotate on a track around the clock. The clock was restored in 1995 by the Central Park Conservancy using funds secured by an endowment established by the Delacorte family in 1993. Andrea Spadini (1912-1983) Andrea Spadini was born in Rome in 1912. As a child, he spent much time with his father Armando, a painter, visiting the Galleria Borghese, where he was particularly drawn to the works of Gianlorenzo Bernini.  In 1925 Spadini traveled first to Florence to spend four years studying under Libero Andreotti and later went to Monza to attend the classes of Arturo Martini at the Istituto d’Arte di Monza. At the young age of 17 he exhibited at the Circolo di Roma in the Palazzo Doria in Rome along with fellow artists Bandinelli, Ceracchini, di Cocco, Mafai and Scipione. After this exhibition he remained in Rome to further attend school and to take part in other shows. His works, mostly portraits, from this period exhibit a strong influence of his contemporaries Mafai and Scipione. In 1940 he was commissioned to create the altarpiece “The Baptism of Christ” at the Basilica Ss. Pietro e Paolo in the EUR district of Rome that was to be constructed in occasion of the 1942 World Fair, which was eventually canceled due to Italy’s involvement in World War 2. During the war Spadini was member of GAP, the Italian resistance movement. Towards the end of the war he collaborated with Fabrizio Clerici to experiment with other media, such as ceramics. After the war he was represented by gallerists Irene Brin and Gaspero del Corso, who marketed his works to American collectors and institutions. It was through this collaboration that he was commissioned to work on the Delacorte Clock in Central Park in 1965. Friends with Spadini, Mrs. Braga commissioned the identical piece at the same time that the original was made for the Zoo. It is the only other casting of the sculpture that was made before the artist intentionally broke the molds.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-10-20
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Bust of a Nobleman

This superbly carved and rare portrait bust exhibits the serene classicism of late Mannerist sculpture created in Florence in the last decades of the 16th century. The all’antica presentation, with shoulders draped in a cloak with elegant, deeply undercut, folds, stands in the tradition of the classicising portrait busts which emerged in Florence in the second half of the 16th-century with the work of sculptors such as Giovanni Bandini (1540-1599) and, more particularly, Giovanni Battista Caccini (1556-1613). The blank eyes are consistent with commemorative portraiture produced circa 1600, and also serve to enhance the all’antica effect of the bust. The decision to represent the sitter in this heroic guise indicates that he was an important individual, almost certainly a military general or ruler, whilst the forked beard, prominent moustache and brushed back hair would suggest that he was living circa 1570-1600. Of the numerous candidates, a plausible identification may be Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma, Piacenza and Castro, Governor of the Spanish Netherlands (1545-1592). A Florentine Mannerist Bust The all'antica presentation of the Castle Howard bust recalls the Mannerist portraiture pioneered by Florentine artists operating in the second half of the 16th century. The approach of representing rulers togate or draped in a cloak held together with a clasp was fully exploited in Florence by Giovanni Bandini, Baccio Bandinelli's leading pupil. The cloak arrangement in the present bust, and the sitter sporting a fashionable late 16th-century beard and moustache, compare with Bandini's Bust of Francesco I de' Medici in the Galleria degli Uffizi and his Bust of Francesco Maria I della Rovere in the Museo Nazionale del Bargello (Pratesi, 2003, op. cit., figs. 93 and 95). Moreover, the manner in which the thick moustache is overlaid onto the beard is reminiscent of Bandini's portraiture in general. His Redentore in the Convento di San Vicenzo, Prato, even has a forked beard, though more exaggerated than in the present bust (Pratesi, 2003, op. cit., fig. 100). The Castle Howard marble finds its closest comparables in the work of Giovanni Battista Caccini, who initially trained in Rome under the sculptor Giovanni Antonio Dosio, famed for his brooding portrait busts. Caccini moved to Florence with his master in 1575, where he worked as an antiquities restorer for the Medici and later rivalled Pietro Francavilla (1548-1616) as the leading sculptor in Florence at the end of the 16th century. The broad pleats of drapes, some with up-turned edges, in the Castle Howard marble, recall several of Caccini's all'antica busts, notably his Carlo Magno in Santissimi Apostoli, Florence, whilst the increased verism, with lined skin and sinewy veins, compares with his Bust of Francesco Bertini in Sant'Agostino, Colle Val d'Elsa (Pratesi, 2003, op. cit., figs. 206 and 208). A particularly interesting comparison for the Castle Howard marble is found in Caccini’s Bust of Emperor Hadrian as a Young Man in the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (inv. no. 2010.10), which exhibits similarly severe classicising drapery. Compare also with the reclining figure of S. Giovanni Gualberto in the Abbey of S. Michele, Passignano (Pratesi, 2003, op. cit., fig. 210). Note the similarly undercut drapery, the sharply delineated eyelids and the lines in the skin. It is this level of surface detail, together with the striking clarity of execution and the beautiful surface polish, which places the present bust within the circle of Caccini. Correspondences can also be seen with works by Caccini's disciple Gherardo Silvani (1579-1675). Compare for example, Silvani's Bust of Filippo di Bernardo Corsini in Santo Spirito, Florence, with textured hair and beard. In terms of the quality of the carving, the Castle Howard bust finds a further parallel in a Bust of Virginia Pucci-Ridolfi (d. 1568) in the Museo Nazionale del Bargello (see Conway library negative number: A83/1552). This bust represents an important comparison because the sitter has the same eyebrows, which are clearly delineated and executed in a stippled manner; an unusual and particular characteristic of both marbles. The sitter also exhibits comparable hair, brushed away from the hairline in wave-like strands. Unfortunately it is unknown who carved this bust, though it has previously been associated with Domenico Poggini (1520-1590) (Pratesi, 2003, op. cit., fig. 664). It was almost certainly carved in Florence or Rome in the last third of the 16th century. Interestingly, there is another Bust of Virginia Pucci-Ridolfi in S. Maria sopra Minerva in Rome, which has many of the same characteristics as the Bargello bust and, like the Castle Howard marble has drapery, which is bordered with a single thin line and is composed of rippled folds. Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma (1545-1592): A Possible Identification The subject of the present bust wears a beard, moustache and hairstyle which would have been fashionable in the second half of the 16th century; Philip II of Spain (1527-1598), for example, wore very similar facial hair. In terms of both physiognomy and beard and moustache type a likeness for the present bust is found in Alessandro Farnese, Duke of Parma, Piacenza and Castro, potentially suggesting an identity for the sitter. Compare, for example, with the Italian, late 16th-century, painted Portrait of Alessandro Farnese in the Royal Armories, Leeds (inv. no. WYL.I.980) in which we see the same prominent moustache and beard, recessive hairline, and thin eyebrows. The large domed forehead, triangular jaw shape, large fleshy nose and brushed back hair can be seen in a 16th-century drawing by Pierre Bellange (1594-1638) in the Grand Palais, Paris (inv. no. P.78.9.1.13), whilst a painting by Antoon Claeissens (circa 1536-1613) in the National Museum Warsaw (inv. no. 131912) shows Farnese with a forked beard. Alessandro Farnese was one of the greatest military tacticians of the 16th century. The son of Ottavio Farnese, Duke of Parma, his mother, Margaret, was the illegitimate daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. He is famed for his tenure as Governor of the Netherlands, during which time he successfully reclaimed Flanders and Wallonia, and eventually recaptured Antwerp. Having defeated English forces sent by Queen Elizabeth I to support the Dutch, Farnese planned to lead a force to invade England, but was halted by Philip II, who launched the Spanish Armada. Following the defeat of the Armada, Farnese was forced to abandon all hopes for an invasion of England. Dedicating his life towards the service of Spain, he never visited Parma, instead proclaiming his son Ranuccio as regent in 1586. Alessandro Farnese was lauded as a hero in Italy for his role in defeating the forces of Protestantism and so it is unsurprising that a leading family may have commissioned a commemorative bust of him. In 1590, the City of Rome ordered Ippolito Buzio to restore a classical Roman torso as a monumental statue of Farnese for the Sala dei Capitani in the Palazzo dei Conservatori on the Capitoline (Leuschner, 2006, op. cit., p. 5). Following Farnese's death, a monumental group of The apotheosis of the Duke of Parma was executed by Simone Moschino, (now at Reggia di Caserta; see Leuschner, op. cit., 1999, pp. 145-146), representing the Governor in a classical military cuirass, being crowned by Victory. Perhaps most famously, Francesco Mochi produced an equestrian bronze statue of Farnese for the Piazza Cavalli, Piacenza (Francesco Mochi, op. cit., no. 13). The decision to portray Farnese in classical dress in the present bust, if the identification is correct, was consequently wholly in line with other representations of the general, whilst fitting into a tradition which had been substantially developed in Florence in the 16th century for the Medici and other notables. Mannerist and Baroque Sculpture at Castle Howard Henry Howard, 4th Earl of Carlisle, amassed one of the greatest collections of sculpture in Britain during the 18th century, primarily through agents based in Italy, notably Francesco de’Ficoroni, himself a celebrated archaeologist. Sculpture was said to be the ‘principal ornament’ of Castle Howard (Guilding, op. cit., p. 78). The majority of the sculptures collected by the 4th Earl were, however, ancient marbles, whilst his son, Frederick Howard, 5th Earl of Carlisle, acquired sculpture from different historical periods during his lifetime, including contemporary busts, as is illustrated by John Jackson’s painting of The Long Gallery, Castle Howard, which features the 5th Earl and his son Lord Morpeth standing alongside portrait busts by Joseph Nollekens of both Lord Carlisle and his long-time friend and colleague Charles James Fox (1749-1806) (Guilding, op. cit., p. 127). Like his father he also added to the collection of antiquities, acquiring ancient marbles in both Sir William Hamilton’s 1801 Christie’s sale and at the sale of the collection of William Ponsonby, 2nd Earl of Bessborough, also in 1801 (Guilding, op. cit., p. 126). The most significant Baroque sculpture in the Castle Howard collection was Gianlorenzo Bernini’s masterful Bust of Carlo Antonio del Pozzo, which is today housed in the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh (inv. no. NG 2436). The bust of Pozzo, Archbishop of Pisa and Special Counsellor to Cardinal Ferdinando de’Medici (later Grand Duke Ferdinando I), was commissioned by his nephew, the famous scholar and antiquarian Cassiano del Pozzo (1588-1657), who was a close friend of Nicolas Poussin and Galileo, and, in addition to Bernini, patronised artists including Alessandro Algardi and Caravaggio. The bust is recorded in the inventories of Pozzo’s heirs taken between 1689-1695 as being in his medal room; the collection was dispersed gradually in the first decades of the 18th century (Sparti, op. cit., p. 564). The Bernini bust has long been presumed to have been acquired by the 4th Earl, primarily due to the extensive marble collection he built up and the fact that the Pozzo heirs were selling the collection at the beginning of the 18th century. However, the 4th Earl's principal interest appears to have been in acquiring antiquities, whilst his son, the 5th Earl, certainly collected later marbles, as is clear from John Jackson's painting discussed above. Indeed, a Bust of Commodus in the J. Paul Getty Museum (inv.no. 92.SA.48), formerly at Castle Howard (sold by this house on 11-13 November 1991, lot 49), may have been collected by the 5th Earl. The Getty bust, which is thought to be Italian, 16th-century, and – coincidentally - has been attributed to Caccini in the past, was copied by Gilles Lambert Godecharle either in London or in Rome circa 1778 (prior to its arrival at Castle Howard), potentially indicating that the 5th Earl was buying sculpture through agents subsequent to his Grand Tour, from which he had returned in 1769 (Fogelman and Fusco, op. cit., p. 136). Interestingly, another 16th-century bust, which remains at Castle Howard, the Bust of Antoninus Pius, has been attributed to the same hand, and may therefore also have been acquired at the same time (Fogelman and Fusco, op. cit., p. 135). It is therefore equally possible that the 5th Earl acquired many of the Renaissance and Baroque marbles in the collection, potentially including the Bernini. Indeed, the same may be true for the present marble. RELATED LITERATURE Francesco Mochi 1580-1654, Florence, 1981, pp. 59-64, nos. 12-13;  S. Pressouyre, Nicolas Cordier recherches sur la sculpture à Rome autour de 1600, Rome, 1984, figs. 236-238; D.L. Sparti, ‘The dal Pozzo collection again: the inventories of 1689 and 1695 and the family archive’, in The Burlington Magazine, CXXXII, 1990, p. 564; E. Leuschner, ‘Francesco Villamena’s ‘Apotheosis of Alessandro Farnese’ and Engraved Reproductions of Contemporary Sculpture around 1600’, Simiolus, vol. 27, no. 3 (1999), pp.145-167; P. Fogelman and P. Fusco, Italian and Spanish Sculpture. Catalogue of the J. Paul Getty Museum Collection, Los Angeles, 2002, p. 136; G. Pratesi, Repertorio della scultura Fiorentina del cinquecento, Turin, 2003, figs. 88-102, 205-208, 210, 664; E. Leuschner, ‘Roman Virtue, Dynastic Succession and the Re-Use of Images: Constructing Authority in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Portraiture’, Originalveröffentlichung in: Studia Rudolphina, 6 (2006), pp. 5-25; P. Stephan, ‘Rom unter Sixtus V. Stadtplanung als Verräumlichung von Heilsgeschichte’, Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte, 72, H.2 (2009), pp. 165-214; R. Guilding, Owning the Past. Why the English Collected Antique Sculpture, 1640-1840, New Haven and London, 2014, pp. 78-81, 93, 126-127, 182-183, 350

