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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO by Scaglietti

TARGA FLORIO, PALERMO, SICILY, 26 APRIL 1964 The weather is warm and dry on this spring morning in Sicily and fans begin lining the public roads of the towns and winding mountainous stretches surrounding the city of Palermo. The 48th running of the legendary Targa Florio is only minutes away, and it is proving to be yet another glorious battle of man and machine against the clock and the elements of surprise that make motor racing purely a sport for the most daring gentlemen drivers in the world. This is, after all, the oldest sports car race in the world, and victory here is more than a fleeting moment of glory – it is a matter of national pride and a global contest that pits the racing teams from Italy against those of the U.S., Germany, England, and France. The challenges for drivers are seemingly endless – elevation changes, blind corners, switchbacks, and of course, the danger of thousands of spectators standing mere inches from the road as sports racing cars roar by at well over 100 mph. But in merely seven hours and 10 laps of the 72-km road course, the winner of the Targa Florio will be crowned and, with him, the all-important points toward the International Championship for GT Manufacturers will be awarded. The starting grid is a veritable who’s-who of star drivers: Dan Gurney, Phil Hill, Bob Bondurant, Masten Gregory, Innes Ireland, Jean Guichet, Hans Herrmann, Joakim Bonnier, and Graham Hill. But the Italian fans have arrived to disappointment as Scuderia Ferrari has recused itself from the race while Carroll Shelby has arrived in force with four competition Cobras, serious backing from Ford in Detroit, and his sights set on the Italian Prancing Horse. Not to be discounted by any means, Stuttgart’s Porsche army was sent to Sicily by Huschke von Hanstein with five Works cars, 904/8s and 904 GTSs, purpose-built for precisely this type of endurance race. Ferrari, of course, is the defending victor, having won the International Championship for GT Manufacturers in both 1962 and 1963 in the over-two-liter category, thanks to the stunning force of the GTO. But for the 1964 season, the FIA made further adjustments, such that the resulting classes amounted to “under two liters” and “over two liters,” the latter of which now included the powerful over-three-liter cars. This resulted in much stiffer competition for Ferrari as the GTOs were now officially in the same class as the larger capacity lightweight Jaguar E-Types, Aston Martin DB4 GT/Project cars, and the AC Cobras. Ferrari was also denied homologation status for its latest sports racing car, the 250 LM, so the 250 GTO was placed into service for one more year. And so, as the racing season for 1964 began, the stakes were exceptionally high. Ferrari was off to a great start for this third race in the Championship, having won both at Daytona and Sebring in the weeks previous, but without the Scuderia fielding its own Works entries, victory is therefore left to the privateers . . . and the GTO. Corrado Ferlaino is one such privateer. An entrepreneur, engineer, and future owner and president of the Naples football team, he is in his early 30s. In December of 1963, before the start of the season, he purchased chassis 3413, a 1962 Ferrari GTO with successful hill climb history and Series I bodywork. In January, three months before his first race in the car at the Targa Florio, the car was sent by the factory to its official coachbuilder at Scaglietti on Via Emilia in Modena, where the GTOs of course were all bodied from the outset. This car was upgraded to Series II coachwork with no rear spoiler. This implemented the latest development in the GTO’s design and signified an improvement aerodynamically for the model, and owner/drivers certainly desired the latest technological offering from Ferrari. Designed by Pininfarina, this improved bodywork was lower, wider, and shorter, with a more aerodynamic, steeply raked windshield, larger tires, wider track, and the engine sitting lower, all with the aim of improving handling and balance – a critical consideration on the curves and shorter straights through the towns and seaside hills along the coasts of Sicily. In fact, this bodywork upgrade was considered so desirable that three additional cars originally built with Series I coachwork were upgraded to this new design, two of which (including this car), featured an extended roofline in the style of the 250 LM. Aside from its aerodynamic intent, retrospectively it is considered an absolutely stunning addition to the car’s presence and renders the car’s profile not only supremely elegant, but extremely sporting and decidedly muscular. Once the car arrived in time for the Targa Florio, it proved to be an extremely challenging event. Only 28 cars finished the race, while over 30 never even crossed the finish line, due to accidents or mechanical failures. Joakim Bonnier came out strong, taking the lead in the Porsche 718 GTR, followed by Edgar Barth in an eight-cylinder 904. By the third lap, Gianni Bulgari, driving a Porsche 904 GTS, had taken the lead. The lead changes continued over the course of the race, lap by lap, driver change after driver change. The Detroit-powered Cobras failed to finish, all exiting the race with incident or mechanical issue. The Ferraris, however, were in their element and on their home turf, deftly maneuvering each 40-minute lap, one by one, until Ferlaino and Taramazzo crossed the finish line victorious, securing a class victory and 5th place overall, as the first in a series of four Ferrari GTOs to successfully finish the race. Most importantly, this victory contributed a maximum 14.4 points toward Ferrari’s Championship hunt – points which proved critical at year-end as Ferrari continued its battle with Shelby’s Cobras and ultimately beat the Americans by a very close count of 84.54 to 78.3. Simply put, Ferrari would not have won the Championship without this car’s all-important victory. Analysis of the points totals awarded to the manufacturers over the course of the ’64 season, race by race, clearly indicates that Shelby would have otherwise won the Championship at the end of the year, if Dan Gurney in his Cobra had beaten Ferlaino in his Ferrari at the Targa Florio. As such, chassis 3413 is effectively the car that won the championship for Ferrari in 1964! GRAN TURISMO OMOLOGATO The Targa Florio class-winner, chassis 3413, is an absolutely outstanding example of the breed and among the very best of Ferrari’s 250 GTOs. Never again would the factory develop and build a so-called production GT car purely for the sake of racing. The 250 GTO’s rise was prompted by the creation of a new International Championship for GT Manufacturers in 1962, for which the 250 SWB Berlinetta was deemed to be insufficient. Longtime Ferrari engineer Giotto Bizzarrini knew that a fresh model would be required to remain competitive with the latest machines from Aston Martin, Jaguar, and Shelby American. The SWB’s front profile was too oblique to exceed 155 mph (the front end lifted at high speeds), and the rear dimensions could not accommodate the ever-widening tires. For one of the first times in its history, Ferrari utilized a wind tunnel to test new coachwork, which eventually featured an extended, lowered nose, and a steeper windshield to reduce drag while maximizing downforce. The hood profile was lower than its predecessor’s, in part because the new tipo 539/62 COMP chassis allowed for the engine to be mounted closer to the ground. To retain full homologation eligibility, the new car retained general 250 GT chassis dimensions and the three-liter short-block Colombo V-12, which in tipo 168/62 competizione form featured six carburetors and larger valves (as in the Testa Rossa). The revised tipo 539 chassis was improved with lighter tubing, stiffer springs, and dual Watts linkages that stabilized the rear suspension. A new five-speed gearbox was fitted to provide maximum acceleration and top speed. While the early 1962 examples featured bolted-on rear spoilers, starting in 1963 the spoiler was formally integrated into the coachwork. For 1964, of course, the Series II bodywork that was adopted was applied to the final three GTOs built, referred to as GTO/64, and retroactively upgraded to four Series I cars as referenced earlier. CHASSIS NUMBER 3413 This car is just the third production GTO built, completing factory assembly in late April 1962. It was the first GTO example to feature Series I coachwork details such as a small radiator intake, narrow brake ducts, hood fasteners, and sail-panel vents. Scaglietti’s coachwork also featured a bolted-on rear spoiler and turn signal lamps below the headlights. Fitted with a tipo 168/62 competizione V-12, the GTO was finished in rosso cina, and the interior was trimmed with traditional blue cloth upholstery. In the first week of May, the Ferrari was driven by the legendary Phil Hill as SEFAC Ferrari’s official practice car for the upcoming Targa Florio. By this time, of course, Phil Hill’s importance to international American motor racing and indeed the Ferrari factory was well established. Not only had he already won Le Mans multiple times, he was also the first American Formula 1 World Champion and, quite indisputably, one of the world’s most talented and highly respected racing drivers. His presence behind the wheel of 3413 is a rare honor few cars in the world enjoy. A few days later, the GTO was officially sold to Mrs. Arnalda Colombo, who purchased the car on behalf of her husband, the famed Italian privateer Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi, one of the most charismatic and successful privateer drivers of the era and a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari who very consistently received the finest, special cars from the factory. Born in Milan in 1931, Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi began racing at the age of 19 with a Fiat Topolino in the 1950 Mille Miglia. In 1953 he began campaigning a Vignale-bodied Ferrari 166 MM spider, mostly in hill climbs. A year later his connection with Ferrari deepened when he began racing a freshly acquired 212 Export. He soon drove the first 250 MM berlinetta in competition, and a personal highlight was his triumph over champion racer Armando Zampieri’s Mercedes-Benz 300 SL. In 1956 Lualdi-Gabardi acquired the first of four Ferrari 250 GT ‘Tour de France’ examples he would own, and it increasingly became his weapon of choice during an aggressive competition campaign from which he emerged as the 1956 Italian Hill Climb Champion. By the early 1960s the privateer was campaigning 250 GT SWB examples (including one of the rare SEFAC hot rods), and he later owned two GTO examples (including the featured car). Having purchased many Ferraris during this period, Lualdi-Gabardi soon found himself on Maranello’s preferred client list, and he apparently lunched with Enzo Ferrari frequently over the years. A crash in 1972 eventually forced the hill climb champion to permanently retire from racing, but not before he had triumphed (or earned class wins) in no fewer than 116 races, a remarkable feat by any measure. Lualdi-Gabardi immediately began campaigning 3413 with great success in Italian hill climbs, starting with a victory at the Coppa Citta Asiago on 13 May. This was followed by a slew of class wins during the next month at hill climbs at Bologna-Raticosa, the Coppa Consuma, Bolzano-Mendola, and Trento-Bondone. The GTO then achieved several outright victories, starting with the Trieste–Opicina hill climb on 22 July, followed by the Trofeo Sarezzo-Lumezzane and the Coppa Faglioli in September, and the Coppa Autunno at Monza in October. Lualdi-Gabardi experienced such success in 3413 that at the season’s conclusion, he was declared the class champion for the 1962 Italian GT Championship. In early April 1963 the GTO experienced a final overall victory with Lualdi-Gabardi at the Stallavena-Bosco Chiesanuova hill climb, and four days later the car was sold to its second owner, Gianni Bulgari, the scion and eventual president of the Bulgari watch company, who was no stranger to the race track and actively campaigned sports cars in period alongside the greatest gentlemen drivers. Bulgari first entered the Ferrari at the Targa Florio on 5 May, during the third round of the 1963 International Championship for GT Manufacturers, and achieved immediate success finishing 1st in class, 4th overall, with Maurizio Grana as his co-pilot. Six months later he won the Coppa FISA at Monza. In merely its first calendar year, the feats of success that 3413 achieved are virtually unbelievable – feats of victory that speak not only to the talents of the drivers behind the wheel, but also to the world-class engineering at Ferrari that placed the GTO miles ahead, developmentally, of its competition on the track. One must consider the competition against which the Ferrari entered these races. Whether on the most legendary race tracks in Europe or local hill climbs in Italy, the GTOs were virtually on another level entirely, repeatedly and aggressively beating the competition. These were indeed the years in which the indelible image of a V-12 front-engined sports car, liveried in racing red with an iconic prancing horse became the international symbol of Ferrari’s racing dominance. All these successes transpired before 3413 was driven to class victory at the Targa Florio the year after by Taramazzo and Ferlaino, at which point of course Ferlaino had commissioned the upgraded GTO/64 coachwork. Ferlaino raced the 250 at least three more times in 1964, earning a class win at the Bologna-Raticosa Hill Climb in late May and 3rd overall at the Mugello 500 KM a month later. Shortly thereafter, 3413 was acquired by Dan Margulies, a dealer residing in London. At some point prior to December 1965, the front coachwork around the nose was slightly modified, with twin vertical vents for brake cooling added in place of the prior rectangular driving lights. In late December 1965, the car was entrusted to Maranello Concessionaires driver David Piper for the Redex Trophy at Brands Hatch where he claimed an outright victory, fittingly in 3413’s final period race. By the time the highly respected racing driver Piper got behind the wheel, he had already been very successful in single-seater racing, specifically Formula 2 and also Formula 1, and continues to remain active in the collector car hobby. VINTAGE COMPETITION In 1967 the GTO was sold by Margulies to Jack Le Fort, a fellow Englishman who ran the car twice at the Prescott Speed Hill Climb before selling it a year later to noted collector Neil Corner. In fact, the car’s entire vintage racing career and subsequent chain of ownership is not only incredibly illustrious, it includes the collection of gentlemen who are rightfully considered among the foremost motoring enthusiasts in the world and whose association with 3413 further serves to confirm the importance of such a car. In 1970 Corner entered the GTO at a race held in conjunction with the Bugatti Drivers Club Meeting at Silverstone, and shortly afterwards the car was acquired by respected collector Lord Anthony Bamford of Stoke-on-Trent. Both Corner and Bamford have owned some of the rarest and most sought-after cars in the world, including multiple GTOs, no less, and their attention to acquiring the very best is impeccable. Lord Bamford attended the English Ferrari Owners Club meet at Prescott in July 1972 and retained possession of the spectacular GTO until the 1980s, when he sold the Ferrari to collector Nigel Moores. In 1988 Moores sold 3413 to Japanese collector Yoshijuki Hayashi, though the car remained domiciled in the UK. The Ferrari participated in European vintage events during this ownership, including the GTO 30th Anniversary Tour in September 1992, and the Goodwood Festival of Speed in June 1993 (British restoration and racing expert Tony Merrick drove the car at both events). The GTO was purchased from Hayashi in April 1994 by Sir Lindsay Owen-Jones of London, then Chairman and CEO of L’Oréal and a respected motoring enthusiast in his own right – in fact, his association with the Ferrari brand is well established and includes serving on the board of directors of Ferrari SpA. Notable events in his ownership included a showing at the Coys Historic Race Festival at Silverstone in 1994 and 1995. In January 2000, this highly significant Ferrari was purchased by the consignor, an esteemed collector based in the Pacific Northwest, who has continued to present, race, and rally the car at premium vintage events. In Dr. Gregory Whitten’s collection, the car kept company with the absolute best of the best and, over the years, this very collection has contained one of the finest Ferrari 250 LMs in existence, a superb SEFAC Hot Rod Le Mans class-winner, a 14-louvre Tour de France and an Alfa Romeo P3, to name but a very small sampling. In concert with an exceptional career in business, typified by an applied mathematics doctorate from Harvard, nearly two decades of work with Microsoft, and most recently the leadership of the financial software company Numerix, it is perhaps to be expected that Dr. Whitten’s passion for detail and expertise are embodied in his ownership of this GTO. Much to his credit, 3413 was regularly exhibited and driven around the world, including four appearances at the Cavallino Classic between 2001 and 2008 and four seasons in the Shell Ferrari Historic Challenge between 2001 and 2009. Chassis 3413 also participated in the GTO 40th Anniversary tour in September 2002; the Monterey Historic Races in August 2004, 2008, and 2011; the GTO 45th Anniversary tour in 2007; the Goodwood Revival Meeting in 2011; and the GTO 50th and 55th Anniversary tours, respectively, held in 2012 and 2017. The car was furthermore presented during the GTO celebration at the 2011 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was reunited with 17 of its GTO brethren. The car is most certainly one of the most actively campaigned and successful GTOs in the world. A LEGEND WITHOUT EQUAL Examples of the 250 GTO are very rarely offered for sale, let alone publicly, and 3413 is now available for the first time in over 18 years. As the third example produced, and the first to originally feature standard design details, 3413 is also notable as the primary steed in Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi’s 1962 Italian GT Championship and a major contributor in 1964 to Ferrari’s final victory in the International Championship for GT Manufacturers. As one of only seven examples to be clothed in Scaglietti’s scintillating Series II coachwork (and one of two to feature the extended roofline), this 250 GTO is quite simply the most important Ferrari ever offered publicly. In 2018, the car was inspected onsite and in person by representatives from Ferrari’s Classiche department, and interested parties are encouraged to speak with an RM specialist to review the report from this visit. Noted Ferrari historian and expert Marcel Massini also recently inspected the car and considers it one of the very best examples, pointing to its successes with Lualdi, its originality, and all its numbers-matching components (engine block, gearbox and rear axle), which are included with the car’s sale. Specifically, it should be noted that while the original gearbox and rear axle are currently fitted, the original engine block was astutely removed years ago for preservation, and is included with the car. The car is currently fitted with a 250 GT engine block built to GTO specification, thereby affording the new owner both the benefit of originality with the ability to drive the car as intended in vintage rallying or competition. In the annals of automotive history, no initials loom larger than GTO. Claiming rarity, a long pedigree of mechanical development, beautifully sculpted coachwork, and an overwhelmingly successful competition record, the Ferrari 250 GTO has justifiably evolved into the world’s most desirable collector car: an instantly recognizable shape, a distinctive exhaust note, and a lustful presence that no other car in the world can claim. The rarity with which the model is publicly offered for sale confirms the desirability of the car and the ultra-exclusive members-only club that its ownership signifies: at any given point in time, 36 or fewer collectors can claim to be GTO owners. It is a club with virtually immediate access to the world’s most important automotive events, in which the mere arrival of a GTO is an historic occurrence and which there is never a barrier to entry. GTO owners count among their ranks captains of industry and luminaries of automotive collecting and, for many, acquisition of these cars is regarded the crowning achievement in an almost impossible hunt. The superb state and quality of 3413 further adds to this extreme rarity and makes its offering, quite literally, the opportunity of a lifetime – a moment in one’s collecting span that is quite likely unrepeatable. For one collector, then, there is no higher honor, there is no greater custodianship of history, and there is no greater achievement in the search of the world’s most important car. DATEEVENTRACE #DRIVERSRESULT1962    May 3-5, 1962Targa FlorioTPhil Hill, Mauro ForghieriTest CarMay 13, 1962Coppa Citta Asagio, Cengio-Tresche Hill Climb364Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st OAMay 27, 1962Bologna-Raticosa Hill Climb232Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st IC, 3rd OAJune 10, 1962Parma-Poggio di Bercerto Hill Climb358Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi2nd IC, 8th OAJune 17, 1962Coppa Consuma Hill Climb374Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st IC, 3rd OAJuly 1, 1962Bolzano-Mendola Hill Climb248Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st IC, 2nd OAJuly 8, 1962Trento-Bondone Hill Climb372Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st IC, 6th OAJuly 22, 1962Trieste-Opicina Hill Climb362Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st OAAugust 26, 1962Ollon-Villars Hill Climb150Edoardo Lualdi-GabardiPracticeSeptember 16, 1962Trofeo Sarezzo-Lumezzane177Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st OASeptember 23, 1962Coppa Fagioli, Ancona510Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st OAOctober 7, 1962Internationales Autorennen, Innsbruck Airfield112Edoardo Lualdi-GabardiPracticeOctober 14, 1962Coppa Autunno, Monza336Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st OA ITALIAN CHAMPIONSHIP Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st IC1963    April 7, 1963Stallavena-Boscochiesanuova Hillclimb794Edoardo Lualdi-Gabardi1st OAMay 5, 1963Targa Florio104Gianni Bulgari, Maurizio Grana1st IC, 4th OANovember 24, 1963Coppa FISA, Monza254Gianni Bulgari1st OA1964    April 26, 1964Targa Florio114Corrado Ferlaino, Luigi Taramazzo1st IC, 5th OAMay 24, 1964Coppa Consuma Hillclimb Corrado Ferlaino4th ICMay 31, 1964Bologna-Raticosa Hillclimb410Corrado Ferlaino1st IC, 8th OAJune 21, 1964Mugello 500 KM5Corrado Ferlaino3rd OA1965    December 26, 1965Redex Trophy, Brands Hatch78David Piper1st OA

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-08-25
Hammer price
Show price

1956 Ferrari 290 MM by Scaglietti

*Premium Lot – Bidding via Internet will not be available for this lot. Should you have any questions please contact Client Services. 320 bhp, 3,490 cc SOHC 60-degree Type 130 dry-sump V-12 engine with triple Weber twin-choke 46 DCF3 carburetors and twin spark-plug ignition with quad Magneti-Marelli distributors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with helical springs and anti-roll bar, De Dion rear axle with transverse leaf spring, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 92.52 in. 1956 Mille Miglia, Juan Manuel Fangio, 4th-overall Extensive and documented racing history An irrefutable piece of automotive history Ferrari Classiche certified Ferrari’s sports-prototype racing cars are among the most legendary in motorsport history as they epitomize the desire, passion, and mechanical brilliance that the Maranello team could bring to bear on the track. Most significantly, each and every design had Enzo’s personal handprint upon them. However, some cars are more special than others, and it is the Works cars that are considered the “Holy Grail” of Ferrari motoring. These iconic cars were on the frontline, the weapons of choice—the sharpest in the armory. They would carry the hopes and prayers of not only the Factory but also of Italy itself and would only be driven by the finest in the world. The Works Ferrari Prototypes were campaigned in the World Sportscar Championship with enormous success, on the greatest, most challenging, and most important circuits that today still provide the foundation and heritage of motorsport as we know it. SCUDERIA FERRARI: CHASSIS NUMBER 0626 The 290 MM was built to contest the World Sportscar Championship, which was as important and carried as much weight to Ferrari as his efforts to win the Formula One World Championship. The WSC was inaugurated in 1953, and Ferrari was immediately successful with championship wins in 1953 and 1954. However, in 1955, the goalposts moved in staggering style as the Germanic efficiency of Mercedes-Benz dominated three of the six events, claiming the World Championship in the process. Then, just as Mercedes-Benz retired at the end of 1955, the old enemy Maserati entered a new machine in the form of the fabulous 300S. Ferrari recognized that it needed a new weapon if it was to reclaim its glory. For 1956, at the suggestion of a returning engineer, the legendary Vittorio Jano, Enzo took the decision to revert to his thunderous trademark V-12 engine after developing various four- and six-cylinder Mondials, Monzas, and 118/121 LMs. Jano and engineer Andrea Fraschetti created an all-new engine, although it followed the principles inaugurated by Aurelio Lampredi, with an integral block and cylinder heads with screwed-in wet liners. The new engine was shorter and wider than the previous Lampredi designs, with considerable effort being put into the combustion chamber design to improve inlet and exhaust valve function. Additionally, two spark plugs per cylinder were fitted, with the net result being a 40 brake horsepower increase over the similarly sized 860 Monza. Enzo convinced the best driver of the era, and, for most, arguably the greatest driver who ever lived, the soon to be five-time World Champion Juan Manuel Fangio, to lead the Works team in his latest and greatest creation. With that, so it was that Fangio and the 290 MM came together with the sole purpose of securing the 1956 World Sportscar Championship for the Maranello Scuderia. In today’s heavily regulated world of motorsport, it is wonderful to reflect on the fact that in the 1950s there were few rules to govern the Works teams in the design of their latest racecars. These wonderful machines were therefore developed to the absolute limit of what was achievable, with no rules governing cylinder capacity or weight. The only limiting factor was the bravery of the driver and his ability to read the road ahead on some of the most challenging events for both car and driver that have ever existed. One such event was the legendary Mille Miglia. XXIII MILLE MIGLIA The 1956 Mille Miglia was held on April 29th and was the third round of the World Sportscar Championship. For this event, Fangio was allocated chassis number 0626, a car that was specifically built with him, and the car offered here today. There were 426 cars entered for the event, of which 365 would start, but only 182 would be classified as finishers. Juan Manuel Fangio was race #600 and would start last, at exactly 06:00 am, driving solo, with no navigator to call the turns and hazards that led in front. The race was intense from the onset, with the weather immediately deteriorating to torrential rain throughout Italy. The closed cars had a distinct advantage, but the Ferraris were still supremely competitive and would take the top five places with Fangio bringing home 0626 in 4th place overall. A remarkable feat considering the conditions and that he was driving unaccompanied. Less than a month later, an incredible photo essay by LIFE magazine photographer Thomas McAvoy chronicled the Scuderia Ferrari’s trip from the 1956 BRDC International Trophy of Silverstone right up to its recent domination and victory at the XXIII Mille Miglia. Three cars from the Mille Miglia were featured heavily, but Enzo Ferrari chose to rest against one specific car for the photoshoot, and that car was 0626 (#600), as can be seen pictured here. The next outing for chassis number 0626 was at the 2nd International ADAC 1000 KM at the Nürburgring, held at the end of May, where it was driven by future American World Champion Phil Hill, Ken Wharton, Olivier Gendebien, and the Marquis Alfonso de Portago. This spectacular roster of drivers finished 3rd overall, but the season was not over, and there were yet more incredibly talented drivers to sit behind the wheel. In July, de Portago once again took the wheel and finished 9th overall at the 5th International Grand Prix of Rouen-Les Essarts in France. Wolfgang Alexander Albert Eduard Maxamilian Reichsgraf Berghe (Taffy) von Trips was to become one of Germany’s all-time great Grand Prix drivers, winning the Targa Florio and even challenging for the World Championship until his untimely death at the Italian GP in 1961. But, in 1956, he had yet to drive a Ferrari. That was until he convinced Enzo to allow him to get behind the wheel of chassis 0626 at the Swedish GP at Kristianstad, the final race of the World Championship. He was partnered with the dashing Peter Collins, and the pair did not fail to impress with a 2nd place finish, which helped Ferrari secure the 1956 World Sportscar Championship, exactly as Enzo had set out to do. Nonetheless, chassis number 0626 was not finished as part of the Scuderia’s Worlds Sportscar Championship efforts just yet, forming part of the team that contested the 1957 title. For the opening round of the season, the IV Mil Kilometros Ciudad de Buenos Aires, 0626 was entered in Works livery for the fast American Masten “Kansas City Flash” Gregory, who was partnered by two Ferrari Grand Prix drivers, Eugenio Castelloti and Luigi Musso. These three great drivers raced chassis number 0626 to a famous championship victory, and Ferrari’s 1957 sports-racing campaign was off to a glorious start. This tremendous form would continue throughout 1957, and Ferrari would go on to secure yet another championship. In spring 1957, chassis number 0626 was sold through Luigi Chinetti to Temple Buell in New York, who had the car repainted blue and white. Buell had many great Ferraris, such as a 750 Monza and 500 TR; most importantly, he was a personal friend of Enzo Ferrari. Under Buell’s ownership, this car continued to compete around the world, including a 2nd place finish in both the VI Portuguese Grand Prix and RACB Grand Prix of Spa-Francorchamps, as well as earning respectable finishes at the Nassau Tourist Trophy and the Cuban Grand Prix, when Juan Manuel Fangio was kidnapped prior to the start of the race by Fidel Castro’s movement. Throughout this season, the car was driven by Masten Gregory, Joakim Bonnier, Paul O’Shea, and Manfredo Lippman. In March 1958, Temple Buell returned the car to Luigi Chinetti Motors, who sold the car to J. Robert Williams of Miami, Florida. Chassis number 0626 then passed through the hands of enthusiastic American racer James Flynn and continued to be raced up until 1964, maintaining her almost unique record of never being crashed and as such maintaining her level of incredible originality. In 1968, repainted red, the 290 MM was sold to well-known collector Bob Dusek of Solebury, Pennsylvania. Mr. Dusek maintained chassis number 0626 for a couple of years, even using her regularly on the “school run!” The significance of 0626 can be gauged by the fact that in 1970 she was then purchased by the world-renowned collector Pierre Bardinon for his renowned Collection Mas du Clos in Aubusson, France. Chassis number 0626 was displayed alongside Bardinon’s extensive collection of Ferrari Le Mans winners at the 1987 Cartier Hommage à Ferrari exhibit held near Paris. Bardinon owned this magnificent car for 34 years before it passed to the present custodian, who is one of the world’s most renowned and discerning collectors of Ferrari and its history. For the past 12 years, chassis number 0626 has been regularly maintained, benefiting from a recent engine rebuild. The provision of a removable passenger screen has also allowed her to comfortably compete in the Mille Miglia Storica, and she has run at various historic events as well as been displayed at the Goodwood Revival Meeting and the remarkable inaugural Windsor Concours of Elegance. The owner has had the car Ferrari Classiche certified to further confirm its stunning originality. Works Ferrari sports-racing cars of the 1950s are rare in their own right, but one with such heritage and degree of originality is almost unheard of. In May 2016, Fangio’s epic drive in the Mille Miglia 60 years beforehand will be celebrated once again in Brescia. Chassis number 0626 surely stands to capture the hearts and admiration of all who appreciate this unique and original example of a Factory Prototype, created by the world’s greatest racecar manufacturer for the world’s greatest racing driver. Chassis no. 0626 Engine no. 0626 Gearbox no. 10 7 S

