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The pink star, one of the world's great natural treasures

The oval mixed cut fancy vivid pink diamond weighing 59.60 carats, mounted as a ring, size 51. Meticulously cut by Steinmetz Diamonds over a period of nearly two years - a process in which the 132.5 carat rough was cast in epoxy more than 50 times in order to create models upon which the design team could experiment with different cuts - it was transformed into this spectacular 59.60 carat, fancy vivid pink, internally flawless oval cut gem – the largest internally flawless or flawless, fancy vivid pink diamond that the Gemological Institue of American (GIA) has ever graded.The diamond was first unveiled to the public in May 2003 as the ‘Steinmetz Pink’, and was modelled by Helena Christensen at a dedicated event thrown to coincide with the Monaco Grand Prix. Writing in the Financial Times on the 31 May 2003, Mike Duff described the diamond as “the rarest, finest, most precious stone the world has ever seen”. The stone was first sold in 2007 and was subsequently renamed “The Pink Star”. In the same article, Tom Moses, senior vice-president of the GIA, is quoted as saying: “it’s our experience that large polished pink diamonds – over ten carats – very rarely occur with an intense colour… The GIA Laboratory has been issuing grading reports for 50 years and this is the largest pink diamond with this depth of colour [vivid pink] that we have ever characterised”. Of all the grades of pink which exist - light fancy pink, fancy pink, fancy intense pink, fancy deep pink and fancy vivid pink - ‘fancy vivid’ is the highest possible colour grade for a pink diamond. The current record price ever paid at auction for a diamond, or any gemstone, is the GRAFF PINK, a superb 24.76 carat, Fancy Intense Pink step-cut diamond, which sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in November 2010 for $46.16 million. Weighing in at 59.60 carats, this diamond is twice the size. The current record price per carat for a fancy vivid pink diamond ($2,155,332) was set by a 5.00 carat diamond, sold in Hong Kong in January 2009. In the summer of 2003, this amazing gem was exhibited at 'The Splendor of Diamonds' exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Displayed in the Winston Gallery alongside the 45.52 carat blue Hope Diamond, the exhibition featured seven of the world’s rarest and most extraordinary diamonds. Also on view for the first time in the United States was the 203.04 carat De Beers Millennium Star, one of the largest diamonds in the world; the Heart of Eternity blue diamond; the Moussaieff Red, the largest known red diamond in the world; the Harry Winston Pumpkin Diamond; the Allnatt, one of the world’s largest yellow diamonds at 101.29 carats; and the Ocean Dream, the world’s largest naturally occurring bluegreen diamond. Commenting at the opening of the exhibition, Dr. Jeffrey Post, curator of the Gems and Minerals Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History said, “each of the diamonds is the finest of its kind and together with the museum’s gem collection makes for an exhibit of truly historic proportions”. In the three months the exhibition ran, the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History attracted more than 1.6 million visitors. From July through November 2005, The Pink Star again took centre stage, this time at the 'Diamonds' exhibition held at the Natural History Museum, in London. “This exhibition will bring together many of the most impressive single stones in the world, fascinating science, and insights into the diamond industry to tell the story of diamonds from deep in the Earth to the red carpet,” said Michael Dixon, director of the Natural History  Museum. For three months, the dazzling exhibition attracted approximately 70’000 visitors a day. As stated in the summary of the GIA monograph, "There are no words more applicable to the Pink Star than those of French painter Eugene Delacroix ['what moves those of genius, what inspires their work is not new ideas, but their obsession with the idea that what has already been said is still not enough']. Valiant attempts to characterize its immense size, rich color, and remarkable clarity and purity all fall short. Much has been said about the Pink Star, but it is not enough. The Pink Star is a true masterpiece of nature, beyond characterization with human vocabulary. It is precisely this elusive beauty that will earn the Pink Star a page in the history books, where attempts to fully capture it will continue for years to come."

  • CHESwitzerland
  • 2013-11-13
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World auction record for any diamond or jewelhighest price for any

The oval mixed-cut fancy vivid pink diamond weighing 59.60 carats, mounted in platinum. Ring size: 5¾, illustrated unmounted. Accompanied by GIA report numbered 2175607011, dated 28 April 2016, stating that the diamond is natural, Fancy Vivid Pink Colour, Internally Flawless; together with a diamond type classification report stating that the diamond is determined to be a Type IIa diamond; also accompanied by a letter from GIA stating that this is the largest Flawless or Internally Flawless, Fancy Vivid Pink, Natural Colour, diamond they have ever graded; the GIA report is additionally accompanied by a separate monograph.Further accompanied by a monograph from Gübelin, duplicate no. 16 of the original report numbered 0701199, dated 22 November 2007, stating that the diamond is Fancy Vivid Pink Colour, IF, Type IIa, together with history and chemical analysis of the stone. _________________________________________________________ One of the Worlds Great Natural Treasures Meticulously cut by Steinmetz Diamonds over a period of nearly two years - a process in which the 132.50 carat rough was cast in epoxy more than 50 times in order to create models upon which the design team could experiment with different cuts -it was transformed into this spectacular 59.60 carat, fancy vivid pink, internally flawless oval cut gem the largest internally flawless or flawless, fancy vivid pink diamond that the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has ever graded. The diamond was first unveiled to the public in May 2003 as the Steinmetz Pink, and was modelled by Helena Christensen at a dedicated event thrown to coincide with the Monaco Grand Prix. Writing in the Financial Times on the 31 May 2003, Mike Duff described the diamond as the rarest, finest, most precious stone the world has ever seen. The stone was first sold in 2007 and was subsequently renamed The Pink Star. In the same article, Tom Moses, Executive Vice President and Chief Laboratory and Research Officer of the GIA, is quoted as saying: its our experience that large polished pink diamonds over ten carats very rarely occur with an intense colour The GIA Laboratory has been issuing grading reports for 50 years and this is the largest pink diamond with this depth of colour [vivid pink] that we have ever characterised. Of all fancy coloured pink diamonds, those graded Fancy Vivid are the most precious and desirable. The current world auction record for a pink diamond is the Graff Pink, a superb 24.78 carat diamond which sold at Sotheby's Geneva in November 2010 for US$46.16 million. Weighing in at 59.60 carats and graded as Fancy Vivid, the Pink Star is twice the size. In the summer of 2003, this amazing gem was exhibited at 'The Splendor of Diamonds' exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Displayed in the Winston Gallery alongside the 45.52 carat blue Hope Diamond, the exhibition featured seven of the worlds rarest and most extraordinary diamonds. Also on view for the first time in the United States was the 203.04 carat De Beers Millennium Star, one of the largest diamonds in the world; the Heart of Eternity blue diamond; the Moussaieff Red, the largest known red diamond in the world; the Harry Winston Pumpkin Diamond; the Allnatt, one of the worlds largest yellow diamonds at 101.29 carats; and the Ocean Dream, the worlds largest naturally occurring blue-green diamond. Commenting at the opening of the exhibition, Dr. Jeffrey Post, curator of the Gems and Minerals Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History said, Each of the diamonds is the finest of its kind and together with the museums gem collection makes for an exhibit of truly historic proportions. In the three months the exhibition ran, the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History attracted more than 1.6 million visitors. From July through November 2005, The Pink Star again took centre stage, this time at the 'Diamonds' exhibition held at the Natural History Museum, in London. This exhibition will bring together many of the most impressive single stones in the world, fascinating science, and insights into the diamond industry to tell the story of diamonds from deep in the Earth to the red carpet, said Michael Dixon, director of the Natural History Museum. For five months, the dazzling exhibition attracted approximately 70,000 visitors a day.

