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A chippendale carved and figured mahogany games table, new york circa 1765

Rich brown color. Old dry surface.  Fitted with a secret drawer. The importance of card playing as a primary social entertainment in the eighteenth century is well substantiated by the large number of surviving gaming tables. This games table is a classic example of a type made in New York, characterized by a serpentine façade with a carved front rail, large projecting front square corners, a playing surface with counters and candle rests, cabriole legs with leaf- and scroll-carved knees, claw feet, and a fifth leg that pivots outward to support the top when opened. The form has long been considered one of the masterpieces of American Rococo furniture design and more than seventy-five examples have been identified, representing several shop traditions. Superior for its crisp carving, delicate form, and refined proportions, this previously unrecorded games table relates to a group of tables identified as Type II, or Beekman type, card tables by Morrison Heckscher in “The New York Serpentine Card Table," The Magazine Antiques (May 1973): 974-983. A pair of card tables originally owned by James W. Beekman (1732-1807) that sold in these rooms, Important Americana, January 21-2, 2000, sale 7420, lot 718 typifies Type II tables. A possible retailer for the Beekman tables may have been William Proctor, a merchant listed in New York City directories working at 56 King Street and 57 Pine Street. In 1768, Proctor sold Beekman a card table, a transaction recorded in Beekman's household account book for the date January 15, 1768 as “to William Proctor for a card table 85 / a china d. 95 / 4 windsor chairs 44 / 11.4.? With its pine front and side skirts veneered with mahogany and oak back outer skirt, this table follows the typical construction of Type II tables noted by Heckscher.  The table displays the additional distinguishing characteristics of a shallow serpentine skirt, a gadrooned molding below the front skirt only, distinctive foliate and asymmetrical C-scroll knee carving with peanuts and pinwheels, and claw feet with high balls and pointed claws.  The unusual and elaborate bookmatched crotch veneers on the skirt are known on two other Type II tables that appear to stem from the same shop.  One at the Metropolitan Museum of Art with a triple top and an inlaid backgammon board was owned by Robert W. Weir (1803-1889), a drawing instructor at the United States Military Academy at West Point between 1834 and 1876 (see Morrison Heckscher, American Furniture in The Metropolitan Museum of Art. (1985): no. 103, p. 171.  Its mate now in a private collection, also with a triple top and an inlaid backgammon board, was originally  owned by Edward de Forest (1708-1782) of Stratford, Connecticut, and descended in his family. Other Type II table construction characteristics found on this table include front and side skirts cut straight and mitered at the corners on the inside, forming a rectangular recess under the table; gadrooned moldings nailed to the bottom of the front skirt; and the stationary half of the outside skirt board nailed to the inner board. Several other examples of Type II tables are at the Museum of the City of New York, Winterthur Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the State Department, and the Henry Ford Museum as well as in several private collections. One with a history in the Van Vechten family of New York sold in these rooms, Highly Important Americana from the Stanley Paul Sax Collection, January 17, 1998, sale 7087, lot 467. Another is illustrated as a “Masterpiece'' in Albert Sack, The New Fine Points of Furniture, New York, 1993, p. 283.

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-01-18
Hammer price
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A pair of gilt-bronze-mounted ebony veneered and mahogany console

