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A MAGNIFICENT BERLIN GARNITURE OF FIVE BLUE-GROUND 'MUNICH' VASES, each of urn shape with shallowly sloping shoulders and waisted cylindrical necks wi

A MAGNIFICENT BERLIN GARNITURE OF FIVE BLUE-GROUND 'MUNICH' VASES, each of urn shape with shallowly sloping shoulders and waisted cylindrical necks with gilt and bronzed angular handles, the bodies painted with extensive views and buildings within richly gilt rectangular cartouches with burnished scrolling foliage, the vivid blue grounds with bronzed and gilt scrolling foliage and anthemion, the necks with bronzed and gilt radiating stylised fronds and anthemion and yellow-centred iron-red flowers divided by a blue band with meandering green fronds and tendrils, the shoulders with half cartouches of pateræ and fronds, each vase with an ormolu collar above the circular spreading foot with a gilt band of orange strapwork and radiating gilt false gadroons above a band of berried green myrtle, on square gilt bases, the convex rims with stylised iron-red and green foliage and interlaced ogival and trefoil arches divided by blue and gilt smaller arches, comprising: A large vase with a circular portrait medallion of Fredrick William II, King of Prussia, in half profile to the left, the reverse with a gilt and bronze Prussian eagle within an oak-leaf cartouche, the shoulder with an ormolu band cast with radiating foliage and gadroons 78cm. high A pair of vases, one with the Altes Museum and the Schauspielhaus, the other with the Werdersche Kirche and the Gens d'armes Markt (one with repaired chip to edge of base, the other with minute chip to bottom edge of one corner and some discolouration to the blue ground) 61cm. high A pair of vases, one with Das Schloss zu Charlottenburg. and Potsdam vom Pfingstberge aus. named in black script inside the neck and the other with Schloss Sanssouci and Neues Palais, Potsdam (the first with some minor discolouration to the blue ground) 51cm. high blue sceptre marks, incised lines, 1834 (5)

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 1993-10-11
Hammer price
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La Schiava Greca (The Greek Slave)

This elegantly conceived figure of a Greek Slave is one of Scipione Tadolini's defining masterpieces. Tadolini was the eldest son and inheritor of Antonio Canova's principal studio assistant, Adamo Tadolini, and, like his father, he rapidly emerged as one of the leading sculptors in Rome during his lifetime. The superbly carved and polished surface of this serene marble stands in the celebrated tradition of idealised statuary established by Canova, the greatest Italian sculptor of the 18th and 19th centuries and the father of neoclassicism. However, the touching portrayal of a beautiful young girl enslaved, together with her orientalist guise, looks forward to the Romantic movement in 19th-century sculpture. An idealised female youth stands in contrapposto, her right arm raised as she contemplates her bracelet. Tadolini's magisterial composition is a response to one of the most famous sculptures of the age, Hiram Powers' Greek Slave, which was exhibited for the first time at the Great Exhibition in London in 1851, where it caused a sensation, both for its beauty and for its scandalous nudity (the marble is currently in the collection of Lord Barnard at Raby Castle, Durham). Like Powers' model, the theme of Tadolini's sculpture is taken from the Greek War of Independence of the 1820's. The young woman has been abducted by the Turks and is about to be sold in a slave market. Tadolini's Greek Slave is consequently a highly emotive and politically charged image, designed to appeal to a Western audience through portraying a Christian innocent enslaved within a Muslim culture. The Turkish context within which the Greek Slave finds herself is emphasised by Tadolini in the beautifully carved headress, which falls about her shoulders, and recalls Ingres' La Grande Odalisque (1814; musée du Louvre, Paris, inv. no. RF. 1158). The present marble is one of two variants of the model created by Tadolini, the principal difference between them being the fact that, in the present composition, the young woman raises her right arm to the level of her chest, recalling the pose of the Venus de' Medici (Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence). In contrast, in the second variant, the slave touches her chin with her right hand, in a gesture reminiscent of Canova's Danzatrice con dito al mento (Pinacoteca Giovanni e Marella Agnelli, Turin). The present model is likely to be the earlier of the two variants. It would also appear to be the rarer, and, together with the present marble, is known from versions in the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (dated 1859), and from a version sold in these rooms on 22 June 1990 (dated 1871). The second variant is known principally from the marble in the collection of the Glasgow Museums: Art Gallery and Museums, Kelvingrove, which is housed in the Kibble Palace of the Glasgow Botanic Gardens (dated 1873). There is also a marble version in the Museo de Bellas Artes, Seville (dated 1862), whilst another is recorded as having been in the collection of the Earls of Strafford at Wrotham Park, Hertfordshire (Hufschmidt, op. cit., p. 200). The Greek Slave was one of the most celebrated and original compositions created by Tadolini, as is illustrated by the fact that he was commissioned to produce several versions for wealthy patrons from around the world. Tadolini's sculpture was particularly popular with visiting British and American Grand Tourists, and it is likely that the present marble was acquired in