The image of the 1920s female golfer is perhaps one of the most culturally important for women in 20th century sports. In 1924, Edith Cummings became the first female athlete to appear on the cover of Time magazine, showing how major steps were being taken in this decade in terms of womankind's place in athletic history.

Time Magazine, Volume IV Issue 8, August 25, 1924 The cover shows the 1923 U.S. Women's Amateur Champion, Edith Cummings. Time Magazine, Volume IV Issue 8, August 25, 1924 The cover shows the 1923 U.S. Women's Amateur Champion, Edith Cummings.

In 1922, Cummings played an 18 year-old from Rhode Island - Glenna Collett, later Vare. Cummings lost to Collett on the final hole. Unbeknown to the sporting world, Collett would go on to be one of the greatest and most decorated female golfers of the 1920s.

1926 Glenna Collett Swing Photo 1926 Glenna Collett Swing Photo

From childhood, Collett's parents encouraged her to participate in sports, and from this their daughter would go on to be a pioneer in American women's golf, making it to the World Golf Hall of Fame.

After just two years of honing her golfing skills, Collett won her first-round match at the 1919 U.S. Women's Amateur tournament and just 3 years later, she beat golfing superstar Edith Cummings.

Two years on from her epic victory over Cummings, Collett beat all male and female records for the amount of wins in her sport as up until 1924, Collett had won 59 out of an incredible 60 matches.

Collet was one of the first Americans to play in the British amateur championships and was runner-up in 1929 and 1930.

Screen Shot 2017-03-30 at 17.11.53 original contestants' badge from the 1935 US Women's Amateur, which was won by the legendary Glenna Collett-Vare at Interlachen. This was Collett's record 6th US Women's Amateur victory. This badge comes from the personal collection of famed collector and golf historian Mark Emerson, and originates from the estate of Opal Hill.

Screen Shot 2017-03-30 at 17.12.48 original contestants' badge from the 1931 US Women's Amateur, which was won by the Helen Hicks over Glenna Collett-Vare at the Country Club of Buffalo. This badge comes from the personal collection of famed collector and golf historian Mark Emerson, and originates from the estate of Opal Hill. Open Hill was a member of the first three U.S. Curtis Cup teams.

With 49 championships under her belt, Collet hung up her clubs at the age of 56, with one final fitting victory at the 1959 Rhode Island Women's Golf Association tournament, the state where she had discovered her passion and unmatchable ability for golf.

"To make oneself a successful match player, there are certain qualities to be sought after, certain ideas must be kept in mind and certain phases of one's attitude towards the game that come in for special notice. The three I have taken are these: love of combat, serenity of mind and fearlessness."

After ending her career, Collett continued to be a dominant figure in golf and women's sports. She received the Bob Jones Award in 1956, the highest honor given in recognition of distinguished sportsmanship in golf. In 1975 she was inducted in to the Word Golf Hall of Fame. Even at the age of 81, Collett had a handicap of 15.

During her career in the 1920s and 1930s, Collett was recognized as one of the Big Four of women's golf along with Virginia Van Wie, Maureen Orcutt and Helen Hicks.

The items of memorabilia featured will be part of Green Jacket Auctions' Spring auction ending on April 8, 2017. Check out the full catalog here.

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