Each with a rectangular bleu turquin marble top above a recessed ebony veneered frieze mounted with a band of ribbon-tied torchères suspending berried laurel leaves interposed by a winged cherub head with scalloped collar with similarly mounted sides, the pilaster front supports with lotus leaf cast collars mounted with a stylised wheatsheaf above stylised carnations and flowers issuing from an acanthus cast baluster vase with a backboard and pierced trelliswork sides intersected by roundels on a platform base, the pilasters mounted with laurel leaf bands on the base, each with the marque au fer R15 underneath the frieze, with eight mahogany veneered brackets for shelves (now missing); Related Literature: Daniel Alcouffe, Anne Dion-Tenenbaum and Amaury Lefébure, Furniture Collections in the Louvre, Vol. I, Dijon, 1993, p. 309, no. 105. Pierre Arizzoli-Clémentel and Jean-Pierre Samoyault, Le Mobilier de Versailles, chefs-d’oeuvre du XIXe siècle, Dijon, 2009, p.104 and p.108, fig. 1. Patrick Guibal, Rosny au Temps de La Duchesse de Berry, Exhibition Catalogue, Entre Cour et Jardin, Marie-Caroline, Duchesse de Berry, Musée de l'îIe-de-France, Sceaux, 2007, pp. 49-58 and p. 227. Jean-Pierre Samoyault, Mobilier Français Consulat et Empire, 2009, Paris, p. 88, fig.155, and p.107, fig.182. This sumptuous pair of console tables with their exquisitely cast and chased gilt-bronze mounts represent the apogee of the oeuvre of Jacob-Desmalter for their Imperial and aristocratic clientèle whose stamp Jacob D.R. Meslée and the marque au fer R 15 for Rosny is found on both tables and the R 15 on the following lot. The pair are recorded in the inventories as having been delivered by Jacob-Desmalter to Marie-Caroline, the Duchesse de Berry for her château at Rosny in Rosny-sur-Seine, Yvelines, near Paris on 1st February 1821, for the Salon des Princes, at the then enormous sum of 2000 francs. Rosny was the favourite residence of the Duchesse de Berry which she set about refurbishing after acquiring it in 1818 (see post). Furthermore, it is interesting to note that No. 32 `Solde des Mémoires de fournitures faites pour l’ameublement du Château de Rosny (somme reçue des mains de S.A.R. Madame),1830, there is an entry for Jacob listed as `1. Jacob, ébéniste à Paris’, supplying 44,543.70 out of a total of 168,37.3 francs worth of furniture to the Duchesse for Rosny, almost a quarter of the expenditure demonstrating the size of her orders to them for that residence, reproduced here in fig. 4. Whilst nothing identical has been recorded to date which emphasises the exclusivity of the model for the Duchesse, some of the gilt-bronze mounts with slight adaptations  often supplied by Pierre-Philippe Thomire can be found amongst Jacob-Desmalter’s production, with the former being the most important bronzier of the Empire period due to the exceptional quality of his gilt-bronze mounts. Pierre Arizzoli-Clémentel and Jean-Pierre Samoyault, op. cit., p.104, fig.1, illustrate a console table with a L’Èlysée-Murat provenance by Jacob-Desmalter, circa 1805-06, now in the Mobiler national, Paris. This console in has a very similar frieze to that upon this table with an alternating band of ribbon-tied swags and torchères. The authors state that these decorative elements have been created by Thomire as they also appear on a console table in the Louvre which Thomire offered to the government as collateral for a loan, which is illustrated by Alcouffe et al., op. cit., pp. 308-309, n. 105, reproduced here in fig. 5. The decoration of the mounts with ribbon-tied swags and torchères of slightly different design, can be seen on a green granite chimneypiece, circa 1805, stamped Thomire à Paris, from the collection of Général Le Marois, Rue de Grammont, Paris, then the Collection of the Duc de Caraman, Château de Lonray, sold  on 3rd November 2005, from the Collections of Lily and Edmond Safra, Volume II, lot 175, ($452,800). Furthermore, a console table with a very similar frieze and with the label of the marchand–mercier Martin Eloy Lingereux was formerly in the collection of the Princes Esterhàzy, and is now in the collection of the Museum of Decorative Arts, Budapest, illustrated by Arizzoli-Clémentel op,. cit., p. 108, fig.1, where Thomire is mentioned as one of the possible bronziers for these types of console tables. However, the authors state that Thomire may have already collaborated with Lignereux in making that table as he purchased the cabinet-maker's business in 1804 . It is also worthwhile noting, that the treatment of the stiff leaves with scrolling tendrils issuing from an acanthus cast stylised vase on the front supports is so typical of Jacob, and can be seen with variations-see for example a commode by Jacob-Desmalter, illustrated by Samoyault, op. cit., p. 88, fig. 55, which was made around 1805, for the bedroom on the first  floor of the hôtel of Prince Eugène, in the rue de Lille, Paris. From this one can conclude that the bronzes on this pair of console tables can be firmly attributed to Pierre-Philippe Thomire. In the exhibition Catalogue of the Duchesse de Berry, op. cit., p. 227, no. 272, see a bureau à gradin by Jacob-Desmalter signed `Jacob D. Rue Meslée’ with the marque au fer `R 15’ in a drawer–the same number as on the offered console tables, which also indicates that it was in the Salon des Princes at some stage on the ground floor. It has an inscription which stated that it came from the bedroom of the vicomte de Gontaut-Biron, ambassador, having previously belonged to the Duchesse de Berry at the château de Rosny and was sold in the sale of the furniture from the château  in Paris in 1836. The bureau was delivered by Jacob-Desmalter on 10th March 1821, for the château de Rosny but no plan exists of the room layout of the château and the inventory has not survived to be able to identify what R15 refers to. Various examples of mahogany Empire furniture ordered by the Duchesse from Jacob were sold in these Rooms, see Nobless Oblige, 17th April 2011, lot 202, for a suite of mahogany seat furniture stamped Jacob D.R. Meslee and branded R 20 for Rosny and lot 204 stamped R 14, for a circular table attributed to Jacob. Until 1824, the Duchesse de Berry commissioned nearly exclusively mahogany furniture for Rosny, most of which was supplied by Jacob-Desmalter (see ante). Finally, a related pair of console tables stamped Jacob Frères rue Meslée, sold at Fontainebleu, étude Osenat,  7th November 2004, for 287680E.  The Château de Rosny: The Château situated in Rosny-sur-Seine was purchased on 14th August 1818 by Charles Ferdinand, Duc de Berry as a summer residence and very quickly became the favoured residence of the Duchesse who devised grand plans for its reconstruction. She had a vision to create a residence modelled on the English Country house model, which would have a more relaxed ambience in contrast to the rigid strictures of the Tuileries and according to Guibal, op. cit., p. 49,  :`Les intérieurs bénéficient d'une complete remise à neuf mais sans aucun excès, car, loin de la pompe et des ors des Tuileries, Marie Caroline entend faire de Rosny une maison à L'anglaise, confortable, largement ouverte sur la nature et où elle pourra vivre, entourée de ses proches, en savourant les plaisirs de la vie à la campagne’. Although the Duchesse de Berry acquired Rosny fully furnished she continued to fill it with newly acquired decorations, furniture and art. In her memories the Duchesse de Maillé states:`Rien ne peut être comparé au mobilier de Rosny: tous les étages et toutes les chambres sont également recherchés et soignés. Elle apporte en ce lieu ce qu'elle aime tout ce que le roi lui donne et tout ce qu'elle achète, de sorte que l'on peut dire que Rosny est encombré de meubles, mais il faut rendre cette justice à Madame qui le mérite, elle a fort bon goût. Tout chez elle est bien choisi. Elle a le sentiment du beau comme une Italienne'. Most of the beautiful furnishings from Rosny were dispersed after 1830 when the Duchesse had to leave France. However, at the beginning of her exile she managed to have a significant part of furniture and objects sent to Trieste, before she transferred them to her estates in Austria including Brunsee which was the most recent loction of this pair of consoles. Rosny was sold in 1836 and unfortunately most of her pieces are not listed, as at the end of the sale it indicated that tapestries, furniture, commodes etc were for sale but no detailed description was given. Marie-Caroline, Duchesse de Berry (1798-1870): Marie-Caroline, the Duchesse de Berry was one of the most remarkable, unconventional and iconic women of the 19th century. On 5th November 1798, Maria-Carolina, Princess of Naples and Sicily, was born in the royal palace of Caserta. She was the daughter of Francis I, King of the Two Sicilies and his wife Maria Clementina, Archduchess of Austria. Her grandmother was Queen Carolina of Naples, herself a daughter of the celebrated Austrian Empress Maria Theresa. In 1816, she married  Charles Ferdinand, Duc de Berry, heir apparent to the French throne, thus becoming Marie-Caroline, Duchesse de Berry. Due to her natural joie de vivre, kindness and good humour, the Duchesse invigorated the tired dynasty and enlivened the strict etiquette of the royal court at the Tuileries. In 1818, the Duke and the Duchess acquired the château de Rosny which became their favourite residence. Until the abdication of Charles X, Rosny would remain the place where the Duchesse de Berry felt happiest. A daughter, Louise, was born to the couple in 1819. Then tragedy struck: four years after their marriage the Duke was murdered in front of his wife on a frosty evening in February 1820. It appeared that with his death the old line of the Bourbon dynasty had come to an end but fate had a further twist when, seven months after the death of his father, the desperately desired heir to the throne of France, Henri, Comte de Chambord, Duc de Bordeaux, was born in September 1820. After that, the Duchesse de Berry became the undisputed social centre of the royal court, the most fashionable and most portrayed princess of her time. Her influence on the fashion of Romanticism was paramount in every sphere, from theatre and the romantic operas of Rossini to the contemporary painters and draughtsmen whose works she acquired to expand the famous art collection of her husband, not forgetting miniaturists, cabinet-makers, ivory carvers and porcelain manufactories among many others.  In 1824, Louis XVIII died and his brother Charles X succeeded him to the throne. The revolution of 1830 overthrew the dynasty of the older line of the Bourbons and with it also all claims to the throne of the “wonderchild”, the young Duc de Bordeaux. Based on a democratic majority, Louis Philippe, Duke of Orléans, from the younger line of the Bourbons, became new King of the French. The principle of legitimacy had come to an end. The Restauration was over and the Tricouleur again the banner of France. The Duchesse de Berry now accompanied the royal family into exile to Scotland although not without having arranged for a significant amount of furnishings, art and personal belongings to be shipped to the safe haven of Trieste beforehand. Determined to regain the crown for her son she conspired against Louis Philippe and landed in April 1832 in Marseille naïvely hoping the French troops would follow her appeal to overthrow the King. As soon as Louis Philippe recognized the threat, he mobilized the military all over France in order to track her down. Despite this Marie-Caroline managed in six adventurous weeks to escape from Marseille to Nantes on horseback, in men’s clothing, armed with pistols, and accompanied only by a small band of supporters. She and her companions waded through bogs, swam across rivers and slept in haystacks. In Nantes, centre of the legitimist Vendée region, she found refuge from June to November. Finally after having been denounced, she was captured and imprisoned in the fortress of Blaye near Bordeaux. Then yet another twist of fate, so typical of the Duchesse de Berry’s life, took place. Apparently she had secretly married Count Ettore Lucchesi Palli (1808-1864), son of the Prince of Campofranco and governor of Sicily, in 1831 and in February 1833, she announced that she was pregnant. In May 1833, a daughter named Anna Rosalia was born. At this point Louis Philippe released her from imprisonment since as the wife of an Italian count she was no longer a political threat. After a short stay in Palermo she reached Austria where Emperor Francis I granted her exile in October 1833. In the following years four more children were born to the Duchess and her husband. In 1837 she acquired castles and estates in Styria and in 1844 the Palazzo Vendramin on the Grand Canal in Venice, then part of the Austro/Hungarian Empire. Marie-Caroline died aged 82 on 16th April 1870 at Brunnsee, her castle in Austria. François-Honoré-Georges Jacob-Desmalter (1770-1841): He was the favourite cabinet-maker of Napoleon and belonged to a dynasty of leading cabinet-makers and was the son of the most celebrated seat furniture maker Georges Jacob. He took over the family's workshop in 1796, together with his brother Georges and the firm became known as Jacob Frères and remained in rue Mesaly or Meslée until 1825. He would have seen his father work on superlative objects such as the chairs for Marie-Antoinette's dairy at Rambouillet. Amongst Jacob-Desmalter's first commissions, was the decoration and furnishing of the town house of General Bonaparte and his wife Josephine in the rue Chantereine and the surviving furniture illustrates the patriotic and symbolic tastes which were so characteristic of the Directoire period heralding the Empire style. His next major commission was for the Récamiers, important and influential French bankers. At about the same time the firm was commissioned to decorate and furnish Malamaison, by Percier and Fontaine, which was the country retreat of Josephine. The firm also provided furniture for Bonaparte's apartments at the Tuileries and also exhibited at the second and third Expositions des Produits de l'lndustrie Française held in 1801 and 1802 in the courtyard of the Louvre and Jacob-Desmalter received a Gold Medal at the 1802 exhibition. Georges, his brother, died in 1803 and then the firm continued for nine years under the directorship of his father and after that Jacob-Desmalter used his own personal stamp "JACOB D. R. MESLEE" applied from 1803 to 1813. It was during the Empire period that his reputation was established and his talent fully recognised, as it is recorded that in 1807, the firm employed 350 workmen. In 1809, he executed the malachite furniture at the Grand Trianon comprising two meubles d'appui, two candelabras and a vase supported by three large chimeras with the head of Hercules and a lion pelt. The latter after a design by Percier and Fontaine was modelled by Cartelier, had already been employed by Jacob-Desmalter for the throne of Napoleon at Fontainebleau. Jacob was known to work with the outstanding bronziers of the day such as Thomire and Delafontaine. His work according to Serge Grandjean, 'is esteemed not only on account of its stylistic homogeneity but because of its consistent high quality'. Charles Percier (1764-1838): Charles Percier and his partner Pierre-François–Léonard Fontaine (1762-1853), the most celebrated architects and decorators during the Empire period, were largely responsible for creating the Empire style and are synonymous with creating the furniture and decoration heavy with symbolism for Napoleon. They had been in Rome from 1785 to 1790, where they had followed David's teaching, and they were fully familiar with Ancient Greek and Roman art, which was a major inspiration for their decoration and furnishing. Percier and Fontaine, published their Receuil des decorations intérieurs (1801, reissued in 1812) and they used motifs such as giant N’s in laurel wreaths, eagles and bees to make the style fully Napoleonic. Both were fully employed by Napoleon as both architects and interior decorators on various palaces such as Malmaison, Tuileries, Louvre, St. Cloud and Versailles. They transformed Napoleon's palaces into lavish showcases for the produce of French art and industry. Percier was also a partner of Jacob-Desmalter and they worked very closely together. Pierre-Philippe Thomire (1751-1843): He was the most celebrated bronzier in addition to Pierre Gouthière during the reign of Louis XVI. Thomire was the son of a ciseleur but also received training under the sculptors A. Pajou (1730-1809) and J.-A. Houdon (1741-1828) and he cast bronze portrait busts for both. Thomire was a pupil at the Académie de Saint-Luc. He was already working for the Royal family by 1775 and collaborated with Jean-Louis Prieur ciseleur et doreur du Roi, on the bronze mounts for the coronation coach of Louis XVI. He set up his own atelier the following year and in 1783, Thomire was appointed as the modeller to the Manufacture de Sèvres, succeeding Jean-Claude Duplessis. He was also well known for bronzes d’ameublement  and during the Revolution, his atelier was used for the production of arms, but in 1804 he reverted to his former profession when he acquired the premises and business of the marchand-mercier Martin Éloi-Lignereux, the former partner and successor to Dominique Daguerre. His business flourished during the Empire period, and was renamed Thomire, Dutherme et Cie and in 1807, he is recorded as employing at least seven hundred workers and he enjoyed prestigious commissions from both the City of Paris and the Emperor including an important toilet service for presentation to Empress Marie-Louise on the occasion of her marriage and also the celebrated cradle for the King of Rome. He is also recorded as gilding his own bronzes and sometimes employing others to do so, such as the fondeur-ciseleur Chaudron. His work pre-revolution is to be found in all the major collections including the Louvre, Versailles, Fontainebleau, Compiègne, the Pitti Palace, Florence and Wallace Collection, London and Waddesdon Manor, Hertfordshire. He retired from business in 1823 and was awarded the Légion d’Honneur in 1834 and died in his 92nd year.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-07-09
Hammer price
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A pair of italian gilt-bronze mounted pietra nefritica o ponderaria