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
Hammer price
Show price

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T. Spider by Scaglietti

300 bhp 3,286 cc four overhead-camshaft V-12 engine, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes, and tubular steel frame. Wheelbase: 94.5 in. Single-ownership from new Purchased new by Eddie Smith Sr., of North Carolina Matching-numbers, fully restored example One of only 10 highly desirable N.A.R.T. Spiders ever built Proceeds to benefit charity It’s a Monday morning in March 1968 and Eddie Smith Sr., known to his family and friends affectionately as “George,” has arrived at work well before dawn. As he has for so many years, he and several volunteers are making the employees breakfast to start the work week with a smile: 150 biscuits, 17 dozen scrambled eggs, and all the sausages, gravy, grits, and fixings to feed a booming hosiery mail-order business in the small town of Lexington, North Carolina. Parked at his office, by the way, is a brand new Ferrari 275 GTB/4*S N.A.R.T. Spider, one of only ten in the world, which he just acquired from his friend and fellow enthusiast, legendary Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti. The story of chassis 10709, one of the most famous and desirable Ferraris in the world, is as much about the provenance of a sports car as it is the remarkable life story of the gentleman who cherished it from the day he took delivery and from whose beloved family it is now offered to the public. It represents not only the ownership of a sports car for all the right reasons, but also, on a much greater level, the shared multi-generational passion that 10709 has encouraged within the family, and the American Dream that it signifies. From Hardscrabble to Hosiery Eddie Smith was born in 1918, one of four siblings, into a poor but loving family. His parents died tragically within one year of each other, well before young Eddie had even turned 10 years old. Thankfully, the Junior Order, of which his father was a member, arranged to have the children sent to an orphanage together, which was, in fact, a blessing, as he later considered it one of the happiest times of his life. Rising every morning at 4:30 to milk cows and tend to the usual farm chores was hard work, but it was relatively short-lived, as his son, Eddie Jr., recently recalled. “When you were 18, your birthday present was the door! They couldn’t afford to keep you, so my dad found his way to the nearest town of Lexington, and that’s where he built his life and started working.” Eddie Sr. started first as an usher at the Carolina Theater in town, where he met his future wife, Sarah, before spending some time as a cab driver, which segued into a dispatcher position and finally the role of manager. Eddie, however, clearly had greater things in mind. He worked his way up the street and found employment with a man who owned a small mail-order hosiery business. Eight years later, he found himself out of work due to the death of the owner and was about to make a career leap that changed everything. In 1952, he and two other partners started their own mail-order hosiery business, which they named the National Wholesale Company. Castrol Fever Fast-forward eight years. Eddie’s business is thriving, he’s bought out his partners, and the company has expanded into lingerie and other apparel. He’s become a daring businessman that has tremendous foresight to seize on expansion opportunities when they present themselves, and time after time, his gambles pay off. One day, in the spring of 1960, he was asked by his son, Eddie Jr., if he would be allowed to attend the 12 Hours of Sebring in Florida with several friends. Eddie Sr. said yes, but he also decided to tag along, and the entire gang headed south in a 1960 Impala Tri-Power 348 with a four on the floor. Immediately enamored, Eddie Jr. later recalled, “He smelled that Castrol burning and it got in his blood!” The father-son duo returned the following year, this time in a new Chevrolet Corvette, but as John Lamm wrote for Road & Track in 1998, “Senior’s tastes were changing. ‘I don’t know what it was, but you hear about the Ferrari mystique…at first we didn’t know much about sports cars, but we’d see Ferraris and they were winning. I’d hear about Jaguars and others, but I always wanted a Ferrari.’” Eddie Sr. satisfied this craving by buying a stunning used 250 GT Short Wheelbase California Spider, which was facilitated by one of the many friends the Smiths were making in the pits and the party tents at the annual races in Sebring, none other than North American Ferrari importer and renowned racing driver Luigi Chinetti. As everyone who met him came to find out, “George” had an absolutely infectious personality; he had a fun-loving effusiveness, a gift for telling stories, and non-stop energy that made him the life of every party, even at those of his son and grandson’s fraternity at Chapel Hill! The $7,000 California Spider was later sold to a fraternity brother of Eddie Jr.’s for $5,600. It was replaced by an equally worthy stable mate, the latest 12-cylindered supercar from Maranello, a 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta, for which delivery proved a much more exciting proposition. “George” was invited directly by Chinetti to join him on the first of several high-speed European tours, the likes of which petrol-heads and Ferraristi can only dream of. As illustrated by an extraordinary family photo album, the two of them, along with Don Weber of Texas, arrived in Paris, from where they drove a then-new front-wheel drive Oldsmobile Toronado nonstop and at breakneck speed toward Modena. After several days of long lunches, dinners, and nights out with Ferrari executives at the Hotel Real Fini, the trio picked up three brand-new 275 GTB/4 Berlinettas, drove over the border into Switzerland, and enjoyed the twisty Alpine roads on their way to Geneva. After a quick stopover, it was back to Paris at high-revving speed, before Eddie’s stunning new car was loaded onto a ship on the coast, homeward bound. In all, Eddie and Luigi romped around Europe in their prancing horses three times; the last time was in 1972, with the new 365 GTB/4 Daytona Coupe, co-driven this time by Eddie Jr. In an endless array of stories about Eddie Sr. that could fill countless volumes, Eddie Jr. recalled how, on two separate daytrips, the father-son team roared through a tunnel at breakneck speed on their way to Florence (unable to find the light switch!) and put the pedal to the metal, chasing a Dino, whose driver had made the mistake of passing the Smiths on the Autostrada, at 140+ mph, on their way to visit the Riva boat factory. N.A.R.T. Spider Amazingly, the most extraordinary car Eddie ever bought simply came into his possession as a matter of personal preference. He owned the four-cam berlinetta for only a very short period of time before Luigi Chinetti came calling once again, recalling Eddie’s love of convertibles. “I talked Enzo into building some spiders. Do you want one?” His protestations at having just bought the berlinetta were met with, “I’ll give you your money back!” And so, Luigi and Eddie headed overseas once more to take delivery of chassis 10709, what would become one of the most famous Ferraris in the world. After the usual stopover in Paris, and a high-speed jaunt through the countryside to Northern Italy, what George found in Maranello was no ordinary cabriolet. This new model was unlike anything Ferrari had built before. Road & Track magazine called it “the most satisfying sports car in the world” and featured it on their cover. In fact, this was the first chassis that had been raced by Denise McCluggage and Pinkie Rollo very successfully at Sebring, and it was later featured in the Steve McQueen film The Thomas Crown Affair. In speaking with RM Auctions recently, Denise commented, “I love the look of the car, and it’s absolutely perfect for all the great driving events, from the Colorado Grand to the California Mille. Even with the top down, you can outrun the rain and stay perfectly dry.” Meanwhile, McQueen loved the car so much that he bought his own example, chassis 10453, not long thereafter. Like so many great sports car importers, Luigi Chinetti recognized the viability of sporty open cars in the American market. The 250 GT SWB California Spider in particular proved itself a resounding success, and to this day, it is one of the most breathtakingly beautiful cars to ever come from Modena. But whereas the four-cam’s predecessor, the 275 GTB, offered a spider variant, the wind-in-your-hair alternative to the 275 GTB/4 was a 330 GTS. As such, the N.A.R.T. Spider was born of a direct request from Luigi Chinetti to offer his buyers precisely what they wanted. Adding the recognizable North American Racing Team badge to the back of the car certainly helped its cache. N.A.R.T., after all, was one of endurance racing’s most successful teams, with a banner campaigned by the likes of the Rodriguez Brothers, Bob Grossman, Masten Gregory, Phil Hill, Jean Guichet, and many others. In all, only 10 cars were built, making them incredibly rare. As Luigi Chinetti Jr. recently recounted, “As an open version of the 275 GTB, it’s a very romantic car. To this day, many people think it’s the prettiest car ever made, and certainly the romance with the little prancing horse in the center of the steering wheel is a very powerful thing. It signifies history and design.” This particular “prancing horse” was originally finished in Azzurro Metallizzato (Metallic Blue), and when Eddie picked the car up, it was also fitted with a chromed front grille guard, which it wears to this day. Years later, as concours judges protested the fitment of this grille guard, Eddie, in his typical good-humored way, declared, “Well, if that’s not original, I’ll be as surprised as you are, because it was on there when I picked the car up myself in Modena!” As Eddie headed north on the Autostrada toward the Swiss border, as per usual, he was most certainly delighting in the finest motor car he had ever driven. With over 300 horsepower, a four-cam, 3.2-liter V-12 fed by six Weber carburetors, a five-speed gearbox, and four-wheel independent suspension, this Ferrari was miles away from anything anyone in Lexington, North Carolina, could have ever dreamed of. The wail of the motor under full acceleration was surely something he delighted in immensely, as Eddie’s daughter, Lynda Swann, recalled. “One of the things he loved most about his Ferraris was the sound. You could hear the N.A.R.T. from several blocks away!” Three Generations of Ferraristi After 10709 was delivered to Luigi Chinetti Motors in New York, Eddie took delivery in March 1968 and headed down to the endurance races at Sebring not long thereafter. He would return two or three times, always with Eddie Jr., who said, “We must have broken the land speed record between Lexington and Sebring on more than one occasion.” The Daytona would come and go, but the N.A.R.T. Spider remained in the family through to the present day. Eddie, in the meantime, had become an ardent supporter and beloved member of the Ferrari Club of America, attending many of its events, reunions, and track days. By the 1980s, he had refinished the car a darker red/maroon metallic color, and it was pictured as such at an FCA national meeting and reunion of N.A.R.T. road and racing cars at Lake Lanier Island in Georgia. Many events followed, including the 30th Annual FCA National Meet in Palm Beach Gardens in 1993, the third annual Cavallino Classic the following year, and the 31st FCA International Concours in Monterey, California. He returned to Cavallino many more times, including Road Atlanta in 1999, the 40th Annual FCA Concours at Sebring in 2003 (where he won the Luigi Chinetti Memorial Award), and Virginia International Raceway in 2004, where he won Best in Show. Many awards were won, parties were attended, and dances were enjoyed. Meanwhile, Eddie Smith Jr. was forging his own path to success. Not long after the N.A.R.T. Spider arrived in North Carolina, the recent college graduate ventured out on his own and bought the struggling Grady-White boat company; it was a company that he not only turned around, but he also led the charge, as he has pioneered industry-leading advancements, manufacturing techniques and unparalleled customer service that have garnered the company J.D. Power & Associates awards every year they’ve been available. Through it all, 10709 remained part of the family, as Eddie tended to National Wholesale, which is now run by his daughter, Lynda. Eddie Jr. employed the same values and hard work as his father to build Grady-White into what it is today, joining the National Marine Manufacturers Hall of Fame in the process and following in his father’s footsteps, who was inducted into the Direct Mail Hall of Fame. Eddie Jr.’s company employs hundreds of dedicated individuals, many of whom have remained with him for decades, including its current president, Kris Carroll. With an emphasis on safety and catering to the needs of the active sport fisherman, Grady-White is unique in that it also espouses its owners’ values of preserving the environment and fisheries for generations to come. In fact, it’s certainly no surprise that the same family that founded National Wholesale, and started every work week with a generous southern breakfast, also built Grady-White into what it is today, with a commitment to ensure every employee comes to work on Monday as happy as they were when they left on Friday. Chris Smith has shared the same passion as his father and grandfather, not only for the N.A.R.T. Spider, but also to the University of North Carolina, the family business, and the values that have kept the family so close. He fondly recalls a high school date to the ice cream shop, where he was scolded by several old-timers, who said, “Do you know whose car that is? You’d better polish it before you return it!” The list of family anecdotes is heartwarming and exceptional to say the least, but it is suffice to say that “George’s” ownership of the N.A.R.T Spider came full circle on his 70th birthday, when Eddie Jr. surprised him with a brand new Ferrari Testarossa. Ten years later, on his 80th birthday, he surprised him once more with a Ferrari F355 F1 Spider. An Infectious Personality As noted Ferrari historian Marcel Massini recalled, “He was a very nice gentleman, a true Ferrari aficionado with a big heart. It was certainly very rare that a Ferrari owner belonged to the club for so long and was active for over 40 years.” Indeed, Eddie Smith Sr. bought and owned this Ferrari for all the right reasons: he enjoyed the camaraderie of the club, but, most importantly, he derived pleasure from flying around the roads in Lexington, listening to the high-revving V-12 and enjoying the car’s stunning good looks. Most long-term FCA members will attest to the wonderful stories “George” told of Luigi Chinetti and his early Ferrari experiences, and their wives will happily recount what a tireless dancer he was. Just as he didn’t leave the dance floor until the party was over, his foot never came off the throttle until it was absolutely necessary! His need for speed was so great that instead of buckling up during takeoff in his private Sabreliner jet, he would stand up in the cockpit, between the two pilots, to experience the surge of acceleration as they were going down the runway. As Luigi Chinetti Jr. recently said, “He was always happy and a true pleasure to be around. He wasn’t just an enthusiast about the cars themselves but the entire experience—the drives around Europe and the visits to the factory. He was a really nifty guy!” A New Home As the value of his N.A.R.T. Spider began to rise, he never once considered parting with it, even when notable celebrities made him offers that most owners wouldn’t refuse. After Steve McQueen was rear-ended at a stoplight in his own N.A.R.T. Spider, he called Eddie, whose car was currently being built. Eddie told him “Steve, I like you but I don’t love you. And you can’t have my car!” Since “George’s” passing in 2007, the car has been stored and maintained in a separate, purpose-built garage within Grady-White’s airplane hangar, as a monument, of sorts, to his ownership of the car; it is complete with his racing suit and beloved worn deck shoes in which he wore when he so frequently drove around the track. A recent inspection by both an RM specialist and a Ferrari expert confirmed the exceptional condition of the car and how well it has been preserved over the course of its life. The restoration was conducted to the highest standards, and enormous effort was used to ensure that even the smallest replaced part, right down to an old bearing, was retained. The body lines are excellent, and the car’s presentation is thoroughly correct. It runs and drives nicely, pulling through the gears with tremendous power and stopping without issue, and most importantly, the car has the distinction of having full matching numbers from front to back; the gearbox, body, and engine stampings all correspond with chassis 10709. For further details and a list of parts that accompany the car, please speak with an RM specialist. In recent years, the car has been seen by the public only on limited occasions. Just last year, Eddie Jr. had the car brought to Savannah, Georgia, for an FCA meet, where he was joined by Chris, Lynda, and all of their children and grandchildren. The entire family and Ferrari community celebrated “George’s” life, but, as Eddie recalls, “Those people enjoyed the car so much that it almost brought them to tears. So we decided the car needs to be somewhere where it can be seen and appreciated.” The experience in Savannah consequently compelled the family to part with the car, and in a final act of supreme generosity for which the Smith family is known, they will donate the proceeds to charity. “The hard part was deciding to let the car go after 45 years, but it’s been in prison in that hangar. ‘George’ always taught us to give back, and by giving all the money to several charities, we know that it would have brought a smile to his face.” Eddie Smith Sr. certainly set an example for philanthropy in the family. Untold children found their way through college with his assistance, or they enjoyed the failing theater in Lexington, North Carolina, which he helped resurrect. As a result, that theater was subsequently named in his honor and turned into a first-class civic center. A new hospital was built with his assistance in Lexington, North Carolina, and the same was true of a new library. In fact, after discovering a battered woman by the side of the road in Lexington on his morning jog, he helped not only her, but countless others, when he kicked off a fundraiser that resulted in the building of a local shelter for women in similar situations. An Unrepeatable Opportunity Ferraris are bought and sold internationally at staggering rates, but their perpetual desirability is attested to by the fact that the vast majority of important examples are not only known and accounted for, but that they are also well documented by historians and enthusiasts. This is especially true of the 350 275 GTB/4s and, more specifically, the 10 additional N.A.R.T. Spiders, which irrefutably signify a holy grail for collectors of road going Ferraris. Add to that 10709’s exceptional purity, matching numbers, and, most importantly, the fact that it has been owned, cherished, and enjoyed in the same good home from the day it was picked up at the factory by its first owner; this is an owner who, much like the buyer of an FXX or 599 GTO, was personally asked by Ferrari whether he would like to buy such a car. For the true Ferrari enthusiast, 10709’s offering at auction is quite simply an unrepeatable and almost unbelievable opportunity. For a complete list of spare parts, please speak with an RM representative. Addendum Please note: if you intend to bid on this lot, you need to register your interest with RM Auctions no less than 48 hours in advance of the sale by calling +1 519 352 4575 and asking to speak with a Client Services representative or emailing clientservices@rmauctions.com. There will be no Internet bidding available for this lot. Chassis no. 10709 Engine no. 10709

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-08-16
Hammer price
Show price

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti

320 hp, Type 213/Comp 3,286 lightweight block V-12 engine with six Weber 38 DCN carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle transmission, four-wheel upper and lower wishbone coil-spring independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in. An historic, unique, and unrepeatable opportunity to acquire such an important automobile The first of only three Works berlinetta competizione cars built; rarer than its 250 GTO siblings Known provenance from new; original matching-numbers engine A superb historic racing and rallying entrant Meticulously researched by Swiss Ferrari historian Marcel Massini Please note, internet bidding will not be offered on this lot. Interested parties wishing to bid remotely are encouraged to bid via telephone or absentee. Please click here to register. Few motor cars in the world possess such intrinsic desirability that their availability at auction sends shockwaves through the community of automotive enthusiasts around the world; fewer still are so exceptionally rare, fast, and achingly beautiful that they attain legendary status. These select few motor cars, at the highest point on the capstone of the collector car pyramid, represent the benchmark from which all superlatives in automotive history are born. They are, quite inarguably, the most important cars in the world. Even within this exclusive group, 06701 stands out among its peers. Without even considering its almost unbelievable rarity, its matching numbers, its breathtaking design, or the pedigree of its family tree, it not only counts the 250 GTO series among its brothers but, more immediately, the two other 275 GTB/C Speciales, successors to the GTO, neither of which are likely to ever come up for sale and one of which holds a record that remains unbroken at Le Mans after a half century! THE GTO ’65 The era into which 06701 was born saw Ferrari not only dominate endurance racing but experience a serious challenge from the American Ford-powered teams in both the prototype and GT classes. The all-conquering 250 GTO had won the GT class three years in a row, and Ferrari’s P-series of sports prototype racing cars were exceptionally formidable as well, but Carroll Shelby’s Cobra Daytonas and the persistent development of the Ford GT40 always had the gentlemen from Maranello looking in their rearview mirrors. Ferrari knew it had a chance for victory in 1965 with a new competition-ready version of its 275 GTB, which was to be released at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1964. As the first Ferrari with an independent rear suspension and a transaxle gearbox, it was a major improvement over the outgoing 250-series and a superb evolution of the front-engined 250 GTO. During late 1964 and early 1965, Ferrari built three 275 GTB/C Speciales, specifically for FIA homologation and factory development, each boasting unique details from the standard 275 GTB/Cs that would follow. All were fitted with super-lightweight aluminum bodywork, a Tipo 563 chassis constructed of smaller and lighter tubes, and the type 213/Comp dry-sump engine topped with six Weber carburetors first seen in the 250 LM, which was mounted lower in the chassis to lower the car’s center of gravity. This engine was specifically developed with big valves and cylinder heads, like the 250 GTO or 250 LM, 9.7:1 compression ratio pistons, the already well-tested Tipo 130 camshaft (10mm lift), and most of the auxiliary casings made in magnesium. With 70 additional horsepower powering a chassis that was lighter in all respects to the standard 275 GTB road car, this was undoubtedly the most formidable weapon in Ferrari’s competition arsenal. As Giancarlo Rosetti stated in his Forza article entitled “Legend of the GTO ’65,” “while the GTB/C Speciales were built on 275 chassis and fitted with 3.3-liter motors, it’s easy to see where they evolved from.” Completed in April 1965, chassis 06701, present here, was the first of the three 275 GTB/C Speciales built. It uniquely hand built in all respects, as were the two cars that followed. As per the build sheet, the car was originally fitted with a 250 LM type exhaust with side pipes. Its rear fender shared a very similar profile with the ’64 250 GTOs, as did its front end, which also bore some resemblance to that of a 330 LMB. For added ventilation to the brakes, two oval slots were cut in the nose and another three vents behind the rear wheels. Additionally, the car features an outside aluminum fuel filler cap, specific to the 140-liter fuel tank, to allow for faster fueling during pit stops and a stunningly sculpted air-intake on the hood. Inside, a pair of GTO-style aluminum bucket seats holds both driver and passenger firmly in position. All told, Ferrari had arranged a powerful arsenal for Le Mans. The 275 GTB/C would ideally run in the GT class and the 250 LM in the prototype class. They were determined to dominate not just one but both categories. With the FIA still incensed from Ferrari’s attempts to incorrectly homologate the 250 GTO and 250 LM, however, the 275 GTB/C Speciales were not granted homologation, as the car submitted was considerably under the dry weight stated for the road-going 275 GTB in Ferrari’s own sales literature. Determined to see the car compete, Ferrari offered to accept homologation at the weight stated for the road-going 275 GTB, but the FIA refused and Ferrari decided that it would not compete in the 1965 season in the GT class. Eventually, both sides would reach a compromise by June of 1965, but only chassis 06885 would see competitive action during that season. Although its racing career was brief, 06885 quickly proved the potency of the Speciales, finishing an incredible third overall at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans, a record that has stood ever since as the best finish by a front-engined car. Chassis 06701, meanwhile, was sold directly from the factory to Pietro Ferraro of Trieste, Italy, in May of 1965, who registered it on the plate “TS 75946” and proceeded to use the car exclusively on the road. It was registered to Cartiere del Timavo, his paper producing company. Prior to the car’s sale, it is believed that the car’s exterior color was changed by the factory from its original Rosso Cina to Grigio Scurro Metalizatto. Furthermore, the factory also fitted front half bumpers and full rear bumpers, indicating that the car would be used by its first private owner on the road. Ferraro passed the car to Alessandro Gregori in 1969, and around this time the car had gained a silver band over its grey paint. Gregori owned the car for just two months but registered it in Vicenza with the registration “VI 167868” for further road use. Chassis 06701 then traveled to the United Kingdom, where it was sold to Colonel E.B. Wilson of London, who then passed the car to long-term owner Michel Pobrejeski of Boulogne-Billancourt, who retained the car for 25 years. Within about the first decade of its life, three GTO style nose vents were cut into the bodywork, in order to provide better ventilation to the engine—a welcome improvement to the car, as demonstrated at the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans where the mechanics of Ecurie Francorchamps cut a progressively wider cooling inlet in the bonnet of 06885 over the course of the race. At that time, Pobrejeski also had the car repainted red. Respected Ferrari collector Brandon Wang would be the next owner of 06701, and he immediately decided to campaign the car in historic events. He entered it in the International Historic Festival at Goodwood and later at Tutte Le Ferrari in Mugello. Chassis 06701 proved to be highly competitive, and in an article written about the car in Cavallino (issue 110), Ferrari historian Keith Bluemel specifically mentioned its outing at Goodwood, stating that, “If a parallel could be drawn with its performance in the race to what it might have achieved during the 1965 season, then it would have been a very competitive package.” The following year, the car took to the Nürburgring for the Ferrari Racing Days and Shell Historic Challenge. In Mr. Wang’s ownership, the car was also shown at the VIII Automobiles Classiques Louis Vuitton Concours d’Elegance in Paris. In 1997, while still in the ownership of Brandon Wang, 06701 was driven on the Tour Auto by Derek Hill with his father and 1961 Formula One World Champion Phil Hill riding along as navigator. Wang decided to restore the car upon its return, opting to refinish the car in its highly attractive two-tone silver and grey color scheme that the car wore earlier in its life. Following the completion of the restoration in 1998, the car was purchased by another noted collector and was displayed at the FCA National Concours in Los Angeles in May of 2002. The year 2005 brought about two more public appearances for 06701, and it was displayed at the 14th Cavallino Classic in Palm Beach in January and was on the track at Laguna Seca for the Monterey Historic Races in August. Since then, 06701 has been carefully preserved by its current owner, who, like his predecessors, is a connoisseur of other fine, rare automobiles. RARITY IN THE EXTREME Notwithstanding the 275 GTB/C’s extraordinary racing capability and bespoke scuderia Ferrari character, 06701 is a car whose inclusion in these pages will almost certainly never happen again, particularly since its two sister cars are very unlikely to become available. Chassis 06885 has been owned since 1970 by noted enthusiast Preston Henn, who has clearly stated that he intends to continue enjoying the jewel of his collection, which some enthusiasts speculate may be the first motor car of any kind to sell for the magic “nine-figure” mark, should it ever become available. The third and final car of the series, chassis 07185, is also part of a prominent private collection and is likewise very unlikely to be sold in the near future. This, then, renders 06701 the only opportunity to acquire this unbelievably rare evolution of the GTO concept, the 275 GTB/C Speciale—a model whose brief stint at Le Mans proved so dominant that its record stands to this day. It is a model so attractive, so fast, so rare, and so superior in every respect that it may rightfully be considered one of the most important cars in the world. Chassis no. 06701 Engine no. 06701 Internal engine no. 044/64