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2017-04-04
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World auction record price-per-carat for a diamond or gemstone

'The Blue Moon' An exceptional Fancy Vivid Blue diamond ring The cushion-shaped fancy vivid blue diamond weighing 12.03 carats, mounted as a ring, size 471/2. “Blue diamonds shine among nature’s most rare and valuable gems. For centuries, their unique sparkle and intriguing form have captivated gemmologists, historians, and spectators worldwide. Though any diamond with natural blue colouration is a rare discovery, some are so exceptional that they emerge only once in a lifetime. The Blue Moon Diamond, a 12.03 carat gem of Fancy Vivid Blue colour and Internally Flawless clarity, is one of those remarkable occurrences”.Introduction of the GIA monograph “Fancy Vivid blue diamonds are extremely rare and the Blue Moon is no exception. It is an historic stone that is one of the rarest gems with this colour and in this size to be found in recent history. After seeing the stone’s colour and understanding its significance, it was fitting to name it the Blue Moon Diamond as not only its shape is reminiscent of a full moon, but the metaphor for the expression is exactly what one could say about the occurrence and existence of such a gemstone”. Suzette Gomes, CEO of Cora International Mining “Thomas Cullinan discovered the Cullinan mine in 1902, which at that time was named the Premier mine. Established on the second largest kimberlite pipe by inherent value, the Premier mine gained immediate prominence as a quality producer of large colourless diamonds and also rare blue diamonds. Annual production from the Premier mine was the largest in the world for the mine’s first decade of operation. Perhaps one of the greatest finds in the mine’s history is the Cullinan diamond. The Cullinan diamond is the largest colourless diamond ever discovered with a weight of 3,106 carats which has since been cut and polished into nine major stones, including 96 minor stones. Two of them currently reside within the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom”. Excerpt from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles website Furthermore the Cullinan I weighing 530.20 carats and the Cullinan II weighing 317.40 carats which are set in the Royal sceptre and the Imperial State Crown of the United Kindgom, the Cullinan mine is also the source of two other important blue diamonds: the Smithsonian Institution’s Blue Heart, a 30.62 ct Fancy Deep blue gem discovered in 1908, and the 27.64 ct Fancy Vivid blue Heart of Eternity, unveiled by Steinmetz in 2000. If “some of the earliest and most historical blue diamonds, such as the Hope and Idol’s Eye, are believed to have originated in the ancient mines of India, in more recent times, the only mine to produce blues with any regularity is the Cullinan mine in South Africa. However, that supply has diminished over the past decade; when in full production, less than 0.1% of diamonds sourced showed any evidence of blue colour. The Blue Moon Diamond is a shining member of that miniscule percentage. Reportedly unearthed from the Cullinan mine in January 2014 as a 29.62 carat rough crystal, the diamond is one of few to have been tracked precisely from the mine to the hands of its cutter”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph Manufacturing The rough diamond was purchased at a tender by Cora International from Petra Diamonds, owner of the Cullinan mine. “Nature granted the Blue Moon Diamond with the gifts of stunning colour and form. However, it is the responsibility of man to capitalize on these qualities and bring the diamond’s innermost beauty to full display. The art of cutting allowed for the Blue Moon Diamond’s natural beauty to reach its optimum potential”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph Greg Stephenson, Diamond Marketing Manager for Petra Diamonds, recalls the moment he first saw the exceptional rough diamond: “I opened the canister in which it was shipped and it fell on to my work pad. I sat there for about a minute just looking at it on my white pad - no light, no loupe - just awe-struck. The colour, the tone, the saturation… magnificent. It was as though it had been dropped in a bottle of old blue ink - extraordinary saturation with no hint of zoning and definitely no modifying colours. It was, without a shadow of a doubt, the most beautiful rough diamond I have ever seen.” Colour After several months of careful and precise cutting process, the gem could reveal its potential and magnificent beauty. The colour is the most important quality for a fancy coloured diamond. “Diamonds obtain their colour from so-called “colour centres”. They are single or multiple non-carbon atoms that replace carbon in the structure of the diamond, causing a disturbance in the structure and sometimes giving rise to the colour. The distinctive blue colour in diamonds is attributed to trace amounts of the element boron in the crystal structure. Minute traces of boron are required to create the colouration. Less than one boron atom per million carbon atoms is sufficient to produce the blue colouration”. Excerpt from the Natural History Museum website “Likely to have never before been seen within such a large diamond, or any gemstone, [the hue of the Blue Moon diamond] could be indescribable to even the most experienced diamantaire or colour theorist; some, however, liken it to the ocean... The colour within the Blue Moon Diamond was so remarkable that it received the grade of Fancy Vivid. In blue diamonds, Fancy Vivid specifically describes those that are medium to dark in tone and strong to very strong in saturation. In a past  GIA study of 462 blue diamonds, only 1% were Fancy Vivid”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph Study The stone is so exceptional that scientists from the Smithsonian Institution and the National Gem and Mineral Collection carried out extensive research on the stone, exploring its physical properties and exceptional characteristics. They were able to study the diamond ahead of its being exhibited earlier this year in the Gem Vault of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. “The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles (NHM) has unveiled one of the rarest stones, a 12-carat Fancy Vivid blue diamond, which is internally flawless. The Blue Moon Diamond was housed in a special, temporary exhibition in the Gem Vault from September 13, 2014 until January 6, 2015”. Excerpt from the Natural History Museum website Phosphorescence “The Blue Moon did not show any obvious fluorescence (…). It did show phosphorescence, in the form of an intense orange-red glow after exposure to UV light. The phosphorescence was most intense after exposure to short-wave UV light and remained visible to dark-sensitized eyes up to 20 seconds”. Eloïse Gaillou and alii, “Study of the Blue Moon Diamond”, in Gems and Gemology “The phosphorescence spectra which showed a red colour component (particularly in early decay time) is a characteristic of rare and exceptionally pure blue diamonds”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph “We are aware of only one other type IIb diamond from the Cullinan mine with orange-red phosphorescence. Type IIb diamonds with orange-red phosphorescence more commonly originated in India or Venezuela (…). The Blue Moon underscores the fact that the phosphorescence behaviour of type IIb diamonds is not tied to a specific geographical source”. Eloïse Gaillou and alii, op. cit.

  • CHESwitzerland
  • 2015-11-11
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Superb and rare fancy vivid blue diamond and diamond ring

Set with an oval brilliant-cut diamond weighing 10.10 carats, flanked by two pear-shaped diamonds, to the circular-cut diamond surround, gallery and hoop, mounted in 18 karat white gold. Ring size: 6¾ Accompanied by GIA report numbered 10542803, dated 24 November 1999, stating that the 10.10 carat diamond is natural, Fancy Vivid Blue Colour, Internally Flawless, inscribed with 'De Beers Millennium Jewel 4'. The GIA report was updated on 10 March 2016. __________________________ The De Beers Millennium Jewels: Exceptional Collection of 11 Important Blue Diamonds Once a while, when a special diamond makes an appearance, it is a rare discovery; however, when a unique collection of special diamonds is unveiled, it is truly a once in a millennium experience. To celebrate the Millennium in 2000, De Beers, together with The Steinmetz Group, showcased an exceptional collection of rare and valuable diamonds, De Beers Millennium Jewels, in a specially designed exhibit at London’s Millennium Dome. The exhibition that lasted throughout the year consisted of the 203.04 carat Millennium Star and eleven phenomenal blue diamonds of various shapes and weights totaling 118 carats, ranging in size from a 5.16 carat pear-shaped to a 27.64 carat heart-shaped diamond, The Heart of Eternity, each specially inscribed with a De Beers Millennium number using De Beers’ proprietary branding technique. This magnificent collection even instigated the “robbery of the millennium” when a ten-ton JCB digger broke through the wall of the Dome only to find replaced replicas of the diamonds which were replaced a day earlier in preparation of the heist. The robbers, armed with sledgehammers, guns and grenades smashed through the gem’s armored casing before being detained. As the most important collection of blue diamonds to be presented at one time, it took De Beers decades to put the collection together. Nine out of the eleven diamonds have been graded by the GIA as Fancy Vivid Blue color and two of Fancy Intense Blue color. Blue diamonds owe their color to impurities of boron, and many are modified with a grey secondary tone, or an uneven saturation with areas of colorless windowing. Very few stones have the intensity or an even saturation as these Millennium blue diamonds and it is this combination of color, saturation and brilliance that make them truly miracles of nature. Historically, blue diamonds were recovered mainly in India and Brazil, but for the last 100 years, they have been randomly and sporadically found in the Premier Mine (since renamed the Cullinan Mine) in South Africa, the source of these fine blue diamonds. Blue diamonds make up much less than 0.1 percent of all diamonds recovered at this mine, and to discover one annually of quality and size is an extremely unusual occurrence. Since its initial appearance at the Millennium Exhibition in 2000, only one of these diamonds have ever come into the open market, when Sotheby’s Hong Kong sold the “De Beers Millennium Jewel 11”, a 5.16 carat internally flawless pear-shaped fancy vivid blue diamond in April 2010. Fancy Vivid Blue Diamonds Auction Milestones Whilst a very small number of important blue diamonds were sold at auction over the last two decades, it was not until 2007 when the landmark Sotheby’s auction in Hong Kong sold a 6.04 carat, internally flawless emerald-cut Fancy Vivid Blue diamond for a record price of US$1,321,495 per carat, breaking the 20-year-old record held by the famous ‘Hancock Red’, and propelling all sizable Fancy Vivid Blue diamonds to new market levels of a minimum of US$1,000,000 per carat. Since then, blue diamonds at auction have had an admirable auction track record. However, all previous prices were totally eclipsed by the Mellon Blue Diamond, renamed ‘The Zoé Diamond’ in New York, again at Sotheby’s in November 2014. Fancy vivid blue diamonds of the utmost quality and size have now reached, in a short time-span, a new phenomenal level of over $3,000,000 at US$3,348,205 per carat for the Zoé Diamond. This record stood for barely a year when the remarkable Blue Moon Diamond sold in November 2015 by Sotheby’s in Geneva for CHF48,634,000. Renamed ‘The Blue Moon of Josephine’, this exceptional blue diamond thus smashed all previous records to stand at US$4,028,941 per carat as the current world record for any gemstone at auction.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-04-05
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World auction record price for any fancy vivid pink diamond

