Hockney was as inspired by the landscapes of the U.S. as he was by his beloved home of Yorkshire. This month, a brilliantly colorful and dynamic work by the artist will be hitting the auction block on this side of the Atlantic at Skinner's, Boston.

Caribbean Tea Time, from the series Moving Focus, 1985-87, edition of 36 plus proofs, published by Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Mount Kisco, New York (MCA Tokyo, 288). Numbered and signed "AP VII/X David Hockney" in pencil on right-most panel l.c. Color lithograph with hand-coloring, and collage on eight sheets of TGL handmade paper, assembled together in a four-panel, folding, contoured, lacquered, and hand-painted wood floor screen, with four screenprinted plastic panels, all designed by the artist, full size 86 x 136 in. (218.4 x 345.5 cm). Condition: Deckled edges and floated as originally presented by the artist, areas of cracking/loss to frame, several rubs to Plexiglas, screenprinted panels somewhat yellowed. Provenance: A private Massachusetts collection. Caribbean Tea Time, from the series Moving Focus, 1985-87, edition of 36 plus proofs, published by Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Mount Kisco, New York (MCA Tokyo, 288). Numbered and signed "AP VII/X David Hockney" in pencil on right-most panel l.c. Color lithograph with hand-coloring, and collage on eight sheets of TGL handmade paper, assembled together in a four-panel, folding, contoured, lacquered, and hand-painted wood floor screen, with four screenprinted plastic panels, all designed by the artist, full size 86 x 136 in. (218.4 x 345.5 cm).
Condition: Deckled edges and floated as originally presented by the artist, areas of cracking/loss to frame, several rubs to Plexiglas, screenprinted panels somewhat yellowed.
Provenance: A private Massachusetts collection.

The multipart folding screen, entitled Caribbean Tea Time (Estimate:$75 000-95 000), shows influence of Hockney's stage designs and photo collages of the 1970s to 1980s. During this period, the artist created a number of set designs for the UK's Royal Court Theatre, La Scala in Milan and the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.

Hockney's first opera designs were for Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress at the Glyndebourne Festival Opera in 1975 and The Magic Flute, 1978. John Cox's 1975 production of W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman's libretto was one of the most celebrated versions of the piece. Both sets and costumes were designed by Hockney. The opera starred American tenor Leo Goeke, who had a glittering career frome the 1960s to the 1980s, reviving his role of Tom Rakewell in The Rake's Progress in 1977, 1978 and 1980.

Hockney's designs for The Rake's Progress Hockney's designs for The Rake's Progress

In 1981, Hockney was commissioned to create sets and costumes for ballets and operas at the Metropolitan Opera House. The set for L'enfant et les sortilèges is a permanent installation at Spalding House, the Honolulu Museum of Art.

The folding screen for Hockney that is up for auction at Skinner is clearly influenced by both the artist's stage designs and photographic collages, a technique he began experimenting with in the 1980s. The vibrant colors are reminiscent of Hockney's studies of L.A. as well as the tumbling hills of his native Yorkshire.

David Hockney's Caribbean Tea Time will hit the auction block at Skinner's in their American & European Works of Art auction on September 27, 2017. The auction will also feature Andy Warhol's Liz, 1964, as well as works by Robert Rauschenberg and Robert Mapplethorpe. Check out more here.

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