Rome by an American collector, who then brought it to the United States. The Tadolini family occupies a fascinating position in the history of Roman sculpture. Four generations of the family of stone carvers lived and worked in the same studio for some 150 years. The building still exists today, on the corner of the Via del Babuino overlooked by the Greek Church of S. Anastasia. It is now the Canova-Tadolini Museum. Scipione Tadolini was trained in the studio of his father, Adamo Tadolini, who was Antonio Canova’s most trusted studio assistant, establishing an international reputation for himself as one of the last great Italian Neoclassical sculptors. Born in Bologna, Adamo trained at the city’s Accademia di Belle Arte, where he received a rigorous education in the classical principles of sculpture. In 1814, he moved to Rome, winning the prize Canova had instituted for talented young sculptors. Impressed by Tadolini’s pure classicism, the master took him on as an assistant. Tadolini became so expert a marble carver that the versions he produced of his master’s models were (and still are) often thought to be originals by Canova himself; including, for example, the Cupid Reviving Psyche in the Villa Carlotta, Lake Como. As a sign of their closeness, Canova helped Tadolini to set up his famous workshop in the Via dei Greci. Scipione Tadolini was schooled in his father's neoclassical style and in the art of virtuoso marble carving. However, the elegant nude Ninfa Pescatrice, which launched his career, set him apart from his father's cool, idealised, aesthetic. Moving away from a strict classicism, Scipione imbues classical subject matter with the Romantic spirit. During his lifetime, he was overwhelmed with commissions, including a marble for the church of Gonfalone in Rome, a St. Michael for a wealthy Bostonian and the very important Bust of King Vittorio Emanuele I, which was the first sculpted portrait to be made of the new King. Visiting the Tadolini studio in 1869, Pope Pius IX declared him to be one of the finest sculptors of his generation. The present marble exhibits superb carving, particularly in the beautifully undercut drapery, the idealised facial physiognomy, and the astonishing realism of the chain and handcuffs. This high quality of carving is characteristic of Tadolini's finest work, together with the signature beautifully polished surfaces, which are in excellent condition in the present marble. Until recently, the statue formed the centrepiece of the interior of one of South Africa's grandest residences, the Enigma Mansion, in Camps Bay, Cape Town. RELATED LITERATURE T. F. Hufschmidt, Tadolini: Adamo, Scipione, Giulio, Enrico. Quattro generazioni di scultori a Roma nei secoli XIX e XX, Rome, 1996, pp. 200-201; http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T082984?q=tadolini&search=quick&pos=1&_start=1#firsthit accessed 2 June 2015 Signed: SCIP O TADOLINI I. F. ROM. 1860. and inscribed in Greek to the bracelet pisto tes and to the necklace elpis (hope)

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
Hammer price
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Pacing horse

As few as four versions of the present horse survive, of which only two measure an extraordinary 89 by 83 centimetres. The spectacular size of the present bronze as well as the rounded Baroque elegance and movement of the model have rightly led art historians to associate the model with a long-lost equestrian monument to Louis XIV that towered over the city of Rennes before the Revolution. Both this bronze and the other large version were once in the possession of the noble Talon-Sampieri family of Italy and were probably inherited from their Belgian ancestor Joseph Depestre, the Count of Seneffe and Turnhout. The high regard in which the model has been held is illustrated by Depestre’s early inventories and estate sale catalogue: “Un Cheval de Bronze, dit le fameux cheval de bronze. Cette piece est unique par toutes ces perfections et beauté.” The model This exceptional bronze horse closely parallels an important bronze equestrian monument of Louis XIV which stood in the Place de Parlement in Rennes and was commissioned from the court sculptor Antoine Coysevox on 9 June 1686 and finally erected in 1726. As was the case with so many effigies of the Sun King, the monument was slated for destruction during the Revolution and the bronze reused for the production of cannons. The only remaining vestiges of the original monument, now preserved in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Rennes, are the two bronze bas-reliefs made for the pedestal of the statue. They depict the presentation of this project by Jules Hardouin-Mansart to the king (Souchal, op.cit, figs. 49a-b). The appearance of the entire monument, however, does survive through reproductions, such as the engravings by Simon Thomassin (fig.1) and Jean-Baptiste Biard and a gouache executed by Jean François Huguet, which is preserved in the Bibliothèque Municipale at Rennes (Martin, op.cit, p.122, fig.64.). The engravings of the monument show that Coysevox’s arrangement of the rear and front legs, a combination of a natural and formal gait, with only the edge of the proper left rear hoof touching the base, is precisely the same as in the present model. Similarly, one long, slightly curled, tress of the mane falls over the right shoulder, while the balance of the mane remains on the left side of the neck and shoulders. The bridle is also comparable, with the exception of the bit; here a simple bridle with a noseband was probably attached and secured by a chain on the outside of the mouth. In both cases the saddle cloth is rectangular with an undulating