The pear-shaped fancy vivid pink diamond of outstanding colour weighing 15.38 carats, mounted as a ring, size 51. Jean-Baptiste Tavernier, a French merchant and adventurer who was best known for acquiring the 'Tavernier Blue Diamond' that he subsequently sold to Louis XIV, first made a reference to pink diamonds in the early 17th century. Tavernier mentioned a very large pink rough diamond weighing over 200 carats, shown to him by Moghuls in the Kingdom of Golconda in 1642. This diamond, named ‘The Grand Table’ and valued at 600,000 rupees at the time, is still the largest pink diamond recorded to date. The French merchant also purchased two pale pink diamonds around 1668 and drew the pictures of the stones in his travel book.Since the 17th century, the value of coloured diamonds has considerably increased. Fancy coloured diamonds are rarer than near colourless diamonds as their hues come from a disturbance during the formation process of the stone deep in the earth. For all coloured diamonds except pinks, the colour comes from trace elements that interfere during the formation of the crystal. A diamond is composed of pure carbon; it is the intrusion of another atom that causes the colour: nitrogen for yellows, boron for blues. Concerning pink diamonds, the colour is a consequence of a distortion of the crystal structure of the stone. Fancy coloured diamonds are rare in nature, but the intensity of the colour is also an important characteristic of the stone. The Gemological Institute of America grades fancy coloured diamonds as: Faint, Very Light, Light, Fancy Light, Fancy, Fancy Intense, Fancy Vivid. Fancy Vivid colours are the most sought-after. The exceptional stone offered in this auction displays a very bright and deep fancy vivid pink colour. Even in the category “Fancy Vivid”, one can find different levels of intensity; the saturation and hue of this stone are absolutely mesmerising. The current record price ever paid at auction for a pink diamond is ‘The Graff Pink’, a magnificent 24.76 carat Fancy Intense Pink diamond, which sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in November 2010 for $46.16 million. The current record price per carat for a fancy vivid pink diamond ($2,155,332) was set by a 5.00 carat diamond, sold in Hong Kong in January 2009. An Exceptional Colour “Certainly, the occurrence of any gem-quality diamond is rare, but the discovery of a pink diamond is exceedingly unusual. Of all diamonds annually submitted to GIA, no more than 3% are classified as coloured diamonds; less than 5% of those coloured diamonds are predominantly pink. The majority of pink diamonds fall within the tone and saturation ranges of Faint to Fancy – very few contain colour so vibrant as to be Fancy Vivid… In addition to Fancy Vivid colour and a remarkable weight of 15.38 carats, the Unique Pink was reported to display stunning clarity and exceedingly pure (type IIa) structure. This rare combination of superior qualities allows the Unique Pink to hold the distinction of a truly exceptional gem”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph “In one previous GIA study of 1,490 pink diamonds – of which 1,166 were type I and 324 were type II – the diamonds were found to occur in a relatively wide range of colour appearances, from “warmer” orangy pinks to “cooler” purple-pinks… The Fancy Vivid Pink designation is exceptionally rare, but particularly so for a type IIa diamond of such significant size”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph “In grading fancy-colour diamonds, the measure of the “C” representing colour far surpasses other “C’s” (clarity, cut and carat weight) in importance”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph Manufacturing the Unique Pink Diamond “Though nature granted the Unique Pink with rare colour and fine purity, it is the responsibility of man to capitalize on these qualities and bring the diamond’s innermost beauty to full display. The ultimate shape and cutting style of the Unique Pink is described as pear modified brilliant. Examination of the details of the polished form provides some insight into the gem’s growth story and enhances its visual impact. Although the precise appearance of the original rough is unknown, it was likely elongated, as crystals of that form often give way to attractive pear shapes… The Unique Pink’s pear modified brilliant cut complements its characteristic form and deepens its natural Fancy Vivid tone and saturation”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph A Type IIa Diamond “Type II diamonds are rare… and represent less than 2% of all diamonds mined. Not coincidentally, they also tend to display exceptional transparency. Type II diamonds are subdivided into two groups. Type IIa stones have no nitrogen or boron impurities (and could be considered the “most pure”)… The Unique Pink was identified as type IIa based on analysis of its infrared spectrum. No features were observed in the spectral region from approximately 1400-1000 wavenumbers, where nitrogen-related peaks are expected to occur. This observation indicates that the diamond is exceedingly chemically pure”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph “As its name suggests, the Unique Pink is a most distinctive item in the fascinating world of gemstones. It is exceptionally rare for any natural diamond to reveal Fancy Vivid pink colour, but for one of 15.38 carats to exhibit such tone and saturation is astonishing”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph "In addition to Fancy Vivid colour and a remarkable weight of 15.38 carats, the Unique Pink was reported to display stunning clarity and exceedingly pure (type IIa) structure. This rare combination of superior qualities allows the Unique Pink to hold the disctinction of a truly exceptional gem”. Excerpt from the GIA monograph

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-05-17
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World auction record for a white diamond