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
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An important irish george ii mahogany side table circa 1755

The rectangular figured top with a molded edge and rounded corners above a plain conforming rectangular frame above an out-curved molding carved with an incised lattice pattern, the protruding pierced apron centered by a boldly carved lion's mask, its mouth agape with protruding tongue and wild crisply carved flowing mane and beard, its hair with scrolled curls, flanked by pairs of swags of oak leaves with acorns and flower heads supported at each end by further flower heads and scrolled acanthus leaves, supported on acanthus leaf carved cabriole legs, the square section paw feet with scrolled leaf carved ankles, each side with a scallop shell above swags of drapery supported at each corner by flower heads and scrolled leaves, the back legs similarly carved to those at the front. The richly detailed carving seen on this table superbly represents the skill and the artistry of the Irish craftsman working in Ireland in the mid-eighteenth century. Below the plain top, eminently suitable for the display of plate, the apron is centered by a deeply sculpted lion's head, which is probably one of the most recognizable features of Irish carving at this period. As noted by The Knight of Glin and James Peill in Irish Furniture - Woodwork and Carving in Ireland from the Earliest Times to the Act of the Union, Yale University Press, 2007, this image was possibly originally inspired by the architect Edward Lovett (c. 1699-1733), who 'was responsible for the introduction of the Kentian plaster tabernacle frame in the style of William Kent and the compartmented ceilings to the Irish interior' (Knight of Glin and James Peill, op. cit.). He was responsible for the interior decoration of 9 Henrietta Place, Dublin. The wooden chimneypiece and over-mantel, which is illustrated by The Knight of Glin and James Peill, (op. cit., fig 68), 'is thoroughly Kentian in inspiration and the lion mask and the frieze was almost immediately reproduced in furniture'. The heavy swags of oak leaves and acorn, sacred to Jupiter, together with the scallop shells, the attribute of Venus who was born of the sea, similarly represent Kent's style, examples of which were included in Some Designs of Mr. Inigo Jones and Mr. Wm. Kent, published by John Vardy in 1744.        A number of similarly designed and carved tables are recorded, many with the attributes of Jupiter and Venus, framing panels of cross hatching, and the feet similarly carved with paws with foliate scrolled ankles. This almost certainly indicates a small and close-knit group of carvers, working both with architects and builders, and with local cabinetmakers, frame-makers and gilders, the relatively small group of local patrons presumably demanding similar fashionable furniture. Although a considerable  number of these tables are recorded by The Knight of Glin and James Peill, (op. cit,) few appear to have remained in the houses for which they were originally commissioned; the lack of precise documentation other than lists of cabinetmakers makes identification of the original maker of these and the present table virtually impossible.   It should finally be noted that, as with most surviving Irish furniture, the table was originally finished with a dark polish which, in the present lot, has survived in a worn and fine patinated condition. See: The Knight of Glin and James Peill, Irish Furniture, New Haven and London, 2007

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-10-23
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A rare and important royal german neoclassical porcelain, ormolu and

