The latest to join this coalition is the actress Lucy Liu, most famous for her starring role in Charlie's Angels (2000) and its 2003 sequel, Full Throttle. Liu actually has cultivated her passion for painting since adolescence, and she has had several international exhibitions, including important shows that have brought her works to the United States and Europe since 1993. This month however, Liu’s works will be exhibited in Singapore for the exhibition Unhomed Belongings, a visual dialogue between her and the renowned Indian artist, Shubigi Rao.

Lucy Liu and Shubigi Rao. Photo: National Museum of Singapore Lucy Liu and Shubigi Rao. Photo: National Museum of Singapore

Liu creates her artworks in her studio in New York, where her production includes drawings, paintings, collages and serigraphs. Most of her works are made of salvaged materials from discarded objects that the artist collects and reuses, transforming them into emotional compositions.

Lucy Liu in her studio in New York Lucy Liu in her studio in New York

The theme of protection is evoked throughout Liu's art: her works aim to convey a sense of security. In fact, her works have long been protected by the use of her Chinese name, Yu Ling, and why for several years her artistic talent hasn't been publicized.

When it comes to actors who have made their artistic vocation known, Liu is one of many.

Adrien Brody, ‘Hooked’ Adrien Brody, ‘Hooked’

Adrien Brody also had a ‘coming out’ as a visual artist in 2016, following an episode linked to a friend who was supposed to be making a work for the actor. Brody procured a canvas for the artist, which later become the basis for his first works.

In an interview with Vogue Italia, Brody said, “Painting, music, photography and visual art have been creative forms of expression for me for decades. I’ve drawn and painted for many years (I used to paint fish and sharks even as child), but I never had the confidence to share that passion. More recently I’ve begun to nurture this, and painting has essentially become my main creative outlet.”

Even before Brody however, the likes of Sir Anthony Hopkins and Dennis Hopper dedicated parts of their lives to art.

Dennis Hopper, ‘Paul Newman’, 1964. Photo: The Hopper Art Trust Dennis Hopper, ‘Paul Newman’, 1964. Photo: The Hopper Art Trust

Dennis Hopper became a photographer, thanks to a gift from his first wife: in the 1960s, Brooke Howard gave Hopper a Nikon with which the actor began to photograph his world. The subject of exhibitions at an international level, Hooper's shots narrate his life among actors, family and friends, travels on the road in the desert, and female nudes.

Winner of an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award, Sir Anthony Hopkins is not only one of the most revered actors of the past fifty years, but he is also a renowned painter with enormous creative talent: "The face is not important. It’s the eyes that are the most haunting part of one’s soul. It’s very primitive. It’s childish art. It has to be childish because I am a child. I’ve discovered lately that I enjoy all that is supposedly wrong with me. I used to take myself so seriously, but now I don’t. I allow myself to revel in the exhilarating nature of life."

Anthony Hopkins, ‘Opera Ball 1’. Photo: © Margam Fine Art, LLC Anthony Hopkins, ‘Opera Ball 1’. Photo: © Margam Fine Art, LLC

The list of Hollywood actors dedicated to art, for both passion and profession, is longer still. Johnny Depp and Brad Pitt, for example, have also ventured into painting, as well as Jim Carrey and James Franco.

Lucy Liu, ‘Velocity’, created following the attack of 11 September 2001. Photo: AFP Lucy Liu, ‘Velocity’, created following the attack of 11 September 2001. Photo: AFP

Lucy Liu, however, represents the female side of this small Hollywood revolution. The exhibition showcasing the works of Liu and Rao, Unhomed Belongings, is taking place in Singapore at the National Museum until February 24, 2019.

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