An unmounted oval brilliant-cut diamond weighing 118.28 carats. Accompanied by GIA report numbered 2155581489, dated 21 August 2013, stating that the 118.28 carat diamond is D colour, Flawless clarity, with Excellent Polish and Symmetry; also accompanied by diamond type classification report stating that the diamond is determined to be a Type IIa diamond. Type IIa diamonds are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Also accompanied by a letter stating that the 118.28 carat diamond "is the largest Oval Shaped D colour, Flawless or Internally Flawless diamond we have graded as of the date of this letter and the report issued." _________________________ A WONDER OF NATURE Diamonds are one of Nature’s most wonderous gifts. Transformed from carbon under immense pressure and unbelievable heat, diamonds represent the mystery of creation, but through Man, by cutting and polishing, it becomes an amazing object of beauty and allure. Throughout history and the centuries past, diamonds have been the folklore of Kings and Queens, countries and wars. Whilst in contemporary times, diamonds are readily available to the world at large, Nature’s largest and most perfect endowments are as before only available to a select few. Large flawless diamonds are the paragon of white diamonds. Rarer still are D/Flawless Type IIA diamonds. These are the most chemically pure type of diamonds and have exceptional optical transparency. Extraordinarily limpid, they have been compared to pools of crystal waters or drops of frozen ice. First identified as originating from the famed Golconda region of India, Type IIA diamonds are now recovered in all major diamond producing regions. Two famous examples of Type IIA diamonds are the Cullinan I and the Koh-i-Noor, both part of the British Crown Jewels. MAN & NATURE Discovered in 2011 from the deep mines in Southern Africa, the 299 carat rough of this oval diamond is one of the largest and most beautiful diamond rough found in recent years. Carefully and meticulously worked over months, step by step, through the skills and artistries of the best diamond master cutters and polishers to guarantee the greatest standards of proportionality and beauty, man was able to transform Nature’s rough endowment into a mesmerizing object of enthralling beauty. The Perfection and Harmony of Nature and Man together is aptly exemplified by the magic of these alluring diamonds, one of the hardest and most precious materials known to mankind. 100 CARAT D/IF DIAMONDS AT AUCTION The magic of the carat number “100” makes for an auction legend. The appearance of a 100 carat D-Flawless diamond is always an international newsworthy event. Only very few D-Flawless or Internally Flawless diamonds have appeared and sold at auction over the decades, and Sotheby’s Geneva has had the privilege of selling three of these important stones over the years: - The Mouawad Splendour, modified pear-shape, 101.84 carats, sold for CHF15,950,000 (US$125,295 per carat), Sotheby’s Geneva, 1990 - The Star of Happiness, rectangular-shape, 100.36 carats, sold for CHF17,823,500 (US$118,397 per carat), Sotheby’s Geneva, 1993 - The Star of the Season, pear-shape, 100.10 carats, sold for CHF19,858,500 (US$165,322 per carat), Sotheby’s Geneva, 1995 - The Winston Legacy, pear-shape, 101.73 carats, sold for CHF25,883,750 (US$262,917 per carat), Christies Geneva, 2013 This highly important oval diamond at 118.28 carats, is the largest D-Flawless diamond ever to be offered for sale at auction and the largest oval D-Flawless diamond in the world as graded by the GIA. Sotheby’s Hong Kong is honoured to be offering this spectacular diamond for auction in October 2013, as we celebrate 40 years in Asia.

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2013-10-07
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World record price for a ruby

Superb and extremely rare ruby and diamond ring Set with a cushion-shaped ruby weighing 25.59 carats, between shield-shaped diamonds weighing 2.47 and 2.70 carats, signed Cartier, numbered, French assay and maker's marks, size 54, case signed Cartier.  "The described ruby exhibits a very impressive size and weight of 25.596 ct, combined with a highly attractive colour and a fine purity. Its colour is further pronounced by its well-proportioned cutting style, resulting in vivid red hues due to multiple internal reflections. Due to complex geological formation processes rubies of such quality generally are found in small crystals and only very exceptionally in such a size as the present stone. [...]Its vivid but saturated colour, poetically referred to as pigeon blood red, is due to a combination of well-balanced trace elements in the stone, typical and characteristic for the finest rubies of Mogok. [...]Based on our records we can conclude that a natural ruby from Burma of this size and colour is extremely rare. Thus, the described gemstone with its combination of outstanding characteristics can be considered a unique treasure of nature." Excerpts from the SSEF appendix letter, 4 February 2015"The 25.59 ct ruby described in the above mentioned Gübelin Gem Lab Report possesses a combination of outstanding characteristics. It displays a homogeneous and richly saturated 'pigeon blood red' colour, which typifies the finest of these gems. The depth of colour, combined with a high clarity and brilliance, all contribute to the beauty of the gem. The shape and finely proportioned cut provides vivid internal colour reflections. In addition, this remarkable gemstone has been spared thermal treatment." Excerpt from Gübelin appendix letter, 11 February 2015

  • CHESwitzerland
  • 2015-05-12
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World auction record for any jadeite jewellery and for cartier

Composed of twenty-seven graduated jadeite beads of highly translucent bright emerald green colour, completed by a clasp set with calibré-cut rubies and baguette diamonds, mounted in platinum and 18 karat yellow gold, length approximately 530mm, unsigned. Accompanied by Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory certificate numbered KJ 84088 (1-5), dated 23 January 2014, stating that the jadeites are natural, known in the trade as "A jade". Also accompanied by SSEF certificate numbered 73188, dated 28 February 2014, stating that the jadeites are natural, with no indications of impregnation. Further accompanied by SSEF Appendix stating that jadeite beads "exhibit a perfectly matching colour, combined with an outstanding translucency and excellent lustre...The rarity of this jadeite necklace is based not only on its excellently matching quality and impressive size, but also on its historic provenance and its highly remarkable style and workmanship. It can be thus considered a true and rare treasure of nature." ________________________________ Jadeite Jewellery of Utmost Prominence in the History of Auction: The Hutton-Mdivani Necklace For hundreds of years, jadeite has been a symbol of supreme status and extreme wealth. The original definition of the two Chinese characters, Fei Cui, which stands of jadeite in modern days, attests the pre-eminence of this special gemstone. Yi Wuzhi (literally “The Book of Foreign Matters’) explains, “Cui, a bird resembling a swallow, the male and red bird is named Fei, whereas the female green bird is named Cui, its feathers are used as adornments.” Cui was a very rare and precious bird in the old days and were hunted for their exceptional bright-coloured feathers. Jadeites, which come in a wide range of attractive colours, were coined Fei Cui for their beauty and high value. Metaphysics pronounces jade as a spiritual gemstone, if it is worn close to one’s skin, energy would be transferred to the wearer and a healthy influence would be exerted, and the jadeite itself, attaining positive aura from the wearer, improves in colour and translucency. The intricate beauty of jadeite is best seen in their mere simplicity, the finest jadeites are always polished as a cabochon spared of superfluous embellishments, while jadeite beads are the epitome of all form of jadeite jewellery under this guiding principle. Top-quality jadeites are often referred to as ‘old mine’ jadeites originating from the reputed mines in Hpakan in Burma. Their dense structure, fine crystals, even colour and high translucency deem such specimens to be the best in the world. However, such exceptional jadeite boulders are extremely scarce and relatively small in size, jadeite beads that could be cut and polished from these rough are mostly 5mm to 10mm in diameter. The twenty-seven jadeite beads on this necklace being offered as Lot 1847 was of extremely fine texture, round and succulent in shape and colour, like mouthwatering grapes under warm sunlight, glowing through their thin skins, exuberant and mellow, elating the spirit of whoever set eyes on them. The most astounding fact lies in the size of its beads, even the smallest bead in this suite measures 15.40mm, far exceeding those that made their way into the auction markets, and the largest of all measures an impressive 19.20mm, not to mention that there are twenty-seven of such enormous jadeite beads in total, amassing to unprecedented illustriousness. In general, to fashion a strand of matching jadeite beads, all the beads must be carved from the same boulder, and as many as thrice the desired number of beads are often needed from which to sleeve the most suitable and matching ones. With the immense wastage involved, jadeite bead necklaces rank among the most valuable and sought-after forms of jadeite jewellery. To put together a suite of such colossal and fine jadeite beads as those found on the Hutton Mdivani Necklace was utterly challenging, since a jadeite boulder of supreme quality and gigantic size must be recovered in the first place for to fashion such stunning beads. Throughout history, jadeites have been highly prized and worn by the rich and famous, many of whom were legendary female figures from the ruling class and notable fashion icons of all times, including Empress Dowager Cixi of China, Madame Chiang Kai-Shek and Madame Wellington Koo, wife of the famous Chinese diplomat V. K. Wellington Koo. The owner and the wearer of this spectacular jadeite necklace was indeed a figure of utmost importance in the world of jewellery collection in the past century, a famous socialite with a lavish taste for luxurious living, prodigal when acquiring the most exquisite gems, but never imprudent in her tasteful and refined selection: ‘Million Dollar Baby’ Ms Barbara Hutton. Every piece of jewel in her treasury was worthy of special mention, and this one-of-a-kind jadeite bead necklace by Cartier is no exception. The understated opulence of this necklace renders the subtlety of Hutton’s beauty and graceful demeanor, which was in no need of ostentatious parade; her strong presence alone defines timeless elegance. However, just as other treasures that were forever lost during late Qing and early Republican period, the provenance of this jadeite necklace remains undetermined. The one thing we can be sure of is that these twenty-seven green succulent beads had already appeared in Europe during the early 1930s, it must have taken a considerable time for the jadeite beads to travel across the oceans. It should also be taken into account that Cartier, as a Couture high jewellery maison, takes tremendous time for designing, sourcing the necessary components and eventually executing their art piece. Considering all these facts, the jadeite beads on this necklace can be dated at least to the late Qing dynasty. When compared to a superb jadeite bead necklace remodeled from a Qing imperial court necklace which was sold at Sotheby’s New York in 2010, the Hutton-Mdivani Necklace currently offered are far superior in colour, texture, translucency and size, which indicates an equally, if not more distinguished original ownership. The jadeite bead necklace made its debut in the auction market in 1988, when it fetched an impressive USD 2 million, which was the highest price ever paid for a piece of jadeite jewellery, causing a great sensation both in the East and the West. Six years later in 1994, the necklace took centre stage at an auction room in Hong Kong and was sold for double its previous hammer price, achieving an astonishing US$4.2 million, setting a new record yet again for jadeite jewelleries worldwide. Since then, this impressive jadeite bead necklace has become one of the most legendary and important piece of jadeite jewellery known to the world.