fringe and the thick wavy hair of the tail is not tied. Compare also the eye sockets, brow, and dilated nostrils as well as the anatomy and voluminous groups of muscles in the early bronze reductions of Fame and Mercury on horseback after the marbles Coysevox executed for the Tuileries in 1701-1702 (The French Bronze, op.cit., no. 41). The relation between the present model and another great lost equestrian statue, François Girardon’s destroyed monument for the Place Louis-le-Grand in Paris of which the design is handed down to us by numerous small scale replicas, has been much discussed in the literature but can probably be dismissed due to distinct differences, including several in both the mane and the tail. (see Seelig, op.cit., p. 211, n. 845) As mentioned before, four versions of the present model exist. Aside from the present cast, a cast of the same size which was also part of the Talon-Sampieri collection was sold at Sotheby’s Monaco on 24-25 June 1984 (lot 3267), and appeared twice more at Sotheby’s New York on 5-6 December 1991 (lot 23) and 26 January 2007 (lot 284). Differences in their facture, including the use of screws to plug casting flaws and varying levels of afterwork, indicate that the latter version was cast in the years immediately following Coysevox’ design of the monument at the end of the 17th century whilst the present cast, which is cast according to the lost wax method, has mounts for a bridle, and has a large casting aperture underneath the separately cast saddlecloth, probably dates from the late 18th century. The dating of the older cast suggests the model may have come into being by casting the model of the horse for the equestrian monument in bronze. As such it may have functioned as a presentation piece for the King or Hardouin-Mansart or to capitalise on a highly original design for a trotting horse, which had been collector’s items since the early 16th century. Since the present bronze was cast around a century later, it is likely to have been made for a family member or second domicile of Joseph Depestre, Count of Seneffe and Turnhout. The other two versions of the model are of a reduced size and incorporated in equestrian statuettes: one representing Augustus the Strong in the Grünes Gewölbe in Dresden and one with an unknown rider in the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid. The smaller bronzes display several variations compared to the present bronze; in addition to bearing a rider, they include saddlecloths, a different arrangement of flowers and a raised support for one of the hooves on the terrasse, and a lower level of modelling of the manes at the top of the head but otherwise more elaborately chased detail. The Dresden bronze is significant because it is known to have been commissioned by Augustus the Strong’s agent and architect Raymond Le Plat and was delivered to the elector in 1715. This record provides a terminus ante quem for the model that fits well into Coysevox’ lifetime and indicates that the sculptor did indeed capitalise on his superlative design for Louis XVI’s equestrian monument by offering beautifully made reductions to other clients. Antoine Coysevox (1640-1720) became apprenticed to Louis Lerambert after causing furore with a sculpture of the Virgin Mary at only seventeen years of age. At twenty-six he was appointed sculpteur du Roi and joined the army of artists decorating the Louvre. His young wife tragically died after only a few months of marriage causing Coysevox to escape Paris and continue his career in Strasbourg and Lyon, where he carried out major commissions for local noblemen and clergy. He was lured back to Paris by a teaching position at the Académie Royale, of which he would eventually become the rector in 1694, one of the great triumphs of sculpture in the history of art. Once re-established in Paris, Coysevox worked on sculpture for Louis XIV’s foremost projects, including the châteaux of Versailles, Trianon, Marly, Saint-Cloud, and Chantilly. He designed and sculpted the funerary monuments for Mazarin, Colbert, Hardouin-Mansard, Le Brun, and Le Nôtre, some of the greatest men of his time. In addition to numerous busts of the royal family and the destroyed equestrian monument to Louis XIV, Coysevox produced a monumental portrait of Louis XIV Standing for the courtyard of the Hôtel de Ville in Paris, which was hidden during the Revolution and is now in the courtyard of the Musée Carnavalet.  His bronze reductions of the classical Kneeling Venus and the aforementioned Mercury and Fame are amongst the most successful small bronzes from the reign of Louis XIV. The provenance Owing to its provenance from the aristocratic Talon-Sampieri family of Bologna, the present bronze can be connected with a bronze documented in 1791 in the inventory of the Château de Seneffe near Nivelles in Belgium, which was then owned by Joseph Depestre, Count of Seneffe and Turnout (1757-1823). After the death of his parents, Depestre inherited the Château de Seneffe and embarked upon a campaign to enhance the decoration of the castle so that it would rival any residence in the Habsburg Low Countries. In order to do so the Count set out to acquire works of art in several of the major sales of his time, including those of Charles of Lorraine and the Marquise de Pompadour. From 1786 onwards Depestre spent most of his time in Paris, where he assembled a second magnificent collection, consisting of approximately one hundred paintings, which was acquired in its entirety for the Louvre. In addition to collecting painting and sculpture the nobleman amassed a group of scientific instruments, was a bibliophile, and an amateur physicist. As is evident from his