Search for over 80 million sold items in our price database

L'Estaque vu à travers les arbres
Sold

About the item

Paul Cezanne (1839-1906)\nL'Estaque vu à travers les arbres\noil on canvas\n17 5/8 x 21 in. (44.7 x 53.4 cm.)\nPainted in July 1878-March 1879
US
NY, US
US

notes

A hamlet on the bay of Marseilles, l'Estaque lies five miles northwest of Marseilles itself and eighteen miles southwest of Aix-en-Provence. Cézanne's mother rented a cottage there for summer vacations, and the artist visited the village frequently, including extended stays in 1870, 1878-1879 and 1883. He was drawn there both by the town's proximity to his family in Aix and by the beauty of its views. At l'Estaque Cézanne fully explored the potential of en plein-air painting, executing some of his most celebrated landscapes.

Writing about Cézanne's views of the bay of Marseilles, Meyer Shapiro has commented:

A marvelous peace and strength emanate from [his] work--the true feeling of the Mediterranean, the joy of an ancient nature which man has known how to sustain through the simplicity of his own constructions (M. Shapiro, Paul Cezanne, New York, 1952, p. 62).

Cézanne painted the present picture between July 1878 and March 1879. It is one of three closely related views of l'Estaque that he made at this time; of the other two, one has a canopy of trees in the foreground (fig. 1) as seen in the present work, while the other is distinguished by the absence of the trees (Rewald, no. 392; Stiftung Langmatt Sydney and Jenny Brown, Baden-Baden). Although Cézanne depicted the same group of buildings in all three paintings, he varied the viewpoint slightly in each, as well as the details of the structures. In the present work, the building in the middle distance at the right appears longer than it does in the other two paintings, while the hut silhouetted against the water in the center is more narrow than in the other versions; moreover, Cézanne truncated the smokestack at the left, which appears much taller in the related pictures (the presence of the smokestack suggests that the building is a tile or brick factory, a common industry in l'Estaque.) The treatment of the foliage in the three paintings also differs: in the present work it is airer and less dense than in the Musée Picasso version (fig. 1). As John Rewald has commented about the present picture, "The upper part, where trees and water meet, is handled with particular freedom" (J. Rewald, op. cit., p. 264).

The composition of the present painting has a dynamic equilibrium. The placement of the trees is nearly symmetrical, and the narrow ledge of land at the bottom of the canvas is balanced by the light band of sky at the top. The land in the middle distance forms an irregular triangle that rises from the left to the right, and the trees at the right form a triangle that rises from the right to the left; the lines of the two triangles cross just slightly above and to the right of the center of the picture. Lionello Venturi, in reference to the Musée Picasso painting, praised "the perfect equilibrium of the composition: expression of beauty, strength, certitude" (L. Venturi, op. cit, p. 53).

To paint his landscapes at l'Estaque, Cézanne typically climbed the hills above the village and set up his easel on the edge of the pine woods there. This vantage, seen here, permitted both the privacy he sought when painting and the best views of the village and bay. The present work is also characteristic in its depiction of the land as a triangular wedge. In the two other views of the bay which Rewald has dated 1878-1879, Cézanne treated the incline of the hillside in the same fashion (fig. 2 and Rewald, no. 394; Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester).

In two letters written to Zola in the latter part of 1878, Cézanne mentioned his engagement with landscape painting:

I intend spending the whole time there if my father gives me the money. In this way I could continue some studies I am making at l'Estaque, which I do not propose leaving until the last possible moment (Letter of 27 August 1878; in J. Rewald, ed., Paul Cézanne, Letters, London, 1941, pp. 121-122).

There are some very beautiful views here. The difficulty is to reproduce them, it is not exactly my line. I began to perceive nature rather late; though this does not prevent it being full of interest for me (Letter of 19 December 1878; in ibid., p. 131).

The present painting may be one of the nature-studies Cézanne had in mind when writing to Zola. Indeed, of the seven l'Estaque pictures which Rewald has dated 1878-1879, three, including the present painting, depict this same view.

Earlier Cézanne had written to Zola in praise of en plein-air painting:

But you know all pictures painted inside, in the studio, will never be as good as the things done outside. When out-of-doors scenes are represented, the contrasts between the figures and the ground is astounding and the landscape is magnificent. I see some superb things and I shall have to make up my mind only to do things out-of-doors (Letter of 19 October 1866; in ibid., pp. 74-75).

Zola also knew l'Estaque well and wrote a beautiful description of it in his novel Naos Micoulin:

A market town situated at the farthest suburban reaches of Marseilles, at the end of a rocky cul-de-sac, which closes off the bay... The countryside is superb. From both sides of the bay rocky arms are outstretched so that the offshore islands seem to block the horizon and the sea is nothing but a vast pool, a lake, intensely blue in good weather. At the foot of the mountains, in the background, Marseilles staggering its houses on the low hills...And the coast takes leave of Marseilles, deepens and widens in great indentations before arriving at l'Estaque, bordered by the factories that release from time to time tall plumes of smoke... But the village, its back against the mountains, is traversed by roads that disappear in the midst of a chaos of jagged rocks...Nothing equals the wild majesty of these gorges hollowed out between the hills, narrow paths twisting at the bottom of an abyss, arid slopes covered with pines and with walls the color of rust and blood... Then again paths full of brambles, inpenetrable thickets, piles of stones, dried up streams, all the surprises of a walk through a desert. High up, above the black border of the pines is placed the endless band of blue silk of the sky...When this dried out country gets thoroughly wet, it takes on colors...of great violence: the red earth bleeds, the pines have an emerald reflection, the rocks are bright with the whiteness of fresh laundry (quoted in J. Rewald, Cézanne, A Biography, New York, 1986, p. 93).

