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  • 22 Apr 2004—19 Jan 2019

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RARE 1900s JAPANESE HP MEIJI MORIAGE FLORAL COBALT VASE

The following treasure is from the living estate of Ailene & Buddy Ford; noted dealers and lifelong collectors of valuable antique & vintage heirlooms. The AEAA is very proud to showcase this incredible latter Meiji period, Japanese hand painted floral Moriage vase with the highly collectible Cobalt ground. This splendid large shelf vase features a scarce mid-waisted (hyperbolic) form, adorned in brilliant floral enamels, and tastefully accented in exceptional swirling and flower Moriage relief clay. Our unique vase also has flush rim gilded handles, and is unsigned, as is about 90 % of early Moriage. This fabulous heirloom dates from ca. 1900-1910, and was potted in the termed Nippon era (see history below). This vase weighs 2#, standing 5 x 5 x 10 inches tall, and is in wonderful condition. xxxxxxxxxxx. The Meiji period, is a Japanese era which extended from September 1868 through July 1912. The Meiji period ran concurrently with that which has become known as Nippon era (1891-1921), but many Meiji pieces were never exported from the home markets, or they went to Germany, Austria & England, BUT NOT THE UNITED STATES! The Meiji period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan. On 3 February 1867, 15-year-old prince Mutsuhito succeeded his father, Emperor Kōmei, to the Chrysanthemum Throne as the 122nd emperor. Imperial restoration occurred the next year on January 3rd 1868 with the formation of the new government. The Tokugawa Shogunate was overthrown with the fall of Edo in the summer of 1868, and Mutsuhito, who was to reign until 1912, selected a new reign title - Meiji, or Enlightened Rule, to mark the beginning of a new era in Japanese history. The first reform was the promulgation of the Five Charter Oath in 1868, a general statement of the aims of the Meiji leaders to boost morale and win financial support for the new government. Its five provisions consisted of:1) Establishment of deliberative assemblies2) Involvement of all classes in carrying out state affairs3) The revocation of sumptuary laws and class restrictions on employment4) Replacement of evil customs with the just laws of nature, and5) An international search for knowledge to strengthen the foundations of imperial rule.Implicit in the Charter Oath was an end to exclusive political rule by the Bakufu (**A shogun's office or administration is known in English as a Shogunate. In Japanese it was known as Bakufu), and a move toward more democratic participation in government. To implement the Charter Oath, a constitution with eleven articles was drawn up. Besides providing for a new Council of State, legislative bodies, and systems of ranks for nobles and officials, it limited office tenure to four years, allowed public balloting, provided for a new taxation system, and ordered new local administrative rules. The Meiji government assured the foreign powers that it would follow the old treaties negotiated by the bakufu and announced that it would act in accordance with international law.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-11-07
Hammer price
Show price

1900 JAPANESE MEIJI HD CARVED WALRUS TUSK LADY SON COY

The following antique is from the living estate of Ailene & Buddy Ford; noted dealers and lifelong collectors of valuable antique & vintage heirlooms. The AEAA is very pleased to present this marvelous Japanese Meiji period hand carved Walrus Tusk revealing lady with her bell, lucky coy, and her son. We have tested for authenticity, and we can report that there are definitely Schreger lines at an angle less than 90 degrees, meaning Walrus and not elephant. Our expert ivory buyers will know but we are a tiny bit confused. In our limited experience, the Japanese caricature features a much less prominent forehead, plus the dress, and the rather risque bare breasts, make us think of the more voluptuous figures usually seen in the Indo Chinese genre. We are aware of at least 3 Quanyin styles going from modest to racey, and this statuette just doesn't feel japanese to us. If you can educate us, we would be most grateful. The carving definition of our lady is exceptional, especially the hair, and the hand carved base is marked, we believe by the artisan. She stands 3 x 8.5 inches tall, weighing 1 #, and is in great condition. xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx. There are many ancient legends involving the koi fish. The oldest of the legends is the story of when Chinese philosopher Confucius was born a son in 533 B.C., King Shoko of Ro presented to him a magoy, a black carp, as a gift. According to this legend, all modern day koi, and their bright colors, are from the magoy given to Confucius by the king. The legend says the Chinese then raised the koi in their rice patty fields to be used for food, especially during the long winter months, and not for pets. The Chinese then passed on their knowledge of raising koi to the Japanese. Raising koi in ponds began in Niigata, Japan during one particularly harsh winter. This was so in Niigata, during a very harsh winter, Japanese farmers could not fish and could not sustain any crops. As a result, the farmers began building ponds in which to raise koi in order to feed their families. During this time, many farmers began noticing different color mutations on the skin of the newly bred koi. So they carefully chose the most beautifully colored fish and bred them in separate ponds to keep as family pets.Koi continue to be bred as pets and enjoyed for their wonderful coloring. Today, there are over 100 different color types of koi fish. Many of the attributes of the koi symbolize several lessons and even trials individuals often encounter in life. The koi fish has a powerful and energetic life force, demonstrated by its ability to swim against currents and even travel upstream. Some of the characteristics associated with the koi include: Good fortune, Success, Prosperity, Longevity, Courage, Ambition, and Perseverance. FURTHERMORE: The fish's coloring also has something to do with its symbolism. Certain colors represent certain aspects or outcomes in life. Kohaku - This koi has a white body with red spots and symbolizes success in your career. Kumonryu - There are two main variations of this koi. One variation is a koi with a white body and black spots and the other is an all black body. This Kumonryu koi symbolizes life changes and transformations. Ogon - This solid, silver colored koi symbolically represents success in business and wealth. Kuchibeni - This white and red patterned koi is often referred to as the "lipstick" fish, because the red coloring around its mouth makes it appear as though the fish is wearing lipstick. Kuchibeni koi represents love and long lasting relationships. Yamabuki - The Yamabuki koi is gold in coloring and symbolizes riches and wealth.

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-11-07
Hammer price
Show price

* Note that the price doesn’t correlate with today’s value, but only relates to the actual end price at the time of the purchase.