Basquiat, Warhol, Elton John have a date June 7

This untitled painting, a collaborative effort between Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, is owned by Elton John and will be auctioned June 7th in Paris. Photo courtesy Sotheby's This untitled painting, a collaborative effort between Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, is owned by Elton John and will be auctioned June 7th in Paris. Photo courtesy Sotheby's

On Tuesday, June 7, two enfants terribles of the art world – Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol – will be offered at auction from the collection of singer Elton John and his husband, David Furnish, at Sotheby's evening sale of contemporary art. Basquiat and Warhol first met at a cafe in 1980, when Basquiat boldly approached Warhol – his idol, who at the time was at the peak of his artistic glory. The encounter led to a series of collaborations in the early 1980s, including this untitled work. Sotheby's estimates it will hammer for $1 million-$1.5 million.

Over the years, Elton John and David Furnish have built a sizable collection of contemporary art by iconic artists such as Willem de Kooning, Louise Bourgeois, Gilbert & George, Tracey Emin and Damien Hirst. The two also own many rare and collectible photographs, 150 of which will be shown at the Tate Modern in an exhibition titled A Radical Eye: the Sir Elton John Collection, in November. Also in the Paris auction will be collaborative paintings by Zao Wou-Ki and Gerhard Richter; and Yves Klein and Gunther Uecker; plus a painting by Kazuo Shiraga.

Annie Get Your Gun! (and hotel trunk, too)

Annie Oakley's personal Parker Brothers 20 gauge shotgun (est. $150 000-$185 000) and her hotel trunk (est. $15 000-$25 000) will be sold June 11. Photo courtesy Old West Events Annie Oakley's personal Parker Brothers 20 gauge shotgun (est. $150 000-$185 000) and her hotel trunk (est. $15 000-$25 000) will be sold June 11. Photo courtesy Old West Events

Two marquee lots in Brian Lebel's upcoming 27th annual Old West Show & Auction pertain to the legendary sharpshooter Annie Oakley. One is her personal Parker Brothers 20 gauge shotgun, made to Oakley's specifications, with 27-inch barrels and a special safety device mounted on the left side of the receiver. A brass inscription on the stock reads, “Annie Oakley to Curtis Liston, 12-25-18.” Liston was a fellow Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show performer and friend. Oakley gave him the rifle as a Christmas present in 1918. It has a pre-sale estimate of $150 000-$185 000.

The other is a classic travel trunk from Ms. Oakley's private collection that she used when traveling to fairgrounds, exhibition arenas and hotels. The iron-bound hardwood trunk is stenciled on the top, “Annie Oakley / Hotel.” It's expected to fetch $15,000-$25,000. The 400-plus-lot auction will be held June 11th, at the Will Rogers Memorial Center in Fort Worth, Texas. Also offered will be the Western artwork collection of actor Dennis Farina (1944-2013). Farina played Detective Joe Fontana on TV's Law and Order. For more info, click on www.OldWestEvents.com.
Prostitute's box held the lady's essentials

Alice was prepared! Her prostitute's box contained, among other things, a dagger, a derringer with mini-ball bullets and a flask for liquor. Photo courtesy Crescent City Auction Gallery Alice was prepared! Her prostitute's box contained, among other things, a dagger, a derringer with mini-ball bullets and a flask for liquor. Photo courtesy Crescent City Auction Gallery

In late 19th century America – more specifically, in the Wild West, where folks played fast and loose with the laws, when there were any laws at all – the ladies of the evening kept what was openly referred to as a prostitute's box. These were wooden boxes designed to keep the lady's essentials. One such prostitute's box, and its contents, will come up for bid at Crescent City Auction Gallery's June 4-5 Southern estates auction in New Orleans, Louisiana. We even know a little about the woman who owned the box: the name “Alice” has been carved into the box's lid.

We also know where she worked: Dodge City, Kansas, one of the most legendary of the Wild West towns. The contents of the box are as follows: a perfume bottle, a wood-handled brass derringer with accompanying mini-ball bullets, an Art Nouveau match safe and powder flask, a sterling-handled dagger and a flask for holding liquor. The box, pictured here, measures 13 ¼ inches by 6 ¾ inches. As for its potential worth, assigning something so rare and unusual is often tricky. Crescent City opted to go modest, saying they expect the box will gavel for $2 000-$4 000.
Trove of Grinch artwork by artist to be auctioned

This hand-painted production cel of the Grinch looking into a hand mirror held in the mouth of his faithful pooch Max should realize $25,000 or more. Photo courtesy Heritage Galleries This hand-painted production cel of the Grinch looking into a hand mirror held in the mouth of his faithful pooch Max should realize $25,000 or more. Photo courtesy Heritage Galleries

This year marks the 50-year anniversary of the TV classic How the Grinch Stole Christmas, adapted from the book by Dr. Seuss and brought to life on the small screen by talented animators like Chuck Jones. To mark the event, Heritage Galleries will conduct an auction on Saturday, June 11th in Dallas, Texas, comprising an archive of Grinch material from the family of Chuck Jones, chosen by his daughter Linda and his grandson Craig Kausen. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Chuck Jones Center of Creativity in Orange County, California.

The trove of 27 original pieces, all related to the genesis and making of the show, will include an exceptional hand-painted production cel of the Grinch looking into a hand mirror held in the mouth of his faithful pooch Max (shown) as he completes his Santa costume (est. $25 000+); and one of the first concept drawings of the Grinch that ever flowed from the hand of Mr. Jones, depicting the Grinch with a larger belly (est. $10 000+). Dr. Seuss's How the Grinch Stole Christmas has been shown on TV every holiday season since its first airing in 1966.

They didn't just collect Shakers, they knew them

Erhart Muller was not only enthusiastic and passionate about Shaker furniture and utilitarian objects, he and his wife Ruth befriended many Shakers. Photo courtesy Skinner, Inc. Erhart Muller was not only enthusiastic and passionate about Shaker furniture and utilitarian objects, he and his wife Ruth befriended many Shakers. Photo courtesy Skinner, Inc.

Erhart Muller, who recently passed away at 105 years of age, was not only enthusiastic and passionate about Shaker furniture and utilitarian objects, he and his wife Ruth befriended many Shakers beginning in the 1940s. The couple had a broad interest in everything Shaker: furniture, woodenware, tools, textiles, baskets and ephemera. Their keen interest was in preserving these objects, along with their historical relevance. The Mullers were meticulous in caring for their collection and recognized very early on the importance of preserving original Shaker finishes.

On Saturday, June 4th, at 10 am Eastern time in Marlborough, Massachusetts, Skinner, Inc. will present at auction The Shaker Collection of Erhart Muller. Highlights will include a red-stained pine tall chest of seven drawers, in original condition; a diminutive tiger and bird's-eye maple and cherry one-drawer table (Enfield, N.H.); a single-drawer table on slightly splayed tapering legs (Canterbury, N.H.); a bittersweet-red and yellow-stained oval fixed handle carrier; an olive green-painted oval covered box; and a painted 13-foot alphabet board (Harvard, Mass.).

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