Entitled simply Human, Gormley's exhibition brings together over one hundred of the artist's works, arranged around the 16th-century fortress. The fortress itself is part of the fabric of the exhibition, evoking not only the great artists of the past but also a history of human violence.

Human at the Forte di Belvedere, Florence Image: Ela Bialkowska via The Telegraph Human at the Forte di Belvedere, Florence
Image: Ela Bialkowska via The Telegraph

One of the exhibition's focal points is the installation 'Critical Mass' (1995), which the artist has described as an 'anti-monument evoking all the victims of the 20th century.' It consists of a series of figures, all based on casts of the artist's own body, progressing in a sequence from crouching to sitting to standing. It has more than a hint of familiar illustrations of the evolution of man, from ape to upright human. Placed opposite in the fortress is a jumbled heap of the same bodies, all chaos and disorder.

Image: Pietro Savorelli via Galleria Continua and White Cube © the Artist Image: Pietro Savorelli via Galleria Continua and White Cube © the Artist

In an interview with the Telegraph, Gormley claims that his intention in creating this contrast is to 'call into question what the human project is: us and our habitat that has cost the planet so much.'

Image: Antony Gormley via Courtesy Galleria Continua and White Cube © the Artist Image: Antony Gormley via Courtesy Galleria Continua and White Cube © the Artist

Human is on show at the Forte di Belvedere, Florence, until 27th September 2015.

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