The moulded shallow baluster body applied with gilt-bronze mounts in the form of satyr and bacchic heads, beneath a collar of gilt-bronze beads, the moulded rim with a simlar larger collar, the interior of both with a gilt-bronze medallion, raised on a spreading turned socle ornamented with conforming bead collars, on a stepped and on moulded square plinth, with similar gilt-bronze ornament This impressive  pair of vases carved in a marble known to have been used in antiquity and known as pietra nefritica o ponderaria,  lapis or aequipondus lapys martyrum , and quarried during the Roman period on the Tyrrhenian coast,  has been executed after models of two famous monumental and iconic vases, the white marble vase known as the Warwick vase, ( now to be seen in the Burrell Collection, Scotland) and also the vase known as the de Lante vase, ( now forming part of the collection of the Dukes of Bedford, at Woburn Abbey Bedfordshire).  These originals both date from the second century BC, and were found around 1771 on the site Hadrian's Villa at Tivoli, near Rome. Both were subsequently engraved by Piranesi and published by him in his famous work,  Vasi, Candelabri, Cippi, Sarcofagi, published in Rome in 1778, (illustrated fig. 1 and 2). The present vases are of an exceptional quality of craftsmenship. The bronzes are finely chiselled and gilded and suggest the authorship of of a very highly skilled manufacturer and strongly indicate a firm such the Milanese firm of bronze makers,  Strazza and Thomas, (1815-1881). The firm began working in the early 19th century and produced bronze and marble vases and other objects of great quality and definition of antiquarian inspiration including works for the Austrian and Italian monarchies of the time following the tradition of other bronze makers such as Valadier, Righetti and Manfredini. The mounts on the present vases vases can be compared with a group of bronze vases and sculpture by the Stazza and Thomas manufactory which form part of the collection in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana in Milan, donated by Giovanni Edoardo de Pecis in 1827. The collection of bronzes is illustrated in Enrico Colle, Angela Griseri and Roberto Valeriani,op. cit., pl.334-344 and clearly shows the range and  exceptional quality of their work which is consistent with that of the present vases. The vases and other items in the collection are also clearly inspired by antiquarian originals as in the present case.  The Design The present vases are decorated with attributes to Bacchus and also with Bacchic masks arranged in profile and with handles formed of interlaced branches of vines ( in the case of the Warwick Vase), and theatrical masks arranged frontally, reminiscent of those of the Propylon Sebasteion discovered at Aphrodisias (Asia Minor) between 1981 and 1983 , and flanked by curved double branch handles ( in the case of vase Lante ). The grotesque masks  which decorate the bowl are connected with the festivals of Bacchusand each vase has two magnificent handles channelled throughout and ornamented with Ferula Graeca, Greek fennel, a plant dedicated to Bacchus.  The original use of these large vases in Greece or Rome was to contain lustra later for the ceremonies of Bacchus. The Warwick Vase The antique vase known as the " Warwick Vase " model is one of the two vases presented here and is probably the model of archaeological vase that most fascinated collectors and artists  while doing their 'Grand Tour' , in the last third of the eighteenth century. The original was a huge vase of antique Roman white marble, flanked by two handles interspersed with enriched bacchanalian heads and emblems various. This vase was discovered in the ruins of the Villa of Emperor Hadrian in Tivoli, near Rome, 1771 , by Gavin Hamilton ( 1723-1798 ),  a famous Scottish painter and antique dealer in Rome. Hamilton, who enjoyed most of his career in the Eternal City, where he settled after 1756 , was a pioneer of the European neoclassical movement. He started primarily as an archeologist but soon turned to painting. Hamilton teamed with Thomas Jenkins (  1722-1798 ), a painter based in Rome from 1753 but launched quickly in the much more lucrative business of antiques dealer of supplying to the elite of the time and which led to him becoming one of the leading bankers of Rome. From 1770 Hamilton had been given a license to excavate at Hadrian`s Villa. Many important sculptures were recorded as having being found there but no record of a full vase was ever made. The explanation given by Norman Mosley Penzer in his study of the Warwick vase, op. cit.,  probably because it was excavated in fragments. The costly restoration of this monumental vase was paid for by Sir William Hamilton (1730-1803) , the famous Scottish aristocrat, British diplomat , antiquarian , archaeologist and volcanologist , then ambassador to the court of Naples, who had just acquired the famous collection Porcinari Greek and Etruscan vases he sold to the British Museum in 1772. Sir William Hamilton  turned to his nephew , George Greville (1746-1816) , 2nd Earl of Warwick, who at that time was renovating his house, Warwick Castle, Warwickshire, who purchased it as part of these renovations. It was transported to England and placed on a pedestal in the park along the axis of the house. A greenhouse was built around then in order to protect it. This extraordinary vase caused a great sensation. One of the first mentions of the Warwick Vase was published in England , in the Gentleman 's Magazine in 1800, and a second , in 1802 , in a book entitled Richard Warner Tour Through the Northern Counties of England . A more detailed description was given in a book by William Field, Town and Castle of Warwick, published anonymously in 1815 . Since 1978 the Warwick vase has formed part of the Burrell Collection in Glasgow ( fig.3). The Lante Vase The Lante vase is the other form of vase presented here and like the Warwick vase was also discovered in fragments in excavations made on the ruins of Hadrian`s villa. Following restoration to its original form, it was removed to the Villa Lanti near Rome where it remained for many years attracting considerable interest. In the late 18th century it was purchased by the great connoisseur and bibliophile, the Right Hon, Lord Cawdor and brought to England. It was subsequently sold at the sale of his museum in Oxford Street on 6th June 1800 for 700 guineas and was bought by Francis Duke of Bedford and removed to his seat Woburn Abbey, where it remains today ( fig.5). Both vases caused a sensation following their discovery.  In their first publication in 1778 by Piranesi ,  the Warwick  and  Lante  vases were to deeply influence artists, silversmiths and major collectors of the last quarter of the eighteenth century and early 19th century and many copies were made. A pair of  Warwick and  Lante vases in white marble , placed on pedestals with antique green marble borders and mouldings of white marble, was commissioned  before 1808 at the Chateau de Villiers, in Neuilly -sur -Seine, the property of Marshal Murat . They were acquired in 1808 , at the same time as the chateau by Napoleon I , and then were sent two years later, in 1810 , to the Château de Compiègne , where they adorned and still adorn with their pedestals, the dining room of the Emperor.The present Lante vase  can be closely compared with various other important examples in various collections. ' A  Lante vase, also in antique marble and gilded bronze, executed in Rome between the late eighteenth century and early nineteenth century , and attributed to Francesco and Luigi Righetti by Alvar González- Palacios, op. cit., and which rests on a patinated bronze group of the Borghese Three Graces is now preserved in the collections of the Museo di Capodimonte e Gallerie Nazionali Naples (fig.4). Another related example was sold by Sotheby's in London in the sale entitled  Treasures, Princely Taste, July 6, 2011  lot 2 , for £ 265,250, rests on a circular base and alabaster antique green marble with bas-reliefs in gilded bronze belonging to the known repertoire employed by Francesco and Luigi Righetti. The vases of course had a great impact in England where they especially fascinated collectors as they appeared in two of the largest private collections of antique marbles of the kingdom, the Warwick Castle collection,  and Woburn Abbey collection. The celebrated silversmith Paul Storr was particularly inspired by the vases. Eight Warwick vases in silver were delivered, for example, to the Prince Regent, later George IV of England, by goldsmiths Rundell of the Crown, Bridge & Rundell and now belong to the collection of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2014-07-09
Hammer price
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A gilt-bronze-mounted ebony, bois citronnier and amaranth inlaid secrétaire