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2014-04-07
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The Perfect Pink a Superb Coloured Diamond and Diamond Ring

THE PERFECT PINK A SUPERB COLOURED DIAMOND AND DIAMOND RING Set with a rectangular-shaped fancy intense pink diamond weighing 14.23 carats, flanked on either side by a rectangular-shaped diamond weighing 1.73 and 1.67 carats, mounted in 18k rose and white gold, ring size 5½ Accompanied by report no. 14432611 dated 16 May 2005 from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the 14.23 carat diamond is fancy intense pink, natural colour, VVS2 clarity, with excellent symmetry Accompanied by a note no. 1009543 dated 24 September 2010 from Gübelin Gemmological Laboratory stating that diamonds are classified into two fundamental groups based on the relative presence or absence of nitrogen incorporated into the crystal structure, as determined by the infrared spectrum. Type I diamonds contains appreciable concentrations of nitrogen, whereas type II diamonds are chemically very pure and do not reveal infrared absorption characteristics related to nitrogen. A further separation of these two groups includes type Ia (nitrogen atoms present in pairs or groups), type Ib (isolated nitrogen atoms), type IIa (no measurable traces of nitrogen) and type IIb (traces of boron). Based on its infrared spectrum, the diamond of 14.23 carats is classified as a type IIa diamond Also accompanied by two reports no. 2125332554 dated 21 July 2010 and 17550927 dated 3 August 2010 from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the 1.73 and 1.67 carat diamonds are D colour, internally flawless clarity

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2010-11-29
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The Archduke Joseph Diamond

THE ARCHDUKE JOSEPH DIAMOND The unmounted cushion-shaped diamond weighing approximately 76.02 carats, in purple leather fitted box Accompanied by report no. 5151001770 dated 14 September 2012 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is D colour, Internally Flawless clarity; a letter indicating that the diamond is Type IIa; a GIA monograph and a letter dated 1 October 2012 stating that 'to date the Archduke Joseph Diamond is the largest D-color, Internally Flawless diamond we have graded from the historic Golconda region'. Letter dated 12 June 2007 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that 'upon examination, prior to and after re-cutting, we can confirm that the 76.02 carat diamond was cut from the diamond known as the 'Archduke Joseph Diamond'' Report no. 12090150 dated 26 September 2012 from the Gübelin GemLab stating that the diamond is D colour, Internally Flawless clarity, and a Note indicating that the diamond is Type IIa; also with an Appendix stating that the diamond is 'blessed with a purity of colour and high degree of transparency, which are particular to the world's finest natural type IIa diamond (the purest type in terms of chemistry). Diamonds of this type and size, displaying such a superior quality as well as an antique cutting style, are extremely rare and will unequivocally evoke references to the historic term of 'Golconda''

  • CHESwitzerland
  • 2012-11-13
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Exceptionally rare and highly important fancy vivid blue diamond

Centring on a brilliant-cut fancy vivid blue diamond weighing 7.59 carats, surrounded by brilliant-cut pink diamonds together weighing approximately 1.70 carats, to shoulders set with brilliant-cut diamonds, mounted in platinum. Ring size: 6 Accompanied by GIA report numbered 2155041817, dated 1 April 2013, stating that the 7.59 carat diamond is natural, Fancy Vivid Blue colour, Internally Flawless clarity; also accompanied by diamond type classification report stating that the diamond is determined to be a Type IIb diamond. Type IIb diamonds are very rare in nature and contain small amounts of boron that can give rise to a blue or gray coloration. Further accompanied by a GIA monograph, stating that "The Premier Blue is the largest round brilliant, fancy vivid blue, internally flawless diamond that GIA has ever graded." (April 2013) __________________________________ ORIGIN Blue diamonds are so rare that according to GIA, only 0.3% of coloured diamonds submitted to the laboratory are predominately blue regardless of its colour saturation. Natural blue diamonds owe its colour to trace amounts of boron particles within the diamond’s crystal structure; otherwise known as Type IIB diamonds, a very rare category in diamonds. Historically, blue diamonds were found in what we now know as the legendary Indian mines of Golconda, presently part of the State of Hyderabad. Most of the diamonds from these mines were alluvial, streamed from their origin to the river banks and beds. Given the factual relatively late discovery of alternative blue diamond sources, most historic blue diamonds would have Indian origin attributions. This is certainly true of the famed Tavernier Blue, known through the well-documented account by Jean Baptiste Tavernier in the 17th century. With the discovery of the South African mines at the turn of last century, in particular the Cullinan (Premier) Mines, blue diamonds were more formally introduced to the world rather than belonging to the realm of the mystic past. A HISTORIC PERSPECTIVE Jewels have always historically been intertwined with the fate of man. Rumoured myths, legendary curses, stories of royalty and tales of renowned jewelers are all fascinating facets that veil famous jewels with intangible mystery. One of the most celebrated “Blues” is the 45.52 carat “Hope Diamond”, now in the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C.: Queen Marie Antoinette, American Heiress Evalyn Walsh McClean, House of Cartier, and Harry Winston were some of the notable owners of this famous blue diamond. The “Hope Diamond” is now considered to have been the precursor of the famed “Tavernier Blue” that had been cut twice, the first time from its original rough size of 112 carats to 67 carats, bearing the new name “Diamond of the Crown”, and then refashioned into its current weight of 45.52 carat, and renamed as the “Hope Diamond”, a cushion-shaped Fancy Dark Grayish-Blue Diamond, donated by Harry Winston in 1958. Other notable historic blue diamonds are the “Blue Heart” (Eugenie Blue), “Tereschenko Blue”, “Wittelsbach-Graff Blue”, and of course the mysterious and long-lost “Brunswick Blue.” MILLENNIUM BLUE DIAMONDS In celebration of the Millennium 2000, a unique collection of special blue diamonds was unveiled by De Beers, together with The Steinmetz Group. Titled the “Millennium Collection”, this collection showcased exceptional, rare and highly valuable diamonds in a specially designed exhibit at London’s Millennium Dome. The collection included eleven phenomenal blue diamonds of various shapes and weights totaling 118 carats, ranging in size from a 5.16 carat pear-shaped diamond to a 27.64 carat heart-shaped diamond, also known as “The Heart of Eternity.” As one of the most important collections of blue diamonds to be presented at one time, it took over two years to plan the manufacture of the diamonds and over countless decades to recover them. Nine out of the eleven diamonds have been graded by the GIA as Fancy Vivid Blue colour and two of Fancy Intense Blue colour. Very few blue diamonds in the market has had the  intensity or an even saturation as these Millennium blue diamonds. FANCY VIVID BLUE DIAMONDS AT AUCTION Whilst a very small number of important blue diamonds were sold at auction over the last two decades, it was not until 2007 when the landmark Sotheby’s auction in Hong Kong sold a 6.04 carat, internally flawless emerald-cut Fancy Vivid Blue diamond for a record price of US$1,321,495 per carat, breaking the 20 year old record held by the famous “Hancock Red”, and propelling all sizable Fancy Vivid Blue diamonds to new market levels of a minimum of US$1,000,000 per carat. Other notable blue diamonds at auction include the ”Begum Blue” (1995), “Wittelsbach-Graff Blue” (2008), “Star of Josephine” (2009), “De Beers Millennium Jewel 11” (2010), and the “Reza Blue” (2010). In October 2011, Sotheby’s Hong Kong set another new record of US$1,686,505 per carat for a 6.01 carat cushion-shaped Fancy Vivid Blue diamond. It is noteworthy to mention in context of the rarity of Fancy Vivid Blue diamonds, that there has not been a sizable matched pair of Fancy Vivid Blue diamonds ever to appear at auction, except for the unique pair of 5.24 and 5.58 carat pendant earrings sold at Sotheby’s Hong Kong in 2002. Earpendants set with Fancy Vivid Blue diamonds are usually fashioned in the very chic and striking “yin-yang” vivid blue and white diamond combination. Past auction examples include the pair of Fancy Vivid Blue diamond earpendants by Bulgari from the collection of Donna Simonetta Colonna, Duchess di Cesaro, sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in 2003, as well as the pair of earpendants by Cartier from the Collection of Betsy Cushing Whitney, sold at Sotheby’s New York in 1998. THE PREMIER BLUE The round brilliant-cut is one of the rarest shapes for coloured diamonds, as they are usually fashioned to best maximize the weight of the often irregular-shaped rough. Furthermore, it is even rarer to find a fancy coloured diamond successfully cut into a round brilliant while still showcasing the highest strength of colour. The combination of the best colour grading of vivid blue, with an internally flawless clarity, in a substantial carat size of 7.59 carats, renders The Premier Blue a very important and exceptional rare blue diamond. GIA notes in the accompanied monograph that “even more significant is the fact that, at the time of the printing of this Monograph, The Premier Blue is the largest round brilliant, fancy vivid blue, internally flawless diamond that GIA has ever graded. Of the highest clarity and colour, The Premier Blue adds to the long and alluring history of blue diamonds.”

