French Masters will take center stage at Georges Prade estate auction, Oct. 15-16

This colorful, gay oil on board painting by Pierre De Belay (Fr., 1890-1947), titled La French Can Can, is estimated at $6,000-$9,000. (photo courtesy Burchard Galleries)

The estate collection of Yves Georges Prade (1904-1992), former vice-president of the Municipal Council of Paris and the General Council of the Seine, will be on the auction block October 15-16 at Burchard Galleries in St. Petersburg, Fla. Prade was a major force in the Paris art world. He served as editor and art critic for the Blue Review and, along with Pablo Picasso, was a wartime activist for imprisoned artist Max Jacob and others. Prade was also Secretary of the Management of the Bank of Paris and the Netherlands and Director of Mumm Champagne.

The sale will feature works by artists such as Pierre De Belay, Regis De Cachard, Albert Gleizes, Tsuguharu Foujita, Achille-Emile Othon Friesz, Max Jacob, Robert Louis Arthur Latapie, Rembrandt, Roger Toulouse and others. Also featured will be antiques and works of art from the estate of John S. Burke Jr., chief executive of the B. Altman & Company department store chain from 1962-1986, and several exhibited works by English artist Frederick Whitehead. Other artists will include Dali, Picasso, Pang and Peter Max. Visit www.burchardgalleries.com.

 

 

Cigar store Indian statues can fetch mighty big wampum

The statue shown here, an Indian with one hand extended, holding a bundle of cigars, is believed to be by Samuel Robb. Its estimate: $100,000-$300,000. (photo courtesy Morphy Auctions)

Anyone who doubts that antique cigar store Indian statues – especially ones made by Samuel Robb, the premier carver of his time, or William Demuth & Company – need only look at the pre-sale estimates Morphy's has assigned these tobacco-related advertising items in their upcoming October 15-16 auction in Las Vegas, Nevada, featuring mostly coin-op and advertising collectibles. The statue shown here, an Indian with one hand extended, holding a bundle of cigars, and the other one close to its body, is believed to be by Samuel Robb. The estimate: $100,000-$300,000.

Other statues in the auction include a William Demuth & Company figure from the late 19th century, featuring a punch figure with a cigar in his mouth, one extended hand holding a bundle of cigars and the other pointed towards his face, retaining its original fuel inlet and believed to be the best original example of very few known (est. $100,000-$200,000); and a handsome Indian holding a bundle of “Best Quality Cigars” and looking off into the distance, one hand shading his eyes (est. $60,000-$90,000). The Samuel Robb statue is the auction's expected top lot.

 

 

Freeman's will auction a rare Tiffany “Iris” lantern, Oct. 16

The “Iris” lantern is a new discovery in the field of Tiffany lighting. Only a handful are known. This wonderful example is expected to sell for $300,000-$500,000. (photo courtesy Freeman's)

Is there any question that Tiffany Studios in New York City in the early part of the 20th century created some of the finest lampshades, stained glass windows, fine jewelry pieces and decorative items in history? I think not. Take for example the lantern in the “Iris”pattern shown here, produced around 1905 by Tiffany. It is one of the featured lots in Freeman's upcoming Design auction, slated for Sunday, October 16, in Philadelphia. It's a tightly curated auction that highlights nature as seen through the work of Art Deco fantasy and New Hope School simplicity.

The “Iris” lantern, which carries a stout pre-sale estimate of $300,000-$500,000, brings together the beauty of nature and the function of design in a special example of glasswork. It's also something of a new discovery in the field of Tiffany lighting. Only a handful are known, and it's the only lantern design by Tiffany to incorporate a floral motif. All other lanterns produced by Tiffany are geometric. This lamp incorporates glass of the highest quality and careful composition in the enchanting hues of a pink and orange sunset. Visit www.freemansauction.com.

 

 

The legendary Wedgwood Portland Vase is up for sale

This copy of the legendary Wedgwood Portland Vase, crafted by Josiah Wedgwood, the noted 18th century ceramics manufacturer, is for sale for $285,000. (photo courtesy M. S. Rau Antiques)

An extraordinary copy of the legendary Wedgwood Portland Vase will be unveiled at the New York Art, Antique & Jewelry Show in New York City, November 9th. It is one of the remarkably rare numbered first editions crafted by Josiah Wedgwood, the renowned 18th century ceramics manufacturer. It is First Edition #22, and was exhibited at the Royal Ontario Museum of Archaeology in Toronto, Canada, from 1951-1953. It is also for sale, through M. S. Rau Antiques in New Orleans, La. The price tag is commensurate with the piece itself: a cool $285,000.

In terms of technical achievement, the First Edition Portland Vases remain unsurpassed in the realm of ceramics. Through his meticulous trials, Josiah Wedgwood not only created stunning works of art, but also perfected jasper, the formula that would become the Wedgwood manufactory¹s signature. Another famed Wedgwood object known as the First Day¹s Vase, inferior in both significance and virtuosity to the present piece, recently sold at a 2016 Christie¹s auction for a record $625,320. Makes the asking price seem almost paltry! Visit www.rauantiques.com.

 

 

From Washington to W: rare presidential items up for bid

From Washington to W The George Washington lot is a fragment of a draft from his first inaugural address. The John F. Kennedy lot is a handwritten draft of a 1960 speech. (photo courtesy Lion Heart Autographs)

Lion Heart Autographs' October 26th auction (its fourth zero percent buyer's premium auction, by the way) is titled Presidential Letters, Free Franks & Speeches: Washington to Bush, Plus Important Autographs in History, Science and the Arts. That's a mouthful of a moniker, but it's 100% accurate. The George Washington lot is a major fragment of a draft from his handwritten first inaugural address. Collectors will swoon for John F. Kennedy's handwritten notes for a 1960 presidential campaign speech in which he mentions his-now famous “New Frontier” theme.

Not all the lots are presidential. Also offered will be a copy of Albert Einstein's Relativity: The Special and General Theory, inscribed by him in 1933, with a humorous four-line poem; a handwritten letter by Samuel Morse that says, “If Lincoln is reelected, I shall despair”; a photo of the auto magnate Henry Ford, inscribed to his “Enforcer”, the union buster Harry Bennett; and an  archive of letters from MAD Magazine publisher Bill Gaines, in which he answers the burning question: “What does the 'E' in Alfred E. Neuman stand for?” Visit www.LionHeartInc.com.

 

 

The Political Table: A Conversation on Dining

Brenda Hornsby Heindl, Jeffrey S. Evans' head of ceramics, will discuss how items played a role in a larger table setting and their use. (photo courtesy Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates)

 

Every year around this time, Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates in Mt. Crawford, Va., presents its annual Fall Lecture Series, on a myriad of topics. This year – in keeping with the spirit of the election season – the firm will hold a talk titled The Political Table: A Conversation on Dining on Friday, Nov. 11. The speaker will be Brenda Hornsby Heindl, head of the ceramics department at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates. Highlighted will be items up for bid in the next day's sale (Nov. 12). The event is free and will start at 6 pm, at 2177 Green Valley Lane in Mt. Crawford.

Items will include an important wine glass cooler from the President Andrew Jackson/Franklin Pierce pattern White House service; the White House china of Rutherford B. Hayes; a unique piece of French porcelain made for the American market; and an 18th century Chinese export porcelain dish made for New York Gov. DeWitt Clinton. Ms. Hornsby Heindl will discuss how these items played a role in a larger table setting and their use. For info, call (540) 434-3939; or, send an e-mail inquiry to info@jeffreysevans.com; or log on to www.jeffreysevans.com.

 

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