Born in Rishon LeZion, which at the time was Mandate Palestine, in 1928, Agam studied at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem. In 1949, he moved to Zürich where he studied under Swiss expressionist Johannes Itten. During his studies, Agam was inspired by artist and designer Max Bill.

In 1951, Agam moved to Paris, where he has lived ever since. Two years after he moved to France, his first solo exhibition was held at Paris' Galerie Craven. By 1955, after taking part in the Le Mouvement exhibition at the Galerie Denise René, Agam joined the likes of Alexander Calder and Pol Bury as leaders in kinetic sculpture.

Image via Haaretz Image via Haaretz

A retrospective exhibition of Agam's work was held at Paris's Musée National d'Art Moderne in 1972, and at New York's Guggenheim Museum in 1980.

Agam is most famous around the globe for his public sculptures. His sculptures can be seen in Paris, Tel Aviv and New York.

In 2009, Agam made a sculpture for the Kaohsiung, Taiwan, World Games. Peaceful Communication with the World, was created using nine ten meter hexagon pillars to create diamond and square shapes. Each pillar was painted in an array of colors, with the idea behind this being, that as children grow, each time they see the sculpture the colors and their perception of it would change with them.

Agam in front of Peaceful Communication with the World. Image via Park West Gallery Agam in front of Peaceful Communication with the World. Image via Park West Gallery

Sponsored by Lubavitch Youth Organization, the 32-foot Hanukkah Menorah created by Agam stands at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 59th Street in New York City. Weighing in at 4 000 pounds, it is the world's largest Menorah, complete with real oil lamps.

The World’s Largest Hanukkah Menorah stands in New York City and was designed by artist Yaacov Agam. Image via The Corcoran Group The World’s Largest Hanukkah Menorah stands in New York City and was designed by artist Yaacov Agam. Image via The Corcoran Group

At Sotheby's, New York, in 2009, Agam became the most-expensive Isreali artist to sell at auction. His work 4 Themes Contrepoint sold for $326 500.

Just a year later, Growth, a work which was part of the 1980 Guggenheim retrospective, smashed its $150 000-250 000 estimate when it sold for $698 000 at Sotheby's. Search realized prices for Yaacov Agam on Barnebys here.

On March 19, New York's Hutter Auction Galleries sale will include Cubic Multiples, a weave and laminate box which opens out to a chair, by Yaavoc Agam.

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Check out Hutter on Barnebys here.

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