The Englewood gallery received fines of $1 250 for everyday the artwork was on display in their store front, as well as a potential 90 days jail sentence.

Laura Borghi, the gallery owner was told by code enforcement officer Walter Deptuch, to immediately remove the piece by Tom Dash, which depicts two partially-nude women.

The code states that nude images can not be on public display, instead, according to the code, Borghi should have hung the work away from the window front of the gallery.

Tom Dash's artwork that is on display at Borghi Fine Art Gallery on Palisade Avenue, Englewood. Tom Dash's artwork that is on display at Borghi Fine Art Gallery on Palisade Avenue, Englewood.

An outraged Borghi commented: "For me, growing up with art - and I have two children of my own - nudity is a beautiful thing.''

"It's a work of art. It's an expression.''

''We're a serious gallery, and the artwork that was on view was nothing that could be offensive to anybody."

According to Borghi's attorney, Brian Bernstein, U.S. and New Jersey constitutions prevent the city from censoring art, therefore Borghi has a strong case against the enforcement of the code enforcement.

Councilman Eugene Skurnick, will address the 1992 approved code on nudity in a city council meeting next week.

“I’m going to be bringing up a modification to the ordinance that will exclude art galleries from this silly ordinance.”

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