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2013-10-07
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Superb and highly important fancy vivid purple-pink diamond and diamond

Centring on a pear-shaped fancy vivid purple-pink diamond weighing 8.41 carats, to a stylized mount pavé-set throughout with circular-cut diamonds, mounted in platinum, signed Sotheby's Diamonds. Ring size: 5½ Accompanied by GIA report numbered 1162202561, dated 27 June 2014, stating that the 8.41 carat diamond is natural, Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink colour, Internally Flawless clarity, with Excellent Polish; further accompanied by diamond type classification report stating that the diamond is determined to be a Type IIa diamond. Type IIa diamonds are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Also accompanied by a signed box. Most pink diamonds through the formation process tend to have less than desirable clarity and also tend to suffer from an inherent trait of internal graining, which affects the brilliance and luster. This 8.41 carat pink diamond is remarkable for its very crisp crystal and internally flawless clarity as well as being “highly transparent and very clear”. This diamond is rare for its size, beautiful hue, and exemplary rich saturation of colour. _______________________________ SOTHEBY'S DIAMONDS Since 2005, Sotheby’s Diamonds has presented limited edition collections of diamond jewellery and bespoke pieces through a partnership with the leading international expert in diamond cutting and polishing. Each stone from Sotheby’s Diamond is hand-picked and every design meticulously handcrafted by European-trained artisans. The exquisite settings and breathtaking designs are either unique or of a limited production numbering ten or fewer pieces. Weaving innovation with tradition, Sotheby’s Diamonds collections feature creative pairings, juxtaposing rare and important diamonds, sometimes with unexpected materials including wood, ceramic and steel. Whimsical while classically beautiful, each and every Sotheby’s Diamonds piece is an individual masterpiece—at the heart of which is always one-of-a-kind diamond. At Sotheby’s Diamonds salons in Hong Kong and New York, these exclusive creations, as well as magnificently set single-stones and rare diamonds and coloured diamonds of unparalleled quality, are available year round. Beyond the salons, Sotheby’s Diamonds will showcase stunning diamond jewellery at the Hong Kong Autumn Sales at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre this 3-8 October. The collection will also be presented at select events in conjunction with the auction calendar throughout the year, as well as at trunk shows in Beijing, Taipei and Singapore among other locations. Contemporary yet timeless, Sotheby’s Diamonds form a perfect marriage of art and jewellery, continuing the Sotheby’s tradition of bringing together the most discerning collectors with impeccable works of art. A HISTORY OF PINK DIAMONDS “A coloured diamond is a touchstone of the universe, a little something God created that man can’t always find…they are the last frontier of collectable.” – R. Winston 1986 The story of this pink splendor was set nowhere else but in the ancient mines of South India, the land blessed with the world’s purest and most famous diamonds, and the only source of diamonds known to men before the 18th century. Jean Baptiste Tavernier, a French merchant and adventurer who was best known for acquiring the Tavernier Blue Diamond the he subsequently sold to Louis XIV, first made a reference to rose diamonds in early 17th century. According to Tavernier’s account, this enormous pink rough weighing over 200 carats was shown to him by moguls in kingdoms of Golconda in 1642 during his second voyage to the East. Valued at 600,000 rupees almost four hundred years ago, this diamond named ‘The Grand Table’ is still the largest pink diamond known to date. In his book ‘The Six Voyages’, he later drew a picture of two pale rose coloured diamonds that he purchased in India circa 1668. Many of the world’s most famous pink diamonds, such as The Darya-i-Nur, Agra, Le Grand Condé, The Hortensia and Shah Jahaan, very likely originated in the famous Kollur mines, near Golconda in Southern India, adorning crowns and jewels of kings and moguls during that period. Some made their journeys into Europe and were sold or presented as largesse to monarchs and the royals. The exact source of some other famous ones is not known, and some quite large pink diamonds have been recovered from alluvial deposits in the interior of Brazil and Africa in more recent times. Natural pink diamonds over a carat are extremely rare to come by; some would say it is beyond rare. The famous ‘Williamson’ pink, currently part of the British Crown Jewels, was presented to Princess Elizabeth (now Queen Elizabeth II) on the occasion of her wedding on 20 November 1947. Taking its name from its finder, Dr. J.T. Williamson, this pink diamond is one of the most illustrious modern day finds from South Africa. In the late 1980s, encouraging soil samples led geologists in search of diamond mines to North West Australia. After a decade looking through kimberlite sites, they finally discovered the Argyle mines, which now supply approximately 90% of the world’s pink diamonds. Yet, despite this significant discovery, their paucity remained stupefying. Only 0.1% of the twenty million carats of rough produced annually is pink, and a whole year's worth of production of these pink treasures over half a carat would fit in the palm of your hand. The majority of the produce qualified as ‘pink’ are usually around twenty points and of low clarity. Currently there are no other pink diamond mines in the world, and any discovery of pink diamond deposits would take at least a decade’s time up to the actual production. As this rare treasure draw more and more attention from gem connoisseurs and aficionadas around the world, the demand of the alluring pinks far exceeds the supply. Whenever a pink diamond over 5 carats is put up at an auction, it naturally assumes a pivotal position in the auction room, drawing waves of approving gasps when it fetches astronomical prices time after time. It does not take an expert to admire this nature’s marvel, and their dreamlike colour never disappoints. That, is the magic of pink diamonds. MYSTICAL PINK – TRANSFORMING DEFECTION INTO PERFECTION It is widely known that diamonds are formed by carbon atoms bonded together in a crystalline lattice that does not absorb any wavelengths of light, thus affording it a white or more accurately, colourless appearance. The whiter its colour, the more precious it is, such is the belief of the majority, because purity is that ultimate rarity. Yet fewer would understand that it is exactly these ‘impurities’, which gemmologists call ‘trace elements’, that account for the vibrant array of hues found in natural coloured diamonds. Each colour is nature’s unique recipe, and only the most subtle balance of ingredients can culminate in a substantial beauty too mesmerizing to be true. Nitrogen and boron are the contributing factors to yellow and blue colours in diamonds; pink, however, kept its own secret far beyond comprehension of researchers. Natural pink diamonds have what is known as a defect centre. With enough of these defect centres the diamond may take on different properties, such as absorb certain wavelength of green light, lending it a pink appearance when light reaches our eyes. How this exactly happens still baffle gemmologists and scientists around the world. What researchers are sure of is that one or more of the carbon atoms in the diamond lattice may be missing or replaced with a different element in the defect centres. This is a result of plastic deformation of the diamond during its geologic history in the earth, usually when it is in semi-solid state. Layers of carbon atoms that are parallel to the orientation of the applied stress are displaced slightly along gliding planes. These glided planes of atoms appear needle-like and are known as pink grain lines or pink graining. The concentration of these bands of graining is directly related to the strength of the pink colour, the more graining there are, the more intense the pink colour. Hence, the critical conditions required for the formation of pink diamonds and the passage as they travel to reach earth surface often result in less than desirable clarity. It is fair to say that pink diamonds come naturally with a certain extent of graining. The linear pattern of surface graining can sometimes be moderately visible; whereas internal graining may give the diamond an overall hazy appearance. For a pink diamond to exhibit a homogenous and saturated pink colour without the obvious shortcoming of graining, a very delicate balance must be achieved, needless to say, completely shunned from human intervention. At the pinnacle of Mother Nature’s mastery is this 8.41 carat fancy vivid purple-pink diamond, displaying not only an evident sweet pink colour, but to be hailed for its exceptionally rare internally flawless clarity with no graining whatsoever and of a most beautiful hue of pink of intense saturation. True perfection, by all odds. QUOTES “Crystal” is a term that is sometimes used in gemmology to describe the appearance of top quality gems that is ‘highly transparent and very clear’. The 8.41 carat Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink diamond is a gem that the term crystal is aptly applied. It is a rare combination of size and saturated colour with an Internally Flawless clarity grade. - Tom Moses, GIA Senior Vice President of Laboratory and Research “Mined by De Beers, and fashioned from a diamond rough of over 18 carats, and through meticulous cutting and polishing, this flawless 8.41 carat vivid purple-pink diamond is a remarkable gift from Mother Nature, through Man’s creative aspiration and technical mastery.” “Pink is adored for its flattering feminine colour : it is the gentle flakes of cherry blossoms in Springtime April; it is delicate cotton candy floss melting at the tips of innocent fingers: it is the cheeks of a new-born tucked into a soft woolly quilt; or a precious dream sailing on chartaceous carnations.”