This guéridon is listed in the Royal account book of Friedrich Wilhelm III King of Prussia as a gift for Maria Anna Leopoldina Princess of Bavaria, future Queen of Saxony and sister of Elisabeth Ludovika Princess of Bavaria, future Queen Consort of Prussia. A detailed ledger at the Berlin KPM Archive (Pret II, Contobuch Sr. Maj. des Königs 1818-1850, p. 178, ID 182) describes this guéridon as follows: "Eintrag vom 7.Mai 1831 Für Ihre Königl. Hoheit die Prinzessin Marie von Bayern 1 große runde Tischplatte, in der Mitte mit coul: Muscheln und Schmetterlinge in Gold med: umgeben von coul: Früchten und Blumen (295 Taler) 1 schwarzgebeiztes Tischgestell mit bronze Verzierungen (130 Taler) Pro 2 Kisten und Verpackung in Linnen nebst Verpackung für die Frau Oberhof Meisterin Ihrer Majestät der Königin von Bayern." At the same time this table was presented to Maria Anna Leopoldina Princess of Bavaria, another guéridon was delivered for her mother, Caroline Queen of Bavaria (1776-1840) mother-in-law of the Prussian Crown Prince, later King William IV of Prussia. That table, now in the Thurn und Taxis Museum, Regensburg, has an almost identical stand and supports a KPM top with a comparable flower border signed and dated E. Sager 1829. The cost of the table presented to “die verwitwete Königin von Bayern” was 400 Taler, whereas the present guéridon cost 425 Taler. This guéridon, with its prominent anthemia, demonstrates the influence of the French Empire style on international design and the oeuvre of the architect and designer Karl Friedrich Schinkel (1781-1841). Schinkel set the stylistic tone in Prussia and worked closely together with the Berlin porcelain manufactory. By the early nineteenth century designers moved away from a somber interpretation of Greek and Roman references in order to create a bold Napoleonic Empire style that had a profound effect on artists and craftsmen across Europe in the 1820s and 1830s. The impetus for this new classicism was largely the Recueil de décoration intérieure by Charles Percier and Pierre Fontaine published in installments from 1801 to 1811. Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Leo von Klenze (1784-1864) were heavily influenced by Percier and Fontaine’s work, though both veered more toward a Grecian paradigm, in part as a reaction to the French Empire style, which was more of an interpretation of Roman models. The above ledger describes the present table as having an ormolu-mounted ebonized stand: "schwarzgebeiztes Tischgestell mit bronze Verzierungen." The original black decoration is still visible underneath the current white paint, which undoubtedly must have been applied slightly later in the nineteenth century, possibly in order to match the guéridon with the white and gold color schemes used by Leo von Klenze that were extremely fashionable in the second quarter of the nineteenth century in Munich. Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur, Berlin The Berlin porcelain manufactory was founded in 1751 by Wilhelm Kasper Wegely and was later acquired by Frederick the Great in 1763. The company has been state-run since. It produced opaque hard-paste porcelain table wares decorated with landscapes, figures and naturalistic flowers, and employed craftsmen that also worked at Meissen. Shortly after 1770 the manufactory began using a different type of kaolin that led to the production of cold white porcelain in simpler forms. Under the patronage of Friedrich Wilhelm II from 1786 onwards, Neoclassicism was gradually replaced by the Empire style, which was characterized by heavy use of gilding, by the early nineteenth century. From 1821 the Department of Painting was run by three craftsmen: Heinrich Friedrich Wilhelm Maywald (1776-1842) in charge of decoration, Gustav Friedrich AmaliusTaubert (1755-1839) in charge of figures and landscapes and Gottfried Völker (1775-1849) in charge of flower painting. Völker, who was also a member of the academy and earned a reputation as an influential oil painter of flower and fruit still lives, was the teacher of Ernst Wilhelm Sager (1788-1837), one of the most outstanding flower painters at KPM from 1825 onward. Sager, who decorated the top of Queen Caroline’s abovementioned table, was also known as an accomplished master painter of vedute, genres scenes and still lives. Schloss Biederstein Maximilian I, King of Bavaria (1756-1825) commissioned Schloss Biederstein as a summer residence for his wife Caroline Queen of Bavaria in 1803. After her husband’s death in 1825, Queen Caroline used the palace as a dowager house. In 1830 the dowager queen moved from Biederstein to a new neoclassical palace erected in the Schlosspark according to designs by court architect Leo von Klenze (1784-1864). Palace Biederstein was eventually demolished in 1934, four years after its contents had been sold at auction in 1930. We gratefully thank the Prussian Palace and Garden Foundation; KPM archives (State of Berlin) for supplied information. Comparative Literature: Dr. Ilse Baer, Table Tops from the Berlin manufactory (KPM) from the first half of the Nineteenth Century, The International Ceramics Fair and Seminar Handbook, 2001, pp. 15-16.

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-02-01
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A louis xv gilt-bronze-mounted jasper ewer, circa 1740

The pear-shaped body with gilt-bronze hinged lid with putto feeding a lamb, with a pawed and serpentine bodied goat over the handle from which wreaths of garlands join those hanging from the neck of the ewer, on a c-scroll mounted base This fascinating ewer is a rare example of a mounted objet after drawings by the celebrated rococo painter and designer François Boucher (1703-1770), who left an important corpus of work for the decorative arts. In addition to his achievements for the Gobelins and Beauvais textile manufactures and the Vincennes and Sèvres porcelain factories, Boucher, a prolific draughtsman, produced a number of designs for vases and mounts, some of which were published in his Livre de Vases of about 1734-38. Published by Gabriel Huquier, it comprised twelve plates, eight engraved by Huquier whilst the remaining four were by A. Bouchet from Lyon (active c.1730-1740). Although he most likely saw and drew antique vases during his stay in Italy in 1728-1731, these plates reveal an idiosyncratic rocaille interpretation of antique motifs.  Plate 12 of this Livre is directly related to the present ewer (fig.1) and the last one of the folio. Instead of presenting an individual vase as in the previous pages, it presents separately the design for the mounts and the unmounted ewer, revealing a clear concern about documenting the process of mounting the object and therefore demonstrating the importance of the ewer itself. Alice Poirer, who studied Boucher drawings for vases, mentions that this plate “is completely different and may have been drawn at a different date but included to round out the series”, noting nonetheless that all extant copies of the Livre des Vases do include this plate. The bacchic thematic mounts, in the genre pittoresque, of the present lot are a slight variation of the print's design. Not only does the print not show the neck swags and garlands but also the lid lacks the wavier lines published and the putto is holding a small lamb. Interestingly, the conforming elements appear in reverse on the print which indicates that the maker of this precious objet was probably looking at a preparatory drawing of this same engraving.  It was common for Boucher to do a number of drawings on the same object he was designing, and one can only presume that one or more lost drawings existed, serving as models for the mounts on this ewer. The current work must be interpreted side by side with another example, the celebrated gold-mounted jasper ewer (fig.2), now part of the Museu Gulbenkian collection in Lisbon. Of the same size, they are designed with slight variations, namely the lid, the foot mounts and even on the garlands. The Gulbenkian example, in red-blood jasper and finely mounted in gold, was once part of the collections of the 12th Duke of Hamilton, and sold in his sale in 1882 to S.Wertheimer. It was subsequently with the Rothschild family until Calouste Gulbenkian acquired it from Henri de Rothschild in 1943. It carries the Maison de Commune marks for the period of 1734-5, which automactically indicate that the drawing on which the print was based were probably executed around 1730-34. The first published association of Boucher designs with the Gulbenkian ewer was done by Simon Ricci in 1911 (Catalogue of a Collection of Mounted Porcelain Belonging to E.M.Hodgkins), but recently Peter Fuhring, in his seminal catalogue on Juste-Auréle Meissonier, discussed it  and suggested a new attribution of the mounts to the Rococo genius on the basis that the putto design was closer to Meissonier's style than Boucher’s and also the close contact the two artists had through their common publisher Huquier. It is a debatable supposition and even Fuhring is not conclusive, stating that “Et si Boucher a dessiné l’enfant, et eventuellement aussi la monture, ce que nous ne pensons pas, il est plus que probable qu’il s’est inspiré du travail de son ami”. The style of the putto nevertheless is very much in line with Boucher’s and even the combination of the goat with putto can be seen in one of his prints, “Fête de Baccus”, published by Huquier. This Boucher connection might have been what attracted Baron Edmond de Rothschild towards this piece, who famously put together a huge collection of Boucher prints and drawings, later donated to the Musée du Louvre. Our attractive light brown jasper ewer, with its pear-shape, scalloped handle lower section and moulding to neck, follows a profile typical of prized receptacles  found in byzantine and medieval Treasuries. The Lisbon piece has traditionally been dated to the 14th century, however a study of the technique and patina of our ewer supports the idea that it was surely carved in the mid-18th century emulating the Gulbenkian’s gold-mounted example. The stone was carved in four pieces - neck, body, foot and handle - and presents a hole, to the interior. It was probably carved when conceived, in order to hollow it out, but the process was interrupted, as it was leading to cracks. These are noticeable in the body and at the time were filled with red paste, as confirmed by expert analysis, also explaining the flat gilt bronze cover, instead of a border rim, under the cover. It is conceivable that the owner of the red jasper ewer, proud and aware of its uniqueness, ordered the piece studied here as a companion, in a comparable stone and mounted in gilt-bronze. Furthermore, one should also consider the possibility of a marchand-mercier, fascinated by the beauty of the gold-mounted piece already then celebrated by Boucher’s print, commissioning this remarkable work, probably a few years after the marked Lisbon example. The admiration and respect towards a medieval shape and the whimsical Rococo creativity of François Boucher converge beautifully in these outstanding objects, making the creation of these ewers even more exceptional and possibly without parallel in the 18th century French decorative arts. Baron Edmond de Rothschild The sale of Mrs. Walters in 1941 states a provenance for the current ewer as Baron E. de Rothschild, which we assume refers to Baron Edmond (1845-1934), although his cousin Edouard (1868-1949) was also alive during a similar period. Born into a dynasty of financiers and collectors, Baron Edmond de Rothschild continued his family’s passion for art and at the age of 13 was already collecting engravings, forming one of the most important collections of engravings and drawings in France. He was also friend of artists and generous benefactor to numerous art institutions, being elected member of the French Academy of Fine Arts in 1906. He was also a prolific benefactor to scientific causes, establishing a foundation for scientific research bearing his name in 1921 and one of the leading supporters of Zionism, buying extensive areas of land and financing Jewish settlements in Palestine. When he passed away he left, among other works, 3,000 drawings and 43,000 prints to the Louvre, and an impressive collection of boxes and miniatures to his son James, now at Waddesdon Manor. Mrs. Henry Walters Sarah Wharton Green was born in 1859 into a prominent family of New England and North Carolina, growing up on her father’s plantation, “Esmeralda”, and enduring some difficult times during American Civil War.  Sarah married the financier Pembroke Jones in 1884 with whom she had two children, Pembroke and Sarah, the former marrying the renowned architect John Russell Pope. Sarah and Pembroke Jones moved to New York where they managed to break into the closed upper echelons of New York society, entertaining lavishly and building an extensive art collection. Pembroke died in 1919 and three years later, Sarah married their lifelong friend Henry Walters, a railway magnate and art collector, who famously left his large collection to the city of Baltimore – now the Walters Art Gallery - when he died in 1931. Mrs. Walters lived for another ten years, selling her own collection with Parke-Bernet in 1941, which consisted mostly of 18th century furniture, statuary and tapestries, totalling then $600,000. Georges Lurcy Georges Lurcy (1891-1953), née Levy, was a French banker born in Paris in 1891, who worked with Banque Rothschild and became extremely successful dealing in securities. He fought in World War I and afterwards acquired the château of Meslay-le-Vidame where he stored his art acquisitions. With the dawn of World War II, he changed his name and his American wife quickly convinced him to emigrate to America. The couple established themselves in North Carolina and New York, continuing their passion for collecting. Georges Lurcy passed away in 1953 and Parke-Bernet organized a historical three day sale, with many masterworks by Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painters and also important 18th century decorative arts, with the proceeds of the sale going to the establishment of a trust promoting the friendship between the American and French people.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
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A gilt-bronze-mounted ebony veneered and mahogany console table by