  • USAUSA
  • 2014-08-15
Hammer price
Show price

1955 Jaguar D-Type

250 bhp, 3,442 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber 45 DCO3 carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension, live rear axle trailing links and transverse torsion bar, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. Legendary overall winner of the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans, raced by Ecurie Ecosse Just two private owners since Ecurie Ecosse; in the same private collection for over 16 years The only Le Mans-winning C- or D-Type that has survived intact and remained essentially original to its winning form The first team-series production D-Type and the first to be designated by its chassis as a D-Type Unequivocally one of the most important and valuable Jaguars in the world 28 JULY 1956 The 24 Hours of Le Mans, the world’s most prestigious and legendary endurance race, starts at four o’clock in the afternoon and it’s raining—an inauspicious start to an already exceptionally dangerous motor race. With 60 years of competition history, the starting grid at La Sarthe is utterly jaw-dropping—legends like de Portago, Trintignant, Gendebien, von Trips, Hill, Maglioli, Behra, Fangio, and Castelloti are piloting prototype and production machinery with names like Ferrari, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Talbot, Porsche, Lotus, and Gordini. This is the golden age of motor-racing—the era of an unbroken Mulsanne Straight, mind-bending speeds, and supreme, life-risking danger in pursuit of eternal glory. This won’t be an easy race, and the men on the starting grid, about to sprint across the front stretch and jump into their cars, know it. After all, 49 cars will start the race and only 14 will finish. One man will lose his life. One of the most stunningly beautiful cars on the grid was the formidable Jaguar D-Type, swathed in traditional Scottish blue with a white cross, the traditional colors of the Ecurie Ecosse outfit. Standing across the track is Ron Flockhart, one of its two drivers, an Edinburgh-born driver who might not have known it, but he was on his way to consecutive Le Mans wins. Quite the adventurer, several years, later, he would make two attempts at breaking the flight record from Sydney, Australia, to London, England, in a war-era P51 Mustang. The Glasgow-born Ninian Sanderson was also on hand, Flockhart’s teammate, and by all accounts his polar opposite. A practical joker with a biting sense of humor, but with the same spirit for adventure . . . a yachtsman, he raced regattas on the Clyde Coast of Scotland. There they stand, two privateer entries in the competitive field, about to begin a 24-hour battle in conditions that Motor Sport Magazine described in September 1956 as “terrible, with rain and mist, and driving at all, let alone racing, was a nightmare . . . . How drivers can take a quick two or three hours’ sleep and then go on again defies explanation!” CRAFTING A LE MANS WINNER Following their win at Le Mans in 1953, where Duncan Hamilton and Tony Rolt led a veritable parade of C-Types to three of the top four finishes, Jaguar faced a problem. It was evident that the limits of the XK 120-based race car had been reached, and that to remain competitive at Le Mans, a new car would be required. While the C-Type had been one of the first cars of its era to employ a steel-tube space-frame, its successor was perhaps the first to claim unitary monocoque construction, with the body and frame combining for structural integrity. The successful and proven 3.4-liter XK engine was retained, but now fitted with triple Weber carburetors good for 245 horsepower. A dry-sump lubrication system was also adapted that reduced height, allowing the engine to be mounted lower, and correspondingly reducing the overall profile and coefficient of drag. It was clear that the design was effective when one of the new cars hit 169 mph on the Mulsanne Straight at the Le Mans trials in April 1954. As the previous Jaguar had been called the C-Type for “competition,” the new Jaguar was dubbed the D-Type. The D-Type made its debut at the 1954 24 Hours of Le Mans, where Rolt and Hamilton were tasked with repeating their victory of the prior year. However, all three of Jaguar’s team entries were plagued with firing problems, and two of the D-Types retired before the #14 car of Hamilton and Rolt was adequately sorted to contend. As 4:00 p.m. approached on Sunday afternoon, the D-Type and the powerful 4.9-liter Ferrari 375 Plus driven by Froilan Gonzales and Maurice Trintignant were far ahead of two Cunninghams, a Gordini, and the Garage Francorchamps’ C-Type. After all was said and done, the Ferrari had only a narrow lead over the D-Type, besting the Jaguar in one of the closest Le Mans finishes ever. Six team cars were constructed for 1954, with chassis numbers in the range of XKD 401 through 406. In 1955, Jaguar began selling team and customer cars with 3.4-liter carbureted engines as the company gradually established the production minimum necessary to satisfy FIA homologation requirements. Fifty-four such cars were eventually built, with chassis numbers starting at XKD 501 (the first privateer team car). The factory simultaneously developed a version of the car for its competition purposes, most immediately recognizable by a longer nose. CHASSIS NUMBER XKD 501 Chassis number XKD 501 was the first D-Type production for a private team, sold to the Scottish racing team Ecurie Ecosse, and dispatched on 5 May 1955. A principal factory customer, Ecurie Ecosse was founded in 1951 and successfully ran C-Types through the early 1950s before eventually purchasing several D-Types. XKD 501 was liveried in the team’s signature colors with the St. Andrews Cross emblazoned on the front fenders. It was initially entrusted to driver Jimmy Stewart, brother of the legendary Jackie Stewart. Jimmy unfortunately crashed the D-Type twice during practice in May 1955. Each time, the car was returned to the factory for repairs. XKD 501 was therefore sidelined during June 1955, when Jaguar entered three longnose D-Types at Le Mans and played an unwitting role in one of motorsports’ most tragic disasters. Three laps into the race, team driver Mike Hawthorn, who had just lapped a much slower Austin-Healey, suddenly turned into the pits. The surprised Healey veered left to avoid hitting Hawthorn, pulling directly into the path of Pierre Levegh, who was driving one of Mercedes-Benzes new 300 SLRs. The SLR careened into the crowd, forever changing motorsports—yet the race continued. The following morning, while holding 1st and 3rd place, Mercedes-Benz withdrew from the race, and Hawthorn was left alone at the head of the pack, a full five laps ahead of the 2nd place finisher, the Aston Martin DB3S driven by Paul Frere and Peter Collins. The D-Type had won its first Le Mans, but at no small cost to the state of racing. Meanwhile, XKD 501 appeared at the Leinster Trophy on 9 July, where Desmond Titterington took the car to 9th overall, and 1st in class. Ecosse driver Ninian Sanderson assumed driving duties at the British GP on 17 July, claiming 6th place. Titterington returned to action in early August, finishing 1st and 2nd at the races at Charterhall, and then enjoyed two 1st place finishes at Snetterton a week later. Sanderson rotated in for a 1st and 2nd place at Crimond, and the two drivers teamed up for a 2nd place finish during the nine-hour race at Goodwood on 20 August. Another 2nd place by Titterington at Aintree on 3 September completed the 1955 season. VICTORY AND VINDICATION During 1956, rule changes mandated the implementation of full-width windscreens, and XKD 501 was so equipped while later receiving the engine from XKD 561 (engine number 2036-9), which the Ecurie Ecosse had acquired in the interim. The car continued to turn in solid performances during the first part of the season, with 3rd place finishes at Aintree and Charterhall, and a 1st and 2nd place at Goodwood on 21 May, while piloted by Ron Flockhart. Flockhart and Sanderson teamed for the 12 Hours of Reims on 30 June, where the D-Type model put on a clinical display. The two Ecosse drivers finished 4th, behind the three factory D-Types at 1-2-3, notably defeating the latest Ferrari TR Spider, and an F1-derived Gordini. The 24 Hours of Le Mans was held in late July, delayed from its usual June date due to modifications to the circuit intended to make the track safer for both drivers and spectators. The Jaguar factory again entered three D-Types with longnose bodywork, though in the face of the latest rule restrictions, the cars were equipped with fuel injection intended to improve mileage (a new consideration in the wake of reduced fuel allowances). Two carbureted 1955 privateer D-Types were also entered, fielded by the Garage Francorchamps and Ecurie Ecosse. The Scottish entry, this car, was again guided by the team of Sanderson and Flockhart. It was here that XKD 501 turned in its greatest performance, but as Motor Sport related two months later, “everyone had to do 34 laps on 120 liters of fuel, which worked out at approximately 11 mpg, with nothing to spare for emergencies. Naturally, the small cars were sitting pretty while the Jaguars and Aston Martins, Ferraris, and Talbots were doing plenty of worrying.” Certainly everyone was expecting a repeat of Reims, but it was not quite that simple. Although Hawthorn in the factory D-Type took an early lead, on the second lap of the race, everything changed with an early accident and two possible winners were eliminated, followed by Hawthorn, who came in after only four hours with a misfire. With 23 hours, 30 minutes still to go, the complete Jaguar team was in trouble, two cars eliminated, and one struggling with a bad fuel line. From a Works standpoint, the race appeared lost and Aston Martin and Ferrari were poised to outrun the older D-Types. The race report continued: “this left the Ecurie Ecosse Jaguar to uphold Coventry honors, and right nobly it did this, for by 5 p.m., it was in the lead and for the rest of the race, it was a game of cat and mouse between Flockhart/Sanderson and Moss/Collins. While Flockhart was driving, he was able to keep ahead of Moss and after 34 laps, when Collins took over the Aston Martin, he made up ground on Sanderson, who took over the Jaguar. Then, the next 34 laps saw the position reversed and the result was that the Scottish Jaguar had the race under its kilt, providing they played their cards wisely. With David Murray in charge of the time-keeping and Wilkie Wilkinson in charge of the pit stops, they could hardly go wrong.” Certainly, the Aston Martin didn’t quite stand a chance. The D-Type was so exceptionally fast that “Jaguar lapped regularly with nearly 1,000 rpm in hand” without significant fuel concerns, while the Aston had to be red-lined, gear by gear, entering the pits on fumes, simply to keep up. On occasion, Moss and Collins would even slip into neutral well before the end of the Mulsanne Straight and dart behind the Porsches’ slipstreams, all in an effort to save fuel. By the race’s final lap, however, with just 14 cars remaining in the field, the D-Type had a seven-lap lead on Trintignant and Olivier Gendebien’s Ferrari 625 LM spider, and a narrow lead over Stirling Moss in the Aston. Swaters’ D-Type held at 4th place, and this is the order in which the cars finished, with XKD 501 claiming its definitive victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. XKD 501 completed 2,507.19 miles at an average speed of 104.47 mph, and a maximum speed of 156.868 mph on the Mulsanne Straight, good enough for 9th in the Index of Performance rankings. In doing so, XKD 501 upheld the D-Type’s dominance despite the adversity faced by the factory cars (to his credit the skilled driver Hawthorn managed to roar his way back to 6th overall). Following the amazing finish at La Sarthe, XKD 501 returned to action in Britain, with a 2nd place at Aintree and 3rd at the Goodwood Trophy Race, but these triumphs paled after its perfect performance in France. AFTER THE LIMELIGHT In 1957, Jaguar retired from factory racing altogether and sold its latest longnose D-Types, with several cars acquired by the Ecurie Ecosse. As these 3.8-liter D-Types became the team’s focus, XKD 501 was only occasionally entered in various races, beginning with the Mille Miglia on 12 May, where the car retired early with Flockhart driving. Ecurie again experienced great success at the 1957 24 Hours of Le Mans, taking 1st and 2nd place, while other D-Type privateers finished 3rd, 4th, and 6th. Even with the Jaguar factory officially retired, the D-Type was still proving to be a dominant force on the world’s biggest stage. XKD 501’s time in the spotlight faded with these developments, however, and the car elapsed 1957 with a handful of DNFs, as well as 3rd, 6th, and 7th place finishes, punctuated by a final checkered flag at the Goodwood Whitsun Meeting in June. The car was essentially retired after June 1957, and it soon passed to Ecurie Ecosse financier Major Thomson of Peebles, Scotland. In May 1967, the car was demonstrated and presented at the Griffiths Formula 1 race at Oulton Park, driven by Alistair Birrell (a photo of which appears in Andrew Whyte’s 1983 book, D-Type and XKSS: Super Profile). In October 1970, XKD 501 was sold to Sir Michael Nairn, a fellow Scot, and over the following few years was sympathetically restored with emphasis on retaining its purity and originality to its 1956 Le Mans specifications by Raymond Fielding, as detailed in the September/October 1996 issue of Jaguar World magazine. The engine head and block were returned to Jaguar to be rebuilt, while the suspension and brakes were restored with proper components. Parts were sourced from John Pearson, one of the world’s foremost authorities on the D-Type, and a boyhood associate of the factory C-Type teams of the early 1950s. Most of the work was actually performed by ex-HRG/Cooper/Vanwall employee Dick Watson. Sir Nairn then used the car rather frequently, including presentation at the 1996 Goodwood Festival of Speed and the Silverstone Classic. In 1999, XKD 501 was purchased by the consignor, one of America’s most respected collectors of exceptional sports and racing cars. The new owner retained John Pearson to evaluate and freshen the car as needed for vintage racing applications, where it was presented at the 2002 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, winning the Jaguar Competition class and the Road & Track Award. A LEGEND AMONG LEGENDS In May 2002, Jaguar World Monthly magazine ran a feature on the car by marque expert Paul Skilleter, where he described his spirited ride: “With a 0–100 mph time of probably around the 12-second mark, the acceleration combined with the blast of the exhaust and the rush of air over the cockpit made it an exhilarating experience . . . The other aspect of a D-Type [that I noticed] is its solidity of build: sitting comfortably deep within those enfolding curves, you feel nothing vibrate, nothing rattle, nothing flex. Just sit in a D-Type and you know why it won Le Mans.” Now offered from only its third private owner, XKD 501 checks all the proverbial boxes. It has won the most grueling contest in sports car racing, the famed 24 Hours of Le Mans, and is a centrifugal component of Jaguar’s three consecutive wins at La Sarthe. The Jaguar has been fastidiously maintained and serviced by just four caretakers, including a restoration by some of the world’s most knowledgeable experts. Almost unique among a run of automobiles that inevitably led hard lives, its history is refreshingly clean, concise, and incredibly well-known. Chronicled in many books as a permanent part of Le Mans lore, this extremely important Ecurie Ecosse D-Type would crown the finest collections, notable for its history, rarity, and beautifully authentic presentation. Not merely a significant and markedly well-preserved D-Type, nor a star in the forefront of important racing Jaguars, XKD 501 can inarguably be held among the most historic British sports cars ever made. It is a legend among legends. Chassis no. XKD 501 Engine no. E 2036-9

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
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1956 Ferrari 290 MM by Scaglietti

In the mid-1950s, Scuderia Ferrari was a force to be reckoned with. After Mercedes-Benz’s departure from international motorsport following the 1955 Le Mans disaster, Ferrari’s path to victory was clear for Il Commendatore. His drivers and cars were ready to cement Ferrari’s reputation in the history books. Only Maserati stood in his way. Within the hierarchy of Enzo-era Ferraris, the sports racing barchettas of the mid-1950s are amongst the most significant cars to wear the Cavallino Rampante. The Works-campaigned examples are especially significant, as they often finished at the front of the pack at the most grueling races, piloted by the most talented drivers. Chassis no. 0628 is no exception to the rule. It boasts an enviable racing history on three continents with many of the greatest drivers of its decade. FERRARI SWEEPS THE 1956 MILLE MIGLIA At the time, Ferrari was experimenting with different engine layouts utilizing the same displacement in order to assess the efficiency of engines boasting greater torque versus engines producing their power at high rpms. Hence the 2.0-liter 500 Mondial, the 3.0-liter 750 Monza, and the 3.5-liter 860 Monza came to be, in addition to the six-cylinder, 4.4-liter Tipo 118 and 121 LM. Scuderia Ferrari was usually entering three to four cars in each important race on the calendar, all with slightly different specifications, engine layouts, and various other trade secrets and innovations in order to distribute the team’s risk and ensure success. Chassis 0628 began life in early 1956 with a four-cylinder 860 Monza engine utilizing Ferrari’s new Tipo 520 chassis. Built specifically as a Scuderia Ferrari Works car, its first outing would be one of the world’s most significant motor racing spectacles: the Mille Miglia. Peter Collins was assigned to 0628. Collins’ copilot was the famous motorsport photographer Louis Klemantaski, who captured an incredible array of images from the race giving the public an idea of what the Mille Miglia was like from a driver’s perspective. Wearing #551 and a green stripe across its nose, Klemantaski’s photographs of 0628 at all stages of the race help to humanize the event, showcasing the masses that came out to cheer on the brave racers and beautiful cars, in addition to showing Collins himself throughout the event. Four entries from Scuderia Ferrari were present at the event. In addition to 0628 with Collins and Klemantaski, Juan Manuel Fangio piloted #600 290 MM (chassis 0626), Eugenio Castelotti drove #548 290 MM (chassis 0616), and Luigi Musso was in #556 860 Monza (chassis 0602). Racing off the starting ramp three minutes after Castelotti, Collins and Klemantaski rocketed out of Brescia and through the Italian countryside for what would become a particularly intense race through a downpour. At the end of the day, Ferrari claimed the top five places, with Collins and Klemantaski 2nd behind Castelotti and in front of Musso and Fangio, as well as Olivier Gendenbien and Jacques Washier in a 250 GT LWB Berlinetta, making for one of the most memorable outings at the Mille Miglia for the Scuderia. The next race on the calendar was the 2nd International ADAC 1000 KM at the Nürburgring. Alfonso de Portago and Gendebien were assigned to 0628 wearing #2, but the pair failed to finish after an accident that damaged the nose of the car. Returning to Italy for its next event, the Targa Florio, Gendenbien would once again be behind the wheel, joined by Hans Herrmann, and the pair finishing 4th overall. Further success for 0628 was found at both the Coppa d’Oro Delle Dolomiti, driven by Gendenbien and Jacques Washer, and the Aosta-Gran San Bernardo hill climb with Umberto Maglioli behind the wheel. At both events, 0628 crossed the line finishing 2nd overall as well as 1st in class at the Coppa d’Oro Dolomiti. For its final race of 1956, 0628 was piloted by Juan Manuel Fangio and Eugenio Castellotti at the Swedish Grand Prix, but unfortunately the pair failed to finish due to engine problems. TWELVE CYLINDERS FOR 1957 Following the Swedish Grand Prix, 0628 was returned to Maranello where it was upgraded with a Tipo 136, 290 S engine with double overhead camshafts for the first race of the 1957 season, the 1000 KM of Buenos Aires. Prior to the car’s most recent restoration at Ferrari Classiche, evidence of this change was still visible on the front lower crossmember of the chassis. Such upgrades were frequently done at the time, as the Tipo 520 chassis was the underlying platform for the 860 Monza, the 290 Sport, and the 290 MM. Both the 290 MM V-12 and four-cylinder found in the 860 Monza boasted a 3.5-liter displacement and as a result, modifications were necessary, but minimal, to make a V-12 engine fit where a four-cylinder once resided. After being shipped to Argentina, 0628 was designated #8 for the 1000 KM of Buenos Aires, the car was assigned to Alfonso de Portago, Peter Collins, and Eugenio Castellotti. They would place 3rd overall. In February 1957, the Tipo 136 engine used in Buenos Aires was removed from the car in Maranello, to be upgraded to Tipo 140-specifications and fitted to a 315. Afterwards, 0628 travelled back across the Atlantic for its next event: the 6th annual 12 Hours of Sebring, now fitted with a 290 MM Tipo 130 V-12 with single overhead camshafts as well as a slightly different nose, with polished aluminum air ducts for the brakes. Phil Hill and Wolfgang Von Trips drove 0628 as #14, but unfortunately the car was forced to withdraw on lap 106 due to a battery failure. POST-SCUDERIA RACING CAREER Sebring would be 0628’s last race with the Scuderia as in the summer of 1957, the car was sold through Luigi Chinetti to noted NART client Jan de Vroom, in trade for a 500 TRC. De Vroom’s first event with his new twelve-cylinder Ferrari was at the Swedish Grand Prix but resulted in a DNF due to an accident on lap 23. Sent to the factory for repairs after the race, the car was converted to 250 Testa Rossa pontoon-style nose configuration. After the work was completed, the car was shipped to Nassau for the Bahamas Speed Weeks. Raced by Jan de Vroom in the Governor’s Trophy and associated preliminary race on 6 December, de Vroom and the Ferrari finished a proud 13th overall, but this would all change over the course of the next few days. Through a complex deal which lead to de Vroom selling the car back to Chinetti and subsequently leasing it to Temple Buell. Buell then enlisted the services of Stirling Moss to drive. Moss requested that the central throttle be reverted to the usual layout in advance of his race. Despite Moss having never driven a 290 MM before, both driver and car clearly were a good fit for each other, and Moss handily won both events, leading from the start in the Memorial Trophy. Following its victorious exploits in the Bahamas, 0628 returned with Chinetti to the States where it was put on display at the 50th Annual Chicago Auto Show in January 1958. Following a podium finish and 1st in class win at Watkins Glen by future Le Mans-winner Dan Gurney, the car was retained by Chinetti for approximately two years before being sold to noted privateer George Reed of Illinois. Owner of RRR Motors (Reed’s Race Rats), Reed campaigned the car in a handful of events over the next year across Wisconsin and Illinois, winning his class on at least three occasions. The 290 MM’s next owner would be Harley Cluxton III before it was purchased by Luigi Chinetti in 1969. Cluxton’s fascinating recollections of his purchase and brief ownership is mentioned in a letter by him in Cavallino 128. The car was shipped to Chinetti’s facilities in Greenwich, Connecticut, and remained there for nearly 20 years. Removed from storage in 1982, 0628 was subject to a partial restoration by François Sicard, and repainted blue and white to match Chinetti’s colors. Its first outing in public for over two decades was at the 1984 Monterey Historics, where it was driven by Sicard. Travelling back overseas, 0628 then returned to the Mille Miglia in 1988, entered and driven by Chinetti and his son, Luigi Chinetti Jr. After the Mille Miglia, the car remained in Europe, yet stayed in Chinetti’s ownership, attending several shows during that time. It appeared at a Ferrari Club meeting in Imola in June 1989 and then returned to the Mille Miglia in 1990. It was also shown at the FF40 International Ferrari Concours in Brussles, where it won the Marlboro Award for an Outstanding Competition car. Tragically, Chinetti Sr. passed away in 1994 and the car was inherited by his son. Chinetti Jr. kept 0628 for the next six years prior to being purchased by noted Ferrari collector and former Microsoft executive Jon Shirley in June 1998. Shirley sent his new 290 MM to Pete Lovely and Butch Dennison of Puyallup, Washington, to be restored, a process that took roughly three years. Chassis no. 0628’s first appearance following the restoration was at the Ferrari Club of America Annual Meeting in Dallas, Texas, in 2001, where it deservedly took Best of Show. A few months later, it graced the 18th fairway at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it not only won its class, but also won the Luigi Chinetti Award, celebrating the best Ferrari on the show field. Featured on the cover of Cavallino 125 later that year, it returned to Monterey in 2002 to be shown at Concorso Italiano, winning Best Ferrari, once again, as well as Best of Show. Two years later, it was driven by Shirley at the Monterey Historics at Laguna Seca. Shirley’s last major outing with the car was with his son Eric on the Colorado Grand in 2007. In March 2008, 0628 was purchased by Hugh Taylor of Worcestershire and at that point imported to the UK. It remained with him for the following four years and was driven by Taylor at the Goodwood Revival as part of the Tribute to Juan Manual Fangio parade in 2011. RETURN TO SEBRING SPECIFICATIONS Upon the current owner’s acquisition of the 290 MM in 2011, it was decided that the car would be certified and fully restored by Ferrari Classiche. With such a colorful racing history in many different configurations and liveries, it was decided that the ideal point in time to return to would be the 1957 12 Hours of Sebring, as this was after its conversion to 290 MM specifications and its final race with Scuderia Ferrari. It was only fitting that the car would return to Maranello for the restoration, where work was overseen and undertaken by Ferrari Classiche. Upon the completion of the work, 0628 was granted Red Book certification by Ferrari Classiche. The Classiche binder itself states that the car maintains its original chassis, the Tipo 130 V-12 fitted to the car by the factory in 1957, its original gearbox, and original body. After the completion of the restoration in early 2015, the car was shown at the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. It was shown once more later that year at Ferrari’s Finali Mondiali at Mugello by Ferrari Classiche, showcasing their restoration efforts and attention to detail. During 2016 and 2017, 0628 was kept in Maranello and put on display in both the Ferrari Museum in Maranello and at the Casa Enzo Ferrari in Modena. The possibilities for 0628 are limitless for its next custodian. Eligible for virtually any concours event worldwide, it also remains eligible for countless vintage racing events, chief of which would be the Mille Miglia. Furthermore, the original pontoon-style front end also accompanies the car. The impressive list of drivers that were given a chance to slide behind the wheel of the 290 MM reads like a who’s-who of the finest drivers of the era. Their combined accomplishments are truly astonishing in every sense, and motor racing would not have captured the world’s attention in such a way without their influence and expertise. Of the four 290 MMs built, three have survived, in addition to only two 315 Ses and three 335 Ses, for a total of only eight cars from what can be considered the golden era of the Scuderia Ferrari’s two-seater sports racing barchettas. The seven other cars all remain in significant collections around the world, unlikely to part with their owners anytime soon, making the acquisition of 0628 an unmissable opportunity. The next owner of this illustrious Ferrari will be afforded the opportunity to add their name to this incredible list as a driver of 0628 in addition to acquiring one of the rarest and most significant Ferrari sports racing cars from the Scuderia’s heyday.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-12-08
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1956 Aston Martin DBR1