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2014-10-07
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'the sky blue diamond'superb fancy vivid blue diamond ring, cartier

Set with a square-cut fancy vivid blue diamond weighing 8.01 carats, the geometric mount set with brilliant-cut and baguette diamonds, size 51, signed Cartier, numbered, French assay and maker's marks. Blue is the colour of trust, honesty, loyalty, reliability and responsibility. This idealistic colour inspires higher ideals, and evokes peace and tranquillity. In nature, it is the colour of water and sky. The colour sky blue, particularly, emanates calm, serenity, spirituality and infinity, and refers to the heavens and what is above. Blue is one of the primary colours and has been used by many artists as a strong component of their works. Even in the decorative arts, this colour is omnipresent. The porcelain manufacture of Sèvres is so famous for its production of blue objects that Sèvres porcelain has become synonymous with the colour: le bleu de Sèvres. Wedgewood also used the combination of blue and white to make its distinctive creations. In fine art, the great Old Master painters demonstrated their talents with their depiction of nature, recreating the delicate and fine aspects of a landscape, selecting just the right colour for the skin on portraits, and using the perfect hue for the subject in a still life. The reproduction of sky has always been one of the artists’ favourite subjects. The skies of John Constable are widely renowned and highly sought after. Many of Monet’s works feature great swathes of blue sky. During the same period, Matisse was using a warm blue to realise his Nudes. Later, Yves Klein took this colour almost as his signature and these days the term ‘Klein blue’ is commonly used. Contemporary artists are still fascinated by this colour and the reproduction of the sky, like Edward Ruscha, with his Mirror Image Level, which will be offered in the Contemporary Art auction in November. Wassily Kandinsky, in his essay Du spirituel dans l'art, assures: “Blue is a celestial colour, evoking a deep calm… The deeper the blue becomes, the more strongly it calls man towards the infinite, awakening in him a desire for the pure and, finally, for the supernatural”. Blue attracts and fascinates people and there is no exception when this colour occurs in a diamond. Fancy Vivid Blue diamonds have a beauty that is incomparable to that of any other gem. They are greatly admired and eagerly sought after by collectors and connoisseurs. Considering that the blue colour in stones is often not evenly spread, and on occasion entirely absent, the encapsulating of a beautiful pure even blue colour is truly a professional challenge for the diamond cutter. He will spend months studying the proportions of the rough in order to guarantee the greatest standards of proportionality, colour and beauty, and to bring out this captivating colour, making fancy vivid blue one of the nature’s rarest endowments of colour in diamonds. Ever since Jean-Baptiste Tavernier sold the French Blue to Louis XIV in 1669, the world has been mesmerised by the rarity of blue diamonds. Reminiscent of the hues of the azure sea, blue diamonds owe their colouration to the trace element boron. Although other rare coloured diamonds, such as pink and red, are found in India, Brazil and Australia, blue diamonds are primarily recovered from the Cullinan mine in South Africa. Their colour may range from a pale blue to a light sky blue to a dark blue. The more intense colours, fancy vivid, are considered the rarest and most desirable. In recent years, Sotheby’s has handled some of the most notable blue diamonds at auction and holds the world auction record price per carat for any diamond and gemstone with the ‘Blue Moon of Josephine’, a 12.03 Fancy Vivid Blue diamond, sold in November 2015 in Geneva for more than USD 4 million per carat.

  • GBRUnited Kingdom
  • 2016-11-16
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A Belle époque Diamond Devant-De-Corsage Brooch, by Cartier

A BELLE ÉPOQUE DIAMOND DEVANT-DE-CORSAGE BROOCH, BY CARTIER The pendant centering upon a pear-shaped diamond, weighing approximately 34.08 carats, an oval-shaped diamond, weighing approximately 23.55 carats, and a marquise-shaped diamond, weighing approximately 6.51 carats, enhanced by Lily-of-the-valley links set with circular-cut diamonds, and suspended from two detachable similarly-set lines, each with a pavé-set old-cut diamond palmette terminal, mounted in platinum, 1912, pendant only 9.1 cm With maker's mark for Henri Picq workshop, signed Cartier Accompanied by report no. 2155827220 dated 20 December 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the 34.08 carat pear-shaped diamond is E colour, VSI clarity, and a Diamond Type Classification letter stating that the diamond is Type IA Report no. 2155827320 dated 16 December 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the 23.55 carat oval-shaped diamond is D colour, VVS2 clarity, a working diagram indicating that the clarity of the diamond is potentially Internally Flawless, and a Diamond Type Classification letter stating that the diamond is Type IIA Report no. 2155827783 dated 24 December 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the 6.51 carat marquise-shaped diamond is D colour, VS1 clarity, and a Diamond Type Classification letter stating that the diamond is Type IIA Report no. 5151827771 dated 20 December 2013 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the 3.54 carat heart-shaped diamond is E colour, VS2 clarity, and a Diamond Type Classification letter stating that the diamond is Type IA

  • CHESwitzerland
  • 2014-05-14
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Superb fancy vivid purple-pink diamond ring