The secrétaire with a rectangular Belgian fossilised black marble top above an egg-and -dart border, the frieze drawer centred with trophies and a three fleurs-de-lys, flanked by a gilt-bronze medal, one depicting the Homage to Asclepius and inscribed Guerin Pinx. and Barre Sculp. and the dated MDCCCXXIV (1824) and the other depicting Pax driving her chariot over Europe and signed Barre F., the fall-front applied with a watercolour painting on vellum of mixed flowers signed E. Panckoucke, within a gilt-bronze border opening to reveal a leather-lined writing surface with a frieze drawer above a mirrored recess with four short drawers above a further long drawer inlaid with stylised anthemions and berried laurel leaves in amaranth on a bois citronnier ground, with mahogany drawer linings, the brass lock signed . Jacob Desmalter à Paris flanked by pilasters with doric capitals, the lower section also mounted with a watercolour painting on vellum of mixed flowers signed E Panckoucke, within a gilt-bronze border opening to reveal three long drawers each side mounted with a ribbon-tied berried laurel branch and a thrysus on a platform base, the cartonniers each with a fossilised Belgian black marble rectangular top above a laurel leaf border interposed by stylised anthemions with the front of each inset with a watercolour painting on vellum of mixed flowers, signed E Panckoucke within a gilt-bronze border with a geometric panel above and below inset with agates, the lower section applied with four patera, opening to reveal six later tooled red leather-fronted cartonniers with gilt-bronze handles above two banks of slats in oak on a platform base Comparative Literature: Henri Regnoul-Barre, Les Barre graveurs généraux des Monnaies créateurs des premiers timbres-poste français et grecs. Paris, 1978, p. 5. Pierre Arizzoli-Clémental and Jean-Pierre Samoyault, Le Mobilier de Versailles chefs-d'oeuvre du XIXe siècle, Dijon, 2009, p. 91. Denise Ledoux-Lebard, Le Mobilier Français du XlXe Siècle, Paris, 1989, planche LXXIX. Fabienne Seillan, Le château de Villeneuve-l'Étang, propriété privée de la duchess d'Angoulême, L'Objet d'Art, no. 414, June 2006, pp. 74-82. Elisabeth Hardouin-Fugier, The Pupils of Redouté, Leigh-on-Sea, 1981, p. 53. Archives nationales, 371 AP : Archives du duc et de la duchesse de Berry, fonds du château de Rosny. 371 AP / 2 : the Duchesse de Berry's accounts from 1817 to 1831. We would like to thank Dr. Fabienne Seillan for her assistance with this footnote and in particular the Provenance of the Duchesse de Berry. This visually stunning and rare set of furniture comprising a secrétaire and pair of cartonniers is constructed in precious and exotic materials including ebony embellished with exquisitely cast and chased gilt-bronze mounts and panels of agates and watercolour paintings on vellum to spectacular effect. It almost certainly must have been an important and specific commission by a member of the Bourbon family in the first quarter of the 19th century and the most likely candidate would appear to be the celebrated Duchesse de Berry, due to her interest in collecting furniture made from exotic materials in the latest fashion, her love of botany and her connection with the painter Ernestine Panckoucke, whose paintings embellish these pieces and the Duchesse's well documented commissions to the firm of Jacob-Desmalter. Furthermore, the frieze drawer of the secrétaire is mounted with her coat-of-arms amongst military trophies. Although the exact Provenance has not been possible to substantiate with any certainty to date, as the furniture does not seem to have been under the administration of the royal Garde Meuble, which would seem to indicate that it was a private commission. Furthermore, there is very little furniture in ebony recorded under the Restauration emphasising its rarity. This is the reason why the furniture delivered by Jacob-Desmalter for the Duchesse de Berry at the château de Tuileries in 1821 is particularly noteworthy. One must consider in this context the archives of the château de Rosny (National Archives) and its furniture, and also examine the engraved medals mounted on the secrétaire. The archives of the duchesse de Berry are incomplete, as for example, there is no record whatsoever of the purchase of works by Anne Ernestine Panckoucke, the artist (see post), whilst the catalogue of the auction of the collections of the duc and Duchesse de Berry indicate that there was a watercolour by this artist at the château de Rosny, and unfortunately there is no evidence of the delivery of this set of furniture in the remaining documents. Nevertheless, the archives contain some very interesting bills from Jacob-Desmalter. These documents, which are very detailed, provide accurate descriptions of the furniture delivered to the Duchesse de Berry not only in Rosny but also in her other residences:Bagatelle and the Tuileries. The Jacob-Desmalter commissions for the Duchesse de Berry: In a bill dated 10th October 1821, several pieces of furniture made of ebony are recorded and designed on the same principle as the secrétaire à abattant and the cartonniers offered here, delivered by Jacob-Desmalter to the Château des Tuileries: - a table of Gothic style made of French ebony designed to received eleven cameos painted by Isabet [Jean-Baptiste Isabey], representing several views of the château de Rosny, which are placed on top, framed by small bronze frames and between them are fitted bronze arrows, the said frames are supported by pins adorned with laurels and ribbons, the middle frame similar and decorated with palm leaves and foliage, the edge of the said table is covered with a bronze frame decorated with several  moldings and arranged to receive the glass which covers the said table, the foot is composed of a decorated gothic dome, supported by three triple columns with their capitals and bases and abacuses, the said columns are fitted on a triangular base which is carried by three gothic chimeras carved in the round - a table of Gothic style similar to that above to receive "fixés" [sous verre] - a table of Gothic style to receive Thiery's rich drawing, made up of a carved frieze of rich Gothic ornaments all around, in addition Gothic arches cut in the solid wood....terminating in flowers, the whole is supported by eight columns with capitals and bases and astragals carved in the same way, the center is occupied by an octagonal column ending with leaves, the whole is fitted on an octagon which is supported by eight lions carved in the round with the greatest care -a Chinese screen made of French ebony  divided into two panels in height, which were filled with solid mahogany panels arranged to be varnished and painted by HRH, each panel will be decorated with a bronze frame carved and gilded. -to jardinières made of French ebony. However, the most interesting record is a bill of supplies made by Jacob-Desmalter for the duchesse de Berry and delivered during  1824. On 30th August 1824, the cabinet maker delivered to the Château des Tuileries : "Two large pieces of furniture altered in the Chinese style to receive lacquer painted panels by HRH,  the panels of which are framed with moldings cast bronze, carved, assembled with nuts and gilded, the uprights simulate bamboo, in the frieze there are two lockable drawers, there are ornaments inlaid in copper in the "fields" around the panels which are inlaid pewter wires, the said furniture made of mahogany, the outside dyed in ebony, sanded and varnished with the greatest care". It is possible to identify this furniture in a description provided by the auction catalogue of the collections of the duc and Duchesse de Berry under the number 629 : "Deux armoires en ébène avec incrustations de cuivre, panneaux en laque, intérieur en acajou" [Two ebony cabinets inlaid with copper, lacquer panels, mahogany interior]. At that time they were at the Château de Rosny. The archives of the Duchesse de Berry from the château de Rosny, unfortunately incomplete, offer multiple parallels to the present set of ebony veneered furniture comprising a secrétaire à abattant,and two cartonniers. These documents are evidence that this set is most probably part of a group of  furniture made by Jacob-Desmalter for the Duchesse de Berry and delivered during the 1820's. They belong to a homogeneous group on account of not only their technique but also their composition in precious materials. Although the Duchesse de Berry acquired Rosny fully furnished she continued to fill it with newly acquired decorations, furniture and art. In her memories the Duchesse de Maillé states: "Rien ne peut être comparé au mobilier de Rosny: tous les étages et toutes les chambres sont également recherchés et soignés. Elle apporte en ce lieu ce qu'elle aime tout ce que le roi lui donne et tout ce qu'elle achète, de sorte que l'on peut dire que Rosny est encombré de meubles, mais il faut rendre cette justice à Madame qui le mérite, elle a fort bon goût. Tout chez elle est bien choisi. Elle a le sentiment du beau comme une Italienne". Most of the beautiful furnishings from Rosny were dispersed after 1830, when the Duchesse had to leave France. However, at the beginning of her exile she managed to have a significant part of furniture and objects sent to Trieste, before she transferred them to her estates in Austria. Furthermore, it is also worthwhile by means of a comparison, to consider the following pieces illustrated and recorded by Ledoux-Lebard, op. cit., planche LXXIX,a meubles à portes by A. Jacob, also with floral painted panels by E. Panckoucke,  which was in the exhibition: Marie-Louise et le Roi de Rome, Musée des Invalides, 1962: Toilette-coiffeuse à caisson en loupe executed for the Empress Marie-Louise who became the Duchesse de Parma, stamped A. Jacob-Desmalter, rue de Bondy, 30. The lockplates were stamped A.-Jacob Desmalter a Paris, reproduced here in fig. 2. The same author also op. cit., p. 366, records  the sale at Galerie Georges Petit 5th December 1930 lot no. 39: très beau bureau ministre... il ouvre a neuf rangs de tiroirs latereaux; en loupe de citronnier avec ornements de plaquettes en agate herborisée dans des encadrements de bronze...:it also had the stamp A. Jacob-Desmalter a Paris on the lockplate of the external drawers, This confirms the supply by Jacob-Desmalter to aristocratic clients of furniture applied both with painted panels and agate plaques reproduced here in fig. 3. . Also lot 40 of the same sale records : `paires de très hauts meubles-cartonniers en bois de citronnier' which were attributed to Jacob-Desmalter. Property from the collection of the Duchesse de Berry was sold in these Rooms, in the Noblesse Oblige sale on 14th April 2011,  and included, lot 208, a Royal gilt-bronze and miniature mounted ebony cased set of drawing instruments by Alphonse Giroux, circa 1829, with the coat-of arms of the three fleur-de lys as on the present piece. The framing mounts with scrolls and lotus leaf at the angles and gilt-bronze rosettes can be seen on a larger scale on a mahogany meubles en serre-papiers, one of a pair, illustrated by Arizzoli-Clémental et al op. cit., p. 91, delivered in 1810 by Jacob-Desmalter for the grand cabinet of the Emperor Napoleon at the Grand Trianon. The medals upon the secrétaire: Jean-Jacques Barre realised a medal on the subject of "Les Victoires et Conquêtes des Français de 1792 à 1815", which refers to Napoléon's conquests. Barre also made a medal depicting "L'offrande à Esculape". For this composition, he was inspired by a painting by Pierre Narcisse Guérin (1774-1833). "L'offrande à Esculape", now at the Louvre Museum, dated by all the modern sources to 1804. Furthermore, in the dictionary of Charles Gabet, this painting is said to have been made in 1802 and was at that time in the Palais de Trianon, in the park of Versailles. Barre may not have needed to see the original to create his medal because there were engravings by Henri Guillaume Chatillon after the painting of Guérin. No evidence permits us to connect these artists or these works specifically to members of the royal family. However, a portrait of the " Duchesse de Berry with her child " by Guérin was auctioned in Bern on 26th October 1988. Regnoul-Barre, op. cit., p. 5, illustrates the medal on this secrétaire depicting the Hommage to Asclepius, by J.-J. Barre (1793-1855) medallist and `Graveur général des Médailles' from 1842-1855 . He was entrusted in 1834, with the engraving of the coins of Louis Philippe. An interesting postscript is that in 1824, he produced a medal of Dr Charles Fleury Panckoucke (1781-1844) of Paris, the husband of the artist who executed the painted panels on this set of furniture. François-Honoré-Georges Jacob-Desmalter (1770-1841): He was the favourite cabinet-maker of Napoleon and belonged to a dynasty of leading cabinet-makers and was the son of the most celebrated seat furniture maker Georges Jacob. He took over the family's workshop in 1796, together with his brother Georges and the firm became known as Jacob Frères and remained in rue Mesaly or Meslée until 1825. He would have seen his father work on superlative objects such as the chairs for Marie-Antoinette's dairy at Rambouillet. Amongst Jacob-Desmalter's first commissions, was the decoration and furnishing of the town house of General Bonaparte and his wife Josephine in the rue Chantereine and the surviving furniture illustrates the patriotic and symbolic tastes which were so characteristic of the Directoire period heralding the Empire style. His next major commission was for the Récamiers, important and influential French bankers. At about the same time the firm was commissioned to decorate and furnish Malamaison, by Percier and Fontaine, which was the country retreat of Josephine. The firm also provided furniture for Bonaparte's apartments at the Tuileries and also exhibited at the second and third Expositions des Produits de l'lndustrie Française held in 1801 and 1802 in the courtyard of the Louvre and Jacob-Desmalter received a Gold Medal at the 1802 exhibition. Georges, his brother died in 1803 and then the firm continued for nine years under the directorship of his father and after that Jacob-Desmalter used his own personal stamp "JACOB.D. / R. MESLEE" applied from 1803 to 1813. It was during the Empire period that his reputation was established and his talent fully recognised, as it is recorded that in 1807, the firm employed 350 workmen. In 1809, he executed the malachite furniture at the Grand Trianon comprising two meubles d'appui, two candelabras and a vase supported by three large chimeras with the head of Hercules and a lion pelt. The latter after a design by Percier and Fontaine was modelled by Cartelier, had already been employed by Jacob-Desmalter for the throne of Napoleon at Fontainebleau. Jacob was known to work with the outstanding bronziers of the day such as Thomire and Delafontaine. His work according to Serge Grandjean, 'is esteemed not only on account of its stylistic homogeneity but because of its consistent high quality'. Anne-Ernestine Panckoucke (1784-1860): The Duchesse de Berry was well known for her interest in botany and in particular in the painting of flowers. She was herself a pupil of the painter Pierre-Joseph Redouté as well as Anne-Ernestine Panckoucke. Also according to Hardouin-Fugier op. cit, a watercolour by the artist was in the duc de Berry's collection. Panckoucke was born in Paris on 10th June 1784 and died in 1860. According to family tradition, as a small girl she (née Désormeaux) together with her parents fled the French Revolution and emigrated to Germany. Her husband whom she married prior to 1814, Louis-Fleury Panckoucke, was a writer, politican and publisher and they had many influential friends in artistic and intellectual circles. Ernestine studied under Prudhon when the latter was working for Empress Joséphine, his patroness at Malmaison. There Ernestine must have met Redouté, though at that time, she was still  known as `élève distinguée du célèbre Van Spaendonk'. Both she and her husband became neighbours of both Redouté and the  Pastorets at Fleury. On her master's advice, Ernestine Panckoucke painted in around 1827, garlands of flowers in a first floor room of her Fleury house. In 1830 she went to Edinburgh with her husband, when he was elected as a member of the local Society of Antiquaries. With Turpin as co-designer she contributed to his Flore usuelle in 1831. One watercolour by her was in the duc de Berry's collection. From the design of a table top in the Musée de Tours, it seems that neutral or dark backgrounds were typical of her 1840's production. According to Hardouin-Fugier, op. cit., `Unlike other pupils of Redouté, whose works remain nearly untraceable, those of Ernestine Panckoucke (one in the Broughton Collection, the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge), be they skilfull botanical drawings or opulent highly decorative, impressively painted later works are numerous enough to place (her)...in a class of her own, as one of Redouté's most gifted pupils'.  The Duchesse de Berry: On 5 November 1798, Maria-Carolina, Princess of Naples and Sicily, was born in the royal palace of Caserta. She was the daughter of Francis I, King of the Two Sicilies and his wife Maria Clementina, Archduchess of Austria. Her grandmother was Queen Carolina of Naples, herself a daughter of the celebrated Austrian Empress Maria-Theresa. In 1816, aged eighteen, this young, blonde, light-hearted and energetic princess was married to Charles Ferdinand, Duc de Berry, heir apparent to the French throne, thus becoming Marie-Caroline, Duchesse de Berry.  The entire future of the Bourbon dynasty now lay on the shoulders of the young couple and yet despite this responsibility the two soon fell deeply in love with each other. Thanks to her natural joie de vivre, kindness and good humour, the Duchesse invigorated the tired dynasty and enlivened the strict etiquette of the royal court at the Tuileries. In 1818, the Duke and the Duchess acquired the château de Rosny which became their favourite residence. Until the abdication of Charles X, Rosny would remain the place where the Duchesse de Berry felt happiest. A daughter, Louise, was born to the couple in 1819. Then tragedy struck four years after their marriage, the Duke was murdered in front of his wife on a frosty evening in February 1820. It appeared that with his death the old line of the Bourbon dynasty had come to an end but fate had a further twist when, seven months after the death of his father, the desperately desired heir to the throne of France, Henri, Comte de Chambord, Duc de Bordeaux, was born in September 1820. This birth was seen as a miracle, not least because the little prince was born on 29 September, the feast of St Michael, the patron saint of France. The entire population of France instantly fell in love with the child and his mother. From then on the Duchesse de Berry became the undisputed social centre of the royal court, the most fashionable and most portrayed princess of her time. Thanks to the new art form of lithography her image quickly became known throughout Europe. She shortened her skirts, showed her ankles, dressed in menswear for horse riding and arranged fancy dress balls in the Tuileries. Bored by the Empire style the duchess adopted the neo-Gothic, adored the Renaissance and redesigned the castle and park of her beloved Rosny. Her influence on the fashion of Romanticism was paramount in every sphere, from theatre and the romantic operas of Rossini to the contemporary painters and draughtsmen whose works she acquired to expand the famous art collection of her husband, not forgetting miniaturists, cabinetmakers, ivory carvers and porcelain manufactories among many others. Famous poets and composers dedicated works to the duchess and the French statesman François René de Chateaubriand recounted her life story in his Memoirs from beyond the grave, which was to become one of the most widely-read books of the 19th century, published in 14 languages. In 1824, Louis XVIII died and his brother Charles X succeeded him to the throne. The revolution of 1830 overthrew the dynasty of the older line of the young Duc de Bordeaux. Based on a democratic majority, Louis Philippe, Duke of Orléans, from the younger line of the Bourbons, became new King of the French. The principle of legitimacy had come to an end. The Restauration was over and the Tricouleur again the banner of France. The Duchesse de Berry now accompanied the royal family into exile to Scotland although not without having arranged for a significant amount of furnishings, art and personal belongings to be shipped to the safe haven of Trieste beforehand. Determined to regain the crown for her son, she conspired against Louis Philippe and landed in April 1832 in Marseille naïvely hoping the French troops would follow her appeal to overthrow the King. As soon as Louis Philippe recognized the threat, he mobilized the military all over France in order to track her down. Despite this Marie-Caroline managed in six adventurous weeks to escape from Marseille to Nantes on horseback, in men¹s clothing, armed with pistols, and accompanied only by a small band of supporters. She and her companions waded through bogs, swam across rivers and slept in haystacks. In Nantes, centre of the  Vendée region, she found refuge from June to November. Finally after having been denounced, she was captured and imprisoned in the fortress of Blaye near Bordeaux. Then yet another twist of fate, so typical of the Duchesse de Berry¹s life, took place. Apparently she had secretly married Count Ettore Lucchesi Palli, son of the Prince of Campofranco and governor of Sicily, in 1831 and in February 1833 she announced that she was pregnant. In May 1833, a daughter named Anna Rosalia was born. At this point Louis Philippe released her from imprisonment since as the wife of an Italian count she was no longer a political threat. After a short stay in Palermo, she reached Austria where Emperor Francis I granted her exile in October 1833. In the following years four more children were born to the Duchess and her husband. In 1837, she acquired castles and estates in Styria and in 1844 the Palazzo Vendramin on the Grand Canal in Venice, then part of the Austro/Hungarian Empire. Marie-Caroline, died aged 82 on 16 April 1870 at Brunnsee, her castle in Austria. Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan(1933-2003) was born in Paris the son of Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan and Princess Andrée Aga Khan. He served as United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 1966 to 1978. His interest in ecological issues led him to establish the Bellerive Foundation in the late 1970's, and he was a knowledgeable and respected collector of Islamic art. During his lifetime Prince Sadruddin assembled one of the finest private collections of Islamic art in the world. He became a knowledgeable and respected collector, accumulating a priceless collection of paintings, drawings, manuscripts and miniatures.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-07-04
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DESC-A finely enamelled and rare doucai Teapot and Cover mark and