The first of five DBR1s Winner of the 1959 Nürburgring 1000 KM; sister to the 1959 Le Mans winner Raced by Roy Salvadori, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham, and Carroll Shelby, among others Fitted with correct reproduction engine for racing, offered with the original Maintained by Aston Martin specialists R.S. Williams The most important model in Aston Martin history Accelerating hard in third gear to 6,700 rpm, the DBR1 closes fast on the tight but sweeping right-hander ahead. Faithfully following the undulating asphalt cutting through the mountainside, the Aston chases by the straight-six’s raucous notes ricocheting off the craggy rock face, grip from the hot Dunlop racers is tenacious, wrote leading Aston Martin author and historian Paul Chudecki in 2014. Down into second for the cambered left/right that follows, rapidly climbing the sinuous roads from Saanen into the Swiss Alps, the twitching tail requires a touch of opposite lock before we’re hard on the throttle for the next short straight. Marvelling at its sublime handling and sheer pace, I can’t help but ponder the outcome had Aston’s most successful racer entered the Mille Miglia with its not dissimilar roads; Stirling Moss had been over one minute faster in the DBR1 over a lap of the 1958 Targa Florio than he had been in the Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR three years earlier, when the combination famously won the Mille Miglia at record speed . . . The DBR1, of course, was the ultimate result of David Brown’s dream in 1949 to win Le Mans, one finally culminating a decade later in that elusive Sarthe victory. Following its DB2 competition entries Aston had produced the DB3, its first purpose-built sports-racing car, with the LB6 engine’s 2,580 cc latterly increased to 2,922 cc, but success was limited. Though the DB3S, its successor, was highly competitive, its improved VB6 engine’s capacity limit remained 3.0 liters and by 1955 240 bhp represented maximum development. Against much more powerful, 3.5–4.5 liter, Ferraris, Jaguars, and Maseratis, its comparative power deficit was a perpetual problem, and the exceptional performances with this engine show just how effective were Aston’s chassis. To address the deficit a new Lagonda – essentially an enlarged DB3S – appeared for 1954 with an Eberhorst-designed 4.5-liter V-12; alas the crankcase design was ultimately too weak and it was abandoned, its considerable potential un-realized, after the fast but fragile two versions failed to finish Le Mans in either 1954 or 1955. Immediately after the latter, work began on an all-new lighter, faster, though still 3.0-liter, Aston under new race car design chief Ted Cutting. Using a perimeter-type, small-tube spaceframe chassis, the DBR1’s front transverse torsion bar suspension remained much as for the DB3/DB3S but the rear was all-new, with longitudinal (against transverse) torsion bars, trailing links, and Watt linkage rather than central-slide-located de Dion axle. Notably, the S430 four-speed box was replaced by a CG537, a semi-dry sump, five-speed transaxle, and cast-iron rather than forged-steel Girlings had light alloy calipers (a first in racing). Cutting also designed the sensuous body – for 1956 with slightly more bulbous wing contours and second-generation DB3S-style radiator intake, unlike the more flowing lines of all 1957 onwards DBR1s – formed in ultra-light 20/22 gauge alloy. Derived from the VB6 but with little or no common components, the DBR1’s RB6, 2,922-cc engine’s bottom end was substantially redesigned – initially with four main bearings – including a lighter alloy crankcase to cope with the planned power increase; the camshaft drive also changed, from chain to gear-driven. Originally, the 60-degree, twin-plug DB3S head was used which, with triple 45DCO carburetors, increased power over the VB6 to 252 bhp at 6,000 rpm; by 1958 all RB6s had 95-degree heads, with larger valves and triple 45DCOs/50DCOs, increasing power to 242 bhp/255 bhp at 6,000 rpm. Thus equipped the DBR1 boasted a roadholding-enhancing four-inch lower center of gravity than the DB3S. An Achilles heel would soon appear, however, the transaxle proving particularly troublesome. For 1956, under Le Mans sports prototype regulations stipulating a maximum 2.5-liter capacity and 28-gallon fuel tank, it was mated to a 2,493-cc RB6 engine (RDP5053/1) with 212 bhp at 7,000 rpm – an output influenced by having to average 10.8 mpg. On its 24 Hours debut, DBR1/1 ran well for 20 hours until running its bearings; 2nd place at both the British Empire Trophy and Easter Goodwood meetings followed early in 1957. In May that year, back to 3.0 liters, it was joined by DBR1/2 at Spa, the Aston’s potential amply demonstrated by Tony Brooks’ easy win in DBR1/2 with Roy Salvadori 2nd in DBR1/1. Soon after, Brooks/Noel Cunningham-Reid led the Nürburgring 1000 KM from flag to finish in DBR1/2 with Salvadori/Les Leston in DBR1/1 6th; hopes were thus high for Le Mans but Brooks, running 2nd with Cunningham-Reid in DBR1/2, crashed trying to engage gear and Salvadori/Leston retired DBR1/1 with a fractured oil pipe. Then Salvadori finished 2nd in the British GP support race and Brooks won again in DBR1/2 at the Belgian GP, that year for sports cars, with Salvadori in DBR1/1 4th. Given 3.0 liters was the engine’s maximum capacity, it was manna from heaven when 1958 regulations decreed a 3,000-cc limit. For Sebring’s 12 Hours, though, the gearbox gremlins struck again, DBR1/2 retiring after Moss had set a new lap record; Salvadori/Carroll Shelby in DBR1/1 went out with a cracked chassis. Better fortune returned at Nürburgring when Moss, sharing DBR1/3 with Jack Brabham, who did just eight laps, drove superbly to win by four minutes; Shelby/Salvadori in DBR1/1 again suffered gearbox failure, while 4th-placed Brooks/Stuart Lewis-Evans in DBR1/2 were forced off the road; Moss had also retired with gearbox failure in that Targa Florio, again after breaking the lap record. Another bitter pill to swallow followed at Le Mans; one DBR/1 retired with another broken gearbox, another crashed, and the third retired with engine failure while leading. Back home, Goodwood provided a fillip when Moss/Brooks won the Tourist Trophy in DBR1/2, with Salvadori/Brabham second in DBR1/1 and Shelby/Lewis-Evans third in DBR1/3. It was another dominant, excellent result, but it wasn’t Le Mans. After nine years fighting to win the French classic, Aston decided it would be the DBR1’s sole 1959 event. That soon changed when DBR1/1 – as all DBR1s, now with 2,992-cc, seven main bearings for greater reliability, and 50DCO Webers, realizing up to 268-bhp – ran at Sebring for Salvadori/Shelby; a change rued when clutch failure caused early retirement. Then Moss persuaded Aston to enter the Nürburgring 1000 KM, convinced he could repeat his 1958 win; using DBR1/1 he did, even more spectacularly, breaking the lap record 16 times in one of his greatest drives, with Jack Fairman driving only eight laps. It would be DBR1/1’s last works race entry. At Goodwood’s Tourist Trophy it would, however, serve as a practice car, where Aston Martin clinched the 1959 World Sportscar Championship, a feat only made possible by DBR1/1’s Nürburgring triumph. Following Aston Martin’s withdrawal from competition in August 1959, DBR1/1 would twice race for Essex Racing Stables in the Nürburgring 1000 KM, with Jim Clark/Bruce McLaren retiring from fourth in 1961 when a con-rod failed at 500 KM and McLaren/Tony Maggs finishing 4th in 1962, at the end of which Aston sold (with 2,992-cc engine, RB6/300/3) DBR1/1 to the Hon. John Dawnay – later the 11th Viscount Downe and long-time Aston Martin Owners Club president – and his brother the Hon. James Dawnay. Allocated its first road registration of 299 EXV on 5 October 1962 (with which it has recently been reunited), both raced the car until the latter crashed at Silverstone in 1963, sustaining bad front body damage. Returned to the Feltham Works, the removed body was saved from being scrapped nearly a year later and the car taken to Aston specialist RS Williams. After laying untouched for 12 years it moved, in 1976, to Aston enthusiast/race entrant Geoffrey Marsh who, having made a body buck from DBR1/2 which he was rebuilding, had a new front section fabricated and the remaining body refurbished; the mechanical components and engine were also rebuilt. Once finished, DBR1/1 returned in 1980 to RSW for race preparation. Subsequently, driven by Mike Salmon, it took many victories/podiums in Lloyds and Scottish Historic Championship/AMOC races during the early ’80s – including winning outright the 1982 Lloyds & Scottish Historic Car Championship – after which appearances comprised shows and concours d’elegances. In 2000 (two years before the Viscount Downe’s death, when his wife Diana, the Viscountess Downe, was elected AMOC president, a position she retains), it was sold to America-based John McCaw. The current owner acquired DBR1/1 from McCaw in January 2009. As his intention was to enter the Goodwood Revival, and deemed its original engine, RB6/300/3 (which comes with the car), too precious to risk racing, R.S. Williams produced another race unit with new cylinder block and heads, facilitated by Geoffrey Marsh already having produced castings for his DBR4. Since 2010 DBR1/1 has been successfully raced at Goodwood by Brian Redman, while in 2013 Sir Stirling Moss drove it during Aston’s centenary celebrations at Nürburgring. Inside the cockpit everything is just as in period, from the bucket seats – well-padded and adequately comfortable for a purpose-built racer – trimmed in the correct tweed cloth (like the right-hand chassis rail next to one’s knee) to the smallest dashboard detail; notably, the owner commissioned former AML employee/motoring journalist Michael Bowler, with the late Ted Cutting’s help, to produce a comprehensive report of DBR1 dashboard variations to ascertain the correct layout. Engaging first gear, via the canted gear-lever and short travel clutch, and pulling away the exhaust emits a loud and suggestive growl, the twin-cam urging one to let it rev. Now producing 301 bhp at 6,500 rpm (redline 6,800), the 2,992-cc engine feels much more a race unit than the 240-bhp DB3S’ similar capacity VB6. ‘Peakier,’ it is not happy pulling below 3,500 on anything more than a trailing throttle – torque builds from 208 foot-pounds at 3,500 to 243 foot-pounds at 6,500, with a 250 foot-pound maximum at 6,000 – meaning one has to consciously keep revs no lower than 3,500–4,000, otherwise the race plugs can foul badly (taking a decent stretch of road to clean them). Floor the throttle then – and what sheer music the roar of that straight-six is, crisp and loud and exuding a tone that only a thoroughbred racing engine can – and the Aston is instantly and viscerally alive, with power rapidly rising from 200 bhp at 4,500 rpm, realizing tremendous acceleration with no let-up before the road dictates lifting-off for the next corner. Free from the trappings of race suit and helmet with arms bare, driving gloves, and sunglasses to protect my eyes, the whole experience is wonderfully raw, as every mechanical note of the RB6 registers in tandem with the bellowing open exhaust little more than an arm’s length away below the passenger door. There’s no heater, of course, and the October weather’s not overly warm, but with the engine’s heat filling the cockpit’s nether regions, it’s of no concern. Dropping down a little from the mountains we’ve now reached the owner’s favorite road for “exercising” his cars, a perfectly surfaced 11 miles incorporating long, sweeping corners, hairpins, and rapid rising and dropping switchbacks. Here the DBR1 is in its element, even more so than DB3S/9, which I’d recently driven on the same route. Taking turns at speed, via the perfectly geared rack and pinion, the sensitive steering is notably more precise, though a tad heavier than ‘3S/9, and it accordingly turns-in better and very quickly, with good self-centring enabling one to easily steer the car on the throttle – all no doubt enhanced by the DBR1’s longer wheelbase. One can almost sense the chassis thinking, and while its edginess doesn’t provide quite the instant confidence of the 3S’s ladder-frame, the R1’s spaceframe is equally informative in relating its brief, similarly signaling its limitations. Nor is the gear-change, in its metal H-pattern gate, difficult once one masters the right balance of double-declutching/engine rpm. Like its predecessor, how quickly ground is covered is down to the confidence the chassis inspires, which exponentially increases with every mile; one can sense the rear Dunlops obediently following the fronts, like a carriage following the locomotive pulling it along rails. Push harder and oversteer will prevail, but chassis feedback is so good that when the rear wheels start to slip those rails, there’s always enough warning to react with throttle and steering inputs; understeer is minimal and oversteer never excessive. With its high-geared steering and surprisingly good lock for a racer, mountain hairpins present little problem though first gear is essential to keep the engine on cam’ to maintain pace, while an indulgent oversteer-inducing dose of throttle facilitates the tighter ones. Although the race rubber will naturally track surface changes the DBR1 with the power on inevitably gets thrown about by undulations and uneven cambers, requiring a firm grip on the wood-rim wheel; comfort is nevertheless amazing for a race car – as is the astonishingly good ride given the constant surface changes. All of which is abetted by consistently impressive and powerful braking, with no thought as to the all-round discs’ competence when braking hard and late. Aware that the Aston’s resounding blare has drawn some local boys in blue’s attention, we make a lengthy stop for still photography. Thankfully, they are nowhere to be seen on our return, as I recall, back in 1996, track-testing DBR1/2 on Silverstone’s old GP circuit, how it could be set up into the most satisfying sequence of high-speed four-wheel drifts. Good in slow corners the DBR1 is really in its element in high-speed bends, responding swiftly to sudden direction changes and the most sensitive of inputs, the combination imparting a feeling of fantastic fluidity. No wonder drivers loved the DBR1’s roadholding and handling, and why it could win despite a power deficit compared to the opposition. Glorious engine apart, this Aston’s overriding asset remains its “chuckability.” My drive – and what a rare privilege to be let loose on such open and inviting roads for almost two hours of sheer driving pleasure – suggests that not only did genius Ted Cutting design a consummate racing car, but also one that could double as a highly effective road-going racer; more than capable, especially in Moss’ hands, of vanquishing all on the Mille Miglia (though its rawness, peaky race engine and barking exhaust would probably preclude its use as a practical road car). Coming from the finest of all Aston Martin collections, owned by a fastidious perfectionist, DBR1/1 is not only the best presented of the five DBR1s produced, it is also without question the most correct down to the smallest of details, inside and out. With its impeccable provenance and enviable racing record, during which this Aston Martin was driven by some of the greatest names in motor racing, DBR1/1, the first of the line and an integral team player to the end, crucial to that 1959 World Sportscar Championship victory, remains an ultimate icon of Aston Martin racing history. Arguably the most important Aston Martin ever built, DBR1/1’s significance cannot be overstated. DATEEVENTDRIVERSRESULTJuly 28–29, 1956Le Mans 24 HoursTony Brooks, Reg ParnellRetiredApril 6, 1957British Empire Trophy, Oulton ParkRoy Salvadori2ndApril 22, 1957BARC Easter Meeting, GoodwoodRoy Salvadori2ndMay 12, 1957Sports Car Race, Spa-FrancorchampsRoy Salvadori2ndMay 26, 1957Nürburgring 1000 KMRoy Salvadori, Les Leston6th, Team PrizeJune 22–23, 195724 Hours of Le MansRoy Salvadori, Les LestonRetiredJuly 20, 1957British Grand Prix Sports Car Race, AintreeRoy Salvadori2nd, Fastest LapAugust 25, 1957Belgian Grand Prix, Spa-FrancorchampsRoy Salvadori4th, Team PrizeSeptember 14, 1957International Daily Express Meeting Sports Car Race, SilverstoneStuart Lewis-Evans6th, Team PrizeMarch 22, 195812 Hours of SebringRoy Salvadori, Carrol ShelbyRetiredJune 1, 1958Nürburgring 1000 KMRoy Salvadori, Carrol ShelbyRetired June 21–22, 195824 Hours of Le MansRoy Salvadori, Stuart Lewis-EvansRetiredSeptember 13, 1958RAC Tourist Trophy, GoodwoodRoy Salvadori, Jack Brabham2ndMarch 21, 195912 Hours of SebringRoy Salvadori, Carrol ShelbyRetiredJune 7, 1959Nürburgring 1000 KMStirling Moss, Jack Fairman1stSeptember 5, 1959RAC Tourist Trophy, GoodwoodPractice CarAddendum Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this lot if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Chassis no. DBR1/1 Engine no. RB6/300/3

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-08-19
Hammer price
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1963 Aston Martin DP215 Grand Touring Competition Prototype

THE ASTON MARTIN PROJECT CARS After winning the World Sportscar Championship in 1959 following 1st-place finishes at Le Mans, RAC Tourist Trophy, and Nürburgring, David Brown pulled Aston Martin out of sports car racing. After another unfortunate season of Formula 1, which sounded the death knell for machines such as the DBR4, the racing department shut its doors at the end of 1960. For David Brown this was not entirely bad news, as he could focus on his new line of road cars – the previous year had seen the introduction of the DB4GT – and leave the racing to the privateers. It was not long, however, before the Aston Martin dealers on the continent were begging for a return to Works racing. Their thinking being, rightly so, that factory competition helps sell cars – and so David Brown approved what would become the first of what would eventually come to be four “Project cars” – sports car racing vehicles all developed from the DB4GT chassis. The first Design Project, DP212, was conceived and executed in five months and was nearly all DB4GT in regard to its chassis and mechanics. The wheelbase was extended by an inch, and instead of the standard platform, replaced by box-frame sections. Truly different was the body shape – very sleek and seemingly aerodynamic, comprised of very lightweight magnesium/aluminum alloy. With an increased engine capacity and triple Weber carburetors, DP212 had a top speed of 175 mph. Driven by Richie Ginther and Graham Hill at Le Mans in 1962, the car placed 5th on the grid. It became clear, however, that DP212 suffered from rear-end lift at high speed. Both Ginther and Hill complained of it at Le Mans and following tests at MIRA, Aston Martin engineers would find that nearly a quarter of the weight was lost! Subsequently, a rear spoiler was added along with an extended and lower nose; this would help engineers plan for the following Project Cars. For the 1963 season, two additional Project cars (dubbed DP214) were created to rival Ferrari’s entries. Built for the GT class, each DP214 was required to have a DB4GT chassis number to conform to regulations. In reality, however, the chassis was entirely different from standard. To lighten the vehicles even more, the box-section chassis was drilled, and the frame had aluminum floorpans attached. Bending the rules even further, the engineers moved the engine back by eight inches, ensuring less rear-end lift. The engine capacity was increased yet again, and both cars were fitted with a David Brown S432 four-speed gearbox. The body was also designed with DP212 MIRA tests in mind: both DP214s were fitted with a low nose cone ending in a smaller radiator intake, and a sizable Kamm tail, giving the bodies a truly magnificent aspect. All in all, DP214s were a full 13 kg lighter than DP212, and nearly 200 lighter than a DB4GT. Both DP214s would go on to compete in the 1963 and 1964 race season, winning both the Coppa Inter-Europa and the Coupes de Paris, while also scoring other podium finishes. Notably, at Monza, the DP214 driven by Roy Salvadori defeated the Works 250 GTO driven by Mike Parkes in the three-hour race supporting the Italian GP. DESIGN PROJECT 215 It was the Works entry for the 1963 Le Mans Prototype Class that truly set the bar for what the Aston Martin engineers could do. A wholly unique competition car, the Aston Martin Design Project known as DP215 was to become the last racing car built by the factory, and the ultimate evolution of the Aston Martin GT racers. It was ordered by John Wyer, designed by Ted Cutting, had an engine from Tadek Marek, and was driven by Phil Hill – the great names associated with DP215. TWO MONTHS TO LE MANS It would be laughable today – a team manager sending a memo to the engineering department in March stating the exact specifications for a car that was to be ready for Le Mans, just two months away. And yet, for John Wyer, that was par for the course, as was the notoriously precise man setting a budget review at just £1,500. For Chief Engineer Ted Cutting, however, the project that would become DP215 allowed him to showcase his incredible automotive genius. Though very similar in looks to the two prior DP214s, DP215 is a very different car under the skin. Originally created as a vehicle for Tadek Marek’s yet-to-be developed V8, for the 1963 season, DP215 was equipped with a four-liter version of the DP212 six-cylinder twin plug engine – although 400/215/1 was fitted with a dry sump oil system. Modifications to the steel box-frame chassis included allowing for the engine to be fitted a full 10 inches further back than in DP212, as well as independent rear suspension. Ted Cutting was focused on improving balance and aerodynamics – the culmination of years of wind-tunnel testing at MIRA in response to driver complaints of rear lift at high speed. Just two short months after John Wyer’s memo, Phil Hill and Lucien Bianchi drove DP215 in the 1963 24 Hours of Le Mans. It recorded at 198.6 mph along the Mulsanne Straight . . . and had not even reached top speed yet! Indeed in practice, the car became the first car to officially break the 300 kph barrier. Its lap time put it in amongst the Ferrari rear-engined prototypes. It was six seconds a lap faster than the Ferrari 330 LMB running in the same class and 12 seconds a lap faster than the Ferrari 250 GTOs in the GT class. DP215 looked to be a sure winner. Unfortunately, the DBR1-type CG537 gearbox failed due to the high torque of the four-liter engine, and DP215 retired after two hours. Repaired and entered the next month at Reims and driven by Jo Schlesser, DP215 again looked to have a win in its sights. However, the since repaired transmission caused Schlesser to miss a gear and over-rev the engine – forcing DP215 to retire while leading the race. With two DNFs behind them, the engineers were able to fit the gearbox originally intended for the car: the S532. Though entered at the 1963 Brands Hatch Guards Trophy, tax regulations kept David Brown from racing the car. With John Wyer turning in his resignation, the racing department lost its lynchpin. In November 1963, the British press reported the Aston Martin Racing Department officially closed. After shutting down its racing department, Aston Martin sold the team cars but kept DP215 for development in the hopes of an eventual return to racing in 1965. These hopes were shattered, however, when DP215 was in an accident during night testing on the M1 motorway. RESTORING DP215 Sold to Malcolm Calvert from Aston Martin in 1974, DP215 had by this time lost some of its original parts. Its four-liter engine was sold to privateer Colin Crabbe for his DP214, and the extremely rare S532 gearbox was lost to time. Calvert, from the Isle of Wight, began what would become a long-term restoration project, spanning several owners. The factory fit the original, 1963 Works DP214/215 spare body on what was a slightly bent chassis. Photos of the car being picked up from Aston Martin by Calvert show that the car was a complete bodied rolling chassis, retaining many of its unique original parts, including the suspension, rear differential unit, dashboard, instruments, pedals, etc. Not interested in racing DP215, however, Calvert also fitted a DB6 engine and ZF gearbox. For several years he used the car on the road, before selling it in April 1978. Purchased then by Nigel Dawes, a noted Aston Martin collector, the restoration work continued. Determined to make all aspects of DP215 as original as possible, Dawes began working with Ted Cutting, the original designer. With Ted on board as a consultant, Dawes searched for several years for the original engine before finding it in DP214 – now converted to wet sump. In lieu of the original and with Ted’s full support, Dawes managed to obtain the Indianapolis Cooper-Aston 4.2-liter engine. Once Forward Engineering reworked the engine to a dry sump, Dawes had an engine as close to the original as was possible. At great expense three original sandcast 50 DCO Weber carburetors were added, the chassis and engine were sent to Chapman Spooner for final modifications, and the body shell was restored, with Ted Cutting addressing the necessary work to be done. The interior was also restored, and Dawes even managed to find the correct, original seats which he had re-covered in a green corduroy which matched the 1963 fabric. A true success, Nigel Dawes' restoration saw DP215 restored to its former glory, excepting the original engine and the S532-type gearbox. Having left his mark on DP215, in 1996 Nigel Dawes sold it on to the next custodian, historic racer Anthony J. Smith. Now of a condition to be used on the road and track safely, Smith enjoyed DP215 at a variety of events, including the Goodwood Festival of Speed and TT Revival. In 2002, the current owner traded a Formula 1 Ferrari for Smith’s DP215; at the time he was looking for a car he could drive on the road comfortably, yet still run as a race car when it suited. Entering the final stages of DP215’s restoration saga, the owner and his son contacted Ted Cutting once again and requested his help to rebuild a brand-new correct-type S532 transmission utilizing Ted’s original plans and the box from DP212 as the standard. Only six of these gearboxes were ever made: two for Works Lagondas, two for the DBR2s, one for DP212, and one for DP215. Working with noted specialists Richard Williams and Crosthwaite & Gardner, the arduous task of crafting the over 1,000 parts that make up the gearbox began. Upon completion, small modifications to DP215 were made to reverse the changes that had been necessary when a ZF gearbox had been fitted. Finally, only one puzzle piece remained. ENGINE NO. 400/215/1 The owner himself will tell you that the Indianapolis Cooper-Aston engine was perfect in DP215, and it is doubtless that he enjoyed hours of time behind the wheel of the Aston Martin. Over 10,000 miles, down to Italy and the South of France, through the center of Paris, and over every road in Scotland, the owners have driven DP215 likely more than any of its previous drivers combined. Yet, all this time its heart was still missing – just tantalizingly out of reach in its sister car. The owner set out with the intention to restore the original engine to DP215. No small feat, considering the engine spent half a century with DP214 – yet the owner was fiercely determined. Finally, the deal was done, and 400/215/1 was at last reunited with DP215. Installed by Chris Woodgate, the engine had only run an estimated 300 miles since an RS William rebuild in 1992. When fitting the dry-sump components that had been created for the Cooper-Aston, the engine was inspected, and everything was found to be perfect, nearly brand new. When Chris Woodgate ran an engine dyno to fine-tune the calibrations, the engine recorded a comfortable 300 bhp – and that was not even a maximum power run, showing that the original Le Mans test figure of 326 bhp should be readily available, if desired. Whole again, DP215 is as on the button as any new owner could hope for. “I was astounded by the six-cylinder engine’s torque, particularly at Tertre Rouge corner, the last one before the Mulsanne Straight. Le Mans cars have such high gears for the straight and often feel dead leaving that right-hander. Not the Aston, which felt quite meaty out of Tertre Rouge and away. And flat out it needed only the lightest steering pressure,” said former world champion and triple Le Mans winner Phil Hill talking about driving DP215 at Le Mans in Inside Track. The consignor, who has also driven at the Le Mans 24-hour race and has had the good fortune to own three Ferrari 250 GTOs over the years, feels that Phil has absolutely focused on the key aspects of the car. He notes: “The lines of the car are absolute perfection. You can see where its outstanding maximum speed came from. From a driving point of view, the acceleration in second and third gears always caused the hairs on the back of my hand to stand up. The previous engine fitted to the car was giving 372 bhp on the dyno, which gives some indication as to what extent the original engine, now fitted to the car, could be developed. The steering is delightfully light (unlike other Aston Martin GT cars of the period), the brakes are outstanding for the era, and the car feels like a thoroughbred to drive. Close examination will show that the build quality is superior to virtually any other competition car of the period.” “My outstanding memory of the car is when I was following the DP215, driven by Paul Vestey, in Paul’s GTO – we were driving on some magnificent roads down to Taranto in Italy, passing and repassing each other at speeds in excess of 130 mph. The sound of the two old warriors was unforgettable. The Aston’s six-cylinder bark perfectly complimenting the Ferrari’s V-12 howl.” “It must be said that despite the car’s extraordinary performance, it is easy to drive at slow speeds and in modern traffic conditions. I once drove it through the Paris rush hour traffic on a Dunhill Rally to the Ritz Hotel in the center of Paris. The clutch is light and the new synchro, in-line, five-speed gearbox is a joy. The torque of the engine enables the car to be comfortably driven at 2000 rpm in fifth gear. It pulls cleanly from there all the way to 6,200 rpm if needed.” “I will always remember that when I asked Ted Cutting what his proudest achievement was during his magnificent career with Aston Martin, he replied that winning the World Sports Car Championship in 1959 with the DBR1s came a very close 2nd to the recorded speed at Le Mans of DP215. This was the fastest speed ever recorded by a front engine car on the old course at Le Mans. He was talking as a designer, of course. I hope that whoever is fortunate enough to become DP215’s next custodian drives and enjoys the car as much as I have done over the years.” Stunningly beautiful, with an engine that is as comfortable at 40 mph as it is at 180 mph-plus, it is not hard to see how unbelievable this car would have been in 1963. Although it might represent the end of an era for Aston Martin, now reunited with its original engine, DP215 is looking toward a fresh start.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-08-25
Hammer price
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1939 Alfa Romeo 8C 2900B Lungo Spider by Touring