interests, Depestre was a highly dynamic individual and forceful businessman. On more than one occasion he put his fortune on the line by speculating with commodities or investing in risky business ventures. According to Duquenne, a particularly bad stint during the final years of the Ancien Régime forced Depestre to make the 1791 inventory of the contents of the Château de Seneffe which first mentions the presence of a large bronze horse in the Grande Salle. (Duquenne, op.cit., p. 181 and Fonds Famille Depestre de Seneffe, op.cit.) The inventory sadly does not make clear if Depestre inherited or purchased the bronze, but it is likely to have been acquired in France. In the same year Depestre’s financial problems forced him to flee to Florence. He was declared an émigré and his properties in France and Belgium were confiscated. In an extraordinary coup, he managed to convince his brother Jean-Baptiste to acquire the house and its contents, who kept it in the family until the Count was able to reacquire it in 1802. He continued his collecting at this time as well, as is clear from a further set of inventories. They confirm that the bronze horse was still in the Grande Salle at this point and record the presence of the saddle cloth and the absence of a rider: “1 cheval de bronze de 2 pie 8 pous de hauteur Sur 2¼ d longeur et 11 pouces de largeur couvert d’une valtrasse” (see Petites archives de familles, op.cit.) In the following years Joseph Depestre had to sell his property to cover his debts twice more. In 1818 he sold the contents for the third time but died before he could reacquire the lot (Duquenne, op.cit., p. 182). The remaining contents of the Château de Seneffe were put up for auction by his heirs in October/ November 1825. There was clearly still a substantial group of furnishings at this point because the sale took place over a period of thirty-eight days. The bronze horse miraculously survived the Count’s financial mismanagement and was presented in the sale announcement in the Journal de Belgique as one of the most precious works of art in the house. (Duquenne, op.cit., p. 186) A poster announcing the sale found recently in the archives of the Talon-Sampieri family equally mentions “le magnifique cheval de bronze”  (op.cit.). The notarial document drafted on the occasion of the sale shows that most of the collections were acquired by two relatives of the deceased, his nephew Viscount Denis Claire Talon and the Chevalier de Knyff. (Duquenne, op.cit., p. 182) The Talon-Sampieri archives contain a document that substantiates Talon’s activity at the sale and proves that it was he that acquired a bronze horse from Château de Seneffe for 610 florins. Upon the death of the Viscount Talon in 1853 the bronze must have passed to his son, Denis Gabriel Victor Talon, who had married Carolina Sampieri and settled in Bologna in 1849. The present bronze remained in their descendants’ possession until recently. The fact that two old casts of Coysevox’ horse emerged from the Talon family collection in the last decades and only one is mentioned in the archival material outlined above suggests that one of the casts has a different provenance or was cast after the earlier version for the family and evaded the family records. If the former is true, the cast could have come into the possession of the family through later inheritance from the French Talon branch, which includes illustrious courtiers such as Omer Talon (1595-1652), advocate and procurator of the King in the French Parliament, Jean Talon (1625-1694), the first Intendant of New France, now Canada, and Antoine-Omer Talon (1760-1811), Lieutenant Chatelet of Louis XVI. Judging by his activity at his uncle’s estate sale, Viscount Mathieu Denis Claire Talon (1783-1853) was an avid collector, who may have been keen to possess both large casts of the horse. His son and his Italian wife and their descendants equally continued to add to their collection during the 19th century. RELATED LITERATURE P. Quarré, ‘La statue equestre de Louis XIV sur la Place Royale’, Mémoires de la Commission des Antiquités du Department de la Côte d’Or, 25, 1959-1962, p. 92; P. Volk, ‘Darstellungen Ludwigs XIV. auf steigendem Pferd’, Wallraf-Richartz-Jahrbuch, XXVIII, 1966, p. 77; The French bronze 1500-1800, cat. M. Knoedler & Co., New York, 1968, no. 41; F. Souchal, French sculptors in the 17th and 18th centuries. The reign of Louis XIV, Oxford, 1977-1993, vol. I, pp. 198-199 and 210, vol IV, p. 57, no. 49; L. Seelig, Studien zu Martin van den Bogaert gen. Desjardins (1637-1694), Altendorf, 1980, p. 211, n. 845; M. Martin, Monuments équestres de Louis XIV, Paris, 1986, pp. 114-116, figs. 60 and 61; M. Raumschüssel, Barock in Dresden, exh. cat. Villa Hügel, Essen, Leipzig, 1986, p. 53, no. 1; A. Boström (ed.), ‘Coysevox’, The Encyclopedia of Sculpture, New York, 2004

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
Hammer price
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A blue and white kendi with german silver-gilt mounts, the porcelain