With a rectangular bleu turquin marble top above a recessed ebony veneered frieze with a band of amphora vases decorated with an anthiemion suspending ribbon-tied swags of flowerheads with tasselled acorns and surmounted by flower and foliate medallions each with a profile classical bust depicting a Satyr, Dionysos, Jupiter, Juno and Apollo with an anthemion at each side, each end with a ribbon-tied wreath enclosing a stylised lyre with drapery, on pilaster supports with lotus leaf cast headers, the front supports mounted with Cupid in a cloak holding aloft a laurel wreath within stylised foliage and flowerheads surmounted by an anthemion, each side similarly mounted to the front, the left side with the mask of Artemis amongst a quiver, arrow and hunting horn, the other side with a female mask above ribbon-tied laurel sprays on a rectangular platform stretcher and block front feet, the underside of the frieze with the marque au fer R15, with a restorer's handwritten pencil inscription inside the frieze`Alois Pock Tischlermeister Priling/Peiling.., Ru...ann 15/11. 1919. Lonn...'; the top of the left side beneath the marble with the pencil inscription Rosny; marble top restored; minor alterations to the carcass of the top  Comparative Literature: Pierre Arizzoli-Clémentel and Jean-Pierre Samoyault, Le Mobilier de Versailles, chefs-d’oeuvre du XIXe siècle, Dijon, 2009,  p. 60, figs.1 & 2, pp. 114-115. Patrick Guibal, Rosny au Temps de La Duchesse de Berry, in exhib. cat, Entre Cour et Jardin, Marie-Caroline, Duchesse de Berry, Musée de l'îIe-de-France, Sceaux, 200, pp. 49-58 and p. 129, plate 60. Jean-Pierre Samoyault, Mobilier Français Consulat et Empire, 2009, Paris, p. 90, fig. 158 and p.196, fig. 334. Odile Nouvel-Kammerer, Exhibition Catalogue, Symbols of Power, Napoleon and the Art of the Empire Style, 1800-1815, Paris, 2007.                                                                                                        This magnificent console table of impressive proportions together with the pair (see lot ..) are amongst the most outstanding examples of console tables by Jacob-Desmalter dating to the early years of the 19th century. Although not recorded in the inventories of the firm, they were almost certainly supplied soon after 1821, (when the pair are recorded as having been supplied), to Marie-Caroline, the Duchesse de Berry for her favourite residence the château de Rosny, as it bears the marque au fer R 15 for Rosny, as does the pair. According to Samoyault, op. cit., p. 210, these type of consoles à pilastres in mahogany, when they were destined to be placed in a salon,  took on a monumental aspect with pilasters of strong proportions enhanced with gilt-bronzes and often had a mirrored back, as on the offered example. The consistency in the superlative quality of this console table and the previous pair together with stylistic similarities with other console tables and mounted furniture by Jacob-Desmalter leads to the conclusion that although the offered table is not stamped by Jacob-Desmalter, it is most certainly by this firm of ébénistes with bronzes by Pierre-Philippe Thomire (1751-1843). The choice of the finest timbers such as finely figured mahogany together with use of ebony as a backdrop to offset the exceptionally detailed almost jewel-like gilt-bronze mounts indicate that it must have been made as an Imperial or aristocratic commission. Its decorative elements with acanthus, anthemions, amphora vases, swags and neo-classical medallions all derive from Antique motifs inspired by the Receuil de decorations intérieures by Charles Percier and Pierre-François Léonard Fontaine first printed in 1801, who promulgated the Empire style with the intention of glorifying the Napoleonic regime, see for example a drawing by Percier and Fontaine  from their Receuil, for the boudoir of Mme. M, illustrated in plate 60. Samoyault, op. cit., p. 90, fig. 158, illustrates a commode by Jacob-Desmalter with a gilt-bronze band of stylised amphora vases and anthemions similar in conception to those on the offered console table on an ebony ground  which was delivered in 1804 to the Empress Josephine at the Palace of Fontainebleau and placed in her bedroom, (Mobilier National, Paris). The decorative device on the front supports of scrolling acanthus, anthemions and flowerheads can be seen on the stiles of an ebony commode by Jacob-Desmalter illustrated by Samoyault, op. cit., p.196, fig. 334, after a design by Percier and Fontaine for le grand cabinet of the Emperor at the Tuileries, circa 1811-1813, now at the Château of Versailles, Paris. The decorative elements in gilt-bronze on this console table with ribbon-tied floral swags and medallions can be seen on a green granite chimneypiece, circa 1805, stamped Thomire à Paris, from the collection of Général Le Marois, Rue de Grammont, Paris, then the Collection of the Duc de Caraman, Château de Lonray, sold  on 3rd November 2005, from the Collections of Lily and Edmond Safra, Volume II, lot 175, for $452,800, reproduced here in fig. 1. An identical chimneypiece to the aforementioned by Thomire was installed in the principal salon of the Empress' apartments at the Château de Compiègne, a room which was decorated by Percier and Fontaine. Another chimneypiece with the same frieze of garlands and torchères was delivered in 1804 for the salon of Prince Eugène de Beauharnais in his hôtel in the rue de Lille in Paris, now the German Embassy. Furthermore, a console table with a very similar frieze and with the label of the marchand -mercier Martin Eloy Lingereux was formerly in the collection of the Princes Esterhàzy, now is in the collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts, Budapest, illustrated by Arizzoli-Clémentel op. cit.., p.108, fig.1, Thomire is mentioned as one of the possible bronziers for these types of console tables. It is also worthwhile considering a console table, circa 1803-06, stamped Jacob D.R. Meslée, illustrated by Arizzoli-Clémentel and Samoyault, op. cit., pp.114-115, which in 1808 was in the Élysée in the grand Salon on the ground floor, which is now at Versailles. The treatment of the flowers on the swags is almost identical and the female profile medallion on its side, to those on the offered table which lends further support to the attribution of the offered console table to Jacob-Desmalter. It is also worth noting the same authors op. cit., p. 142, no. 33, for the celebrated model of the console table with female terms which originally was in the bedroom of Murat in the Élysée, circa 1803-06,stamped Jacob DR Meslée. The internal supports are decorated with scrolling mounts conceived in a similar vein to those on the front supports of the offered table, with rinceaux, scrolls, rosettes and palmettes. One should also consider a pair of pedestals  in amboyna, decorated with gilt-bronze mounts attributed to Jean-Philippe Thomire, circa 1811, formerly at the Tuileries according to the register of the Garde-Meuble royal, and belonged to the Duchesse de Berry which have mounts on the front with Cupid amidst scrolling foliage similar to those upon the offered consoles supports with an amphora shaped vase, illustrated by Guibal, op. cit., p. 129, plate 60.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-07-09
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An italian pietra dura top from the florentine grand ducal workshops

