Our all-too-brief overview of TEFAF begins with this miniature (4 x 2 cm) Cycladic marble, circa 2700-2600 BC, from Charles Ede, whose gallery of ancient art has been a London fixture since 1971. Like most Cycladic idols associated with Spedos, this one is of a female form.

Since 1996, when it was established in Manhattan by its namesake, James Claude Taffin de Givenchy, TAFFIN has been a leading designer of one-of-a-kind, high-end jewelry. This brooch features a stunning spessarite cabochon surrounded by Burmese sapphires set in oxidized silver, blackened 18K white gold, and 18K rose gold.

This handsome black walnut sideboard (80 x 180 x 56 cm) from DeLorenzo Gallery was made circa 1960 for a client named “BELL,” as indicated by the client's name on the reverse. The sideboard features two sliding doors lined with pandanus cloth, and it stands on two sturdy plank feet.

It may be that Parisian artist Jacques Villeglé anticipated the graffiti-art movement of the 1970s and ’80s New York, better than anyone. This collage of ripped posters mounted on canvas (164 x 196.5 cm) from 1961 looks right at home in the city.

Meanwhile, in Southern California, painter Sam Francis was channeling the colors of his new coastal home and the south of France, as seen in this acrylic on paper (121.9 x 161.3 cm), circa 1961. Though the works in this series sprung from a battle with tuberculosis, which he won, there’s a buoyancy to them that has given them a timeless appeal.
If you’d like to attend TEFAF’s VIP Preview on Thursday, May 3 or the Opening Night Benefit for the Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering that evening, visit www.giving.mskcc.org/tefaf or call 212-639-7972.

Comment