The lobed compressed spherical body rising from a flat base, to a tall cylindrical neck, painted with roundels of a horse, crane and lion below a wide band of peony and chrysanthemum at the shoulder, the ribbed domed spout with various diaper panels, each bordered with an antler motif, with further roundels to the top of the neck, below a band of key-fret at the mouth, the subtly matted silver-gilt mounts echoing the antler motifs and flowers and incorporating bats' wings with entwined strapwork and a grotesque mask with lobate jowls and winged ears Striking for its meticulously painted cobalt blue decoration, kendi of this lobed form and design are extremely unusual, and no other closely related example appears to have been published. Blue and white kendi were produced exclusively for export to the Middle East and Southeast Asia, although a small number found their way to Europe. Blue and white wares of this type were produced at non-official kilns in Jingdezhen, Jiangxi province, which were not under strict Imperial supervision. As a result some innovative and original designs were created, as exemplified by this piece. Of particular note are the four different geometric patterns that decorate the spout, the playful rendering of the animal roundels on the body, and the lush flower blooms and leaves on the shoulders. Compare a slightly smaller kendi of similar lobed form, painted with flower sprays, from the F. Lugt collection and now in the Institut Néerlandais, Paris.1 Chinese porcelain was an exotic and valuable material in the West. It had properties which were unknown to European science;2 it was hard, translucent, impervious to liquid and coming from an exotic land, far away, was, in the early days at least, very difficult to acquire. It was given powers, which like ‘Unicorn horn’ (Narwal) and ‘Serpents’ tongues’ (fossilized sharks’ teeth) could warn of poison or act as an antidote to it.3 No wonder its owners embellished it with precious mounts. In Giovanni Bellini’s ‘The Feast of the Gods’ (National Museum of Washington) painted for a member of the D’Este family in 1514, a parcel-gilt silver beaker and cover lie on the ground while a satyr carries in a Chinese blue and white bowl with silver-gilt handle and strap. Chinese porcelain was still a royal gift towards the end of the 16th Century; Robert Burghley presented Queen Elizabeth I with a gold-mounted bowl in 1587, and a ewer owned by Burghley or his son Robert Cecil with silver-gilt mounts dated 1585 is in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.4 Kendi, which were made for the Middle Eastern market and designed for pouring directly into the mouth, appear in a few European paintings from the early 17th Century. An un-mounted example was used by Jan Breughel the elder on at least two occasions including his 1617 allegory of ‘Sight’ in the Prado (acquisition no. po 1394).5 It is visible behind a hardstone cup, part of the Kunstkammer objects of the Habsburg archduke Alberto VII (1559-1621) and his co-Sovereign Clara Eugenia of Spain (1566-1630). An example with silver mounts appears in a painting dated 1615 by Nicolaes Gillis.6 An even more elaborately mounted kendi, is in a painting by Pieter Roestraten (1630-1700).7 (see detail). The handful of mounted examples that have survived,8 have mostly rather plain white mounts of English make. These mounts include a spout in the form of an animal’s head but are otherwise, with the exception of the Boston example, linear and functional. Unlike those,  the current example has silver-gilt mounts which are inventive and complimentary to the Chinese ornament. They are likely to have come from a main centre such as Augsburg or Nuremberg where the skills existed and the goldsmiths were leaders in the current style. Items with Nuremberg mounts, formerly belonging to the princes of Hatzfeldt, and exhibited together with the kendi in 1905, are now in the Thyssen-Bornemisza collection and the Metropolitan Museum of Art.9 The latter item, the silver base and mount of a cup, by Wolf Christof Ritter of Nuremberg, is like the mounts of the kendi, in lobate style. The kendi and three other items can be identified in the portrait of Marie, Fürstin von Hatzfeldt (1820-1897), who is seated in a magnificent dress in front of a desk, arranged with family treasures (see following page). On the Fürstin’s right, next to a small marble bust is a carved smoky quartz cup with silver-gilt mounts; to her left below the kendi is a carved rock crystal cup with gold mounts, probably of the Miseroni workshop,10 and also on her left, behind the candlestick, a rock crystal bowl from the Miseroni workshop with gold mounts, given to the cavalry captain and future general field marshal Melchior von Hatzfeldt (1593-1658) by Adolf von Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorf (1600-1631). This became a gift from J. Pierpont Morgan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (acquisition no. 17.190.544). Despite the limited descriptions of objects in the Hatzfeldt family’s early inventories these three items can be identified in family papers with some confidence from 163411 when the collection was stored in the ‘Hatzfelder Hof’ in Cologne during the Thirty Years’ War. This is where Franz von Hatzfeldt (1596-1642), Prince-Bishop of Würzburg (1631) and of Bamberg (1633) had taken refuge from enemy forces since 1631. These three items are then more obviously in the inventories of 1641,12 still in Cologne, and 1673/74,13 the latter being drawn up following the death of Hermann von Hatzfeldt-Crottorf-Gleichen (1603-1673), the Prince Bishop’s brother. The earliest inventories also include silver and silver-gilt mounted porcelain items, but it cannot be stated for certain, due to the limited descriptions, that the kendi, is one of these. As the kendi was included in the portrait of the Fürstin made at Schloss Trachenberg in 1876, it can probably be identified from the inventory taken only six years earlier, of items belonging to an Entailed Estate at Schloss Trachenberg , as one of 2 porcelain jugs mounted with silver-gilt and valued at 40 Thalers.14 No other reference to silver-gilt mounted porcelain in that inventory is possible. These two porcelain jugs with silver-gilt mounts can be traced back through an earlier inventory of 1779 which also records them as part of the