(Left) Alberto Giacometti, "Chariot", 1950. (Right) Amedeo Modigliani, "Tête", 1911-1912. Photo via Sotheby's (Left) Alberto Giacometti, "Chariot", 1950. (Right) Amedeo Modigliani, "Tête", 1911-1912. Photo via Sotheby's

Early this morning Sotheby's and the art news publication Artdaily reported that the auction house broke their record for highest total value of a sale with a rare bronze sculpture by the Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti that sold for $100,965,000. The sculpture, Chariot, executed in 1950 portrays a goddess frozen in time and is a central part of modern art. The goddess was viewed as symbol of hope for the post-World War generation. The piece held the highest value of all the objects in this week's auctions at both Sotheby's and Christie's.

"With its connotations of healing, strength and magic, this heroic sculpture is a symbol of renewal following the Second World War," says Simon Shaw, Sotheby's co-head of impressionist and modern art.

The previous auction record for a Giacometti art piece, Homme qui marche I, was also set at Sotheby's set when it sold for $104,300,000 in 2010.

Other auction highlights include the sculpture Tête by Amedeo Modigliani. The piece had an estimate of $45,000,000 but sold for $70,725,000, setting a new record for Modigliani. The sculpture was executed between 1911-1912 is part of a series of rare sculptures carved from stone taken from Parisian construction sites.

Yesterday Barnebys wrote about another highlight from the auction, Vincent van Gogh's Nature morte, vase aux marguerites et coquelicots. The painting sold for $ 61,765,000, which is well over its estimate of $30,000,000 — $50,000,000.

During the upcoming week both Sotheby's and Christie's will auction off impressionist, modern postwar and contemporary art with a combined value of $1.7 billion.

Story via Sotheby's/Artdaily

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