The rectangular top inlaid with the depiction of a teapot decorated with foliage, a cross-hatched tankard with a flower on top, an upturned cup and saucer decorated with flowers and a cockerel, a further cup decorated with a ribbon motif on the exterior and leaping fishes together with a shaped bowl, all with sprays of flowers on rockwork and a porphyry ground within a gilt-bronze foliate border; the later rosewood and walnut Louis XV style table with a female bust on each knee surmounted by a c-scroll cartouche, the front and back with a further c-scroll foliate and flower cast cartouche, on cabriole legs terminating in scrolled feet, the whole decorated with brass and pewter tortoiseshell boulle work depicting scrolling foliage, the apron carved with scrolls and acanthus; with maker's stamp A. Staudinger in Wien The Kinsky Table by Alvar González-Palacios This table top of Egyptian red porphyry inlaid with pietre dure, or hardstones, is well documented in the Archivio di Stato in Florence amongst the administrative  papers of the Grand Duke Ferdinand III (1769-1824) (fig.1).  Some documents dated 1793 (see appendix) clearly relate to the making of this object. On 11 October of that year the Director of the Galleria dei Lavori recorded that the costs of the table top (which was obviously already finished) amounted to 917 scudi, a figure that included a gratuity payment to the workers who had had to work overtime in order to complete the commission as swiftly as possible. The table was a gift from His Royal Highness, Grand Duke Ferdinand III of Habsburg-Lorraine, to the Prince Kinsky. The craftsmen rewarded for their work were Damiano Jacopucci, Francesco Stradi, Antonio Gianvitter, Francesco Pucci and Giovanni Battista Soldi (doc.1). Another document in the archive (doc.2) bearing the same date describes what the gift made by the Grand Duke to Prince Kinsky looked like:  a porphyry table top with pietre dure commessi showing porcelain vases.  Document 4, also bearing the same date, repeats the description adding that the table top had a bronze frame (which still survives) and a carved and gilded support (now lost). Document 6 specifies that on 6 July 1793 the carver Lorenzo Dolci was paid for the support for the porphyry table given to Prince Kinsky. Finally Document 7 shows how on 7 October 1793 Antonio Mariotti needed reimbursement for the cost of the packing case for the pietre dure table given to “Principe Ulrico Kinshij”, which was very probably despatched to Vienna in the same year. Some of this information is confirmed in the “Ruolo stabile della Real Galleria di Lavori” of Florence from the year before, in May 1792, which I have previously published (1). In that list, amongst the sottomaestri, or assistant masters, the name of Damiano Jacopucci appears (he was a member of a family of Florentine commettitori, the craftsmen who specialised in this form of stone inlay, the most famous of whom, in the middle of the eighteenth century, was Giovanni Battista); Francesco Stradi and Antonio Mariotti appear as ‘operai‘ - workers as do the ‘segatori’ – sawmen, Francesco Pucci and G. B. Soldi. Antonio Gianvitter is the same Antonio Pranevitter who I listed  (and who was already working in the Gallery in 1784 when he is recorded as Antonio Granevitter – his surname which is clearly German in origin is written in different ways). The Director of the Real Galleria dei Lavori in 1792 was Luigi Siries (the son of Cosimo who had died a few years earlier and was a member of a famous family of artists and directors of the Grand-Ducal workshops). The documents that appear here do not mention who might have designed the table (which is only to be expected as they record the payments to the stone cutters who made the table top).  It shows, with a liveliness and dynamism that is almost surreal, an irregular stone slab which seems to float in the space and upon which are placed six pieces of porcelain in different colours and four stems bearing flowers (yellowish jasmine, light blue convolvulus and red and white anenomes).  In the middle sits a globular teapot typical of the Marchese Ginori porcelain manufactory at Doccia, near Florence. On the right an upside down coffee cup rests against a porcelain saucer of Yongzheng famille rose pallette; in the foreground is a two handled white and yellow shaped ecuelle and to the left is a blue ground covered tankard with a handle and rococo style finial both also from the Ginori factory. Beside this is a little cup with tiny blue fish painted around the inside (2). Although the documents do not tell us, we know who might have designed this table top because of a pictorial, rather than a written source, that illustrates it. It is an oil painting on canvas, documented as being by Antonio Cioci, the designer in the Galleria at that time. The painting model dates to 1786 and is in the  Museo dell’Opificio delle Pietre Dure in Florence (3) (fig.3). It shows with great precision the six pieces of porcelain that appear on the Kinsky table top but they are arranged alongside other Oriental objects which are larger in size. The composition is, however, very similar and all the porcelain is laid out on a cut slab which has been left in its natural state.  It seems to me beyond doubt that at the end of 1792 or the beginning of 1793 Antonio Cioci’s model was adapted for the table featured here which was finished, as I have discovered, in October 1793. Antonio Cioci was employed in the Galleria dei Lavori di Firenze at the end of 1771 and died on 15 November 1792. Immediately afterwards his son, Leopoldo Cioci, began work as designer and was in charge of selecting the stones for the Galleria.  It may be that he adapted his father’s design for this table(4). Prince Kinsky was a member of one of the most important Bohemian families and was closely linked to the Habsburg Lorraine dynasty. It should be remembered that Leopold II had been Grand Duke of Tuscany until 1790, using the name Pietro Leopoldo.  His eldest son left with him for Vienna in 1790, becoming Emperor Francis II shortly afterward, in 1792, on the premature death of his father. The Grand Duke Ferdinand III, the second son of Leopold II, was frequently in Vienna, where he celebrated his wedding to his cousin Luisa in 1790 (5). In 1786, Antonio Cioci  provided the model for the table top laid with porcelain objects, which  together with its pendant was to have been copied in pietre dure.  In 1789 both of these canvases remained unused in the Galleria.  It was only decided to have them made in pietre dure in 1792, and instead of using a porphyry ground the so-called nephritic stone, a type of jade, from Egypt was chosen. In 1795 the first of these two tables was completed but work on the other took many more years.  Complex historical circumstances and the extreme difficulties caused by the Napoleonic wars, meant that it was not finished until 1803. Both pietre dure tables, were taken to France under Napoleon, but are now in the Palazzo Pitti. They are larger in size than the Kinsky Table and the nephritic ground is an oily green, which together with their more elaborate porcelain compositions gives them a completely different character (6). By way of contrast Antonio Cioci has given particular emphasis, in the Kinsky Table,  to the single objects as they float upon the blood red porphyry background to wonderful and distinctive effect. It is almost certain that Prince Kinsky was in Florence in 1793 as the documents record that on 14 October of that year “Signora Principessa Kinshij, e per detta dal signor Luigi Siries, reca £ 666.13.4  e sono per valuta di un coperchio e un fondo per una scatola fattovi di commesso vasi, e fiori” (7). A carved support for the porphyry table top was made and gilded between July and October 1793 by the carver Lorenzo Dolci, as is shown in document 6 (8). This support has not been identified and is now lost and probably destroyed.  However a few decades later a much richer Boulle style base was made which was more in sympathy with the prevailing Austrian taste for the rococo. Notes (1) A. González-Palacios, Il Tempio del Gusto. Il Granducato di Toscana e gli Stati settentrionali, Milan , 1986, p. 136. (2) The tankard is identical to one illustrated by L. Ginori Lisci, La porcellana di Doccia, Milano, 1963, pl. 48 where it is described as a “tazza da birra" - beer cup and is dated 1774. (3) A.M. Giusti, P. Mazzoni, A. Pampaloni Martelli, Il Museo dell’Opificio delle Pietre Dure a Firenze, Milan, 1978, cat. 544; González-Palacios, cit., fig. 248. 4 González-Palacios, cit., p. 86. This information is in Archivio di Stato di Firenze, Imperiale e Real Corte, 5128, c. 87 (the number of the sheaf of documents was at one time 2375); for Leopoldo Cioci see the same publication, passim. (5) Luisa Bourbon was the daughter of Ferdinand IV and Maria Carolina of Austria.  It should be noted that another person mentioned in document 1, Marchese Manfredini, was tutor and then Maggiordomo and Consigliere to the Grand Duke.  On the death of the Emperor Leopoldo II in 1792, Manfredini went with the young Grand Duke to arrange the financial affairs of the two brothers in 1792. (6) This complex issue was analysed in González-Palacios, cit., pp. 87, 88 and Appendix II, docs. 63, 64, 71, 75, 79, 85 and 86. In the same publication the two tables with nephritic grounds are illustrated at figs 249 and 250. (7) ‘Signora Princess Kinskij, as signor Luigi Siries states, brings £666.13.4 to the administration of the Galleria for a cover and a bottom for a box made of commessi with vases and flowers’.  Archivio di Stato di Firenze, Imperiale e Real Corte, 5166 (Libro Maestro, Galleria dei Lavori, A, 1793 c. 34 a destra, voce "Ritratto di generi venduti"). I do not know the current whereabouts of this object or whether it was completed, nor do I know what its dimensions were. (8) For Dolci see González-Palacios, cit., passim and  in particular E. Colle, I mobili di Palazzo Pitti. Il primo periodo lorenese, Florence, 1992, passim and pp. 220 ff. Translated by Emma Bassett Appendix 1. Archivio di Stato di Firenze; Imperiale e Real Corte, 5128; (Galleria dei Lavori, Affari diversi n. 100r.) "In sequela di Rappresentanza de' 9 stante, con cui il Direttore della Real Galleria dei Lavori accompagna una tavola di commesso in pietre dure, e ne domanda increditamento del valore in Scudi 917, compresa in detta somma una straordinaria recognizione a favore di diversi lavoranti di quel Dipartimento per essersi dovuti impiegare nel terminarla con celerità oltre le ore prescritte dai Regolamenti veglianti, è stato rescritto come appresso… Sua Altezza Reale approva l'esecuzione della tavola di cui si tratta, già fattasi dalla Reale Altezza Sua passare in dono al Principe Kinscky per mezzo del suo Maggior Domo Maggiore marchese Manfredini, e vuole che del valore della medesima nella somma risultante dall'ingiunta nota in scudi Novecentodiciassette, sia secondo il consueto accreditata la Galleria dei Lavori nella scrittura della Guardaroba generale riguardante quell'azienda. Inoltre concede agli infrascritti lavoranti che... hanno travagliato alla tavola predetta, una recognizione in aumento di mercede in somma di scudi cinquantanove, da pagarsi loro dall'istessa Guardaroba generale, repartita come appresso, cioè: a Damiano Iacopucci scudi ventiquattro... Francesco Stradi scudi dieci... Antonio Gianvitter scudi nove... Francesco Pucci scudi otto... Giovan Battista Soldi scudi otto... E dalla Segreteria della Corona e di Corte si partecipino in conformità gli ordini opportuni. Dato li 11 ottobre 1793”. (Seguono le firme del sovrano, di Luigi Bartolini che ne ha preso visione, e del segretario Huart). 2. Archivio di Stato di Firenze; Imperiale e Real Corte, 5166; (Libro Maestro Galleria dei Lavori, A 1793 a carta 12 a destra) "11 ottobre £ 1820 [La Guardaroba generale] Fa buone [al magazziniere della Real Galleria dei Lavori Pietro Giusti] il conto donativi al suddetto per la valuta delle pietre occorse nella Formazione di una piccola Tavola di Porfido fattavi di Commesso di Pietre dure Vasi di Porcellana, stata regalata da Sua Altezza Reale al Principe Kinski" 3. Archivio di Stato di Firenze; Imperiale e Real Corte, 5166, (Libro Maestro Galleria dei Lavori, A 1793 a carta 39 a destra) "11 ottobre  £ 3920 [La Guardaroba Generale] fa buone il conto donativi per la Manifattura della Tavola di Porfido intarsiatovi in pietre dure vasi di porcellana, regalata questa al Principe Kinski” 4. Archivio di Stato di Firenze; Imperiale e Real Corte, 5166; (Libro Maestro Galleria dei Lavori, A 1793 a carta 47 a sinistra) "Adi 11 Ottobre £ 6419 Buone agl'appresso conti, e sono la valuta data dal Direttore della Real Galleria alla Tavola di Porfido intarsiatovi Commesso di Pietre dure rappresentanti Vasi di Porcellana con cornice di bronzo, e suo piede intagliato, e dorato, stata questa regalata da Sua Altezza Reale al Principe Kinski" 5. Archivio di Stato di Firenze; Imperiale e Real Corte, 5166 (Libro Maestro Galleria dei Lavori, A 1793 a carta 48 a destra) "11 ottobre £ 4599 Fa buone il Conto donativi per la Manifattura della Piccola Tavola in Pietre dure, rappresentante Vasi di Porcellana, stata questa Regalata da Sua Altezza Reale al Principe Kinschi" 6. Archivio di Stato di Firenze; Imperiale e Real Corte, ????, (carta 32 a sinistra e a destra) “a Lorenzo Dolci il 6 luglio 1793 pagato anticipo di £ 140, con saldo di £ 84 al 19 luglio, per l'intaglio  ad un piede di tavola” "1793 adi 11 ottobre £ 266 Fa buone il conto donativi e sono la valuta del Piede di Tavola di Porfido regalata da Sua Altezza Reale al Principe Kinski " 7. Archivio di Stato di Firenze; Imperiale e Real Corte, 5209, n. 59;  "a 7 ottobre 1793 La Real Galleria dei Lavori deve dare a Antonio Mariotti per suo rimborso di spese occorse per la cassa e imballatura di una tavolina di pietre dure... e regalata da Sua Altezza Reale a Sua Altezza il Principe Ulrico Kinshij The base This top's base was made by - and carries the stamp of - one of Vienna’s leading cabinet-makers, Anton Staudinger, and not by the Carl Leistler firm, to whom it had been previously attributed. To replace the Florentine carved giltwood base by Lorenzo Dolci, Staudinger created a Louis XV design with a boulle-work decorated surface, resulting in a successful combination between the sumptuous base and a more subtle pictorial top, perfectly in line with contemporary stately taste. Information about Anton Staudinger and his oeuvre is still scarce, but he is mentioned in 1833 on a list of craftsmen working in Vienna (Notizen über Produktion, Kunst, Fabriken Und Gewerbe). He had become a ‘Tischlermeister’ (master cabinet-maker) in 14 June 1828 and had his business in the Viennese Weiden district at Haupstrasse, 450. Anton Staudinger exhibited at the third Vienna Industrial Exhibition (Allgemeine Gewerbeausstellung) in 1845, where he presented furniture made of rosewood with ‘Bull-Decoration’, such the present table. The exhibition catalogue refers to him as one of the best cabinet-makers in Vienna delivering “beautiful, solid and diligent work of good style”. Prince Franz de Paul Ulrich Kinsky The recipient of this gift was the third Prince Kinsky von Wchinitz and Tettau - Franz de Paul Ulrich. Born in one of the family’s palaces, Zlonice, in 1726, he married the Countess Maria Sidonie von Hohenzollern-Hechingen in 1749. Three years later, upon the death of his first cousin Franz Joseph, and 2nd Prince Kinsky, he became the head of the family. He had an outstanding military career, having fought in several battles of the Seven Years’ War where he was wounded on multiple occasions. He rose through the ranks of the Imperial Army to achieve its highest rank – Field-Marshall – in 1778. He was in the Privy Council and was given the Order of the Golden Fleece and the Military Order of Maria Theresa. Although some sources wrongly place his death in 1792, he died in Prague in 1797.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-07-09
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A pair of italian gilt-bronze, bronze and egyptian porphyry candelabra