Entailed estate (Majorat) of the Hatzfeldt family, and possibly 1722 where they are recorded at Schloss Crottorf, the ancestral seat of the family. The Majorat was set up in 1662 by Hermann Graf von Hatzfeldt (1603-1673) and ratified by the emperor in 1668. It stipulated that the freie Standesherrschaft Trachenberg, and certain Hatzfeldt property, should always stay with the family. When Hermann Hatzfeldt’s great-great-grandson, Friedrich Karl Franz Cajetan Fürst von Hatzfeldt-Trachenberg (1779-1794) died without issue, Trachenberg together with most of the entailed estate devolved onto the branch of the family Hatzfeldt-Werther-Schönstein headed by Franz Ludwig von Hatzfeldt (1756-1827) who received the Prussian title of a Prince in 1803. Franz Ludwig’s daughter-in-law was Fürstin Marie (1820-1897) who features in the portrait. Not all objects belonging to the Entailed estate are known but some of them such as the mounted hardstone cups in the portrait of Fürstin Hatzfeldt, can be identified from the 1779 inventory.15 As the two porcelain jugs (one of which is probably the kendi), are also recorded in the 1779 inventory as part of the Entail it is possible that they also entered the family collection before 1722. Notes 1. Maura Rinaldi, Kraak Porcelain. A Moment in the History of Trade, London, 1989, pl. 221 2. In 1512 the Portuguese Duarte Barbarosa wrote that it was made ‘from the shells of fish ground fine, from eggshells and white of eggs and other materials…’ Jean Michel Massing, ‘From Marco Polo to Manuel I’, in Encompassing the Globe, Portugal and the World in the 16th and 17th Centuries, the Essays, Washington, 2007, p. 228 3. Op. cit. p.228. In an inventory of 1532, Chinese porcelain is described as `So sound that if some evil people should soil it with poison to harm anybody it would instantly break of itself and fall into pieces rather than tolerate the evil beverage which was meant to injure our inside’ 4. Timothy Schroder, Renaissance and Baroque Silver, Mounted Porcelain and Ruby glass from the Zilkha Collection, London, 2012, p. 220 5. Dr. A.I. Spriggs, Oriental Porcelain in Western Paintings 1450-1700, Transactions of the Oriental Ceramic Society, vol. 36 (1964-6), p. 78 6. Op.cit. p 78 7. Pieter Gerritsz van Roestraten (circa 1630-1692) Nature morte, oil on canvas. Sold Sothebys London, 2 July 1985, lot 165 8. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, (55.471) probably English mounts, circa 1610; Victoria and Albert Museum, London, (M220-1916) maker’s mark RP with an escallop, English, late 16th century; The Art Institute of Chicago, ( 1966.133) English mounts, circa 1610; Topkapi Museum, Turkish mounts (TKS 7809), late 16th century 9. Hannelore Müller, The Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, European Silver, London, 1986, no 54; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Accession no. 17.190.630 10. The smoky quartz cup was sold Sothebys Amsterdam, 17 December, 2008 lot 255; the rock crystal cup was sold Lempertz, sale no. 928, 20. November 2008, lot 1015. 11. ‘Specification verscheidener [sic] Altfrenkischer Geschier und Antiquiteten so den 18ten 7brs. 1634 in den Schanck im gewölb eingesetzt worden. Erstlich ein groß Cristallen geschir, ungefehr 2 Maß haltendt. It. ein Cristallen drinckgeschier in golt eingefast. Noch ein Tranckgeschir von Dupasio in golt eingefast Noch zwey geschir von Cristall in golt gefast.‘ Verzeichnisse ueber gräfl. Hatzfeldsches Gold- und Silbergeschirr, und Bücher de anno 1634 et 1684 (Archiwum Panstwowe Wroclaw, Archivum Hatzfeldtów Nr. 909, p. 6). 12. ‘1 Cristallen geschier, in goldt eingefast, mit gulden Handthaben, vom Hertzogen von Holstein.’ (the Holstein-rock crystal cup, Metropolitan Museum New York) ‘1 gantz dunkel braun geschier von Tupasio in golt gefast, mit rubinen versezt, in einem roten futerall.’ (the smoky quartz cup) Inventaria und Consignationes über Jouvelen, Silberwerk, Praetiosa, Meubles und Schriften der Hatzfeldischen Familie gehörig 1641 – 1661 (Archiwum Panstwowe Wroclaw, Archivum Hatzfeldtów Nr. 911, p. 6). 13. `Ein dickhe geschnittene Crystallene Trinckhschalen, am Fueß mit einem güldenen Reyff, undt unden ahn deß Fueßranffts mit golt eingefast in einem schwartz ledernem Futral’ (the Lempertz rock crystal cup). Inventarium über Des Hochgebohrnen Herrn Graffen Hermanns von Hatzfeld und Gleichen Verlassenschaft zu Blanckenhain, Würtzburg und Trachenberg de Annis 1673 et 1674 (Landeshauptarchiv Koblenz, Bestand 56 Nr. 1070, III, Q 47 – 57, Nr. 55, Fol. 49). 14. ‘Titel VI. An Uhren, Tabatieren und anderen kleinen kostbaren oder künstlichen Stücken. A. An vergoldetem Silber Zwei weiß und blau porzellaine Krüge mit vergoldetem Silber beschlagen. 40 Thaler’ (Two white and blue porcelain jugs mounted with silver-gilt. 40 Thaler value) Nachweis derjenigen Veränderungen welche seit dem Inkrafttreten des Allerhöchst am 19tn März 1870 bestätigten Familienschlusses bei der Substanz des Fideicommiss-Fürstenthums Trachenberg und bei dem zugehörigen Fideicommiss-Inventarium bis zum 30tn September 1876 vorgekommen sind (Archiwum Panstwowe Wroclaw, Archivum Hatzfeldtów No. 3273, p. 25). 15. Inventaria über den sämtlichen Nachlaß des abgelebten Herrrn Fürsten von Hatzfeld De Anno 1779 (Archiwum Panstwowe Wroclaw, Archivum Hatzfeldtów Nr. 835, p.66-69) A number of other items from the Entail have been identified, which include: A Fayence Jug dated 1610, with silver-gilt mounts. First mentioned in a Hatzfeldt inventory of 1634 (probably) and certainly in 1641. Sold Dorotheum, 16.10. 