DESC-A finely enamelled and rare doucai Teapot and Cover mark and period of Yongzheng the finely potted body of squat ovoid form resting on a countersunk base, set with an upright curved spout opposite the ear-shaped loop-handle, delicately painted within underglaze-blue outlines in predominant shades of transparent green enamel together with iron-red and touches of aubergine and yellow with a continuous frieze of boys at play within a balustraded garden, each side depicting two boys parading with flowers before lush plants and rocks bordering a pond in the foreground, in the shelter of twin trees emerging from pierced rocks projecting on either side leafy branches circling the shoulder revealing multicoloured billowing clouds beyond, all beneath a short tapered neck with a zigzag border dividing dot motifs, the matching cover with floral sprays and a border of ruyi heads circling the knop (wood stand) (3) 18.9 cm., 7 1/2 in. across, condition report available It is extremely rare to find a doucai teapot, or any figure-decorated piece of Yongzheng doucai porcelain, but a blue-and-white teapot and cover of the same form and design in the National Palace Museum, Taiwan, is included in the Illustrated Catalogue of Ch'ing Dynasty Porcelain in the National Palace Museum, Republic of China: K'ang-hsi Ware and Yung-cheng Ware, Tokyo, 1980, pl.80. For the painting style compare also a drum-shaped doucai jar of the Kangxi period, illustrated in Kangxi Porcelain Wares from the Shanghai Museum Collection, Hong Kong, 1998, pl.182. Quantity: 1

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2001-05-01
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A chippendale carved cherrywood blocked and reverse-serpentine-front

Appears to retain its original finish.  Chests with reverse-serpentine ``swelled'' facades were popular in America from the 1760s to the end of the century, particularly in Massachusetts, Philadelphia and Connecticut. This superb example exhibits a visually dynamic design: the overhanging top and base molding conform to the bold undulating rhythm of the blocked serpentine front, which is further enhanced by pilasters carved with a serpentine motif and vertical rows of brasses. The case is supported by robust ogee-bracket feet with inner brackets following the contour of the blocking. Alice and Thomas Kugelman, the Connecticut furniture scholars, examined this chest in November of 2003, and noted that its idiosyncratic qualities make for an interesting exercise in attribution. The large overhang of the top, a rare feature in oxbows, and the rural base molding, suggest it stems from a shop located in a smaller town in the central part of the Connecticut River Valley. The drawer construction, cosmetic top rail, blind dovetail in the front feet, and backbrace dovetailed to the rear feet follow construction techniques found in that area, although here the top rail is attached with one central screw and the shape of the arched backbrace with its long extension is distinctive. The unusual decoration on the pilasters appears to be an abstraction of the vine-carved pilasters found on Springfield, Massachusetts case furniture. The ogee bracket feet are of the standard Massachusetts type and Chippendale in style, but the late feature of the scribe molding of the drawers, rather than the bead molding found on Chippendale pieces, suggests this piece probably dates to circa 1800. A second chest from this shop, also made of heavy stock with the same idiosyncratic construction, is offered as Lot 1258 in this sale. The top on a sliding dovetail, as seen on this chest, is a Massachusetts trait, while dovetailed backboards are usually only found in the Massachusetts part of the valley. This distinguishing characteristic relates this example to two groups of Connecticut River Valley furniture from Massachusetts. Furniture from one of the groups is unpublished.  The other group is associated with the work of Reuben Beman, Jr. and Bates How (b. 1776) of New Marlborough, Massachusetts, represented by a chest-on-chest signed by Beman at Winterthur Museum and a chest of drawers signed and dated by How at Yale University (see Nancy Richards and Nancy Evans, New England Furniture at Winterthur, 1997, no. 195, p. 401, and Gerald Ward, American Case Furniture, 1988, no. 63, p. 143).