In the Egyptian taste, each in the form of a standing Egyptian figure in a Nemes headdress and elaborately draped costume holding a pylon shaped tablet with stylised hieroglyphs supporting an acanthus leaf cast vase with spirally-twist border issuing bullrushes with green patinated gilt-bronze leaves and four scrolled reeded acanthus leaf cast candlearms with plain vasiform candle-nozzles and drip-pans, with a futher raised central candlenozzle, on a gilt-bronze and Egyptian porphyry socle with  paterae suspending ribbon-tied fruiting swags within an acanthus border supported on the back of four recumbent lionesses on a square white marble base Comparative Literature: Alvar González–Palacios, Il patrimonio artistico del Quirinale, I Mobili Italiani, Milan, 1996, p. 333, no. 141. Alvar González–Palacios, Exhibition catalogue,  L’Oro di Valadier, Un genio nella Roma del Settecento, Fratelli Palombi Ed., Villa Medici 29th January-8th April 1997,  p. 257, no. 103. Alvar González-Palacios, Il Gusto dei  Principi, Arte di Corte del XVII del XVIII secolo, Milan, 1984, Vol. I, `Ristudiando I Righetti’, pp. 303-317 and Vol. II, p. 260, figs. 520, 521. Enrico Colle, Angela Griseri, Roberto Valeriani, Bronzi Decorativi in Italia, Bronzisti e Fonditori Italiani dal Seicento, Milan, 2001, p.189-198. John Wilton-Ely, Giovanni Battista Piranesi, The Complete Etchings, Vol. II, San Francisco, MCMXCIV, p. 937, no. 864. This pair of striking candelabra on porphyry bases, which are exceptional both in terms of their innovative design, finely cast and chased gilt-bronze mounts are almost certainly the production of an outstanding Roman bronzista at the end of the 18th century, namely Francesco Righetti (1749-1819) (see fig. 1). They are inspired by the renewed interest in Egyptian and Antique archaeological discoveries which appealed to the taste of discerning European collectors in the second half of the 18th century, due in no small part to their subtle combination of luxurious materials incorporating gilt-bronze and Antique Egyptian porphyry derived from the ruins of Roman Antique columns. The Model: The attribution of this pair of candelabra to Francesco Righetti, (whose life and work has been profusely studied by Alvar González-Palacios op. cit..), can be made upon the basis of a number of striking similarities between this so far unrecorded pair of candelabra to other known works by him. A close comparison can be made with the candelabrum, one of a pair in bronze, gilt-bronze, white and verde antico marble, with neo-classical figures signed F. Righetti, 1797, now in the Palazzo del Quirinale, Rome, illustrated by Alvar González–Palacios, Il mobile Italiani, op. cit., p. 333, no. 141, reproduced here in fig. 3. The base with its classical gilt-bronze patera suspending floral swags, the beading, the raised gilt-bronze socle upon which the figures are supported, the square marble plinth on the base supported on the backs of recumbent lionesses together with the plain vasiform candlenozzles and drip-pans and the patinated bronze green leaves in the central shaft are almost identical to those on the offered pair. Furthermore, a pair of candelabra in gilt-bronze, rosso antico and white marble with neo-classical figures in bronze supporting identical baskets on their heads cast with acanthus and a spirally- twist border, as on the offered pair, signed F. Righetti, F. Romae 1792, are illustrated by A.G. P., L’Oro di Valadier, op. cit., p. 257, no. 103. This further comparison makes the attribution for the offered pair to Righetti indisputable. It is also worthwhile comparing an important pair of brûle-parfums, in the form of an Antique athénienne attributed to Francesco and Luigi Righetti dating to the early 19th century, sold from the Collection of Mrs Barbara Piasecka Johnson from her Monaco residence, Sotheby’s, Paris,15th October 2003, lot 73, (172,8756E), the bases reproduced here in fig. 4. The base of the pair with its floral swags suspended by a patera on an alabaster socle and black marble base are resting on recumbent lions, not unlike the base on the offered pair of candelabra. The device of using animals to support the base of candelabras and surtout was often employed by Righetti. The recumbent lionesses supporting the bases of the candelabra are often repeated in his work and there is listed in Francesco Righetti’s catalogue of bronze copies and statues dating from 1794, `Les deux Lionnes qui sont au bas de l’escalier du Capitole’ and `Les deux Lionnes de la Fontaine des Thermes d’un palme’. One should also not discount the influence of G.B. Piranesi on the design of the offered pair of candelabra, see for example his design for a Chimneypiece in the Egyptian style with sphinx supports similar to those on the offered pair, illustrated by Wilton-Ely, op. cit., p. 937, no. 864, reproduced here in fig. 2. The Egyptian figures on the stems were probably inspired by the two Egyptian Isis priest caryatids (Antineous) which flank the entrance of the Museo Pio-Clementino, Rome, which were originally part of the celebrated Hadrian’s Villa, although of a different design in terms of their dress. These figures also make an appearance in the oeuvre of Valadier, (in whose workshop Righetti had been apprenticed, see post), as early as the 1780’s, for example, on clocks. As Righetti was originally a pupil of Valadier, he was influenced by  his master's work and it is worthwhile comparing a pair of Roman gilt-bronze and porphyry candelabra, circa 1774 by Liugi Valadier, possibly in collaboration with Lorenzo Cardelli, now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, are illustrated by Koeppe and Giusti, op. cit., p. 311, no. 121, (The  Wrightsman Fund, 1994 (1994.12.1.2.). They were originally commissioned by Prince Marcantonio Borghese for Palazzo Borghese in Rome in  1774. The upper part with the candlearms and the bullrushes can be seen in a design by Valadier  illustrated by A.G.P., op. cit., p. 203, no. 85, with two female figures on a porphyry base which have been inspired by the Three Graces at Villa Borghese after a famous Piranesi print. They may in turn have inspired Righetti in the design and use of porphyry on the offered pair of candelabra. A pair of candelabra from the workshop of Giuseppe Valadier,with neo-classical figures in gilt-bronze with virtually identical nozzles to those on the offered pair on porphyry bases, sold in these Rooms, 7th July 2009, lot 61 (£205,250). Francesco Righetti (1749-1819): He was a leading sculptor, silversmith and bronze founder and a pupil of the leading 18th century Roman goldsmith Luigi Valadier (1726-1785). Righetti produced copies after the Antique and indulged the taste of collectors for faithful replicas of celebrated statues, both ancient and modern and antiquarian ornaments. In 1794, his foundry even produced a catalogue, printed in French, offering copies in three sizes, including full-size, to "amateurs de l'antiquité et des beaux arts". He produced a wide variety of pieces including copies of many antique and modern statues, busts, vases, trophies, animals, marble pedestals, replicas of fountains and gilt ornaments for clocks and obelisks. In 1780, Francesco's son Luigi was born and he was to become his pupil and partner in the famous workshop. In 1782, Pope Pio VI visited the workshop and after that Righetti's relationship with the Vatican intensified. In 1805, Francesco Righetti became "fonditore camerale" of the Vatican. He was also the favourite founder of Antonio Canova. After Righetti's death, Luigi and his son Francesco Righetti the younger (born 1805) continued the foundries in Naples and Rome. His long career and the list of 1794 suggest that a vast number of unsubscribed bronzes and objects must  be attributable to him and his workshop.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-07-09
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An italian walnut, burr walnut and parcel-gilt bureau cabinet, venetian