180 bhp, 2905 cc DOHC inline eight-cylinder engine with dual overhead cams and dual Roots-type superchargers, four-speed manual transmission, double-wishbone independent front suspension with coil springs over dampers, swing axle rear suspension with radius arms, transverse semi-elliptical leaf spring, and hydraulic friction dampers, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 118.1 in. Offered from the Sam & Emily Mann Collection The Italian equivalent of the Bugatti Atlantic; the ultimate Italian sports car of its generation One of approximately 12 extant Touring Spiders Documented by marque authority Simon Moore in The Immortal 2.9: Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award-winning restoration by U.K. 2.9 expert Tony Merrick The first “Immortal 2.9” to be offered at public auction this century extraordinary adj. 1) very unusual; very different from what is normal or ordinary 2) extremely good or impressive What, in the mid-1930s, passed for a sports car? The wealthy buyer’s options were few and far between. MGs were exciting, true, but small, inexpensive, and rough around the edges. Mercedes-Benz 540 Ks and Duesenbergs were fast but massive, and not particularly storehouses of new technology. Bugatti, certainly, qualified, with its nimble if unorthodox chassis engineering and potent, when supercharged, overhead-cam engines. Above all of these was the Alfa Romeo 8C 2900, whose lineage is part of a consistent and logical evolution stretching back to the 1920s, to the competition-oriented P3s, and the overwhelming race victories achieved in the early to mid-1930s by the 8C 2300s. The 8C 2900 was not a mere sports car, but the most advanced, modern, and compelling sports car that money could buy. To the gentleman who was accustomed to watching the workings of his Swiss watch or mastering the intricacies of his yacht’s sails, it was a symphony. Each wheel carried independent suspension; its Vittorio Jano-designed straight-eight engine was two alloy banks of four cylinders, with not only dual overhead camshafts, but two Roots-type superchargers, as well. As exciting and dramatic as the 2.9 chassis itself was, they benefitted from the addition of some of the most sensuous and well-balanced coachwork of the pre-war era. Foremost among the handful of mostly Italian coachbuilders whose works graced the 2.9 chassis was Milan’s own Carrozzeria Touring, whose patent for Superleggera construction happily coincided with the birth of Alfa Romeo’s masterpiece. The Superleggera method, based upon lessons learned from Frenchman Charles Weymann’s fabric-paneled coachwork, utilized an inner framework of pencil-thin, hollow steel tubes, wrapped in outer panels of aluminum, with fabric used in-between as a buffer against electrolysis. Unlike previous lightweight construction methods, Touring’s new idea allowed for a virtually featherweight structure that could be curved to suit the wind. Tales are rife of Touring engineers running prototype bodies on the road, with strips of felt attached; photographers would capture images of the cars at speed, and the body lines would be adjusted to suit the curves of the “stream lines.” Some of Touring’s best early Superleggera bodies were built on the 2.9 chassis, both the long-wheelbase Lungo and short-wheelbase Corto variants. Regardless of the length, the bodies were nearly perfect in their curvaceous proportions and most notably, their steeply raked windscreen and grille, with rear wheels often shaded by fitted spats, long flowing pontoon front fenders, and a rear end that appeared tucked between the fenders, visually exaggerating the great powerful length of the nose. Touring’s usual attention to detail resulted in small sparkles of polished chrome here and there, like sterling silver displayed on black velvet. One of the fortunate circumstances of the 8C 2900 is that every known chassis has been scrupulously studied and researched by a knowledgeable historian, Simon Moore. Mr. Moore has known almost all of the surviving examples and their owners through the decades and has compiled his research in The Immortal 2.9: Alfa Romeo 8C 2900, first published in 1986 and revised with his latest findings in 2008; needless to say these books, along with his work on the 8C 2300s, are considered vital to any dedicated connoisseur’s library. His attention to accuracy and detail has pieced together the stories of many surviving cars, not least among them that which is offered here. LAS CARRERAS DE UN 2.9 Moore’s latest research indicates that the known history of this car starts in 1949. According to the Brazilian newspaper Folha da Manha (now Folha de Sao Paulo) for 15 February 1949, an amateur driver in Sao Paulo called Mario Tavares Leite imported an 8C 2900B to Brazil from Italy. The poor photo in that paper shows the front of a Touring Spider. He raced his new acquisition at Interlagos, in the sports car class, and won a race there, on 31 July 1949. He won again at the II Premio Cronica Esportiva Paulista meeting at Interlagos on 30 April 1950, after which the car disappeared. In an article on Brazilian racer Camillo Christofaro in a now-defunct Brazilian magazine, Motor, for 3 September 1986, he states: “Em 1958 Camillo pegou um Alfa Romeo de passeio, encurtou o chassi e fez um carro grand prix, equipou com motor Corvette (...)” or, roughly translated, that Camillo took an Alfa Romeo touring car, shortened its chassis, put a Corvette engine in it, and made a racing car. It seems probable, therefore, that this was the single-seater Mecanica Nacional car raced by Christofaro after he had bought both a Tipo 308 and the 8C 2900B from his uncle, Chico Landi. The chassis was part of a hoard of parts that came from Brazil in late 1972, which was acquired by David Llewelyn. Meanwhile, in Argentina, another long chassis 8C 2900B, also with Touring Spider coachwork, was acquired by Carlos Menditeguy of Argentina. In 1953, the car was sold to a Buenos Aires racer, German Pesce, and his partner Iantorno. The two men modified the car by removing the body and installing cycle-fendered racing coachwork, and the complete original body was set aside save for the radiator grille and surround, which were incorporated into the new racing body. The complete original Touring coachwork was sold to Juan Giacchio, owner of a body shop in the Buenos Aires suburb of Palermo. Giacchio retained the body until his passing in 1986, and at that time it was offered by his widow to Ed Jurist of the Vintage Car Store. Hector Mendizabal, the well-known Argentinean broker of the period, confirmed that it was from an 8C 2900B Lungo chassis, Touring body number 2027, the color a light silver blue with red leather—and it was missing the grille. Correspondence from both individuals during that period indicated an association with chassis 412041. MEANWHILE, IN EUROPE During this same period, as often happens, pieces of a puzzle began to fall together elsewhere. In 1983, David Black acquired the modified 8C 2900 rolling chassis, which was still complete with authentic 8C 2900 suspension and transaxle, from David Llewellyn; the frame had its engine bearers (and thus the chassis number) cut away to accommodate the Corvette V-8, although a correct frame number, 432042, in the proper Alfa Romeo typeface, was still present. Moore recalls in The Immortal 2.9 his recollection of seeing the frame a decade earlier in 1973: “I was completely convinced that this was a genuine Alfa Romeo frame.” Following Black’s death, the car passed to Jan Bruijn in 1993. Guido Haschke of Switzerland subsequently acquired the rolling chassis and, at the same time, acquired the original, remarkably well-preserved Touring Spider body from Italian collector Count Vittorio Zanon di Valgiurata. The body, in the same light silver blue and missing its radiator grille and surround, was without doubt the Menditeguy Touring Spider, body number 2027, which is pictured in Moore’s book, while still in Buenos Aires. The following year, 1994, Sam Mann was alerted to the availability of the project and contacted Alfa Romeo restorer Tony Merrick, a gentleman who carries the same prestige in 2.9 restorations as Simon Moore does in documenting their past, to inspect the car and advise as to its authenticity. Merrick, who has had 10 to 12 of these fabled cars through his workshop, found the components to be authentic, and with his advice, Sam opted to purchase the car and engage Merrick to perform the restoration. Through the sleuthing of Moore and Merrick, a complete original 8C 2900B engine, number 422042, was acquired, thus securing the last of the necessary components for a proper and authentic restoration. It is a reality understood by those in racing circles that these high-performance Alfa Romeos and many other similar cars were simply tools used on a track, and such is the nature of competition racing that as technology and rules evolved, so did the cars, which often led multiple lives. That these truly rare components from a model with such a miniscule production run survived to be united by a dedicated enthusiast is nothing short of remarkable. It is worthy of note that during the subsequent restoration, the original body number, 2027, was located on numerous panels. Interestingly, 2026 appears on the glove box door, indicating that the two sequential bodies were being built at the same time, and someone put the wrong glove box door in this car! During the restoration, when Merrick placed the body on the re-lengthened chassis, he found that the holes on the top of the frame lined up exactly with the holes in the inner fender liner panels. According to Merrick, who has fully disassembled at least six of these cars, the holes were not made to a drawing or template but were drilled freehand by the Touring workmen during assembly so that a series of screws would hold it all together. This construction method would have created a unique “fingerprint,” thus indicating that the body could have somehow been original to this chassis. Merrick recently confirmed he still holds this belief, given his understanding of the construction of these cars on a more forensic level. To summarize, since no hard evidence exists to confirm the true sequence of events, it remains possible that the Menditeguy Alfa traveled to Brazil from Argentina in the mid- to late-1950s, sans Touring body, where it was then further modified and raced with the Chevrolet V-8, only to be reunited with its original Touring coachwork some four decades later. Mr. Merrick had completed the restoration of the chassis, drivetrain, and body by late 1997, with the exception of paintwork, which was performed – in its current lustrous black – upon arrival back in the United States. At that time, Sam opted to add the chromed stone guards on the rear fenders, and the flashing on the rear of the front fenders, authentic design elements which he had admired on another 2.9 Touring Spider. The car was subsequently debuted at the 1999 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it was awarded 2nd in Class and the Gwenn Graham Trophy for Most Elegant Convertible. More recently, this year it was deemed the Most Elegant Car at the Cavallino Classic Sports Sunday at the Mar-a-Lago Club. Since joining the Mann’s stateside stable, noted twin cam specialist Phil Reilly has handled all maintenance, repair, and tuning work. Most recently, Sam has been able to acquire the rare and valuable fuel pumps specific to the 8C 2900, which will be included with the sale for installation by the next owner. Perhaps the most persuasive testament to the quality of the restoration and its subsequent expert care, and the effortless drivability of the 8C 2900, is the fact that the Manns have spent over 12,000 miles behind the wheel, including seven 8C Alfa Tours between 1999 and 2013, in addition to the Copperstate 1000, the Colorado Grand, the California Mille, and the California Classic Rally. IMMORTAL AND EXTRAORDINARY Only approximately 32 2.9 chassis were made; the survivors are the most sought-after European sports cars of their generation, none more so than those bodied by Touring. Of the extant examples of the 8C 2900, it is believed that only 12 are Touring Spiders, seven of which are on the long chassis. They can be justifiably referred to as “Italy’s version of the Bugatti Atlantic,” as, like the Bugatti Type 57SC of fame, they combined the best engineering and styling of their generation in one advanced, sensuous, undeniably thrilling package. Ownership of this car for the last two decades has certainly been thrilling for Sam and Emily Mann, who describe the car as “a pleasure to drive way beyond its years.” He fondly recalls “loping along” behind fellow 2.9-owner John Mozart on one of the fabled 8C tours: “My left foot was resting on the handbrake and my right arm was resting on the door sill, and we were just comfortably flying right along. My speedometer cable had broken and I didn’t know how fast we were going along a 10-mile stretch until John told me when we stopped later on: 105 miles an hour.” Sam is still astonished at the way this car combines so many important facets in equal measure: high performance, a convertible top (and a disappearing one, at that), a huge compartment for luggage along with a compartment for tools, a spare tire, and supplies. “Most supercars today don’t have a place for glasses or a jacket, and here in 1939, you have a car that has substantial performance along with convenience and elegance for a weekend drive – or to cross Europe.” Then as now, buying one places its owner in the foremost echelon of automotive enthusiasts. With the majority of these cars in significant long-term collections, acquiring one has, until this point, required not only significant financial resources, but more importantly, being in the right place at the right time. The 2.9 is, yes, “immortal,” as it was described by Automobile Quarterly, made famous by Simon Moore, and preserved through the care, experience, and attention to detail of restorers like Tony Merrick. It remains simply extraordinary – in every sense of the word. Chassis no. 412041 Engine no. 422042 Body no. 2027

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione by Scaglietti

A CALIFORNIA SPIDER MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the golden era of sports car racing was at its height. Every weekend, privateers and manufacturers alike would take racetracks around the world, racing everything from homebuilt specials to the latest and greatest in handcrafted, exotic Italian sports cars. Races varied from fun and seemingly non-competitive to events where the reputations and livelihoods of manufacturers and professional drivers alike would hang in the balance. In many regards, post-war organized motorsport was still in its infancy, allowing for a sort of romanticism to be associated with the events, their participants, the spectators, and the cars themselves. One of the major players in the sports car racing scene in the United States at the time was Luigi Chinetti. Chinetti was a highly successful racing driver in his own right (having won the 24 Hours of Le Mans outright in 1932, 1934, and 1949), the official Ferrari distributor for the U.S. East Coast, and the man behind the fabled North American Racing Team. Luigi Chinetti and N.A.R.T. entered a trio of cars for the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959. This included a 250 Testa Rossa (0666), a 250 GT LWB Berlinetta (1461 GT), and a 250 GT LWB California Spider, chassis number 1451 GT, the car presented here. Within the hierarchy of the LWB California Spiders, chassis number 1451 GT sits at the very top of the pyramid. Built to full “competizione” specifications, it was the second of eight California Spiders bodied in aluminum and bore the first outside-plug, Tipo 128F engine, topped with high lift camshafts, triple 40 DCL6 carburetors, and a competition-spec fuel tank with an external fuel filter. Horsepower was quoted at an exceptional 262.5 bhp at 7,300 rpm. For Le Mans, its pilot and owner would be Bob Grossman, a successful sports car dealer based in Nyack, a village in Rockland County, New York. BOB GROSSMAN’S FIRST TRIP TO LE MANS Grossman was no stranger to Ferrari’s California Spider, as he had owned and raced one earlier that season. As evidenced in this car’s specifications, however, not all California Spiders were created equal, and Grossman was about to find out the difference between a “standard” California Spider and a proper factory-tuned and race-prepared macchina. Nonetheless, the car was very much fresh from the factory and barely turned out in time for the big race with the date of completion marked on the factory build sheets as 15 June, just five days before the race! Grossman and Chinetti certainly had the odds stacked against them. Stanley Nowak’s Ferrari California Spider elaborates on the pre-race atmosphere: “Grossman recalls the exterior of the car was only roughly finished. A ‘flash’ of paint covered the primer and the unfinished seats were covered with ‘rags.’ Chinetti provided the very difficult to obtain special car and the very difficult to obtain entry for Le Mans, and he ran the show! Grossman was privileged to pay for the car and drive it! Even his co-driver was unknown to him and when they did meet, it was a bit awkward as Fernand Tavano spoke no English and Grossman spoke little French! In addition, Grossman had never driven at Le Mans!” Of course, in the end, the California Spider was on their side, and the car did not disappoint. Grossman proved to be a consistent driver and with Tavano on his side, the pair made an excellent team. The pair covered 294 laps over the course of 24 hours, landing them in 5th place overall and 3rd in their class. This was a very impressive finish for the team, especially considering that this was Grossman’s debut at the Circuit de la Sarthe! In an interview of Grossman conducted by Seymour G. Pond for Il Tridente magazine in 1995, Grossman reflects on his adoration of Ferrari and how reliable he found Ferraris to be during his racing career, commenting that “the expense in racing is not the car, it’s the maintenance . . . when I stopped racing Ferraris I found out what it cost to race.” This is brought up again in another interview of Grossman in the September 1959 issue of Car & Driver: “Having raced nearly every sports car under the sun, Grossman feels happiest of all with his Ferrari association (‘It may be expensive, but it's reliable. In thirteen races, I haven’t yet had any mechanical failure’)”. RACING IN THE NORTHEAST AND THE BAHAMAS After Le Mans, 1451 GT returned to the factory to be properly finished in metallic silver, before being shipped to its new home in New York and being reunited with Grossman. In the meantime, Grossman had sold his other California Spider, and when 1451 GT arrived, he immediately took to the track. Grossman raced his California Spider at SCCA events at Thompson, Bridgehampton, and at the Watkins Glen Grand Prix before 1451 GT was put on a boat and shipped to Nassau, where it took part in the Nassau Speed Week races. There, its most notable finish was taking 1st overall in the Memorial trophy race. The 1960 season saw Grossman and his California Spider race at a variety of tracks in the Northeast, and it accrued 1st in class finishes at Marlboro on two separate occasions, Roosevelt and a 1st overall finish at Virginia International Raceway. After its racing career came to a close at the end of the 1960 season, the California Spider left Grossman’s ownership and passed between owners in Maryland and Florida before being purchased by noted collector Gerry Sutterfield of Palm Beach Gardens. Sutterfield kept the car until around 1975 when he sold it to Sidney V. Stoldt of Ridgewood, New Jersey. The California spider was then acquired by Paul Pappalardo and sold in 1981 to Jon Masterson of Long Beach, California. Masterson immediately commissioned a complete restoration, refinishing the car in Rosso Corsa over a beige interior, but keeping its competition features intact. The restoration was completed in August of 1983 and the car’s first event on the show circuit was the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance. The car’s significance was not lost on the judges of the world’s most prestigious concours, and 1451 GT came away with 1st in Class honors. A string of both concours and vintage racing events followed, and the car did exceptionally well both on the lawn and on the track. The car returned to Pebble Beach in 1994, raced at the Monterey Historics on four separate occasions, ran the Colorado Grand in 1990, and appeared in numerous other events around California and elsewhere in the United States, traveling as far away as France, where it was shown at the 1990 Bagatelle Concours in Paris. Masterson finally decided to part ways with his beloved California Spider when the current owner purchased it from him in 2007. Chassis number 1451 GT was not kept out of sight for long, and it appeared at the Cavallino Classic in 2008. Later that year, 1451 GT was granted Ferrari Classiche certification, confirming that it still boasts its original chassis, engine (complying to its original competition specifications), gearbox, and a rear differential of the correct type. In 2009, the car was driven in the Copperstate rally and shown at the Ferrari Club of America national meet a few months later and at the 5th Annual Masterpiece Concours in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. RETURN TO LE MANS LIVERY After attending the historic races at Moroso during the Cavallino Classic in 2010, the owner decided that it was time for another full restoration. This time, the car would be returned to its proper Le Mans livery. The Ferrari specialists at Motion Products Inc. were chosen to undertake the restoration, which was completed in 2011, at which time the car promptly returned to the show circuit. Shown for the first time in its proper, period-livery at the Cavallino Classic in 2011, 1451 GT received a platinum award. Since then, the car has only been shown at a handful of select events. Driven by its current owner on the highly exclusive Le 250 Tornano A Casa tour in France and Italy in 2014, it returned to the United States where it was put on display at the 60 Years of Ferrari in America celebration on Rodeo Drive in Beverley Hills, California. The California Spider returned to Pebble Beach in 2015 where it earned 3rd in Class honors. The next year, it was shown at the Ferrari Club of America Annual Meet in Columbus, Ohio, where it fittingly won the N.A.R.T Award! For the next owner, a number of tantalizing possibilities await, including continued entry to the world’s finest concours events and vintage races, and it would surely be welcomed at next year’s Le Mans Classic. Thanks to its powerful engine and tall gearing fitted for Le Mans, the current owner comments that this is an absolute pleasure to drive, as evidenced by its numerous entries in vintage races and rallies with not only its current custodian, but also with Jon Masterson as well. Few Ferraris campaigned at Le Mans can eclipse its significance and purity, and it can be argued that 1451 GT is one of the most significant Ferraris in existence, a high point for both Grossman and N.A.R.T.’s career during one of the most celebrated eras in motorsport. DATERACE NUMBEREVENTDRIVERSRESULTJune 20-21, 19591624 Hours of Le MansBob Grossman and Fernand Tavano5th OA, 3st ICAugust 9, 195991SCCA National, MontgomeryBob Grossman1st OASeptember 6, 195991Race 5, SCCA ThompsonBob Grossman9th OA, 4th, ICSeptember 7, 195991Race 4, SCCA ThompsonBob Grossman6th OA, 2nd ICSeptember 20, 1959119Race 5, SCCA BridgehamptonBob Grossman1st OASeptember 25, 195995Watkins Glen Grand PrixBob GrossmanDNFDecember 4, 195918Governor's Trophy Preliminary, NassauBob Grossman19th OA, 12th ICDecember 4, 195918Governor's Trophy Race, NassauBob Grossman9th OA, 3rd ICDecember 5, 195918Ferrari Race, NassauBob Grossman7th OADecember 6, 195918Memorial Trophy, NassauBob Grossman1st OADecember 6, 195918Nassau Trophy Race, NassauBob Grossman19th OA, 4th ICApril 16, 196040President's Cup, National Races, MarlboroBob Grossman10th OA, 1st ICMay 1, 196019VIR SCCA NationalBob Grossman1st OAMay 15, 196019Race 8, SCCA CumberlandBob GrossmanDNFMay 31, 196041Race 8, SCCA Nationals, BridghamptonBob Grossman7th OA, 3rd ICJune 6, 1960 Vanderbuilt Cub, Rossevelt RacewayBob Grossman10th OA, 1st ICJuly 10, 1960 MarlboroBob Grossman10th OA, 1st ICAugust 6, 19609Race 1, Scca National, MontgomeryBob Grossman4th IC

  • USAUSA
  • 2017-12-06
Hammer price
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1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Scaglietti