2008, lot 1101. An elephant tusk with gold mounts, mid-16th century, coming from the von Thüngen family. First Hatzfeldt inventory 1673/74. Sold Sothebys, Amsterdam 17 December 2008, lot 258. A Rhinoceros Horn cup, with German silver-gilt mounts. First Hatzfeldt inventory 1634 when it was unmounted. Second Hatzfeldt inventory of 1641 when it had silver-gilt mounts and a round case. Fourth Hatzfeldt inventory of 1779 when it was recorded with the onyx appliques. “10. ein Geschirr von Rhinoceros mit Silber vergoldt eingefaßt, worauf sieben geschnittene Onix steine sind. Da einer davon in ein Ring gefasst worden, so gehört dieser Ring gleichfalls zum Majorate.‘ (A dish of rhinoceros mounted with silver gilt, applied with seven cut onyx stones. As one stone was mounted in a ring the ring also belongs to the Entailed estate). Sold to Eugen von Gutmann 1912. Acquired by Baron Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza (1875-1947). See Hannelore Müller, The Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, London, 1986, no.54 A rock crystal cross with gold and enamel mounting set with pearls and precious stones, probably Milan, end 16th/beginning 17th century, sold Lempertz, sale no. 928, 20. November 2008, lot 1012. Listed in the inventory of 1634 as “Erstlich ein Crucifix von Golt undt Cristallen mit Perlein undt Rubinen versetzt pro 800 Rthlr.’

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
Hammer price
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A pair of george iii rosewood, tulipwood and marquetry commodes circa

The D-shaped tops with central rosette within interlaced bell flower garlands with a crossbanded and pearled edge, with two faux fluted frieze drawers and bowed cupboard doors, each inlaid with ribbon tied bell flower surrounded rosettes, enclosing four short and one long drawers George Spencer-Churchill, fifth Duke of Marlborough ( 1766-1840), polititian and major collector, principally of books, was born George Spencer on 6th March 1766, taking the additional name of Churchill by royal licence in May 1817. He was Member of Parliament for Oxfordshire from 1790 to 1796 and for Tregony from 1802 to 1804, and during the second ministry of William Pitt the younger, was Lord of the Treasury. In 1806 he was summoned to the House of Lords through a writ of acceleration in his father`s barony of Spencer of Wormleighton. From 1798, he resided at Whiteknights Park at Earley, near Reading where he became famous for his extravagant collecting. He paid in 1812, the then fantastic sum of  £2260 for Valdarfer`s edition of Decameron at the Duke of Roxburghe`s sale and in 1815, bought much of the library of James Edwards, the celebrated Bedford missal. Sadly his extravagance was to lead to bankruptcy and his collections were seized and his collection, including the present commodes, was sold in 1819. He retired to Blenheim, where he lived on a small annuity granted to the 1st Duke of Marlborough, by Queen Anne. Although no documentary evidence is known to exist to link the present commodes to the firm, they have long been attributed to the firm of Mayhew and Ince on stylistic grounds and through that firm`s known association with 4th Duke, father of the 5th Duke, and one of the firm`s most important clients, (see Journal of the Furniture History Society, 1994, Hugh Roberts, op. cit., pp.117-149). The firm of John Mayhew ( 1736-1811) and William Ince (d.1804) was one of the most successful and enduring partnerships of cabinet-makers in the 18th century. They are first recorded as partners in December 1758, advertising from an address at Broad Street in January 1759. Earlier Mayhew had been apprenticed to William Bradshaw, and Ince to John West, before forming a brief partnership after West`s death in 1758 with Samuel Norman and James Whittle. In 1763 they were described as `cabinet-makers, carvers and upholders’, and in 1778 `manufacturers of plate glass’ appeared on their bill heading. From 1780s the categories of `cabinet maker’ and upholsterer predominate, reflecting the change in taste from carved to veneered and inlaid furniture, which was more fashionable. One of their early ventures was to publish The Universal System of Household Furniture in 1762 which included eighty-nine numbered plates and six smaller ones dedicated to 4th Duke of Marlborough. The relative failure of this work, which was issued in only one edition, was probably caused by the distinctly Rococo manner of the designs which was to become rapidly unfashionable in the next few years due to the rise of the neo classical taste reflected in the present commodes. The partnership was quick to embrace these new forms as is shown by their own work and their involvement with Robert Adam himself in making furniture to his own designs for many of his important clients. Mayhew and Ince worked for many important patrons who included the Prince of Wales, 5th Duke of Devonshire, 5th Duke of Bedford and 1stDuke of Northumberland.  Particularly striking in the design of the present commodes are the distinctive oval medallions, trailing husk motifs and fluting on the frieze which are all motifs which reflect the George III Roman fashion promoted by such architects as Robert Adam ( d.1792) and James Wyatt ( d.1813).This fluting also appears on a pair of commodes similarly attributed to Mayhew and Ince, sold Christie`s London 10th April 2003, which was attributed on the basis of other inlaid elements seen in these examples, also seen on other pieces known to be by the firm. The sparing use of inlay seen on these commodes is also seen with the present lot. The distinctive form of the husk inlay on the top of the present commodes is also of almost identical form to another commode also attributed to the firm, sold Christies London, 30th November 2000, lot 130.. This commode which contains inlaid elements known to have been used by the firm also has an inlaid frieze similar to the present examples and is also of a similar distinctive shape. The distinctive oval medallions on both doors derive from an engraving of the Sun God Apollo`s temple that was illustrated in Robert Wood`s Ruins of the Temple of Palmyra, 1753 can also be seen on the doors of a bookcase, attributed to the firm with a tentative provenance of Warren Hastings at Daylesford House, Gloucestershire, offered by Christie`s London, Important English Furniture 9th June 2009, lot 219. The commission of the firm for Warren Hastings was one of the firm`s larger commissions and it would seem entirely likely that this cabinet was made by the firm and further supports the present attribution.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2013-12-03
