Monumental oil painting by Jean Jansem up for bid in Susanin’s Sept. 19 art auction

Day 1 of Susanin’s series of three planned auctions for September 19th, 20th and 21st will feature 539 lots of fine art, online and at the firm’s gallery in Chicago, Illinois. Pieces will range from wonderful prints and multiples to several original paintings by the noted German-born artist Wolf Kahn (b. 1927), to the artwork pictured here: a monumental oil on canvas (64 ½ inches by 82 inches in the frame) by the late Armenian-French painter Jean Jansem (1920-2013). Signed lower left and titled Marchande de Legumes, the work carries a pre-sale estimate of $30,000-$40,000 and has already attracted worldwide attention.

Monumental oil painting by Jean Jansem This monumental oil on canvas (64 ½ inches by 82 inches in the frame) is by the late Armenian-French painter Jean Jansem (1920-2013). (photo courtesy Susanin’s Auctioneers)

Jean Jansem’s less pronounceable real name is Hovhahnes Semerdjian. He was born in Turkey but his family moved to Paris when he was 11 and that’s where he began to paint, at first in the free academies of Montparnasse and later at the highly regarded Ecole des Arts Decoratifs. Jansem’s style has been described as “miserablist” – an artist of unfortunate people. He’s not an unknown by any means. His artworks appear throughout the world, in prominent museums and collections. Jansem once said, “The act of painting reveals who we are. We are betrayed by what we love.” The auction will begin at 10 am Central time. Check out more here.

 

 

 

 

Unopened box of 1965 Topps football cards, 24 packs, could bring $350,000 at Mile High

Mile High Card Company’s last auction featured a near-complete box (20 packs of 24, unopened) of Bowman 1948 baseball cards, one of the true sports card finds of the new century. So what do they do for an encore? Welcome to Beer Box II, an attic find in Tennessee that may even eclipse the Bowman box in terms of rarity and final price realized. It’s a full, intact box of 1965 Topps “tall boy” football cards, unopened and looking like they were just pulled off the store shelf. The cards are graded in NM to NM/MT condition (some even better) and Brian Drent of Mile High predicts the box will sell for $350,000 or more.

Unopened box of 1965 Topps cards This fully intact box of 1965 Topps football cards, with 24 unopened packs, was discovered in a Tennessee attic. It could bring $350,000. (photo courtesy Mile High Auction Co.)

It’s lot #1 in Mile High’s internet-only auction, now online and ending Thursday, Sept. 14th. So what makes this box so special? Coupla things. First, it’s from Topps’ “tall boy” card collection, a carry-over of the supersized cards from their hockey series of the previous season. Second, it introduced Joe Namath, the rock-star quarterback of the New York Jets, to the New York spotlight. The Namath rookie card is arguably the most important football card ever made, and a GEM MINT example (of which there are none in existence today) would probably mean a million-dollar-+ payday for the lucky person who owns one. Click here to find out more

 

 

 

Baranger Studios jewelry store motion display at Pook & Pook/Noel Barrett sale

Pook & Pook and toy specialist Noel Barrett will team up to host an auction of American and European antique tin toys, trains, dollhouses and more on Friday, September 15th, online and at Pook & Pook’s gallery in Downingtown, Pa., starting at 10 am Eastern time. The huge, 500-lot sale will feature renowned toy makers such as Marklin, Carette, Lehmann’s, Hubley, Kenton, Vindex, Dent, Kilgore, Christian Hacker and others. The doll category will feature an original marionette of Howdy Doody from the 1950s kids’ TV show (est. $12,000-$16,000), showgirl art dolls by Van Craig and a Bill Baird stick puppet of a gangster.

Baranger Studios jewelry display This electric-animation depiction of “The Diamond Cleaners” busily repairing a huge diamond ring was made by Baranger Studios. (photo courtesy Pook & Pook/Noel Barrett)

One of the more visually arresting lots is the one pictured here: a jewelry store motion display by Baranger Studios of Pasadena, California, an electric-animation depiction of “The Diamond Cleaners” busily repairing an oversized diamond ring. It’s one of two Baranger Studios displays up for bid (the other, from the 1950s, is titled “The Wooden Soldiers”). Both should bring $5,000-$6,000. Baranger motion machines (or “Baranger Motions”) were store window mechanical advertising displays custom-made by Baranger and rented to jewelers between 1925 and 1959. These displays are highly prized by collectors today. Find out more here.

 

 

 

Ancient art and antiques will be auctioned by Palmyra Heritage Gallery, September 17

Fans of ancient art and antiquities need to mark their calendars for Sunday, September 17th, at 11 am Eastern time. That’s when Palmyra Heritage Gallery will hold a huge, 269-lot Ancient Art and Antiques Sale, online and at the firm’s gallery in New York City. The auction will feature a variety of authentic ancient Egyptian, Greek, Roman, near Eastern antiquities and Islamic art, plus a great selection of ancient coins. A sample lot is the one pictured here: a large, late period (circa 715-330 BC) wooden Egyptian upper fragment of a sarcophagus lid, having a fine face styled with a long with and decorated collar.

Ancient art and antiques This large, late period (circa 715-330 BC) wooden Egyptian upper fragment of a sarcophagus lid, is expected to hit $8,000-$12,000. (photo courtesy Palmyra Heritage Gallery)

The piece, measuring 18 inches tall by 18 inches wide, is expected to change hands for $8,000-$12,000. Palmyra Heritage Gallery is a third generation family business that specializes in Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic and pre-Colombian artifacts; as well as ancient Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Islamic coins. It has been in its present gallery, at 1050 Second Avenue in Manhattan, since 1995. The firm is known for its reasonable prices and authentic items, featuring a large selection of ancient coins and artifacts from numerous cultures. All items are acquired from local private estates and collections. For more info click here.

 

 

 

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