The upper section with an arched top surmounted by a pierced balustrade with a peacock  flanked by a tree, column and a stylised building surmounted by a pierced scroll, rocaille, flower and foliate carved cresting above a cartouche-shaped engraved mirror depicting a seated female in 18th century dress in a landscape representing Juno above a pair of mirrored doors opening to reveal a fitted interior   `scarabattolo' with a central door surrounded by twelve serpentine and bowed long drawers and sixteen short drawers with herringbone parquetry banding, the pigeon holes with pierced rocaille and scrolled mouldings above three frieze drawers and two candleslides, the splayed sides with a mirrored door in each side revealing two drawers and pigeon holes above five further narrow drawers, the lower section with a serpentine fall-front with a removeable fitted interior revealing secret drawers and a slide revealing a recess and two further secret drawers, the interior with a door flanked by six long and six short drawers above three serpentine and bowed long drawers with drop handles, with pierced rocaille giltwood clasps at the top and base of the stiles and splayed concave sides on bracket feet, with  pierced carved giltwood cartouches with acanthus, rocaille and foliage Comparative Literature: Giuseppe Morazzoni, Mobili Veneziani del’700, Milan, MCMXXVII, plates CLXXXVI, CLXXXVII. G. Morrazoni, Il Mobile Veneziano del’700, Milan,1958, Tav. CCCLXVIII and Tav. CCCLXIX. Clara Santini, Mille Mobili Veneti, L’arredo domestico in Veneto dal sec. XV al sec. XIX, Venezia, Modena, MMII, pp. 73, plate 84, p. 75, plate 87, p. 76, plate 88. This imposing bureau cabinet of supremely elegant proportions and gentle serpentine form in finely figured walnut with delicately carved elements highlighted in parcel-gilt in imitation of gilt-bronze mounts, with flared concave mirrored sides represents the apogee of Venetian craftsmanship in the middle years of the 18th century. The viewer would have been dazzled by the sheer magnificence of this most emblematic  of Venetian  18th century trumeau. The superlative quality of its execution make the present bureau-cabinet one of the best surviving examples of the Venetian repertory. Unfortunately, due to lack of documentary evidence, very few names of cabinet-makers, carvers and gilders survive, to enable an attribution to a particular maker to be made. These trumeau as they were known (from the French mirror which used to stand between two windows), very soon became the pre-eminent piece of furniture in the palazzos of the Venetian aristocracy and wealthy merchants. Although they were meant to cut a bella figura on the best wall of a salon, these pieces were supposed to be functional too, as on the present example where there is an elaborate `scarabattolo'- the inside of the upper section, fall-front and even the side doors are fitted with various pigeon-holes, drawers and cupboards and there are numerous secret drawers. While the bureaux-cabinets commissioned  for the surburban villas were often lacquered or decorated in arte povera to simulate lacquer, the finest examples of which are found in the most important palazzos of the lagoon were of serpentine form veneered in burr walnut which was highlighted with parcel-gilt carved elements and were mounted with an engraved mirrors, so typical of Venetian production, as on the present example. As a large proportion of Venetian furniture was on a small scale apart from mirrors and several large-scale bureau cabinets veneered in plain walnut are recorded, but very few survive with their gilded elements intact as on the present example. Moreover, the gilded elements depicting a building and balustrade on this bureau are reminiscent of the capriccio found on Venetian mirrors of this date. It is interesting to note that bureau cabinets on a similar scale and of the same exceptional quality as the offered example, were formerly in leading Italian collections, such as those illustrated by Morazzoni, op. cit., plates, CLXXXVI (sig. Ing. G. Gatti-Casazza) and CLXXXVII (conte L. Hierschel De Minerbi).  Furthermore, Morazzoni, op. cit., (1958 edition), illustrates in Tav. CCLXVIII, a related bureau cabinet with parcel- gilt elements which is of similar form to this bureau cabinet which is now in the Museum Ca’Rezzonico, in Venice and another one more similar to the offered example, as the sides have mirrored doors, in Tav. CCCLXIX, (formerly in the collection of Tullio Silva). Related large walnut bureau cabinets some with parcel-gilt elements sold at auction include: -lot 125, sold in these Rooms, for a world record price, on 13th December 1996  (£540,000). -lot 543, sold Sotheby’s Milan, 18th December 2001 (740,000,000Lire). It had an elaborate parcel-gilt cresting and flared mirrored sides as on the offered example. - one sold in an Italian auction on 27th April 2004 for 280,000E. - lot 116, The Splendours of Venice, sold in these Rooms, 6th July 2010, (£217,250), although entirely in walnut with a single mirrored door and flared sides. -lot 70, sold in these Rooms, from the Collection of Giovanni and Gabriella Barilla, 14th March 2012,(£265,250), of similar form, but on a smaller scale and solely in walnut with no parcel-gilt elements.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-07-09
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"the butterfly service".  a cozzi porcelain dinner service, circa 1770