Hammer price
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A pair of george iii rosewood, harewood, mahogany and satinwood marquetry

In the manner of John Cobb, with applied gilt-metal mounts, the serpentine tops inlaid with to the centre with an oval panel depicting an urn, within  foliate arabesques and  border of meandering foliage, the conforming front inlaid with trellis and inlaid to the corners with a slender twin handled urn on a shaped socle, the sides each fitted with a door enclosing on one commode a shelf on each side and on the other three drawers, on fluted turned tapering supports The present pair of commodes relates closely to a group of furniture attributed to the great 18th century cabinet-maker John Cobb and discussed in Lucy Wood, The Lady Lever Art Gallery, Catalogue of Commodes, 1994, pp. 88-97.  In particular the parquetry inlaid decoration to the top has close affinities with a commode attributed to John Cobb and supplied to Thomas Villiers ( 1709-1786), Baron Hyde of Hindon ( cr. 1786) and 1st Earl of Clarendon ( cr. 1776), illus. Lucy Wood, op. cit. pl. i-ii, p.88. Comparisons can also be made to another commode with a similar trellis design seen on the front and sides of the present commodes, illus. op. cit. pl. 84, p. 94 and also  a Bonheur du jour,  illus. op. cit. pl. 92 which combines  the geometric designs seen on the top of the present commodes with the trellis designs, seen on the front and sides. For further comparison see The Journal of Furniture History, Colin Streeter, Marquetry Tables from Cobb`s Workshop,  Vol. X, 1974, pp.52-53, pl.28a- 30b.    The present commodes can be said to be in a transitional style which is typical of Cobb`s work. The form shows both a strong French influence in the serpentine outline and in the  style of some of the inlay but also shows neo-Classical influences as evidenced by the urn motif to the top and front styles and also the leaf-carved supports. Very little is known of the early life of  the Royal cabinet-maker John Cobb ( circa 1715-1778), until he entered into partnership with the elder William Vile in 1751. Shortly after this, on 31st May 1755, he married Sukey Grendey and became the son-in-law of the celebrated cabinet-maker Giles Grendey. Cobb continued in business for thirteen years after Vile`s retirement in 1764, during which time he produced the documented inlaid commode and two pedestals for Paul Methuen ( 1772) which have become seminal to the construction of his identity as a producer of high quality furniture often incorporating a variety of exotic timbers ( cf. Anon., Corsham Court, 1993, p.11, fig.111). The present commodes also have affinities with furniture known to have been supplied by the prominent firm of London cabinet-makers, Mayhew and Ince, (a partnership which flourished between 1758 and 1804), suggesting that this firm may have also supplied them. It is noted that in the Dictionary of English Furniture Makers that amongst `the diverse forms' of furniture produced by Mayhew and Ince was the `highly proficient and adventurous use of marquetry, distinguished by a variety of techniques and pointing to a significant number of specialist marqueteurs in the firm`s employ,' continuing that their work was distinguished by the use of `large scale  Antique motifs.. derived from engravings, simply coloured and boldly inlaid on a contrasting ground; extensive and delicate surface engraving to achieve the illusion of depth; and subtle inlaying ( usually of foliate designs), differentiated from the ground wood only by the natural colour and figure of the inlay'. Clearly neo-classical inlay deriving from the Antique can be seen in the present commodes but more specifically the inlaid urns on the stiles of the present commode can be closely compared with a commode attributed to Mayhew and Ince, illustrated in Lucy Wood, op. cit. p. 203.  A similar motif also appears on a commode designed by Robert Adam for Lord Derby and supplied by Mayhew & Ince in 1775, again illustrated, Lucy Wood, op. cit. p.207. It is interesting also to note that the form of the commode with doors to each end enclosing shelves and drawers compares with another commode of the same form, also attributed to Mayhew and Ince, probably supplied to Archibald Douglas ( later 1st Baron Douglas) at 104 Pall Mall, London, circa 1773 and illustrated Lucy Wood, op. cit., pp 195-197.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-12-04
Hammer price
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Porcelain & Pottery

Items made of porcelain, earthenware, stoneware and faience from every country are found under the category Porcelain & Pottery. Plates, cups, antique vases, tableware, china figurines and Chinese serving dishes are just some of the items that can be found up for auction under this heading.

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