When Renoir visited Cézanne in l'Estaque, he too was moved by the sublimity of the landscape, exclaiming:

How beautiful it is! It's certainly the most beautiful place in the world, and not yet inhabited...There are only some fishermen and the mountains...so there are no walls, no properties or few...here I have the true countryside at my doorstep (Quoted in J. House, Renoir, London, 1985, p. 233).

1878 was a difficult year for Cézanne. In the spring his father discovered that Cézanne had a mistress, Hortense Fiquet, and an illegitimate son; disapproving of the situation, he cut the painter's stipend in half to one hundred francs a month. To survive, Cézanne turned to Zola, who gave him an additional sixty francs a month. However, by the end of the year Cézanne and his father had reconciled, and the artist's work at l'Estaque resumed.

(fig. 1) Paul Cézanne, La mer à l'Estaque derrière les arbres, 1878-1879. Musée Picasso, Paris.

(fig. 2) Paul Cézanne, Le Golfe de Marseille vu de l'Estaque, 1878-1879. Musée d'Orsay, Paris.

title

L'Estaque vu à travers les arbres

medium

Oil on canvas

creator

Paul Cezanne

exhibited

Cologne, Sonderbund, Internationale Kunstausstellung, May-September 1912, p. 33, no. 147.

Buenos Aires, Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, La pintura francesa de David a nuestros días, July-August and October-November 1939, p. 37, no. 9.

New York, M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., Impressionist Treasures from Private Collections in New York, January 1966, p. 10, no. 2 (illustrated).

New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Summer Loan Exhibition, Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture from Private Collections, July-September 1966, no. 21.

New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Summer Loan Exhibition, Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture from Private Collections, July-September 1967, p. 2, no. 14.

The Hague, Gemeentemuseum (on extended loan).

dimensions

17 5/8 x 21 in. (44.7 x 53.4 cm.)

literature

K. Scheffler, "Die Jüngsten", Kunst und Künstler, 1913, p. 393 (illustrated).

G. Rivière, Le maître Paul Cézanne, Paris, 1923, p. 208.

J. Meier-Graefe, Cézanne, London, 1927, pl. CIII (illustrated).

L. Venturi, Cézanne, son art, son oeuvre, Paris, 1936, vol. I, p. 157, no. 427 (illustrated, vol. II, pl. 120).

"Impressionist Treasures", Arts, January 1966, p. 12 (illustrated).

S. Orienti, L'opera completa di Cézanne, Milan, 1970, p. 106, no. 423 (illustrated).

J.J. Rishel, "La mer à l'Estaque", Cézanne, exh. cat., Grand Palais, Paris, 1995-1996, p. 222 (illustrated, fig. 1).

J. Rewald, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: A Catalogue Raisonné, New York, 1996, vol. I, p. 264, no. 396 (illustrated, vol. II, pl. 124).

provenance

Ambroise Vollard, Paris.

Elsa Tischner-von Durant, Freising.

Galerien Thannhauser, Berlin.

Lotte Cassirer-Fürstenberg, Berlin.

Paul Cassirer, Amsterdam.

M. Knoedler & Co., Inc., New York.

Lore and Rudolf Heinemann, New York (by 1966); sale, Christie's, New

York, 14 May 1997, lot 6.

Acquired at the above sale by the present owner.


*Note: The price is not recalculated to the current value. It refers to the actual final price at the time the item was sold.

*Note: The price is not recalculated to the current value. It refers to the actual final price at the time the item was sold.


Advert
Advert

Sold items

ARBRES À COLLIOURE
Sold

ARBRES À COLLIOURE

Realized Price
23,640,375 USD

Nu couché vu de dos
Sold

Nu couché vu de dos

Realized Price
18,496,000 USD

Le Palais Ducal vu de Saint-Georges Majeur
Sold

Le Palais Ducal vu de Saint-Georges Majeur

Realized Price
16,479,952 USD

Les maisons dans les arbres
Sold

Les maisons dans les arbres

Realized Price
12,326,028 USD

Les grands arbres au Jas de Bouffan
Sold

Les grands arbres au Jas de Bouffan

Realized Price
11,776,000 USD

Arbres et maisons au bord de l'eau
Sold

Arbres et maisons au bord de l'eau

Realized Price
11,137,400 USD

Withdrawn

Paysage aux trois arbres

Realized Price
8,721,000 USD

Sold

Cabane sous les arbres

Realized Price
8,482,500 USD

Withdrawn

Les maisons dans les arbres

Realized Price
7,856,000 USD

Sold

L'Estaque

Realized Price
7,033,420 USD

Sold

Paysage à l'Estaque

Realized Price
6,848,000 USD