  • USAUSA
  • 2004-01-17
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A finely enamelled large 'nine peach' bottle Vase (Tianqiuping) sealmark

A finely enamelled large 'nine peach' bottle Vase (Tianqiuping) sealmark and period of Qianlong, the enamels possibly later the globular body rising to a tall, slightly waisted, neck, naturalistically enamelled in a delicate palette with peaches growing in clusters from two gnarled boughs picked out in bluish-grey and sepia with spots of white, yellow and blue lichen, the branches rising from the base and spreading around the swelling sides, the large fruit with unusual pale yellowish-green skin graduating to intense rose-pink at the tip and accented with pink speckles, all set off by a profusion of slender curled leaves in apple-green and turquoise, and sprouting white and pink blossoms and buds 54.7 cm., 21 1/2 in Provenance: Collection of J.M. Hu. Sotheby's New York, 4th June, 1985, lot 55. Several similar vases from the former imperial collection are now dispersed in various museum collections; two examples still in Beijing are published in Kangxi, Yongzheng, Qianlong: Qing Porcelain from the Palace Museum Collection, Hong Kong, 1989, p.335, pl.16, and in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum: Porcelains with Cloisonne Enamel Decoration and Famille Rose Decoration, Hong Kong, 1999, pl.86; a third preserved in one of the former imperial summer residences in Liaoning is illustrated in The Gathering of Select Gems from Shenyang Imperial Palace Museum Collection, Shenyang, 1991, p.33 right; and one in Taiwan is included in the Illustrated Catalogue of Ch'ing Dynasty Porcelain in the National Palace Museum, Republic of China: Ch'ien-lung Ware and Other Wares, Tokyo, 1981, pl.27. A Qianlong bottle from the T.Y. Chao collection, sold in our Hong Kong rooms, 18th November 1986, lot 134, is illustrated in Sotheby's Hong Kong, Twenty Years: 1973-1993, Hong Kong, 1993, pl.277. Although this design, which conveys wishes for longevity, is based on a Yongzheng prototype, it became popular only in the Qianlong period and is rarely found with a Yongzheng mark. One such bottle of Yongzheng mark and period in Beijing is published in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum, op.cit., pl.45; another from the Barbara Hutton collection was sold in our Hong Kong rooms, 30th April 1996, lot 498. The present tianqiuping is unusual in the pale shading from yellow to pink of the peaches, which bear delicate spots, and the sparser distribution of the foliage, which leaves much of the gnarled tree trunk exposed. Quantity: 1

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2000-11-14
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Bust of a woman

In the middle of the 18th century, on the crossroads of Late Baroque and Rococo, Genoa saw the rise of its most talented and successful school of sculptors. Usually destined for the city's many well-preserved palazzi or one of the opulent churches of Liguria, major marble carvings by members from the school rarely appear outside Italy, let alone on the market. The present bust bears all the hallmarks of a Genovese 18th-century masterpiece, combining beauty and elegance of design with impressive, seemingly revolving drapery and the daring incorporation of inventive motifs in the details. Particularly these details, which take an almost architectural form here, are signature flourishes of one of Genoa's most internationally renowned sculptors, Francesco Maria Schiaffino. His authorship is substantiated by the object's noble provenance. The bust represents a woman with an elaborate diadem crowned by a scalloped ornament and a decorated knop in the hair at the back of the head around which a braid is wrapped. A great swathe of drapery orbits the shoulders, leaving one breast exposed, and is knotted together and suspended at the lower edge of the truncation. The subject's great, alluring beauty is attained by piercing eyes, a sleek jawline and shapely flattened chin, her soft neck, and wonderfully drilled and textured curled locks. Equally noteworthy are the highly unusual fluted buttress to the reverse and the socle, which is rhythmically decorated with rocaille elements. The figure was reputedly previously displayed in a grand Genoa palazzo alongside a bust of a man which is in private hands elsewhere. The exuberance and less classical handling of the face and the mannered details on the bust point to the work of several of Genoa's greatest sculptors, including Filippo Parodi and Bernardo and Francesco Maria Schiaffino. These sculptors benefited from being trained in Rome by late Baroque masters such as Camillo Rusconi before returning to their native city and absorbing Spanish and, more importantly, French fashions. Their decorations of the Genovese palazzi often pushed the limits of marble sculpture, a case in point being Bernardo Schiaffino's virtuoso Romulus and Remus groups in the Palazzo Bianco. The ingenuity with which the reverse, socle, and hairpieces of the present bust are detailed, however, are only paralleled in the most ambitious work of Bernardo's younger brother, Francesco Maria: the 1735 Tomb of Saint Catherine of Genoa in the church devoted to her in that city. Around the elevated glass coffin in which the mummified body of Saint Catherine Fieschi is displayed, Schiaffino placed four unidentified monumental female personifications of Virtues, reclining on enormous projecting marble volutes reinforced with iron, who rapturously look up to the Saint. Each has amazonian proportions and is enveloped by drapery of which the folds reach around the bodies before elaborately crossing around the abdomen much like the present bust. The collar of the Virtue with the cloth headdress often reserved for Old Testament women lifts up from the body in a similar fashion as is seen on our bust's proper left shoulder. Equally important to note is the treatment of the hair of the woman with a helmet where the curling locks flow to one side to balance a swathe of drapery on the shoulder and are lent a sense of movement by being fully carved free from the figure and detailed and textured by following a spiralling pattern with a toothed chisel and drills. Conclusive, however, are the women's headdresses: two have diadems that compare well to the present figure whilst the Virtue with the Old Testament headdress has a circular hairpin at the back of the head that performs the same function as the knop at the back of our figure's head which is decorated with Rococo shapes that are nearly identical to those on the socle of the bust. Because Schiaffino slowly moved away from the late Baroque style of his master Rusconi as the century progressed and because his early representations of women such as those on the Saint Catherine Fieschi tomb were often meant to convey forcefulness or rapture, the facial features of the present bust compare better to Schiaffino's manner of representing youthful women towards the end of his career. From the 1740s onwards he lent grace and a childlike alertness to his female subjects by giving them slender, elongated faces with sharply delineated features such as the thin and long nose and small mouth with plump lips that also typify the physiognomy of the present carving. The Virgin of the Immaculate Conception he supplied for the chapel in the Palazzo Doria Lamba in 1762, for example, compares particularly well to the present bust. As such Schiaffino probably carved the bust one or two decades after the tomb in Genoa, around 1750-1760. RELATED LITERATURE Sculture di Francesco Maria Schiaffino, exh. cat. Palazzo Rosso, Genoa, 1973; L. Puccio Canepa, 'Interventi settecenteschi a Chiavari: F. Schiaffino e G. Galeotti nella chiesa di S. Giovanni Battista', Arte cristiana 89, 2001, pp. 355-368

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-09
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L'amour en plein air; Réunion champêtre

Following Antoine Watteau’s early death in 1718, it was left to his erstwhile and only pupil, Jean-Baptiste Pater to meet the rising demand for the ‘modern’ subjects of the fête champêtre or fête galante that the former had introduced. Admitted to the Académie Royale as an associate member in July 1725, Pater devoted the rest of his highly successful career to producing genre paintings such as these for the Parisian market. The spirit and subject matter of Pater’s works were profoundly influenced by Watteau, and like them he skilfully clothed the figures in his imaginary settings in an imaginative mixture of contemporary clothing and fancy dress. Although Watteau only occasionally painted versions of his designs, Pater did so routinely. The design of the first of these pictures, for example, is mirrored by another signed work formerly in the collection of Frederick the Great of Prussia and now at Schloss Sanssouci near Potsdam.1 Frederick was an avid collector of Pater’s works, and owned over forty works by him. Another very similar work, but with some figures reversed, was sold New York, Sotheby’s, 25 January 2007, lot 98 ($600,000). This pair of paintings is also thought to have had the distinction of having belonged to two of the most famous collections of paintings formed in the 19th century. By tradition they were acquired from the collection of George, 3rd Duke of Sutherland at Stafford House in London, one of the most famous collections of paintings and objets d’art of its day. An invoice dated 3 November 1876 records the sale of '1 piece of Mother of pearl furniture, metal mounted &c, 1 Small piece to match and 2 Pictures Watteau'  to Alfred de Rothschild for the sum of ten thousand pounds. The collection formed by Baron Alfred de Rothschild (1842 – 1918) and kept at his houses in Halton in Buckinghamshire and at Seamore Place in London, was no less magnificent, and included several paintings by both Watteau and Pater. However, the illustrated catalogue of his collection, published in 1884, does not record a pair of paintings of this description by either artist. 1. F. Ingersoll-Smouse, Pater, Paris 1928, p. 40, no. 35, reproduced fig. 31.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-04-28
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Ferdinand berthoud and balthazar lieutaud. a louis xvi ormolu mounted