320 hp, 3,286 cc aluminum-block V-12 engine with six Weber 38 DCN carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent suspension with front and rear unequal-length wishbones, coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers, and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in. The 23rd of only 32 examples produced; considered one of the very best in existence Shown at the Earls Court in 1966 Successfully and frequently campaigned by Ron Fry, David Skailes, and Jack Maurice throughout England, with countless 1st place finishes Formerly of the renowned Matsuda Collection in Japan Ferrari Classiche certified; retains all of its original mechanical components An exceptional 250 LM in every regard; one of the most important and sought after of all Ferraris RACING IN THE UNITED KINGDOM Like all other 250 LMs, chassis number 6105, the 23rd of just 32 examples constructed, was destined for the race track. The Ferrari was ordered through Maranello Concessionaires by noted privateer Ronald Fry, a descendant of the prominent Fry family, who had made their fortune through confectionaries and chocolates in England starting in the 18th century. Ronald Fry was a seasoned racer, and it was no secret that his favorite cars were those from Maranello. Fry had traded in his 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO (chassis number 3869GT), which he had campaigned quite successfully over the 1963 and 1964 seasons, and with the arrival of the 250 LM in mid-September, he was obviously quite excited to get his newest Ferrari out onto the track. The 250 LM, boasting a new mid-mounted, 3.3-liter V-12, was developed for the GT class but forced to compete as a sports prototype. This was a drastically different automobile from earlier 250-series Ferraris. Nevertheless, it proved to be highly successful on the track, exhibiting spectacular poise due to its combination of handling and horsepower, which was beautifully mastered by a number of skilled drivers lucky enough to get behind the wheel. In 1965, chassis 5893 took 1st overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, making it the last Ferrari to ever do so, cementing the car’s place in automotive history. The 250 LM is widely lauded as one of the greatest Ferraris of all time by owners, historians, and tifosi alike, and it would appear that Fry would agree. In his ownership, it was very actively campaigned on hill climbs, sprints, and club races around England for the rest of 1964 through to 1966, often placing in the top three with his weapons-grade Ferrari. Taking a 250 LM to such events was the automotive equivalent of taking a gun to a knife-fight, and the car’s results speak for themselves. Chassis number 6105 (easily recognizable thanks to its registration number, RON 54) proved to be very successful in Fry’s ownership, and he often finished 1st in class and occasionally 1st overall. During the warmer months of the year, this car would be campaigned as often as four times a month. Seemingly every possible weekend that Fry could be out on the track in his Ferrari he made his way to an event and came home with a trophy in hand. In December 1965, Enzo Ferrari presented Ron Fry with a medal of recognition for his outstanding achievements in racing, which is a testament to the success of both Fry and his 250 LM. More importantly, even though the car was campaigned with much frequency, Fry never had a major accident, and as a result, the car remained in exceptionally original condition. This is an important point to note, as 250 LMs in particular were raced hard and consequently many fell victim to the hardships of motorsport. Therefore, it is nearly impossible to find an example that is in such original condition, boasting such extensive competition history, as 6105. In October 1966, chassis number 6105 returned to the Earls Court Motor Show, where it was displayed by Maranello Concessionaires in celebration of its racing success. Prior to the 1967 racing season, Fry sold his 250 LM in January 1967 to David S. D. Skailes, of Staffordshire, the owner of Cropwell Bishop Creamery in Nottingham, who reregistered the car on plates BFB 932 B. Shortly after acquiring the car, Skailes had the engine overhauled by the Ferrari factory in Maranello and, at the same time, had body specialist Piero Drogo install a long nose on the car, giving it a more distinctive front end. Skailes continued to race the car at events in the UK and even campaigned the car, with Eric Liddell, at the nine-hour race at Kyalami in South Africa, placing 6th overall. In October 1968, the 250 LM was acquired through Maranello Concessionaires by its third owner, Jack Maurice of Northumberland, who traded in his 275 GTB in order to make the purchase, and re-registered the car on license plates JM 265. Much like Ron Fry before him, Maurice continued to campaign his 250 LM on hill climbs and sprints around the UK, and the car returned to many of the same venues that it raced at under Fry’s ownership. For the 1970 season, Maurice had accumulated eight class wins, placed 2nd in the Shell Leader’s Hill Climb Championship, and won the Baracca Trophy and the David Poter Trophy for his exploits on the track. Following the success of the 1970 season, 6105 took a brief respite from competition and was featured in a pair of articles written by Jack Maurice for the Ferrari Owners’ Club UK magazine, a five-page article in the Winter 1970–1971 issue, titled "Speed-Hillclimbing in a 250 LM", and a two page article titled "The Duchess" in Autumn 1975. Maurice had the engine rebuilt at Diena & Silingardi’s Sport Auto in Modena over the winter of 1975/1976 and sold the car in 1976. After passing through Martin Johnson, chassis number 6105 was purchased by Richard Colton, of Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, and once more returned to the track under his ownership, participating in even more hill climbs and sprints around the UK. Following another four years of racing, Colton decided that his 250 LM was deserving of a restoration. To bring the car back to its original specifications, Colton purchased an original Scaglietti nose for a 250 LM from Robert Fehlmann, replacing the car’s Drogo long-nose, and had it fitted to the car during its restoration by GTC Engineering. Following the completion of the restoration, Colton showed the car at a pair of Ferrari Owners’ Club meetings in the UK, one in July at Eastington Hall and the other in September at Avisford Park. AFTER 20 YEARS ON THE TRACK Nearly 20 years after it was delivered new to Ron Fry, in 1984, chassis number 6105 was sold to its first owner outside of the UK, Mr. Yoshiyuki Hayashi of Tokyo. Hayashi kept the car in his collection for 11 years before it was sold to another esteemed Japanese collector, Yoshiho Matsuda, who also owned a 250 GTO and 250 Testa Rossa. In Matsuda’s ownership, the car was featured in a book on his collection, titled Rosso Corsa – Matsuda Collection, as well as pictured in issue 92 of Cavallino magazine and featured in the Japanese magazine Car Graphic. Following a brief stint in the United States for three years with Kevin Crowder, of Dallas, Texas, the car returned to Europe and was owned by Robert Sarrailh and Andrea Burani before being purchased by Pierre Mellinger, of Lausanne, Switzerland. In his ownership, Mellinger exercised the car frequently, being driven and enjoyed by him on several European driving events. Mellinger drove the car on the Italia Classica in September 2011 from Maranello to Venice and back, as well as in the Tour Auto in April 2012. Also in 2012, chassis 6105 was driven by Mellinger at the Le Mans Classic, taking to the track for the first time in more than 30 years. Prior to this, the car received over $100,000 of work at GPS Classic in northern Italy, excluding an engine and transmission rebuild. This 250 LM was sold to its current custodian later that year, as part of The Pinnacle Portfolio, and while in this collection, it has been beautifully preserved alongside other highly significant Ferraris. From the moment one first sets eyes on it, the sheer level of character and originality is instantly palatable. Although exhibiting slight signs of use from its more recent outings, it is evident that this is a very well-preserved and original example of one of Ferrari’s most celebrated racing cars. The car’s Ferrari Classiche certification only further confirms that it retains all of its original mechanical components. Additionally, it is offered with a spare, un-numbered 128 F-type engine, as well as an additional crankshaft and a set of Borrani wire wheels on Dunlop tires. Of course, the factory-correct appearance of its Scaglietti nose makes it all the more appealing. The opportunity to purchase a 250 LM at auction is a rare occurrence, but the opportunity to purchase a pure example with known history from new is an unrepeatable opportunity. As one of the finest and most original examples of the last Ferrari to win overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the importance of the 250 LM as a model, and chassis number 6105 in particular, simply cannot be understated. Race chart available within the catalogue description. Chassis no. 6105 Engine no. 6105 Gearbox no. 16

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato

*Premium Lot – Bidding via Internet will not be available for this lot. Should you have any questions please contact Client Services. 314 bhp, 3,670 cc DOHC twin-plug alloy inline six-cylinder engine with triple Weber 45 DCOE carburetors, four-speed synchromesh alloy-cased manual transmission with overdrive, front and rear coil-spring suspension, and four-wheel Girling hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95 in. The 14th of just 19 DB4GTs tailor-made by Zagato The only example delivered new to Australia; successful period racing career Restored by marque specialist Richard Williams and Carrozzeria Zagato Award winner at numerous European and American concours events Unquestionably the most desirable and attractive iteration of the vaunted DB4 ENGLISH SOUL, ITALIAN SUIT “Driving a 250 SWB is like wielding a hammer, it commands your respect through aggression and raw power. The Zagato, however, feels more like a tailored suit. It’s agile, sophisticated, and equally responsive…it’s a truly beautiful car to drive. And it fits perfectly.” – Peter Read In the early 1960s, Aston Martin and Ferrari were in a heated battle for supremacy in the World Sports Car Championship. It seemed as if every season brought about a new, race-ready vehicle to ensure each company’s victory, and the teams were consistently fighting each other for top honors. Competition was just as fierce in the showroom. Both companies were busy producing exciting and exceptional machines to appeal to their high-end clients, mainly in an effort to continue funding their racing exploits. Aston Martin changed the game in 1959 by winning that year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans with a decisive 1-2 victory, with four Ferraris left chasing in their rearview mirrors. As Ferrari updated the aging 250 GT “Tour de France” with the SWB Berlinetta, Aston Martin introduced the DB4GT in an effort to level the playing field, but it was not enough. Looking to hold back the onslaught of competition-specification Berlinettas, Aston Martin knew it needed something that would take the DB4GT to the next level. The solution was to approach an outside coachbuilder who could utilize their existing platform yet produce a new car that was both more attractive and competitive than its predecessor. The DB4GT was by all accounts a tough act to follow, but Carrozzeria Zagato was not one to shy away from a task. This would be an Aston Martin unlike any other, and when the completed product was unveiled at the 1960 London Motor Show, it was clear that Zagato had fashioned exactly what Aston Martin needed. Considered by many to be the coachbuilder’s finest design, the DB4GT Zagato is instantly recognizable as both an Aston Martin and a Zagato, thanks to the famed carrozzeria’s deft ability to masterfully craft distinctive design elements from each company into one harmonious work of art. Boasting a slightly elongated nose with a more pronounced grille, visually the car appears much more aggressive than the outgoing DB4GT. At the rear, the taillights were set into the fenders, and the C-pillar was reduced by featuring a larger rear windshield. While the DB4GT was already a highly attractive automobile, the Zagato coachwork gave the Aston Martin a more voluptuous appeal, smoothing out the harder edges in favor of a more dynamic and fluid shape. Changes were more than just skin deep, as Zagato and Aston Martin also endeavored to make this car faster than its standard brethren, reducing nearly 50 kilograms of weight and adding 12 horsepower to the total output. CHASSIS NUMBER DB4GT/0186/R The 14th DB4GT to be tailored by Zagato, chassis DB4GT/0186/R was completed on December 19, 1961, and then shipped to Australia shortly thereafter. Laurie O’Neill of Strathfield, a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, would be the first lucky owner. A successful businessman, O’Neill made much of his fortune from quarrying but also held the franchise to Peterbilt trucks in Australia. In his spare time, his preferred hobby was racing, and he owned a great variety of sports cars, ranging from Aston Martins and Ferraris to a Porsche 935 along with a handful of grand prix cars. The DB4GT Zagato would be O’Neill’s weapon of choice for the 1962 season, and the Aston would bring him great success. With Doug Whiteford behind the wheel, the car was undefeated in its first two outings at Calder and Longford on February 25 and March 3, respectively. On March 5 in Longford, Whiteford drove 0186/R to another 1st overall in the South Pacific GT Championship and a 4th-place finish in the Sports Car Championship on the same day. Whiteford and 0186/R notched one more 4th overall in the GT Scratch Race but failed to finish at the Sports Car Trophy race the following weekend due to tire issues. This would prove to be the car’s worst finish for the 1962 season. The Zagato would finish in no less than 3rd place over the next five events while driven by Laurie O’Neill himself and Ian Georghegan. They ended the season on a high note, finishing 1st in class in the GT Scratch Race at Katoomba on October 28, 1962. That year would mark the end of the DB4GT Zagato’s racing career, as O’Neill sold the car prior to the 1963 season. For the next 30 years, the DB4GT Zagato would remain in Australia with only two subsequent owners. Colin Hyams acquired the car immediately following O’Neill’s ownership in 1963, and it was shown at the 1965 Melbourne Motor Show during his ownership. Hyams then sold the car to Alex Copland in 1968, and it would remain with Copland in static storage for over 20 years. In 1993, the Aston Martin was acquired by G.K. Speirs of Aberdeen, Scotland, through Goldsmith and Young, who returned the car to its native land. There they performed a minor restoration so the car could be entered into vintage racing events. During this time, the Aston was frequently campaigned at such events as the 1997 Goodwood Festival of Speed and the Goodwood Revival in 1998 and 1999. The DB4GT once again returned to Australia in 1998, where it was driven for demonstration laps at the Melbourne Grand Prix and the Classic Adelaide 500 before returning to the U.K. Purchased by Peter Read from Speirs, Read decided that 0186/R was deserving of a complete restoration to concours standards. The process took two years from disassembly to completion, with work divided between Aston Martin specialist Richard S. Williams in England and Carrozzeria Zagato’s own facilities in Italy. No stone was left unturned to bring the car back to as-new condition, and although original metal was used wherever possible, Zagato’s own craftsman fabricated new panels, using the original bucks, when absolutely necessary. Williams completely rebuilt the car’s mechanical components, including the engine, suspension, and brakes, and was also commissioned to fully restore the interior as well as complete final assembly when the bodywork returned from Italy. Following completion in 2002, chassis 0186/R hit the concours circuit, where it immediately accrued an enviable record of accolades. On its very first outing at the Louis Vuitton Concours at the Hurlingham Club in June 2002, the DB4GT Zagato not only won its class but was also named Best of Show. That win ensured an invitation to the Bagatelle Concours d’Elegance later that month, where the Aston also won its class. Further Best in Class honors were also earned at Villa d’Este, Pebble Beach, and the Neillo Concours in 2007, as well as at the Presidio of San Francisco Concours and the Carmel-By-The-Sea Concours in 2009. At virtually every event the car attended, it found itself driving across the stage in honor. Shown most recently at The Quail: A Motorsports Gathering in August of 2013, the car remains breathtakingly beautiful. Not just a concours queen, 0186/R has also been driven respectfully on several tours, where it performed marvelously and without issue. As one of the finest DB4GT Zagatos in existence, it will surely continue to excel at future events. ONCE IN A GENERATION With only 19 DB4 GTs graced with coachwork by Zagato, just having the opportunity to see a DB4GT Zagato is a dream few realize. So treasured by their owners, not a single example has traded hands for the greater part of a decade. While its direct competitor from Italy would be the Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta, it would be more appropriate to compare the car to the vaunted 250 GTO, though both were produced in greater numbers. Both Aston Martin and Ferrari pushed the envelope of performance when these models were new, both boast wins on the world’s most competitive stage, and both boast handcrafted aluminum bodywork with designs worthy of inclusion in any major art museum. However, in terms of rarity, nearly half as many DB4 GT Zagatos were built compared to the 250 GTO. As an engineering masterpiece and a design icon, the Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato has few peers, and its significance to Aston Martin, Zagato, and its genre simply cannot be overstated. The DB4GT Zagato embodies the essence of Driven by Disruption and deserves to be regarded not only as a historically significant machine but also as a groundbreaking work of art. Date Race Number Event Driver Result February 25, 1962 GT Handicap Race, Calder Doug Whiteford 1st overall March 3, 1962 GT Scratch Race, Longford Doug Whiteford 1st overall March 5, 1962 South Pacific GT Championship, Longford Doug Whiteford 1st overall March 5, 1962 South Pacific Sports Car Championship Doug Whiteford 4th overall March 11, 1962 GT Scratch Race, Sandown Doug Whiteford 4th overall March 11, 1962 Sports Car Trophy Race Doug Whiteford DNF June 10, 1962 Over 3,500 cc, Silverdale Hillclimb Laurie O'Neill 1st in class August 19, 1962   Geelong ¼ mile sprints Doug Whiteford 15.00 secs August 26, 1962 25 Catalina Park, Katoomba Ian Georghegan 2nd overall October 14, 1962 11 Over 2,000 cc, Sports Scratch Race, Warwick Farm Ian Georghegan 3rd in class October 21, 1962 Over 3,500 cc, Silverdale Hillclimb Laurie O'Neill 1st in class October 28, 1962 25 Over 1,600 cc, GT Scratch Race, Katoomba Ian Georghegan 2nd in class October 28, 1962 Over 1,600 cc, GT Scratch Race Ian Georghegan 1st in class Chassis no. DB4GT/0186/R Engine no. 370/0186/GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-12-10
Hammer price
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1964 Ferrari 250 LM by Carrozzeria Scaglietti

An Italian operatic masterpiece of sound and color One of the finest original examples of Ferrari’s first mid-engined car Finished 8th overall and 1st in class at the 1968 24 Hours of Daytona A time capsule that is being publicly seen and offered for the first time in decades At times, the defining barometer of a motor car’s beauty is dependent on speed: how does it look at full speed as opposed to simply sitting statically on a manicured concours lawn or in a finely-lit private collection? By that qualifier alone, the Ferrari 250 LM is the epitome of design perfection. It is a purebred racing car that stirs the soul and enlivens the senses of not only the driver, but also the spectator, whether it’s being off-loaded from its transporter or roaring at breakneck speed down the famed Mulsanne Straight at Le Mans, in the middle of the night or in the pouring rain. Indeed, as Marcel Massini, the preeminent Ferrari historian declared, “Ferrari’s 250 LM is one of the most spectacular mid-engined sports cars ever built. A true competition race car rarer than the legendary 250 GTO, and the last Ferrari to win the gruelling 24-hour race at Le Mans.” Certainly the defining decision that affects the 250 LM’s shape is the mid-engined configuration, which allowed the artisans at Scaglietti to wrap the bodywork around the chassis in a heretofore unseen manner. At just under 44-inches tall, the car is low, sleek, and menacing. The voluptuous fenders over the rear wheel arches flow beautifully to the kammback tail, a feature that linked the LM to Ferraris of years past, and also to Ferraris of years to come. Add to that the state-of-the-art mechanical specifications of 320 horsepower, a rip-snorting Ferrari V-12 engine, a five-speed gearbox, four-wheel suspension, and disc brakes, and the resultant combination sees nothing but checkered flags whenever it takes to the track. CHASSIS NUMBER 6107 Chassis number 6107 is the 24th car of only 32 total 250 LM examples produced, and it is particularly special, because its first owner did not have racing in mind when he acquired the car. In fact, the car was used exclusively as a road car and enjoyed as such on open California roads! Steven Earle, of Santa Barbara, California, is well-known within the vintage racing community as the founder and longtime organizer of the Monterey Historic Automobile Races, and he ordered this car in the early summer of 1964 through Rezzaghi Motors, in San Francisco. The chassis was completed by the factory on July 23, 1964, with the body being eventually finished in Rosso Cina paint (a deep shade of red) and equipped with the LM’s standard spartan road car amenities, including blue corduroy cloth upholstery. Following completion, 6107 was shipped to San Francisco directly by air, not passing through the traditional conduit of importer Chinetti Motors, and it was delivered to Mr. Earle in November 1964. Registering the car for road use, with California tags reading “MKW 781,” Mr. Earle generally used it about town over the next several years, accruing only a few thousand miles during his ownership and photographing the car both at home and on the famous Mulholland Drive, where the car was an absolute thrill to drive. In 1966, desiring to attract less attention from police, he had the Ferrari repainted in a dark blue metallic color, and it was in this livery that the car appeared for sale in an advertisement in the January 1967 issue of Road & Track magazine. In the ad, Mr. Earle describes the car as “amazingly docile” and “very easy to drive.” Declaring the car to have accrued 3,000 miles on highways only, and never raced, Mr. Earle sought $14,750 for the rare Ferrari. In March 1967, a buyer was found in Chris Cord; he was a friend of Mr. Earle’s who resided in Beverly Hills and is better recognized as the grandson of E.L. Cord, the renowned founder of the pre-war American luxury marque of the same name. As Mr. Earle describes in a 1981 letter to Mr. Massini, Mr. Cord had previously purchased a different LM, but was dismayed when it arrived bodied in fiberglass, a factory decision on which he had not been consulted. In addition to experiencing significant flex, the fiberglass material caused Mr. Cord to develop an allergic reaction, eventually forcing him to sell the car in October 1965. During Mr. Cord’s brief year of ownership, the car was displayed by Chic Vandagriff’s renowned dealership, Hollywood Sports Cars, as the centerpiece of their stand at the Los Angeles Auto Expo in September 1967. RACECO AND THE GENTLEMEN FROM ECUADOR Soon thereafter, in early 1968, the race career of 6107 began in earnest, when the car was purchased from Mr. Cord by Guillermo Ortega and Fausto Merello, two Ecuadorean drivers who competed under the banner of the Raceco team. With little time to prepare, Raceco equipped 6107 for “Sports” Class endurance racing with the addition of four roof-mounted recognition lights and one so-called “Cyclops” lamp, which was centrally mounted on the front of the hood. Repainted a deep shade of red and wearing #34, chassis 6107 was entered in the 24 Hours of Daytona on February 4, where it was driven by Ortega, Merello, and John Gunn. It qualified for an impressive 14th place on the starting grid. Bested only by prototypes like Porsche’s 907 and the Autodelta team’s Alfa Romeo Type 33/2 entries (as well as a lone Shelby Mustang), the then four-year-old 250 LM managed an amazing 8th place overall finish and a 1st in class, outpacing every entry from the GT Class and numerous prototypes and Trans-Am cars. Two-and-a-half months later, the 250 LM was campaigned again by Raceco, this time at the 12 Hours of Sebring. With the car now painted yellow and racing as #39, the same team of drivers attempted to repeat their Daytona success, but a clutch failure after 33 laps forced an early retirement. In February 1969, chassis 6107 was entered by Raceco at the 24 Hours of Daytona again, with Merello, who was joined by Edward Alvarez and legendary Ferrari driver Umberto Maglioli. Unfortunately, the presence of the 1954 Carrera Panamericana winner was of no consequence, and the car (now wearing #38) was again forced to an early exit, this time retiring after lap 68 with engine troubles. Following these setbacks, Mr. Merello took the 250 LM home to Ecuador, where the recent creation of the Autodromo Internacional de Yahuarcocha in Ibarra was attracting some of the world’s top drivers. With Merello and Pascal Michelet, who bought out Ortega’s stake in the car, at the wheel, 6107 was entered at the inaugural Yahuarcocha race in 1970. Still competitive, Merello and Michelet led much of the race, until an engine failure forced them to retire. The car also competed at the 12 Hours of Ecuador on September 26, 1971, though it is unknown how well the car fared. Ultimately, Michelet purchased the other 50 percent stake from Merello and continued to race 6107 throughout Ecuador and Peru. It is also believed to have been entered by the French expatriate as #36 at the 1974 24 Hours of Le Mans, though the car never arrived for qualifying. Ultimately, in 1974, the technical rules were changed in Ecuador, and displacement was limited to 3,000 cubic centimeters. As a result, Michelet decided to sell the car. In 1975, he found a buyer in Londoner Robs Lamplough. In February of the following year, Lamplough sold this car to fellow Englishman Stephen Pilkington, of Lancashire; he was a known collector of fine race cars and immediately recognized 6107’s merit and potential, declaring “the chassis was never rusted. It was superb.” Ferrari specialist Bob Houghton conducted a sympathetic restoration of the car, with it being refinished in red, as when it was first delivered, but it was never actively raced again. In 1983, chassis 6107 was purchased by a prominent Japanese collector, who also recognized the car’s inherent importance, and he put it on display in his personal garage for the next three decades. Believed to have as few as 10,000 original miles on its fully matching-numbers driveline, this phenomenal 250 LM, now gently freshened and returned to driving state, represents the zenith of 1960s vintage Ferrari collecting, claiming rarity, importance of model, celebrated beauty of design, and a legitimate racing pedigree. It is offered now for the first time in decades, and it has not been seen by the general public in as many years. Chassis 6107 is notable as perhaps the most original example with such an important racing record. Indeed, few known examples of notable originality lack a competition record of such significance. In fact, 6017 further distinguishes itself from others, as it is a car of clear, documented provenance and period correctness, which stands in stark contrast to some of its 31 colleagues, where years of racing and ownership changes have taken their toll on originality. Associated with some of racing’s most illustrious names, this superlative Ferrari offers an extremely rare opportunity to acquire one of the finest known 250 LM examples. Its public availability, which is the first in many decades, is a moment of tremendous historic importance. With over 300 horsepower roaring behind one’s back, and the driver seated inches from the ground at over 150 mph, the racing enthusiast will attest to the symphony of power, color, and noise that is a Ferrari 250 LM at full throttle, be it at full speed in the Le Mans retrospective or racing through the switchbacks on Mulholland Drive. Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this car if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Addendum Please note that an import duty of 2.5% of the purchase price is payable on this car if the buyer is a resident of the United States. Also note this lot should have a diamond notation indicating an ownership interest rather than the triangle notation which indicates a guaranteed lot. Please refer to the catalogue terms and conditions for full explanations of the terminology. The title for this lot is in transit. Chassis no. 6107

  • USAUSA
  • 2013-11-21
Hammer price
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1962 Shelby 260 Cobra "CSX 2000"