Set with a pear-shaped fancy vivid purple-pink diamond of exceptional colour weighing 8.24 carats, between pear-shaped diamond shoulders, size 52. Jean-Baptiste Tavernier, a French merchant and adventurer who was best known for acquiring the 'Tavernier Blue Diamond' that he subsequently sold to Louis XIV, first made a reference to pink diamonds in the early 17th century. Tavernier mentioned a very large pink rough diamond weighing over 200 carats, shown to him by Moghuls in the Kingdom of Golconda in 1642. This diamond named ‘The Grand Table’ and valued at 600,000 rupees at the time, is still the largest pink diamond recorded to date. The French merchant also purchased two pale pink diamonds around 1668 and drew the pictures of the stones in his travel book. Since the 17th century, the value of coloured diamonds has considerably increased. Fancy coloured diamonds are rarer than near colourless diamonds as their hues come from a disturbance during the formation process of the stone deep in the earth. For all coloured diamonds except pinks, the colour comes from trace elements that interfere during the formation of the crystal. A diamond is composed of pure carbon; it is the intrusion of another atom that causes the colour: nitrogen for yellows, boron for blues. Concerning the pink diamonds, the colour is a consequence of a distortion of the crystal structure of the stone. Fancy coloured diamonds are rare in nature, but the intensity of the colour is also an important characteristic of the stone. The Gemological Institute of America grades fancy coloured diamonds as: Faint, Very Light, Light, Fancy Light, Fancy, Fancy Intense, Fancy Vivid. Fancy Vivid colours are the most sought-after. The amazing stone offered in this auction displays a very bright and deep fancy vivid purple-pink colour. Even in the category “Fancy Vivid”, one can find different levels of intensity; the saturation and hue of this stone are absolutely exceptional. The current record price ever paid at auction for a diamond or any gemstone is ‘The Graff Pink’, a magnificent 24.76 carat Fancy Intense Pink diamond, which sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in November 2010 for $46.16 million. The current record price per carat for a fancy vivid pink diamond ($2,155,332) was set by a 5.00 carat diamond, sold in Hong Kong in January 2009. Last year, in October, Sotheby’s Hong Kong offered a 8.41 carat Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink diamond, which sold for $17,778,247, a world auction record price for a fancy vivid pink diamond.

  • CHESwitzerland
  • 2015-11-11
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A SENSATIONAL RUBY RING, BY VERDURA

A SENSATIONAL RUBY RING, BY VERDURA Set with an oval-shaped ruby, weighing approximately 15.99 carats, within a circular-cut diamond and polished gold surround, to the trifurcated gold hoop, ring size 7 1/4, mounted in platinum and 18k gold Signed Verdura Accompanied by report no. CS 1074180 dated 11 March 2016 from the AGL American Gemological Laboratories stating that it is the opinion of the Laboratory that the origin of this ruby would be classified as Burma (Myanmar), with no gemological evidence of heat. Also accompanied by a letter stating this Burmese ruby has received the highest and most prestigious TQIR classification of Exceptional Accompanied by report no. 80019 dated 27 April 2015 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the analysed properties confirm the authenticity of this transparent ruby, no indications of heating, origin: Burma (Myanmar); also accompanied by an appendix stating that the ruby possesses extraordinary characteristics and merits special mention and appreciation. The ruby has a remarkable size and weight of 15.991 cts and exhibits an attractive vivid colour, combined with fine purity. The inclusions found by microscopic inspection represent the hallmarks of classical ruby mines in the Mogok valley in Burma (Myanmar), well known for its wealth in gems since historic times. Its attractive vivid red colour is due to a combination of well-balanced trace elements in this gemstone, characteristic for the finest rubies from Mogok. In addition to these qualities, this ruby has been spared exposure to heat treatment and its clarity and colour are thus all natural. A natural ruby from Burma of this size and quality is very rare and thus can be considered an exceptional treasure With report no. 15090007 dated 3 September 2015 from Gübelin Gem Lab stating that gemmological testing revealed characteristics consistent with those of rubies originating from Burma (Myanmar), no indications of heating

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-04-20
Hammer price
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Important fancy intense blue diamond brooch, alexandre reza

Set with a marquise-shaped fancy intense blue diamond weighing 6.64 carats, highlighted with two pear-shaped fancy intense blue diamonds weighing 2.01 and 1.01 carats, further accented with similarly shaped colourless diamonds, may be worn as a pendant, signed A. Reza, French assay and maker's marks. The beautiful brooch offered in this sale was originally a pendant suspended from a necklace set with D-colour, Internally Flawless marquise-shaped diamonds, created by Alexandre Reza. Alexandre Reza   During his career, Alexandre Reza (1922-2016), the celebrated Paris-based jeweller, assembled one of the largest, most diverse and precious collections of gems in the world. He travelled widely to carefully select each stone individually, and then transformed them with his vision and the skill of his virtuoso craftsmanship into delicate works of art that are the exquisite suites of necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings for which Alexandre Reza is justly renowned. He first supplied gems to, and manufactured for, some of the greatest jewellers of the 1960s and 1970s, including Cartier, Chaumet, Van Cleef & Arpels, Boucheron, Gérard, Harry Winston and Bulgari. He then decided to create his own brand and established his retail operations on the Place Vendôme in Paris, as well as in Geneva and in the South of France. The jeweller’s art begins with an understanding that jewels are the most personal of decoration and are meant to be worn to reflect and enhance a woman’s beauty. Reza was inspired in his designs both by historical jewels of royal provenance as well as by a modern classicism of his own creation. Movement, lightness of composition and harmony are the key words of his designs. Each of Alexandre Reza’s creations is imbued with his special understanding of and appreciation for both the physical beauty and the metaphysical properties of the precious gems with which it is set. He brought together the most appealing gems with outstanding properties and qualities. The pendant brooch offered in this sale is a fine example of the careful selection of gems for which Alexandre Reza is reputed. He assembled three fancy intense blue diamonds with D colour pear-shaped diamonds within a delicate and radiant design. Another example of Reza's precise selection of gems is the fancy vivid blue diamond ring sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in May 2010 for a record price of more than CHF 7 million (USD 6.3 million). The brand continues today, based at 21 Place Vendôme in Paris, under the leadership of Alexandre's son, Olivier; while respecting the passion and dedication to perfection which have always been the hallmark of the company, Olivier's unique vision has brought a new exciting aesthetic to Reza's creations.

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-05-17
Hammer price
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A Magnificent Ruby and Diamond Necklace, by Etcetera

A MAGNIFICENT RUBY AND DIAMOND NECKLACE, BY ETCETERA Designed as an articulated brilliant-cut diamond lattice-work band, centering on a line of graduated pear-shaped diamonds, thirteen pear-shaped diamonds weighing approximately 5.14 to 1.00 carats, framed by two rows of oval and cushion-shaped rubies weighing approximately 7.02 to 1.10 carats, to the brilliant-cut diamond link backchain accented with a pear-shaped diamond, mounted in 18k white gold, 43.9 cm long With maker's mark for Etcetera Accompanied by premium report no. 79458 dated 20 March 2015 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the forty-eight rubies weighing approximately 120.00 carats total are of Burma (Myanmar) origin, with no indications of heating and the colour of these rubies may also be called 'pigeon's blood' in the trade; also accompanied by an appendix stating that the natural ruby necklace possesses extraordinary characteristics and merits special mention and appreciation. The rubies exhibit a highly matching vivid colour and an outstanding fine purity, rarely encountered in rubies of Burmese origin. The small inclusions found by microscopic inspection and the analysed properties of these rubies are the hallmarks of rubies from the reputed mines in the Mogok valley (the majority of these rubies including the largest ruby) and Mong Hsu (southeast of Mogok). Their attractive and saturated colour - poetically referred to as "pigeon blood red" - is due to a combination of well-balanced trace elements in these gemstones, characteristic for the finest rubies from Burma (Myanmar). The rubies have been spared exposure to heat treatment and their colour and purity are thus entirely natural. Assembling a matching selection of natural rubies from Burma of such quality and size - all showing the most sought after "pigeon blood red' colour - is extremely rare and exceptional. Thus this ruby necklace can be considered a true treasure of nature Also accompanied by thirty-five reports from the Gübelin Gemmological Laboratory stating that the rubies are of Burma (Myanmar) origin, with no indications of heating and this colour variety may also be called "pigeon's blood red" in the trade Also accompanied by forty-eight reports from the Gem Research Swiss Lab stating that the rubies are of Burma (Myanmar) origin, vivid red colour (GRS type "pigeon's blood"), with no indication of treatments Thirteen reports dated from 10 August 2010 to 30 May 2013 from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the pear-shaped diamonds weighing from 5.14 to 1.00 carat range from D to G colour, internally flawless to SI1 clarity

  • HKGHong Kong SAR China
  • 2015-06-02
Hammer price
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* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.

Jewelry & Gems

Barnebys gathers jewelry from auction houses all over the world here. Beautiful necklaces, rings, bracelets, earrings and other fine jewels are in this category.

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