9-inch enamel dial signed Ferdinand Berthoud, annual calendar at XII, blued steel sweep seconds hand, blued steel mean minutes hand, finely pierced and engraved gilt hands for solar minutes and hours, the movement with weight-driven five wheel time train, Graham's dead beat escapement with maintaining power, fine beat adjustment on the crutch, the grid-iron pendulum of nine brass and steel bars, with temperature arc and massive lenticular bob oscillating against an engraved beat plaque, suspended from a knife-edge secured to the backboard,  five wheel striking train with spring barrel, double twelve hour outside cout wheel striking on a bell, the calendar and equation kidney geared from the spring barrel and concealed beneath the dial plate, the backplate cut for removal of the pallets and signed Ferdiand Berthoud A Paris, the case surmounted by a gilt ball and wings above finely chased acanthus corners framing the bezel, glazed trunk door, the plinth set with a star, the rear stamped twice B Lieutaud This very stylish longcase clock forms part of a distinguished group of clocks documenting the splendid collaboration between the celebrated clockmaker Ferdinand Gerthoud and the great ébéniste Balthazar Lieutaud. Most of which are today housed in the finest museums around the world. Other Longcase Clocks by Ferdinand Berthoud and stamped by Lieutaud: - A similar clock with virtually identical dial and movement is in the Wallace Collection, London, Fig. 1, and is described in great detail and compared with this clock in P.Hughes, The Wallace Collection, Catalogue of Furniture, London 1996, Vol. I, P.444-451. - The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (W. Rieder, The Jack and Belle Linsky Collection in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1984, pp. 243-244), ebony case, previously from the collection of Mrs. Jacques Balsan, then Thelma Chrysler Foy, sold Parke-Bernet, New York, 13, 15 and 16 May 1959, lot 352. - Formerly the collection of the Earls of Stair, Loching Castle, Fig.2, having been inherited through the 10th Earl of Stairs' marriage in 1846 to Louisa Jane Henrietta Emily de Franquetot, eldest daughter of Auguste-Louis-Joseph-Casimir-Gustave, duc de Coigny, sold in these Rooms, 6th July 2011, lot 27 for 421,250 GBP. - Hillwood Museum, Washington, D.C., collection of Mrs. Post, bought in 1956 at French and Co., New York, possibly that formerly from the collection of Prince Paar of Vienna, sold in these Rooms, 8 May 1912, lot 113, tulipwood case. - Frick Collection, New York (T. Dell, The Frick Collection, an illustrated catalogue, Princeton, 1992, V, pp. 314 - 332), formerly from the collection Feyt, Paris, 1790, and the collection of the Vicomte de Saint Georges, the mounts signed and dated Caffieri 1767. - Museum at chateau de Versailles, formerly the collection of Thomas de Pange, sold 5 March 1781, lot 134, then the collection of the duc de Noailles, seized during the Revolution in 1793. -Hermitage Museum, Moscow, ebony case with a five-pointed star to the plinth as the present example. Ferdinand Berthoud (1727-1807) Ferdinand Berthoud was born in Placement, near Couvet about twelve miles south-west of Le Locle. His father, Jean Berthoud, was an architect and judiciary. In 1741 he was bound over to his brother, Jean-Henri, with whom he served a three year apprenticeship before leaving for Paris where it is thought he worked for a period of time with the great horologist, Julien LeRoy (1686-1759). By 1752, at the age of twenty-five, Berthoud had made a clock with perpetual calendar that also indicated mean and solar time; this he was asked to present to the Académie des Sciences who greatly approved of it. By this very early stage in his life Berthoud had established himself as a highly acclaimed horologist. His output of clocks, watches and marine chronometers was astonishing, as was his insatiable appetite for writing on the subject. On 24 July 1764 he was appointed Horologer Mécanicien de sa Majesté et de la Marine ayant l'inspection de la construction des horologes Marines with an annual stipend of 3,000 livres that had increased to 7,000 by 1782. The position was of considerable importance at a time when the race to construct a timepiece capable of finding longitude at sea was the social and political talk of all western Europe. From 1766 he designed all marine clocks and watches used on the King's ships. In 1766 he was appointed a member of the Royal Society of London and later a Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur. In 1786 he was a member of the commission to establish a Royal clock factory and in 1793 made a member of the Temporary Commission for the Arts. Berthoud's writings covered more than 4,000 quarto pages with more than 120 engraved plates from drawings by his own hand; his most important works included: Essai sur l'Horlogerie (1763), Traits des Horloges Marines (1773), De la Measure du Temps (1787) and Histoire de la Measure du Temps par les Horloges (1802). Berthoud specialized in making complicated astronomical timepieces, he made comparatively few regulateurs de parquet in his lifetime and perhaps only as many as 30-40 watches a year. All his clocks and watches were at the cutting edge of horological innovation and as with all great clockmakers he was not only an inventor and clockmaker but he also possessed a creative and artistic eye. He had the cases for his clocks made by the cabinet-makers Petit, Duhamel, Joseph, Cressent and particularly by Lieutaud. The bronziers Martincourt, Osmond, Saint-Germain and particularly Caffieri supplied him with clock cases as well as bronze mounts. Balthazar Lieutaud (ca. 1720-1780) Son of the ébéniste Charles Lieutaud, maker of clocks and part of the privileged enclosure of Saint-Jean de Latran, Balthazar Lieutaud became maitre on 20 March 1749. Living on the Ile de la Cité in the rue de la Pelleterie, and in 1772 in the rue d'Enfer, Balthazar Lieutaud regularly worked for the clock-makers Viger, Baillon, Dutertre, Balthazard, Voisin, Gudin, Lepaute, Robin, etc. It appears that Berthoud commissioned Lieutaud to make several longcase clock cases, of which the clockmaker was possibly  the owner of the design. He worked with Caffieri, but also with the bronziers Charles Grimpelle and Edme Roy. After his death in 1780 his wife continued the atelier until 1784.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-07-04
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A SEVRES (HARD-PASTE) PORCELAIN CHROME-GREEN GROUND PART TEA SERVICE (CABARET 'BONAPARTE')

A SEVRES (HARD-PASTE) PORCELAIN CHROME-GREEN GROUND PART TEA SERVICE (CABARET 'BONAPARTE') Iron-red stenciled factory marks for 1812 and green painted ground color mark of 13.Ms.12 for 13 March 1812 to each piece, various incised date cyphers and repairer's marks, the portraits by Le Guay and Jaquotot, the silver-gilt handles with maker's mark for Pierre-Noël Blaguière used post 1803 Finely painted with portraits of Emperor Napoleon I and his family, most after paintings by Jean-Baptiste Isabey or Baron François Pascal Gérard and identified in French on the underside, each reserved on the green ground decorated in platinum and gilt with a trellis enclosing bees, each cup with its original silver-gilt handle, comprising: A tea-pot and cover (théière 'Asselin') - Napoleon I and Marie-Louise A milk-jug (pot à lait 'Grec') - Elisa Bonaparte A sugar-bowl and cover (pot à sucre 'à pied anse volute' et son couvercle) - the Roi de Rome and his aunt Caroline Bonaparte Three cups and two saucers (tasse 'Jasmin à pied cannelé', 1ere grandeur et sa soucoupe) - Pauline Bonaparte, Hortense de Beauharnais and Catherine Frederica of Württemberg Together with: A Sèvres chrome-green ground saucer of similar date, the decoration slightly variant to the other two in the present part service but identical to that accompanying a blue-ground portrait cup of Marie-Louise by Le Guay offered as the previous lot in this sale (11)

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-10-21
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AN ATTIC RED-FIGURED KALPIS

AN ATTIC RED-FIGURED KALPIS attributed to an early mannerist circa 470-460 b.c. The shoulder panel showing the "Seven Against Thebes" in the process of arming themselves before the final assault on the city, with a nude figure of Parthenopaios in the center, he alone identified by an inscription in red to his right, clutching a mass of his long hair in his left hand which he prepares to cut off with the short sword held in his right, the scabbard hanging on his left side, a large plumed and crested helmet on the ground in front of him, to the far right a bearded warrior, perhaps Adrastos, climbs into his chariot but looks back at his companions, a spear in his right hand, between them a bearded man is putting his baldric over his head, a mantle draped over his left arm, behind Parthenopaios a pair of bearded warriors, possibly the brothers Polyneikes and Tydeus, one holding a spear in one hand and baldric in the other, a mantle draped over his arms and shoulders, the other similarly clad, holding a cuirass, behind him a standing warrior with a spear, a shield on the ground between them, and at the far left, a youthful warrior, his face turned frontal, his right hand pressed to his cheek, his other hand resting on the right shoulder of his companion, three kalos inscriptions in red in the field; the panel framed by a band of palmettes and lotus buds above, a similar larger band below, with a coarsened pomegranate chain on either side, and vertical lines on the lip, graffiti under the foot 13¾ in. (34.9 cm) high

  • USAUSA
  • 2000-06-12
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A german parcel-gilt silver and enamelled cup and cover, caspar widman