260 bhp, 260 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine with a single four-barrel carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with upper transverse leaf springs and lower A-arms, and front disc and rear inboard disc brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in. CSX 2000, the legendary and very first Shelby Cobra Offered from the Carroll Hall Shelby Trust The most important American sports car in history An unrepeatable offering after over five decades of single ownership ESTIMATE: PRICELESS! The greatest achievements in modern history are often so cataclysmic, so utterly earth-shattering and downright revolutionary, that humanity is left wondering, what if? What if Thomas Edison failed in developing the electric lightbulb? What if Henry Ford’s business went under before mass production of the Model T? What if the Wright Brothers failed to take flight, however briefly, at Kitty Hawk? What might the consequences have been . . . what might the world have looked like? Would society, as we know it today, be an ever-changing, hyper-speed web of 24-hour international business and culture, seemingly developing at a rate unheard of, even a century ago? The realm of possibilities is endless, almost frightening. Chaos theory refers to this as the “butterfly effect” – the notion that something remarkably small can have an extraordinarily large impact on the future. By that measure alone, then, Carroll Shelby, alongside Edison, Wright, and Ford, must be counted among the greatest innovators of the 20th century, for if it had not been for CSX 2000, American sports cars and racing would likely never have landed on the world stage, and the American auto industry would quite simply not be where it is today! The creation of CSX 2000 is the stuff of pure entrepreneurialism and vision. In 1962, only 10 years had elapsed since Carroll Shelby first stepped into a race car. The Texan was raised in a family without a car, but on that first day, in that first race, as he emerged from the MG TC in victory lane, the crowd took notice . . . and soon the world did, too. Race after race, win after win, Shelby developed a gentleman’s hobby into a full-blown career, circumnavigating the globe and piloting the most exclusive machinery in the world. Behind the wheels of Ferraris, Aston Martins, Maseratis, and other illustrious marques, he quickly developed a reputation at famed races from Monza to Le Mans. Amazingly, his career was a very brief but exceptionally successful flash in the pan; only seven years after stepping into a race car, he was the winner of the 1959 Le Mans 24-Hour race behind the wheel of an Aston Martin, and the following year, he abruptly ended his racing career due to health warnings. But this, after all, was the man who once raced with a shattered elbow by taping his cast to the steering wheel and who responded to his doctor’s warnings of heart problems by racing with a nitroglycerine tablet under his tongue! And this was the man who spent years studying European GT racing, from the inside out, developing a dream to build a car of his own and to compete successfully on the world’s greatest stage. He knew what it took to build a great car and, perhaps just as importantly, he knew the power of men like Enzo Ferrari, who he felt could bend FIA regulations with his might if any manufacturer came close to beating him. As depicted in the book Shelby’s Wildlife, “Shelby’s American blood boiled at the thought that European manufacturers such as Ferrari had the power to close the door on the efforts of an American like Lance Reventlow, who had spent a fortunate on his Chevy and Buick-powered sports cars.” Other privateers, like Briggs Cunningham, were successful too, but dominance over the European marques still escaped an American, even with Chevrolet’s own Corvettes incapable of returning victorious. After racing Cadillac-powered Allards as well, Shelby also truly knew what the potent combination of an Anglo-American hybrid might offer on the racetrack. CSX 2000, then, was the cornerstone on which Shelby built his success. At 37 years old and with little money to his name, within five years, Shelby built his company to employ over 500 people with a World Manufacturer’s Championship title to its credit. People like Ken Miles, Phil Remington, Al Dowd, and Pete Brock thereafter all became inextricably linked with the legend of the marque as drivers, managers, marketers, and visionaries. Although he considered a variety of platforms, circumstances pushed him toward A.C. Cars of Britain and Ford Motor Company in particular. The A.C. Ace was an exciting sports car, but the Bristol motor that powered it was suddenly going out of production in 1961, and with that, the company faced a problem. In September of that year, Shelby wrote to Charles Hurlock at A.C. and proposed the concept. Not long thereafter, Ray Brock at Hot Rod magazine informed Shelby that Ford was developing a lightweight small-block V-8 of 221 cubic inches. With the help of engineer Dave Evans at Ford in Dearborn, Shelby test-fitted this motor in a borrowed A.C. Ace and eagerly contacted Hurlock to let him know he found a suitable motor. From then on, things progressed quickly. The very first Cobra arrived in the United States, without a motor, in February 1962. This very first car, CSX 2000, was personally picked up at the Los Angeles airport by Carroll Shelby and his colleague Dean Moon before being brought back to Moon’s shop, where they installed the now-available and larger-displacement 260-cubic inch V-8 with a Ford gearbox in a matter of hours. And with that, CSX 2000 was complete, running, and driving. Wyss recounts Moon’s recollection: “We got drunk and drove it around—an impromptu road course we had set up between the oil derricks. When it didn’t break, even after all that rough treatment, well, then we knew we had a good car.” Shelby then moved from strength to strength. Dave Evans in Dearborn arranged a meeting with Don Frey, Ford Division General Manager. Shelby walked into the famous Glass House on Michigan Avenue for a sit-down that effectively kick-started the worldwide future success of Shelby American. Despite Detroit’s recent history of vilifying performance cars, Frey was an enthusiast and Ford was in the midst of promoting its new “Total Performance” marketing image, for which the new high-performance 260 V-8 in the Falcon Sprint was a perfect match. Several handshakes later and Ford Motor Company was now officially bankrolling Shelby for the first group of cars. Before this infusion of capital, however, CSX 2000 had been built on a shoestring. The entire company’s finances rested on this prototype and the securing of a successful deal for Shelby American that involved A.C. Cars and Ford. Amazingly, one of the car’s earliest functions was as a press car for the motoring trade, particularly with prominent magazines and in cities around the country to drum up interest and sales for the fledgling company. Time after time, however, what the public failed to realize was that every image of a Shelby Cobra in seemingly different colors was in fact the very same car – CSX 2000, repainted repeatedly in a stunt of Shelby’s own invention. Dean Moon initially wanted the car finished in his favorite shade of yellow, but as Shelby had already invited the Sports Car Graphic editors to test drive it and there was not enough time to paint it, they took 10 boxes of Brillo Pads and scrubbed the car through the night until the raw aluminum gleamed. An artist painted a stylized Shelby logo on the hood and trunk lid, and of course the “Powered by Ford” badge produced by Shelby certainly made the directors in Detroit quite pleased. Sports Car Graphic was successfully won over, decisively stating, “. . . we can safely say that it is one of the most impressive production sports cars we’ve ever driven.” The colors red, then blue, and finally yellow all followed for its official unveiling at the New York Auto Show, but regardless of the livery, Shelby’s genius, publicity-savvy approach was generally the same. Journalists were generally treated to a tour of Moon’s shop, followed by an impressive demonstration of a Weber-carbureted 260 V-8 on the dyno and concluding with a high-speed test drive through those famous oil derricks. In June of that year, Car Life tested CSX 2000, running an astonishing 4.2-second, 0–60 time. Road & Track accomplished the same and for its September issue, featured the car in the same shade of bright yellow paint applied by Dean Jefferies prior to the 1962 New York Auto Show, recording a top speed of 153 mph with a standing quarter mile of 13.8 seconds at 112 mph. Writers from Hot Rod and Cars, even an early ad in Playboy, all followed, but according to Wyss, who wrote Shelby’s Wildlife, only Car and Driver, in a 1970 road test, described the car exactly as Shelby intended: “The Cobra is a shockingly single-purpose car. No frills, no extra sound deadening, only the implements (tube frame, four-wheel disc brakes, fully independent suspension) required for rapid transit. The flat instrument panel has single white-on-black gauges – one to monitor every factor you might need to check, including oil temperature. The external body sheet metal extends right into the cockpit to form the top of the instrument panel and the windshield clamps down on the cowl, in traditional British sports car fashion, just inches in front of your nose.” In fact, CSX 2000 was also the only Cobra in existence for the first five months. The stakes were high. Should CSX 2000 have been written off due to a breakdown in testing or an accident by a careless journalist (or even at the hands of Carroll himself), the company would have suffered a monumental setback, one that it might not have recovered from. In the years that followed, CSX 2000 has remained an irreplaceable part of the Shelby organization. According to the aforementioned Motor Trend article, the car was first relegated to storage, likely un-driven, for about 10 years, and it was used by employees at the Carroll Shelby School of High Performance Driving. In the years that followed, it participated in a long list of events that supported the history of and were related to Shelby American and certainly the sports car hobby and industry as a whole. From the extensive celebrations at the Monterey Historics and Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2012, as well as the New York Auto Show the same year, to being named the most significant car of the past 50 years by Motor Trend in 1999, the list of accolades and honors is extraordinary. As the car sits today, it is breathtakingly original with the workmanship of Shelby American visible throughout. Speaking to Motor Trend, Carroll Shelby recounted years later, “. . . we strengthened the chassis tubes, we had to put different spindles and hub carriers on it, we had to put a different rear-end in it . . . there were very few nuts and bolts in that car that were the very same nuts and bolts as in an A.C. Ace.” As one analyzes the car, from front to back, it is also immediately clear that this is the only Cobra to be produced by Shelby with inboard rear disc brakes. It has the first set of hand-built and welded tubular headers, and the motor is cooled by an AC radiator. The trunk lid is longer than on production Cobras and in fact, the trunk itself is upholstered. Other telltale AC signs are the Ace bumpers, the Ace dashboard, and the hinges, which are flat, as compared to the rounder style. Also of note is the gas filler cap, which is the only one in this location, as well as the black foot boxes and the steel hand-made scatter shield over the bellhousing for the four-speed transmission. Finally, it is particularly fascinating to see the completely original upholstery and the chips in the paint, where one can see the multiple paintjobs used to promote the car during its early days. Ultimately, no degree of hyperbole could ever truly summarize CSX 2000’s monumental importance to the automotive industry. Had it never been built, had it accidentally been crashed by an employee or even a journalist, the impact on Shelby American would have been clear: 289 Cobras would not have gone on to dominance in the USRRC and SCCA Championships, nor on the international stage that was the FIA World Sportscar Championship, and specifically the 1965 24 Hours of Le Mans. Certainly there would never have been any 427 Cobras, or any of the tremendously successful GT350 and GT500 Mustangs that followed, including, of course, the cars that won the SCCA B-Production Championship. And what of General Motors? Would they have been motivated to build their Corvette Grand Sports had the Cobras not come onto the scene with such force? Lest we forget Carroll Shelby’s personal leadership in the Ford GT40’s win over Ferrari at Le Mans in 1966 and his involvement in 1967, then it is clear that, fundamentally, without CSX 2000, Mr. Shelby would not have become the only man to win Le Mans as a driver, constructor, and team manager. Shelby American aside, CSX 2000 is also the catalyst for such cars as the Dodge Viper that followed years later, and the GT350s, which, in and of themselves, generation after generation, represent the finest American performance cars, consistently beating out foreign competition, none of which would have been possible if Carroll Shelby had not installed a 260 V-8 into an A.C. roadster one fateful day in Southern California. It is RM Sotheby’s distinct honor, on a personal and professional level, to have been entrusted to offer CSX 2000 at auction. With 260 and 289 Cobras exceptionally and inherently valuable in and of themselves, how does one comfortably estimate CSX 2000’s offering at auction in Monterey? How would one treat the Mona Lisa being removed from the walls of the Louvre or the Declaration of Independence from within the National Archives? Simply put, this car is of such historic importance to an entire industry and generation that, with the entire world watching, collectors and aficionados will celebrate a man, a car, and his priceless legacy. Chassis no. CSX 2000

  • USAUSA
  • 2016-08-19
Hammer price
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1998 McLaren F1 'LM-Specification'

680 bhp, 6,064 cc DOHC 48-valve 60-degree aluminum V-12 engine, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with double wishbones, light alloy dampers, coaxial coil springs, and a front anti-roll bar, and four-wheel Brembo ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 107 in. The most iconic supercar of the modern era The 63rd and second-to-last road-specification F1 built One of two examples upgraded by McLaren Special Operations with an LM-spec engine, while retaining its road-specification interior with numerous upgrades, including satellite navigation Fitted with the additional Extra High Downforce Package The best of both worlds: a fully street-legal F1 with LM performance and modern upgrades for a fraction of an LM’s price The McLaren F1 is a car that needs no introduction, yet its significance to the history of the automobile in general warrants a brief overview. It was built and designed on a blank sheet of paper by a team led by Gordon Murray and Ron Dennis, who were looking to make zero compromises in the pursuit of automotive perfection. In doing so, they managed to write themselves into the annals of motoring history. On March 31, 1998, a McLaren F1 (chassis XP5) achieved a top speed of 240.14 mph at the Ehra-Lessien Proving Ground in Germany, setting a record for road going production cars that would stand for nearly seven years, smashing the previous record held by a Jaguar XJ220 by almost 30 mph. To this day, the McLaren F1 still holds the record as the fastest naturally aspirated production car. Even though it was purposely built to be the world’s finest road car, the F1’s performance was unrivaled on the track, and a McLaren F1 took 1st overall in the 1995 24 Hours of Le Mans. To those at McLaren, and in the opinion of many car enthusiasts worldwide, the F1 is the ultimate road car. Some would further argue that it is the greatest automobile ever built. CHASSIS NUMBER 073 The second-to-last “standard” F1 road car built, chassis number 073, was completed in 1998 and delivered that year to its first high-profile owner. According to information supplied in the owner’s manual (written in and signed by Gordon Murray himself), this car was designated as a European-delivery example that had been finished in AMG Green Velvet with a two-tone cream and green interior. The car was built over the summer of 1998, and it is noted as being delivered new on September 4, 1998. However, rather than being shipped out to its first owner, that owner specified for his car to be kept at McLaren’s facilities in Woking. Since the F1 was left in the custody of McLaren, all its requisite services and upgrades were performed by the factory during this time. A unique aspect of McLaren is that owners, current or original, of McLaren F1s have the opportunity to send their cars back to the factory to be upgraded to their desire. That department, now called McLaren Special Operations, was set up to service, upgrade, and personalize F1s for their discerning clients. Some cars that entered the MSO facilities received only minor cosmetic updates, while some received sweeping changes that left few stones unturned, in an effort to improve upon what is the finest road going automobile ever built by man. Chassis 073 is an example of the latter. THE ULTIMATE F1 In fulfilling McLaren Special Operations’ goal of making chassis 073 the finest and most desirable F1 on the planet, the car was fitted with the more powerful LM-specification engine. These engines were further optimized with parts derived from the GTR race cars to provide 680 horsepower at 7,800 rpm, which was accomplished by increasing the compression ratio, changing the cams, using different pistons, and swapping airflow meters for air pressure sensors. Chassis number 073 was also updated with larger radiators, to provide additional cooling, and a sports exhaust. It is one of only two road going F1s to be fitted with an LM engine. McLaren also installed the Extra High Downforce Package, which includes a revised nose with additional front wing vents and a more aggressive rear wing over the traditional High Downforce Package. It was also fitted with a 4-millimeter Gurney flap, to further aid the car’s high-speed stability. As the original headlights were a noted weak point on F1s, gas discharge headlights were fitted for improved visibility. A custom set of 18-inch multi-spoke wheels were fitted as well. Finally, the car was refinished in a brilliant orange metallic, which is a hue seldom seen on F1s and perfectly suits its stunning design. The updates did not stop there. Inside, the car has been fitted with a number of modern amenities. The interior was updated to GT specifications and retrimmed in magnolia leather and alcantara, with beige alcantara inserts in the seats. Numerous other modern improvements were made, including upgrading the air-conditioning system and stereo and installing a Phillips satellite navigation system, as well as a helicopter-grade car-to-car radio and intercom system. The intercom allows passengers to speak to each other with ease, even while accelerating north of 7,000 rpm. McLaren fitted the car with a larger 14-inch steering wheel, an LM-style handbrake, an LM-style instrument cluster with a shift light, and tinted side windows, and they also etched “073” into the tachometer. The final touch was by Gordon Murray: he signed the car just ahead of the ignition switch on the transmission tunnel. The sum of these upgrades produced a car which is lauded by many as the finest driving F1 in existence, as it is a perfect mix of the best aspects of both the original road car and the radical LM. Only five LMs were sold to the public (with an additional prototype being retained by McLaren), and while these cars are considered the very best, they rarely come available for sale and are often traded for nearly twice the value of a road-specification F1. Chassis 073 offers all that the F1 LMs offer, but in a package that can be comfortably enjoyed on the open road. The car was sold by its first owner in 2003 to a collector in Florida, and it has remained in the Sunshine State ever since. Since leaving the custody of its original owner, the car has only accumulated an additional 700 kilometers, meaning that the engine has covered just under 6,000 kilometers during its time with chassis number 073. It has only been serviced by McLaren, to ensure that it is appropriately maintained and ready to drive and enjoy at a moment’s notice. Please consult an RM representative to review the extensive receipts on file from 2013, which total over $80,000 and include such notable items as the replacement of a clutch and fuel cell. Accompanying chassis number 073 is its original exhaust, a correct original gold-plated titanium Facom tool roll, a Facom mechanic’s roll-around tool chest with a torque wrench, luggage, and its original owner’s and service manuals. It was also fitted with new tires. THE BEST OF THE GREATEST Few people ever get to see an F1 in person, and even fewer have ever had a chance to inspect one up close, let alone slide past the butterfly doors and into its three-seater cabin. Perhaps two or three hundred people have ever had the privilege of driving one, and fewer still have ever realized the dream of owning a McLaren F1. Today, RM Sotheby’s offers a rare and singular opportunity for a new caretaker to purchase chassis number 073, a U.S.-legal example. The successful bidder will sit behind the wheel of a car that combines the comforts of the original F1 with the performance of the radical LMs and the best of modern conveniences—all as set up by the talented artisans of the McLaren Special Operations team. Within the realm of the McLaren F1, a special car in its own right, chassis 073 is even more special, as it offers luxury options that are absent from the LM and performance above that of the road-specification F1s. Moreover, it is one of only two examples, making it rarer than a typical LM, and it is a car whose three-seat configuration may never be repeated within the advent of modern safety regulations. Here, in the ultimate version of the greatest automobile ever built, its new owner will become the next member of a close-knit and exclusive fraternity of enthusiasts, each of whom is dedicated to serving as the custodian of a McLaren F1 and enjoying it at speed. To call this car the "modern 250 GTO" is no exaggeration, nor is the exclusivity of joining this rarified club. Addendum Please note that due to California emissions this vehicle will need to be purchased by a dealer or out-of-state resident. McLaren Automotive has generously offered the next owner of this F1, along with a guest, a day to spend at their facilities in Woking, Surrey, UK. This invitation includes a tour of the McLaren Technology Centre and McLaren Production Centre, followed by lunch at their VIP dining room. Guests will also be invited to visit the McLaren Special Operations facility to see the heritage McLarens being restored, upgraded, and serviced alongside the latest models, as they arrive straight off the production line and are having bespoke modifications carried out. The tour also includes visiting the McLaren GT workshops to view the latest GT3 and GT Sprint vehicles being built and serviced. This invitation is in addition to any accompaniments made available in the catalogue description. Chassis no. SA9AB5AC4W1048073

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1956 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione 'Tour de France' by Scaglietti

260 bhp, 2,953 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 38 DC3 carburetors, four-speed all-synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and parallel trailing arms, and four-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102.4 in. Placed 1st overall at the 1956 Tour de France Auto The actual car that instituted the “Tour de France/TdF” nomenclature Raced and owned by the legendary Marquis Alfonso de Portago The fifth of only seven Scaglietti-bodied first-series competition berlinettas Awarded First in Class at Pebble Beach and Meadow Brook and the Prix Blancpain Award at the Louis Vuitton Concours d’Elegance Cavallino Classic Platinum award winner A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire one of the most historically significant competition Ferraris of all time THE 250 GT BERLINETTA If there was to be one positive outcome of the horrific accident at the 1955 24 Hours of Le Mans, it was the FIA’s return to emphasizing dual-use grand touring cars. This stimulated a new chapter in the design and build of road going competition sports cars from manufacturers across Europe. During the 1955 season, Ferrari disproportionately focused on its grand prix program, and Armando Zampiero took advantage by winning the Italian Sports Car Championship in his Mercedes-Benz 300 SL. Keen to return the title to an Italian manufacturer, Ferrari commissioned Scaglietti to build a new series of competition berlinettas centered on the 2,600-millimeter-wheelbase 250 GT chassis, which already qualified for the FIA’s new GT-class formula. Based on a short progression of Pinin Farina show cars that were fashioned after the 250 and 375 MM designs, the new Scaglietti coachwork featured a truncated fastback rear end with a large glass section, a long front deck with curvaceous fenders, frontally placed headlamps, and a large egg-crate grille. Beginning with chassis number 0503GT, Scaglietti built just nine cars in this first style before subtle redesigns saw an increasing number of louvers in the rear sail panels. Zagato built coachwork for an additional five examples of the initial series, bringing the total number built to 14. The first few berlinetta examples faired reasonably well in various European hill climbs and sprints over the summer of 1956, but the new road going competition model experienced its greatest success at the Tour de France Auto in September, a six-day rally of hill climbs, drag races, and circuit competitions. Piloted by a flamboyant and daring Spanish marquis, the new berlinetta was to become synonymous with the French race itself. THE MARQUIS DE PORTAGO Few figures in racing history, which is given to be awash in extraordinary men of great accomplishment, could match the Marquis’ lust for life, his mercurial success in racing, or his tragic demise. Alfonso de Portago was officially named Alfonso Cabeza de Vaca y Leighton, Carvajal y Are, 13th Conde de la Mejorada, 12th Marquis de Portago; he was born in October 1928 to a long line of Spanish nobility that included famous New World exploration figure Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, a onetime governor of Rio de la Plata. Portago’s grandfather was the governor of Madrid, and he was named for his godfather, Alfonso XIII, the last king of Spain. Portago’s father, Antonio Cabeza de Vaca, led a larger-than-life existence as an accomplished gambler and polo player who starred in his own movies and once took boxing lessons from the controversial heavyweight champion Jack Johnson. Cabeza de Vaca’s example would seemingly play a huge role in the young Marquis’ casual disregard for danger, which was perhaps emphasized by his father’s early death from a heart attack during a polo match. Following the elder Marquis’ passing, his widow (an Irish beauty who had inherited a vast American estate from her first husband) moved the young Alfonso to America for schooling. After being expelled from The Lawrenceville School, it was clear that the Marquis did not take to such formality, and his mother was soon forced to relocate him to her residence within the Plaza Hotel in New York, where he befriended an elevator boy named Edmund Nelson. The two boys would become friends for life, eventually experiencing great racing thrills together before their ultimate bonding experience in death. Alfonso de Portago, known to friends as Fon, grew to be an athletic young man, excelling in swimming, jai alai, and polo. His equestrian skills were impressive, and he was one of the world’s leading steeplechasers in 1951 and 1952, despite sometimes being thrown from his horse. Portago seemed to routinely challenge himself to ever-more difficult feats, such as his bobsledding stint, where he learned the sport’s nuances in roughly two weeks in order to lead the Spanish national team at the 1956 Olympics. He was also an accomplished pilot, once flying beneath a bridge to win a bet. Despite the hours required for all of these pursuits, Portago always found the time to chase beautiful women, marrying New York socialite Carroll McDaniel in 1948, at the age of 20. Though the couple had two children, the Marquis could never resist the lure of the feminine chase, and he was known to be a regular philanderer. His courtships of Revlon spokesmodel Dorian Leigh (said to be a partial inspiration for Truman Capote’s Holly Golightly character from Breakfast at Tiffany’s) and actress Linda Christian (an early Bond girl on a television version of Casino Royale) were his most high-profile affairs. In a telling interview with automotive writer Ken Purdy, Portago once said, “The most important thing in our existence is a balanced sex life.” Meanwhile, the Marquis and his wife lived in Europe for most of their relationship, and he began experimenting with midget car track racing in Paris during 1953. In October 1953, while attending the Paris Salon, Portago had a chance meeting that would change his life, forming a quick bond with Scuderia Ferrari driver Luigi Chinetti. The famed North American Ferrari importer invited Fon to be his co-driver at the Carrera Panamericana, which was to be held two weeks later, and the Spaniard couldn’t resist the opportunity, holding on for dear life in Chinetti’s 375 MM as a passenger for the entire race. With his eyes opened to the art of racing, exercised at its finest by Chinetti, Portago was bitten by the racing bug and soon bought his own 4.5-liter Ferrari. Starting to compete in earnest in 1954, Portago passionately threw himself into each and every contest, as he did with everything he pursued in life. Not even yet knowing how to change gears at speed, the Marquis teamed with the well-known Harry Schell in a Ferrari 250 MM at the 1,000 KM of Buenos Aires in January 1954, finishing 2nd overall. After a DNF at Sebring in 1954, Portago sold the Ferrari in favor of a Maserati A6GS and began to learn the subtleties of the various circuits and needs of his cars. He was leading the first leg of the 1954 Carrera Panamericana when his Ferrari 750 Monza broke down. In November 1955, Portago placed 2nd at the Venezuelan Grand Prix in the Ferrari Monza, finishing behind only Juan Manuel Fangio’s Maserati 300S. Fangio would later say of Fon, “I considered him one of the most courageous of all the racing drivers…a good driver and an excellent comrade.” In December, the Marquis’ efforts saw real dividends, with three victories at the Bahamas Speed Week in his Monza. Portago was recruited in early 1956, on the basis of his growing success and prestige as a Ferrari customer, to serve as an official member of Scuderia Ferrari, racing Ferrari/Lancia D50 examples in F2 races over the next two years, as well as various sports cars. He continued to campaign an assortment of four-cylinder Ferraris (857 S, 860 Monza, 500 TR, and 625 LM) and started racing one of Maranello’s new 250 GT racing berlinettas, chassis number 0557GT (the feature lot), in October 1956, winning the Tour de France Auto and Coupes du Salon, as well as the Coupes du USA in April 1957. His victory at the 1956 Tour de France was the first of four consecutive victories for the mighty 250 GT Berlinetta model at the French race, a foundation of its legend and TdF namesake. By spring 1957, Portago was widely considered to be one of the ten best drivers in the world, a phenomenal accomplishment considering that he had never driven a real race car prior to 1954. His outsized personality played well in the media, where he was endlessly quotable, and he was even occasionally provoked into fistfights. In a highly publicized interview with Sports Illustrated magazine, Portago said, “Racing is a vice and as such extremely hard to give up.” Many writers and racing peers were convinced the Marquis had a death wish, as he frequently drove his cars to extremes, very aggressively, and with little regard for long-term consequences. All of these factors ominously bore down upon the Marquis at the Mille Miglia in May 1957, where his own temerity finally became his undoing. Portago already detested the notoriously dangerous Italian road race, once saying, “It’s a terrible thing, the Mille Miglia.” But matters were made even worse when the last-minute substitution of an ill Scuderia driver forced Portago to take the wheel of a model he already disliked, Ferrari’s 335 Sport. With long-time compatriot and frequent co-driver Edmund Nelson as his navigator, Portago set off with reckless abandon, unable to stifle his competitive instinct despite his misgivings about the car and the course. For several legs, Portago managed the 335 S quite admirably, but in typical style, he refused to listen to the admonition of pit crews who noticed one of the rear tires rubbing away from contact with the fender. The Marquis ironically refused to waste time with a tire change. A famous photograph was taken of Fon kissing Linda Christian during a late pit stop out of Florence; she had flown out to meet him. Minutes later, just 30 miles from the finish line, after clearing a curve outside of Mantua, the worn rear tire blew out while the car was doing close to 150 mph. The rear axle failed and sent the 335 into the air, through a concrete mile marker and a telephone pole, before it careened and rolled through two ditches. Nine spectators were killed in the accident, and both Portago and Nelson were killed almost instantly. The tragedy of the accident extended beyond the death of the young Marquis at just 28 years old, though. It signaled the death of the Mille Miglia itself, as the race’s organizers, finally bowing to growing pressure to banish the deadly event once and for all, canceled the legendary contest. In doing so, they ended a golden era in European sports car road racing. CHASSIS NUMBER 0557GT This long-wheelbase 250 GT may be the most important Tour de France example. As winner of the 1956 Tour de France Auto, it is the primary namesake of the TdF moniker. Chassis number 0557GT is the ninth example of fourteen first-series cars and the seventh of only nine to be clothed in Scaglietti’s louver-less coachwork. Originally sold to the Marquis Alfonso de Portago on April 23, 1956, the car took some months to prepare, with original build sheets showing the specification of the rear axle on August 28 and the Tipo 128B engine on September 10. Registered with Italian tags reading BO 69211 and decorated with #73, the ravishing Berlinetta was entered by the Marquis in the Tour de France Auto on September 17, where he was joined by Ed Nelson. The 1956 TdF was routed at 3,600 miles and included two hill climbs, one drag race, and six races at various circuits, including Le Mans, Comminges, Rheims, and Montlhéry. Portago and Nelson managed to win five of the six circuits, taking 1st overall in the Tour and beating both Stirling Moss’s Mercedes-Benz 300 SL and future three-time Tour winner Olivier Gendebien’s Ferrari 250 Europa GT. On October 7, the Marquis drove the Berlinetta to a 1st overall finish at the Coupes du Salon at Montlhéry, while two weeks later the car achieved a 1st in class finish at the Rome Grand Prix. Portago’s final triumph in this car came the following year at the Coupes USA on April 7, where he once again took 1st overall. Sadly, this would be the car’s final outing with the Marquis at the wheel, as his tragic death in the 335 S would occur a month later at the Mille Miglia. Following Fon’s passing, chassis number 0557GT was returned to the Maranello factory and was offered by the Portago family to Alfonso’s friend, C. Keith W. Schellenberg, of Richmond, Yorkshire, England, a Lichtenstein-descended shipping magnate. Schellenberg kept 0557GT for over two decades, and the car was seen little before being offered for sale in 1983. Chassis number 0557GT was then purchased by the esteemed Peter G. Palumbo, of England, who sold the car in 1992 to Lorenzo Zambrano, the late and equally esteemed Ferrari collector who resided in Monterrey, Mexico. During his ownership, the car received a ground-up restoration by highly respected Ferrari restorer Bob Smith Coachworks, of Gainesville, Texas. Shortly after the restoration, a leather-bound book documenting the car’s history and restoration process was produced to showcase its amazing story and restoration, and this book still accompanies the car. Often seen during Zambrano’s ownership with California dealer plates reading 31333, the 250 GT was exhibited frequently over the following 12 years, starting with a First in Class win at the International Ferrari Concours d’Elegance at Monterey, California, in August 1994. A few days later, the car was displayed at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, again taking home a First in Class award. Presented as a non-judged entry at the Cavallino Classic in February 1996, the Berlinetta then won the Prix Blancpain Award at the prestigious Louis Vuitton Parc de Bagatelle Concours d’Elegance in Paris in September. Shown at Rétromobile the following February, the car then returned to the United States and was exhibited at the Meadow Brook Concours d’Elegance in August 1997, where it garnered a Blue Ribbon award. Presented again at Pebble Beach in August 2004, the Berlinetta won a Third in Class award and then took a Platinum award at the FCA’s International Concours a few days later. Following Mr. Zambrano’s passing in May 2014, this exquisite and historically important 250 GT was domiciled within his estate and is now offered for the first time in 23 years. The car remains in excellent condition following a recent service and has clearly been very well maintained after its restoration by Bob Smith Coachworks. As the first 250 GT Berlinetta to win the Tour de France and the fifth of only seven Scaglietti-bodied first-series competition berlinettas, 0557GT is without exaggeration one of the most significant Ferrari competition sports cars to ever be offered publically. It holds a highly significant place in Ferrari history and stands head and shoulders above the rest of TdF production as the most important example of the model. Also claiming the unique original ownership of the fascinating Marquis Alfonso de Portago, one of racing’s most flamboyant fallen stars, this sensational TdF is accompanied by copies of its original build sheets and period photographs, affirming its fantastic history. Undoubtedly the most important of all the 250 GT Tour de France examples, this influential long-wheelbase Berlinetta should attract the interest of top-tier Ferrari collectors and connoisseurs worldwide, as it would comfortably join the most significant collections of Maranello’s finest. This very TdF gave the model its iconic nickname with its stunning victory at that race in 1956, and as such, it is not only a valuable piece of Ferrari lore but also a hugely significant and successful competition vehicle. This represents the first time chassis 0557GT has been offered for sale in over two decades, and it is very likely an opportunity that will never present itself again. Make no mistake, this is a singular opportunity to purchase an important piece of Ferrari history. Chassis no. 0557GT Engine no. 0557GT

