The proceedings kicks off with Contemporary and Post-War Art on December 5.

 

Anselm Kiefer, Die Schlange (The Serpent), 1982-1991 Anselm Kiefer, Die Schlange (The Serpent), 1982-1991

Thanks to Georg Baselitz, Gerhard Richter, Sigmar Polke, Jörg Immendorff and Anselm Kiefer, German painting saw an incredible revival in the 1970s. Kiefer throws every medium a the canvas: paint, straw, ash, iron and lead to create his apocalyptic visions.

The serpent is a recurring metaphor in Kiefer's oeuvre. In this piece, as well as being a symbol for evil, it is a messenger for change, catastrophe and simultaneously resurrection. Represented undulating in burnt black earth, the serpent seems rooted in the underworld whilst somehow connected to the heavens by nine lead wires,  a possible sign of resurrection and renewal.

After years of Nazism and war, Kiefer's approach to renewal is a vestige of the past but also as a source of inspiration and creation from destruction.

Ernst Wilhelm Nay, Irisches Märchen, 1951 Ernst Wilhelm Nay, Irisches Märchen, 1951

Another German painter, Ernst Wilhelm Nay was an abstract artist, influenced by Tachisme, the French style of abstract painting popular in the 1940s and 1950, similar to Europe's abstract expressionism. Other artists of this movement including and Jean Dubuffet, Serge Poliakoff and Georges Mathieu.

Alfred Leslie, Minnie's Cookie Jar, 1959 Alfred Leslie, Minnie's Cookie Jar, 1959

American artist and filmmaker Alfred Leslie is another of the abstract expressionist painters. However, in the 1960s, Leslie changed his style to realistic figurative paintings. This work, Minnie's Cookie Jar, comes just at the end of his abstract expressionist period. The same year it was painted, Leslie collaborated with Robert Frank to direct the short film Pull My Daisy, which was narrated by Jack Kerouac.

Yaacov Agam, INTIMACY, 2007-2009 Yaacov Agam, INTIMACY, 2007-2009

Yaacov Agam is one of the most important figures in the world of kinetic art. He builds his creations in accordance to how the viewer will see movements based on geometric shapes and bold colours.

Intimacy is a remarkable example: whilst looking at the piece, each step the viewer takes creates a new combination of forms and colour, creating a new vision, as if it were in motion.

The Modern Art sale on December 6 features a section entitled the Painters of Montmartre. The Parisian district of Montmartre remains today a pilgrimage for lovers of 19th century and modern art. Picasso, Van Gogh, Renoir and Toulouse-Lautrec were all, at different periods in time, residents of the district.

Henri Julien Rousseau dit le Douanier, Corbeille de groseilles et de cerises, 1880 Henri Julien Rousseau dit le Douanier, Corbeille de groseilles et de cerises, 1880

One of the most prominent painters of the Montmartre district was Henri Julien Rousseau dit le Douanier. His fellow avant-garde artist and poets supported his work as they saw hime as the the fathers of Modernity in painting. In 1908, Picasso held a banquet in honour of Rousseau at the famous Bateau-Lavoir studio, in Montmartre.

Kees van Dongen, Cavaliers au bois de Boulogne, 1906 Kees van Dongen, Cavaliers au bois de Boulogne, 1906

Kees van Dongen is a French painter of Dutch origin. A fauvist, he is particularly known for his gaudy paintings which were appreciated by the upper bourgeoisie. Van Dongen became a famous portraitist for the upper class. He once rather amusingly said about painting such sitters: "The main thing is to lengthen the women and, above all, to make them thin, after that, all they have to do is enlarge their jewels.''

Bernard Buffet, Table à jeu, 1977 Bernard Buffet, Table à jeu, 1977

French expressionist painter and member of the anti-abstract art group "L'homme Témoin," Bernard Buffet created more than 8 000 paintings and an incredible amount of prints during his lifetime. Overshadowed by other artists of the 1950s and shunned by museums, the artist sent shocks through the art world as he placed a bag over his head, ending his life at age 71.

Maurice Utrillo, Rue de banlieue, 1948 Maurice Utrillo, Rue de banlieue, 1948

Born in the Montmartre quarter of Paris, France, Utrillo was one of the few famous painters of Montmartre who was born there. Utrillo is best known for his landscapes and for the controversy surrounding his paternity. Whilst his father remained somewhat of a mystery, his mother was artist Suzanne Valadon, who had been taught to paint by Berthe Morisot, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec after sitting for them, with Edgar Degas later becoming her mentor

Check out Tajan's full catalog on Barnebys here.

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