Of hexafoil columbine form, fitted inside the cover with a 1526 medal of Friedrich Behaim VII of Nuremberg, the body, cover and foot fitted with blue, green and red enamelled discs, red enamel also at the finial, cast, chased and engraved with stippled arabesque strapwork, foliage and fruit, marked on body, cover and foot The medal inside the cover of the cup (see detail) shows the profile of the 35-year-old Friedrich Behaim VII von Schwarzbach (1491-1533).1 Profoundly Lutheran, he was a member of one of the twenty 'old' Nuremberg families solely eligible for office in the city’s decisive ruling bodies, where he served as Ratsherr, Bürgermeister and member of the war council. The reverse of this medal, known from bronze and silver examples2 is dated 1526 and inscribed with a dedication relating to Luther’s teachings. It is quite likely to be connected to the second Diet of Speyer of 1526, an important event for Lutheran Nuremberg and Friedrich Behaim, as it saw the lifting, however temporarily of the Imperial injunction against Martin Luther and his works.  The medal was probably placed in the cover of this cup by a member of the Behaim family to commemorate their ancestor.3 Commemoration of Friedrich Behaim VII by this medal is known to have happened, as a record exists of what must be his grandchildren Paulus, Friedrich and Katharina Behaim, planning to cast the medal in silver to form pendants in his honour in 1586.4 The cup was acquired before 1882 by Mayer Carl Rothschild, Frankfurt banker and heroic collector; it is published and illustrated in that year in the record made of some of his treasures by his executor Ferdinand Luthmer (see fig. 1). Luthmer describes it as 'Pokale..an die formen der Jamnitzer-Becher,' a term used at the time for what is otherwise known as a columbine or Akelei cup  (shaped like an Aquilegia flower). This was the shape for the item of silver that Nuremberg goldsmiths were required to complete as one of the three tests before becoming masters of the guild. Marc Rosenberg in Drei Soggenanten Jamnitzer Becher remarks on the 'striking kinship' between the cup now offered and a design by Virgil Solis, the Nuremberg printmaker and engraver (see fig. 2). After Mayer Carl’s death in 1886 his collection of mostly German works of art kept at the Frankfurt country house of Günthersburg amounting to over 500 pieces, was divided into five portions by a group of experts, which included Ferdinand Luthmer.  The cup is listed in the first portion no. 181c as: 'Becher Jamnitzerform, silb. Verg., auf dem Dreipass-Fuss sowie dem sechstheiligen Körper und Deckel entsprechende Medaillons, Auflage in Email translucide auf Silber, Spitze Blume mit roth. Email translucide. Durchm. 11 ½ cm., Höhe 18cm [sic]' This first portion was bequeathed to Carl Mayer’s seventh daughter Bertha Clara (1862-1903) who had married the Prince de Wagram in 1882 and lived in Paris. When the prince, who outlived his wife, died in 1911, the cup was sold at the Galerie George Petit, lot 9, to the dealer A.S Drey for 30,000 Francs or £1,200 equivalent Caspar Widman (working dates 1554-1590) is recorded as a chosen goldsmith of the Nuremberg council,5 the governing body controlled by patrician figures such as Friedrich Behaim VII. A pair of stacking beakers by this master dated 1565 and with the arms of three Nuremberg patrician families, Muffel, Tucher and Rieter, was sold Sotheby's, London, 18 December 2007, lot 196.  A third beaker, possibly part of that series, is at Anglesey Abbey, near Cambridge. 1. It is one of a group of medals by the anonymous Nuremberg master of 1525-27, associated with the hand of Matthias Gebel (circa 1500-1574). See: Marjorie Trusted, German Renaissance Medals, A Catalogue of the Collection in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London 1990, p. 84  2. Op. cit. no. 130; and exhibition catalogue, Wenzel Jamnitzer und die Nürnberger Goldschmiedekunst 1500-1700, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, 28 June-15 September 1985, no. 601  3. An example of such a thing happening would include three Nuremberg cups of 1582 by Hans Kellner, which had a  commemorative medal of Johann Wilhelm Löffelholtz (1558-1600), fitted in their covers after his death in 1601. See: Monica Bachtler, Goldschmiedekunst, Bielefeld, 1986 no. 13 4. Georg Habich, Die Deutschen Schaumünzen des XVI Jahrhunderts, vol. I, reprinted London, 1994, p. 138, no. 942 5. Karin Tebbe et al. Nürnberger Goldschmiedekunst 1541-1868, Nuremberg, 2007 no. 962

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-07-08
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A portuguese silver-gilt salver on foot, maker's mark ie, probably

Embossed and chased with Old Testament scenes interrupted by stylized fountains, central armorial-engraved roundel,  low foot with wire rim incorporating dolphins, later pinned with raised sides of cherubs and fruit below openwork architectural rim   The arms are those of a bishop from the family of León Garabito, probably for Juan de Santiago y León Garabito, bishop of Guadalajara, Mexico (1641-1694), ordained in September 1677. The salver may be the one exhibited in Exposição Retrospectiva de Arte Ornamental Portugueza e Hespanhola, Lisbon, 1882, no. 122 belonging to Sua Magestade El-Rei o Senhor D. Fernando, as Fructeiro de prata dourada com muitas fuguras e outros ornatos em relevo. No centro um medalhão com brazão de um prelado. Obra portugueza. Secolo XVI The raised side with cherubs and lace-like rim made in one piece, has been pinned to a late gothic salver.  The latter conforms in decoration and layout to known Portuguese salvers of the early 16th Century. An example which was presented at the 1954 exhibition in Paris1 embodies these characteristics; size, around 25-30 cm in diameter, inner and outer plain bands with ropework borders, two bands of dense story-telling ornament, architecture seen from above and a low ornamented foot with fat wire rim. The distinct embossed gothic foliage of the present salver can be found on a number of 16th Century Portuguese pieces including another salver on foot with Lisbon marks, sold Sotheby's, Paris, 30 October 2008, lot 180. The broad spiky rim including the border of cherubs probably dates to around 1600.  A dish with late 16th Century Lisbon marks which has a similar architectural rim is in the Museo Lázaro Galdiano Madrid2. The outer rim of the salver is decorated with six Old Testament scenes embossed in expressive detail.   1. The Temptation (Genesis 3, vv.1-7): Eve holds up the fruit while Adam touches his chin:  2. The Expulsion (Genesis 3, vv.12 and 13):  Adam and Eve's hands graphically express their words to the Lord `she gave me of the tree and I did eat' and `The serpent beguiled me and I did eat'; 3. Unidentified scene of a man and woman beating a soldier or knight, a distraught woman attends: The knight on the ground is in elaborate armour, dateable to between 1490 and 1520, while the garment visible at his neckline is typical of the 16th Century. The naked woman wields a jawbone, which although an attribute of Samson and Cain, is here probably just a simple weapon in contrast to the elaborate armour. 4. Samson kills the lion (Judges 15 v. 6):  The jawbone which Samson uses later in the story to slaughter the Philistines is already visible in his pocket. He has a `fillet' round his impressive head of hair, a fashion of young men in the mid to late 16th Century3; 5.  Jacob wrestles with the angel (Genesis 32, vv.24-32): The angel and Jacob are visualized as twins reflecting Jacob's twin brother Esau, with whom he was already competing at birth (`and his hand took hold on Esau's heel' (25, v26), and who he is about to meet again after an absence twenty years. The scene records the moment when the angel touches the hollow of Jacob's  thigh.  6. Unidentified scene, possibly Daniel's vision of the Heavenly Kingdom: A king in archaic costume sits on his throne lifted by four griffins, possibly referring to the four kings who Daniel served; the four kingdoms which the visions told would eventually be replaced `And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed (Daniel 3, v.44). 1 Les Trésors de L'Orfèvrerie du Portugal, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, November 1954-January 1955, cat 43 2 José Manuel Cruz Valdovinos, Platería Europea en Espanňa, Fundación Central Hispano, 1997, no. 49 3 Maria Jedding-Gesterling ed. Hairstyles, Hamburg, 1988, p. 62 and 64

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2012-07-04
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The 1983 Holland & Holland set of six Wildfowl and Wader Guns

A set of six Wildfowl and Wader Guns, comprising six single-trigger "Royal De Luxe" model self-opening sidelock ejector guns 1983, Holland & Holland, Comprising one 12-bore gun, no. 40601 with 29-inch chopper-lump barrels with 3-inch chambers, about full choke borings, the frame and locks with sideclips, the highly-figured stock with pistol grip, gold oval engraved JWK, 7 lb. 3 oz. nitro proof; a pair of 12-bore guns, nos. 40602/3 with 28-inch chopper lump barrels with 2 3/4-inch chambers, about 1/2 and 3/4 choke borings, the frames and locks with bright scenes, the highly figured stocks with pistol grips, gold ovals engraved JWK amd PMK, respectively, 6 lb. 5 oz. nitro proof; a pair of 20-bore guns, nos. 40604/5 with 27-inch chopper-lump barrels with 2 3/4-inch chambers, about 1/2 and 3/4 choke borings, the frames and locks with bright scenes, the highly figured stocks with pistol grips, gold ovals engraved JWK and PMK, respectively, 5 lb. 8 oz., nitro proof; one 28-bore gun, no. 40606 with 26-inch chopper-lump barrels with 2 3/4-inch chambers, about 1/2 and 3/4 choke borings, the frames with bright scenes, the highly figured stocks with pistol grips, gold oval engraved JWK, 5 lb. 3 oz., nitro proof; each gun profusely engraved with game scenes of birds, waders and wildfowl, set against a bright cyanide hardened and polished finish; the set together with tools.

  • USAUSA
  • 2010-06-08
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A pair of italian mother-of-pearl inlaid tulipwood, kingwood, ebony

Each of bombé serpentine form, with a later engraved red tinted white carrara marble top with the coat-of-arms of the princely families of the De Cardine-Pignatelli surmounted by a Princely Coronet and beneath an ermine baldacchino with boldly scrolling foliage, above two long drawers concealing secret drawers inlaid with a stylised rosette within a c-scroll cartouche within borders of c-scrolls above a shaped apron inlaid with a stylised scallopshell, on splayed legs with gilt-bronze scrolled feet, one marble top bearing the signature `Celebrano' and dated 1774   Comparative Literature: Enrico Colle, Il mobile in Rococò in Italia: Arredi e Decorazioni d'interni dal 1738 Al 1775, Milan, 2003, pp. 70, 71, 72. Antonella Putaturo Murano, Il Mobile Napoletano del Settecento, Naples, 1977, p. Tav. XVIIIb.   This important and magnificent pair of Neapolitan commodes are for their size almost certainly the best pair of parquetry commodes recorded to date. There is only one other recorded pair of similar quality with elaborate parquetry now in Palazzo Barberini, Rome, one of which is illustrated by Colle op. cit., p. 72. This pair of commodes relate to other examples being produced in Naples in around the 1770's, for example, two commodes illustrated by Colle op. cit., p. 70 (one sold in these Rooms, 10th June 1999, lot 93) and p. 71, which bear similarities to the offered pair in respect of the use of exotic woods and the design of the parquetry runs over the full surface of the drawers in different coloured woods. The possible makers for this magnificent pair of commodes include Antonio Ross, a German and Giovanni Bali, circa 1760, who is described as making marquetry in the German style. The extensive secret drawers in both commodes indicates make these a particularly fine example and the quality of the craftsmanship can be seen in their construction. The coat-of-arms on the marble tops which have been tinted red and engraved is of the De Cardine (the Cardenes of Aragonese origin), an old Neapolitan aristocratic family and Princes of the Holy Roman Empire.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2015-05-12
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Porcelain & Pottery

Items made of porcelain, earthenware, stoneware and faience from every country are found under the category Porcelain & Pottery. Plates, cups, antique vases, tableware, china figurines and Chinese serving dishes are just some of the items that can be found up for auction under this heading.

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