Each painted with one or several different butterflies within flower garlands, comprising: 2 salad bowls, 2 mustard pots, 3 sauce tureens, covers, stands and ladles, 2 wine coolers, 20 serving dishes,  50 plates, 32 soup plates An imaginative entrepreneur and banker, Germiniano Cozzi created the most successful Venetian porcelain factory of the late 18th century. He became involved in the porcelain business, first as a partner with Nathaniel Friderich Hewelcke, who had founded his porcelain factory in 1761. In 1763, however, the factory went bankrupt and Hewelcke went back to Germany. Germiniano Cozzi then started up his own factory on the Caneraggio, and was soon afterwards offered support from the Senate and Venetian authorities. The factory grew rapidly, employing 50 people, including 7 painters, 7 potters and 2 sculptors, with a shop in Campo san salvador. Its great strength was firstly to source some proper kaolin in Italy (in the cave del Tretto, near Vicenza) instead of importing it illegally from Saxony. Secondly, the factory adapted its production to its clientele, creating less costly creamware for the wider public and high quality porcelain for the nobility.  Overall, figures and tableware thus pleased a very large international clientele, either imitating creations from other factories, especially Meissen, or being a new design from the factory itself.  Beautiful large services were designed and painted either with mythological subjects, or scenes after classical poems such as Jerusalem Delivered, written in 1580 by Torquato Tasso, or with animals. The factory shut in 1812, after Cozzi’s death. The service here offered is a perfect example of one of these rare Cozzi inventions. One plate of the type is recorded in the Correr Museum, Venice (see. N. Barbantini, Le porcellane de Venezia e della Nove, 1936, pl. 227).

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-11-05
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THE EXTENSIVE 'REEPMAKER' MEISSEN-MARCOLINI PORCELAIN ORNITHOLOGICAL DINNER SERVICE, gilt and painted in colours, possibly by the bird-painter Mann, i

THE EXTENSIVE 'REEPMAKER' MEISSEN-MARCOLINI PORCELAIN ORNITHOLOGICAL DINNER SERVICE, gilt and painted in colours, possibly by the bird-painter Mann, in the rococo and transition styles, with various bird vignettes in wooded landscapes surrounded by various butterflies, ladybirds and flies, the borders outlined with gilt wavy trelliswork, the oval bulging twohandled tureens with covers, the domed covers applied with a scantily clad putto holding a cornucopia overflowing with flowerheads and fruit in relief, comprising; - one very large tureen with cover and stand, the tureen with two vignettes, the handles modelled as rocailles overflowing with vegetables in relief, the domed cover surmounted with a putto wearing a yellow garment, with two vignettes, the stand with wavy border in relief, the handles modelled as rocailles, the tureen marked with blue overglaze crossed swords above 3, the covered tureen 38 cm wide and 30 cm high, the stand 44 cm wide - a pair of tureens with covers and stands, similarly decorated to the preceding, one putto with a yellow, the other with a purple garment, one tureen marked with blue overglaze crossed swords above a star and a hatch, the other tureen marked with blue overglaze crossed swords beside a dot and above a hatch, the covered tureens 34.5 cm wide and 25 cm high, the stands 40 cm wide - a pair of small flattened tureens with covers and stands, similarly decorated to the preceding, one putto with a purple, the other with a blue garment, both tureens marked with blue overglaze crossed swords above a star and a hatch, the covered tureens 27 cm wide and 17 cm high, the stands 36.5 cm wide - a pair of twohandled doublelipped sauceboats, the outside with two vignettes, the inside scattered with insects, with intertwined branch handles, the lips generous, both marked with underglaze crossed swords above a star, a hatch to the stand ring, one with Pressnummer 25, 22 cm wide - a pair of moutardiers with covers, the singlehandled mustard barrels with loop handle, the very slightly domed cover applied with a flowerbud finial, the moutardiers 10 cm high - a small spoon, 12 cm wide - four Transition-style triangular tripod saltcellars, with three vignettes, the concave bowl with insects, the sides with blue guilloches in relief, the stocky flaring feet outlined in gilt, all marked with Pressnummer E53, the saltcellars 9 cm wide and 4 cm high - a pair of Transition-style oval twohandled quadrupod butterdishes with covers, the dishes and covers with two vignettes, the handles and feet geometrically modelled à la grècque, the domed covers applied with a large flowerbud finial surrounded with sunburst flattened leaves, both marked with blue underglaze crossed swords above a star and a hatch, the covered beurriers, 17 cm wide and 11 cm high - a pair of deep ogival-shaped saladiers, the inside with butterflies and ants, the outside with two vignettes, the bowls 25 cm diam. and 8 cm high - a pair of lozenge-shaped sidedishes, with gilder's mark m, 29 cm wide - a pair of oval sidedishes one marked with a black fleur-de- lys and impressed D, 22 cm wide - a pair of shaped rectangular chargers both with Pressnummern 5 and 42, 42 cm wide - four shaped rectangular chargers one with Pressnummern 4 and 39, two with D, one with 4 and D, 39 cm wide - six shaped rectangular chargers, all with Pressnummern 2 and 43, gilder's marks n and g, 23.5 cm wide - four shaped square bowls all with Pressnummern 3 and 40, gilder's mark n, 25 cm wide - eight shaped square bowls, 21 cm wide - eight shaped square bowls, with various gilder's marks, 18 cm wide - four shaped circular bowls, all with Pressnummern 3 and 13, 26.5 cm diam. - eight shaped circular bowls, all with Pressnummern 2 and 20, 25 cm diam. - a pair of shaped circular chargers, one with Pressnummern 4 and 20, the other with 4 and 13, 38 cm diam. - four shaped circular chargers, with Pressnummern 3 and 13, 33 cm diam. - six shaped circular chargers, with Pressnummern 2 and 13, 29.5 cm diam. - eight shaped deep dishes, with Pressnummer 20, 26 cm diam. - twenty four shaped deep dishes with Pressnummern 54 and A, some with 18, circa 22.5 cm diam. - sixty three shaped dishes, some with Pressnummern 54 and 18, 24.5 cm diam. (the condition is excellent), all variously marked with underglaze blue crossed swords and a star and one or two hatches, mostly 1774-1780, the Transition-style pieces impressed E54 before 1774 (186)

  • NLDNetherlands
  • 1992-05-12
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A set of four italian carved and silvered figures on giltwood bases

Each in the form of an antique god or goddess, on a flaring carved giltwood base Comparative Literature: Paola Rotondi Briasco, Filippo Parodi, Genoa 1962; Filippo Parodi (1630-1702): of Genoese in origin, Parodi was highly esteemed both as a decorator and as a sculptor and worked in his native city for the major part of his career. During the six years he spent in Rome, he worked closely with Bernini whose style he emulated and later incorporated into his own sculptural works (particularly the tomb of the Doge Morosini in Venice). The time Parodi spent in Rome is vital for the comprehension of the stylistic characteristics of his work. The crowning of the pediment of the altar of the Virgin in S. Maria delle Vigne, Genoa, with allegorical figures of Faith, Hope and Charity follows a composition that occurs frequently in Roman churches, and four statues representing characters from Ovid's Metamorphoses (Narcissus, Heliantha and Flora, all Genoa, Palazzo Reale) reveal a thorough knowledge of Roman Baroque sculpture. Ernest and Jean Boissevain at Villa delle Rose: These magnificent sculptures originally formed part of the collection of celebrated operatic soprano and philanthropist Jean Tennyson Boissevain (1903-1991) and her Dutch born husband Ernest Boissevain (1898-1984) at Villa delle Rose in the hills above Florence. The stunning Villa delle Rose was built in the 15th century in typical Tuscan style by the Rossi family who in 1487 sold it to the Antinori family. It remained in the latter's posession until the mid 20th century. The Boissevains bought the villa, restored it carefully to its old splendour and assembled an eclectic collection of Chinese and European ceramics, silver, sculpture and furniture. The couple also spent their time between other homes in Ischia, Vermont, and an apartement on Avenue George V in Paris. However, it was in Villa delle Rose that the couple would entertain lavishly their friends including Quenn Anne of Romania and the Duchess Canevaro di Zoagli. They breathed new life to the old ballroom (see fig.1) that subsequently saw famous musicians and conductors such as Arthur Rubinstein and Herbert von Karajan perform.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-07-03
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Porcelain & Pottery

Items made of porcelain, earthenware, stoneware and faience from every country are found under the category Porcelain & Pottery. Plates, cups, antique vases, tableware, china figurines and Chinese serving dishes are just some of the items that can be found up for auction under this heading.

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