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1953 Jaguar C-Type Works Lightweight

220 bhp, 3,442 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with three Weber carburetors, four-speed fully synchronized manual transmission, independent front suspension with upper and lower wishbones, torsion bars, and hydraulic dampers, live rear axle with trailing arms, ‘double-action’ torsion bar, and torque reaction member with hydraulic dampers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96 in. Finished 4th overall at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1953 The second of only three Works Lightweights One of the final C-Types built; the rarest of the racing Jaguars Campaigned to multiple wins by Ecurie Ecosse in 1954 Driven by the who’s who of Jaguar racing fame Expertly restored to 1953 Le Mans specifications Extremely well documented; available for the first time in 15 years A truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire one of the most important Jaguars ever THE C-TYPE AND LE MANS Few sports-racing cars have achieved such legendary status as the Jaguar C-Type, which won the 24 Hours of Le Mans twice for Coventry during the company’s domination of the event in the 1950s. The C-Type began life as the famed XK120 roadster, which had taken the world by storm in 1948 with its revolutionary dual overhead-cam engine. Several privateering customers entered factory-supported XK120 examples at the 1950 Le Mans race, and Leslie Johnson’s car was remarkably competitive, spending considerable time in 4th place. After watching the event, Jaguar founder Sir William Lyons and engineer Bill Heynes were convinced that a lighter, more aerodynamic body with modified XK120 mechanics had a strong chance of winning the race. Development work soon commenced, starting with a new lightweight tubular space frame, one of the very first uses of the technique in sports car construction. The XK120’s rear suspension was redesigned with additional positioning links, and the 3.4-liter XK engine received a new cylinder head, high-lift camshafts, racing pistons, and an un-muffled dual exhaust system, raising the motor’s output to 200 horsepower. Most noticeable, however, was the new car’s exquisite coachwork: a fluid aerodynamic conjunction of curves and bulges penned by Jaguar stylist Malcolm Sayer. The first three cars were hand-built in only six weeks and were the first purpose-built race cars for Jaguar. That purpose was to win Le Mans, which they did twice. Initially known as the XK120C (C for competition), the C-Type debuted at Le Mans in 1951 with a team of factory-sponsored cars. While two of the three entries were forced to retire early with oil line issues, the car driven by Peter Walker and Peter Whitehead took the overall victory—the first British car to win Le Mans in nearly 20 years. Jaguar not only won Le Mans, but they did so handily, finishing 77 miles ahead of the 2nd place finisher and setting the following records: fastest lap speed of 105.232 mph, 24-hour speed record of 93.495 mph, and greatest distance traveled in 24 hours at 2,243.886 miles. The triumph spurred considerable customer interest, of course, and the new racing model was put into limited production, with 50 cars built by early 1953. The factory’s 1952 Le Mans campaign was less successful, with all three Works cars retiring early due to cooling system issues. Considering the domination of Mercedes-Benz’ 300 SL, Coventry’s engineers realized that the C-Type required a few upgrades to remain competitive for 1953, and a final run of three cars began development. XKC 052: ON THE TRACK Chassis XKC 052 is the second of those three lightweight Works examples that were prepared specifically for the 1953 running of Le Mans. These cars constituted the final examples of the mighty C-Type (a last development car wore a D-Type-style body) and featured a number of upgrades over the prior examples. Improvements included new thin-gauge aluminum coachwork, more powerful Weber carburetors, a fully synchronized gearbox and triple-plate clutch, an additional upper link to the rear axle, and a rubber aircraft fuel bladder, amongst other lighter, weight-saving components. Most importantly, the three cars were the only lightweight C-Types built by the factory and were the first disc-brake-equipped entrants to ever run Le Mans, being the only cars so outfitted among the 1953 field. This distinction proved to be quite significant in the race’s outcome. On February 12, 1953, chassis number XKC 052 was tested by Norman Dewis in preparation for the upcoming race. Wearing #19, the C-Type was entered with its two sister cars (XKC 051 and XKC 053) during the Le Mans weekend of June 13, 1953, piloted by Peter Whitehead and Ian Stewart. As the sun set on the first day of competition, Jaguar, Ferrari, and Alfa Romeo appeared to be the teams to beat. The Jaguar drivers soldiered on through the night, certainly battered but not to be defeated. With the rigors of endurance racing taking their toll, only one of the three Ferraris remained by daybreak, while all three Alfas retired early. The C-Types, essentially unmatchable through the curves with their low weight and disc brakes, continued to set the race-leading pace, with 051 and 053 in 1st and 2nd place, respectively, and 052 only a few laps behind in 4th. The Jaguars continued to run strong, fighting through the fatigue and exhaustion, and by the 24th hour, this order remained, with Briggs Cunningham’s C5-R preserving 3rd place to stave off a 1-2-3 sweep by the Coventry team. With Ian Stewart concluding driving duties at the end of the grueling 24 hours, XKC 052 completed 297 laps with an average speed of almost 167 km/h. Following this smashing success, XKC 052 continued its factory competition campaign, with appearances at Silverstone and Goodwood, but mechanical issues resulted in two DNFs. By the end of the 1953 season, Coventry was beginning development of its next sports-racing model (soon to be known as the D-Type) for the following year’s Le Mans, as the company was far more interested in competing at Sarthe than other venues or series. Consequently, in November 1953, chassis number 052 was prepared for private sale with a rebuild to Le Mans specifications and was sold to the famed Ecurie Ecosse. On December 12, 1953, the Scotland-based scuderia registered the Jaguar with tags reading LFS 672. Painted the Ecurie’s signature color of Flag Metallic Blue, XKC 052 was mostly driven by Jimmy Stewart, older brother of famed Jackie, through May 1954, finishing 1st three times at Goodwood and once at National Ibsley. In early June, future Le Mans winner Roy Salvadori took over for Stewart, winning two events at Snetterton on June 5 before Stewart returned to finish 1st at Goodwood two days later. Ninian Sanderson then became the car’s principal driver for the next month, taking 2nd place at National Oulton Park on June 12 and at the National Charterhall race on July 11. Salvadori claimed another checkered flag at National Charterhall on September 4, following it up with a 2nd place finish at the Penya-Rhin Grand Prix on October 10. In total, XKC 052 netted Ecurie Ecosse eight victories during 1954, with four 2nd place finishes, four 3rd place finishes, and three 4th place finishes, which is a remarkable overall record for a single season. In the October 22, 1954, issue of Autosport magazine, the Ecurie Ecosse advertised all three of its 1954 team cars for sale, and XKC 052 was soon thereafter purchased by well-known privateer Peter Blond. Repainting the C-Type green, Mr. Blond used the car for club racing throughout 1956, finishing 2nd at Goodwood in March 1955 and 5th at the Spa Grand Prix in May, with Hans Davids at the wheel. Three 4th place finishes at the Goodwood International, BARC Goodwood, and the Crystal Palace International rounded out the 1955 season. The following March, Mr. Blond improved upon his BARC performance with a 3rd place finish at the Goodwood event. By mid-April 1956, XKC 052 passed to Maurice Charles, who continued the car’s racing endeavors with appearances at Goodwood and the Aintree 100 and a 5th place finish at Brands Hatch on August 6. Mr. Charles offered the car for sale in October, and it was soon after purchased by Jim Robinson, of Northampton, who ran the car twice at the Evesham sprints, finishing as high as 2nd in class. The owner advertised the car twice in Autosport during 1957, eventually selling the C-Type to Alan Ensoll later that year. Mr. Ensoll somewhat renewed the car’s competition relevance with some stronger driving in various hill climbs and sprints, taking 3rd place at Charterhall in May 1958 and 1st in class at Barbon Hill and Yorkshire. Second place finishes were achieved at Charterhall and Catterick Camp, with an all-out victory earned at the Castlewick Hill Climb in June. In September 1958, Mr. Ensoll sold the Jaguar to Tom Candlish, and it remained competitive with a 4th place result at Charterhall and 1st overall finishes at the Rest-and-Be-Thankful Hill Climb Championship and the unlimited GT race at Charterhall in July 1959. During an outing around this time, XKC 052 was involved in a moderate accident, and in late 1959, the important race car was sold to Ian Denney, who completely restored it, including a new lightweight body. After passing in 1969 to Brian Classic, the car was acquired in 1970 by Paul Grist, who cosmetically returned it to its former Ecurie Ecosse livery. XKC 052: ON THE ROAD In 1971, the C-Type found a more permanent home when it was purchased by the esteemed Martin Morris, one of Britain’s more astute collectors of the period. The car remained in the Morris family’s purview for over 30 years, finally reaching the status of rare collectible. In one of the C-Type’s final period outings, Stephen Curtis ran it at the Le Mans 50th Anniversary event on June 9, 1973, finishing a commendable 11th place. In 1986, Mr. Morris commissioned a comprehensive two-year restoration of XKC 052 that was publicly enjoyed a few years later with the car’s participation in the Jaguar factory's Cavalcades to Le Mans in 1991 and 1993. In 2000, Morris’s son assumed control of the C-Type’s care, and he soon sold the car into American ownership for the first time in its existence. XKC 052 was purchased then by the consignor, one of the world’s foremost collectors of important vintage sports cars and a regular exhibitor at premium concours d’elegance, including Pebble Beach. The consignor’s first order of business was a proper renewal to 1953 Le Mans specifications, which he entrusted to John Pearson, of the United Kingdom. The C-Type was completely mechanically refreshed and mounted with new, completely accurate, lightweight thin-gauge aluminum coachwork built by RS Panels to the factory-correct thickness. This is typical of these types of race cars, as they saw a great number of years of competition; the lightweight aluminum bodies were never intended to outlast their racing careers. The body was finished in the Ecurie Ecosse livery, with a fresh coat of the famous blue paint and decorated with #19 roundels. The 1959 replacement body has been retained for the car’s overall historical record and completeness. Following the completion of Mr. Pearson’s exacting work, the consignor began to enjoy the Jaguar on various rallies and tours, starting with the factory's C-Type Cavalcade to Le Mans in June 2001. XKC 052 was also featured on the cover of the December 2001 issue of Classic Jaguar World magazine. In August 2002, the car was exhibited at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as a display-only, non-judged entry; while in April 2005, it participated in the California Mille. Four months later, the C-Type drove the prestigious Quail Rally, staged in conjunction with the Quail Motorsports Gathering in Carmel Valley, California. Furthermore, XKC 052 is eligible for just about any of the most prestigious and exciting events the world over. Enjoying climate-controlled storage and regular maintenance and attention as needed ever since, XKC 052 has benefited from a pampered life over the last 15 years and still displays the beautiful quality of Mr. Pearson’s restoration. Now publicly available for the first time in many years, this historically significant C-Type is one of those rare sports-racing cars that truly embodies a crowning acquisition. It is a very significant component of Jaguar’s storied racing history and remains one of the rarest and most significant race cars of that period, let alone one of the most timelessly beautiful sports cars ever designed. The apogee of the C-Type’s technical development, this highly desirable Works Lightweight would make a spectacular addition to the most pedigreed collections, being enjoyed for its brisk performance in vintage rallies throughout the world. XKC 052 also promises acclaim at the world’s finest concours, offering future ownership a singular and impressive landmark in the Coventry legend. Chassis no. XKC 052 Engine no. E 1055-9

  • USAUSA
  • 2015-08-13
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1954 Jaguar D-Type Works

After winning Le Mans twice in three years with the C-Type, Jaguar realized that 1954’s contest would require a freshly designed model. The result was the legendary D-Type, one of the first cars to feature monocoque construction and all-wheel disc brakes, which would go on to win Le Mans three consecutive years between 1955 and 1957. OKV 2 – THE LEGENDARY WORKS D-TYPE Chassis no. XKD 403 was the lead car of the three Works entries prepared for Le Mans in 1954. It officially completed construction on 3 June, fitted with engine no. E 2003-9 and finished in traditional British Racing Green. The D-Type was registered for road use as OKV 2 and was entrusted to principal Jaguar drivers Stirling Moss and Peter Walker (the same team that placed 2nd at Le Mans the previous year). Designated as #12, XKD 403 was the fastest car in practice, heightening expectations that Coventry would triumph over Maranello once again. Unfortunately, at Le Mans all three team cars experienced an engine misfire issue that was traced to contaminated fuel (oddly, Jaguar was the only team provided with polluted fuel). Regardless, Moss managed to take the lead during the earlier hours, also setting the fastest time with 172.97 mph on the Mulsanne Straight. However, around the twelfth hour after 92 laps, at the end of another high-speed run down the straight, the D-Type’s brakes began to fail and Moss deftly swung into the safety road to the pits, where the car retired. A few weeks later at the 12 Hours of Reims, with Moss and Walker driving, OKV 2 did not finish once more. At the Tourist Trophy at Dunrod in September the D-Type was fitted with a 2.5-liter engine, no. E 2005-9, and Peter Whitehead and Ken Wharton finished 5th. Following the season’s conclusion, XKD 403 underwent use as the factory’s development car for the 1955 Le Mans and played a key role in Jaguar’s success over the next several years. OKV 2 was designated as the Workhorse for test driver Norman Dewis, now with a 3.4-liter engine, no. E 2004-9. Notes of his test work, as well as later correspondence, are noted in the car’s extensive file, including his assertion that “this car is one of the best examples of the works ‘D’ types.” For 1955, Coventry undertook some modifications to the D-Type, using longer noses and a revised engine to win Le Mans outright. XKD 403 continued as a factory car in several contests, finishing 3rd at Silverstone in May with team driver Tony Rolt at the wheel. Dewis drove the car at the Brighton Speed Trials after which it was utilized as the factory’s test car for Le Mans drivers that year. At the testing, OKV 2 was driven by illustrious competitors such as Mike Hawthorn, Jimmy Stewart, and Ninian Sanderson, amongst others. In May 1955, the D-Type was sold to Jack Broadhead with the intention of competition use by driver Bob Berry, who was also Jaguar’s public relations manager. Berry drove the car in several British events during the season, finishing 2nd at Goodwood thrice, 2nd at Oulton Park, and 3rd at Aintree. En route to the Portuguese Grand Prix in late June, the transporter broke down. The tools and spares were loaded in OKV 2 and it was driven 980 miles to the race. Incredibly, the D-Type finished 5th and was then driven the 980 miles back. After several more entries by Berry, OKV 2 was returned to the factory for maintenance, and the engine, gearbox, and rear axle were rebuilt. An accident at the season-ending Tourist Trophy necessitated some chassis and bodywork, and the opportunity was taken to fit a stiffer front anti-roll bar and a new rear anti-roll bar assembly. Berry continued to race the D-Type during 1956, finishing 1st at both Oulton Park and the Goodwood Whitsun Meeting in May where Bob qualified on the pole and led from flag to flag, winning the race by 23 seconds. At the later event at Goodwood, Berry was involved in a bad accident. The car returned to Jaguar following the incident and in short order, was fully rebuilt at the factory, including a production D-Type tub with a steel front subframe. Factory notes indicate that XKD 403 was then “repaired by [experimental] after ’56 Goodwood shunt.” The car was back up and competing by September, with one win and finishing between 3rd and 6th place at a number of events. In March 1957 the factory fitted XKD 403 with a full-length windscreen and a passenger door, and later that month driver Peter Blond finished 2nd at Snetterton. Le Mans winner Ron Flockhart roared to 1st place at the British Empire Trophy Race in early April, while Berry enjoyed several 2nd-place finishes a month later, as well as an outright victory at Oulton Park in October. In early 1958, the factory replaced the engine, from E 2004-9 to E 2065-9, and fitted a new gearbox, and Reg Harris then placed 2nd at Silverstone in May. In August 1960, XKD 403 was sold to Gerry Crozier, and he continued to race the car in minor contests, finishing 2nd at the Essex Hill Climb in October. He sold the Jaguar a year later to David Jacox, a former pilot based in Calgary, Canada, who went on to manage several large aviation companies. Jacox offered the car for sale in 1962, as confirmed by a period advertisement in Road & Track magazine. Jim Baker, a mechanic for the Le Mans-winning Ecurie Ecosse teams and a friend of David Jacox, drove the D-Type to Toronto to arrange a sale to Jim Catto of Ontario. Catto employed a British mechanic named Alistair Smith, who prepared the car for further racing and entered it at Mosport Park in June 1963. During the race, Smith was tragically killed during an off-course low-speed incident as XKD 403 reportedly turned on its side on an embankment as he tried to exit the car. The owner garaged the Jaguar indefinitely, ultimately resulting in 17 years of storage. XKD 403 – RETURN TO THE TRACK In 1980 the Jaguar was removed from storage and sold to Godfrey Miller of Canada, and he arranged a sale to the renowned marque specialists at Lynx Engineering in England. Principle mechanic Chris Keith-Lucas, soon to be a recognized niche expert in his own right, restored the otherwise complete D-Type, and notes of his recollections of XKD 403 “as an amazingly un-spoilt “time-warp” car” are included in the car’s documentation. Following refurbishment, XKD 403 was sold to Jim Wallis of Sevenoaks, England, and he used the car at events on occasion while retaining possession for 14 years. In 1995 the D-Type was purchased by Robert Cooper of Gloucestershire, and he continued to sparingly use it, most significantly attending the Jaguar Factory Cavalcades to Le Mans in 1996 and 1997. In 1999, OKV 2 was sold to marque expert and historian Terry Larson of Mesa, Arizona, whose first drive in the car was racing it at Goodwood. Larson put over 20,000 miles on the car in numerous tours and races during his ownership. Jaguar’s chief development test engineer for 34 years, Norman Dewis also raced the car twice at the Monterey Historics. Terry assembled a vast trove of paperwork, including a number of original factory documents and letters. During 12 years of care, Larson used the D-Type at numerous tours and races, including the 2000 Copperstate Classic, the California Mille in 2000 and 2002, the Wine Country Classic in Sonoma in 2000 and 2003, as well as the Monterey Historic and Pre-Historic races on several occasions. The Jaguar also participated in the C-Type and D-Type Tours in Arizona no less than a dozen times. Perhaps the apogee of Larson’s ownership transpired in August 2010, when the D-Type was presented at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as part of the year’s Jaguar celebration. Purchased in 2011 by the consignor, OKV 2 has continued to enjoy use in events such as the 2013 Wine Country Classic and the 2015 Monterey Historic races. XKD 403 is one of five Works cars built in 1954 and is undoubtedly one of the most actively raced D-Types of them all, having campaigned in at least 55 races during the 1950s alone (including 24 podium finishes, of which five were overall victories). As the Workhorse for D-Type development, this car has been driven, in practice or competition, by 16 of the factory’s most legendary drivers and associated privateers, including Stirling Moss, Peter Walker, Mike Hawthorn, Duncan Hamilton, Jack Fairman, Peter Whitehead, Ken Wharton, Bob Berry, Jimmy Stewart, Desmond Titterington, Don Beauman, Peter Blond, Ivor Bueb, Norman Dewis, Ron Flockhart, and Ninian Sanderson – the who’s-who of Jaguar racing. Having been extensively raced by Jaguar and then retained by the Experimental department for further testing and development, XKD 403 is presented exceptionally authentic condition from when it left the factory in 1956. This remarkable D-Type is a veritable cornerstone of Jaguar’s competition history. OKV 2 benefits from a deep file of research, including factory documentation, the 1954 Le Mans entry forms, personal notes from Norman Dewis and Bob Berry, hundreds of period photographs, and FIA papers. Prospective bidders are encouraged to review the extensive documentation prior to the sale as well as to inspect the car onsite in Arizona. The car is also accompanied by a spare Works engine with correct RAC markings. As recounted by feature articles in magazines such as Jaguar Heritage, Classic Cars, and Jaguar World, this legendary racing D-Type has been fastidiously cared for and maintained by some of the most significant names in the Jaguar niche. The ex-Moss 1954 Le Mans D-Type would crown nearly any automobile collection, commanding the attention of Coventry enthusiasts and sports car aficionados worldwide.

  • USAUSA
  • 2018-01-19
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