Jacques Nève

Jacques Nève is an clockmaker and has been a member of the CNES (Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en objets d’art et de collection) since 2009. His workshop is located in Braine-le-Château, Belgium.

Jacques Nève offers a selection of clocks dating from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, carefully selected in terms of quality, originality and historical provenance.

The expert horlogist Jacques Nève also provides confidential appraisals for estate settlements, division of family property, insurance coverage and sales purposes. Certificates of authenticity can be provided on request.

Countries
  • Belgium
Objects "Jacques Nève"

Cartel Sarton

French Wall Cartel « Mask of Apollo », from a model by Osmond. Ormolu, Louis XVI-period, circa 1785. Two-train movement, with anchor recoil escapement of the tic-tac type and silk-suspended pendulum. Half-hourly strike on a sivered bell, with countwheel. Two-weeks autonomy. Enamel dial with Roman numerals for the hours and Arabic numerals for the five-minutes intervals. Red signature h. Sarton A LIEGE. Very finely cut, engraved and gilt brass hands. Fire-gilded bronze case of architectural form with acanthus leave garlands and ribbons. Fire-urn on top and pomegranate at the bottom. H. 71 cm (28"), W. 36 cm (14"), D. 13 cm (5"), founder, bronzier, was established rue Maclou in Paris in 1773, he made cases for the most renowned Parisian clockmakers: Lepaute, Robin, Charles Le Roy, etc…, (1748-1828), horologist to the court of princes. Hubert SARTON (1748-1828) lived during a momentous period in history. A product of the Enlightenment, he was also a precursor of the industrial age. Furthermore he was fortunate enough to grow up and live in Liège, which at the time was one of the most dynamic artisan and industrial centres in Europe. Very little has been written about him, yet his contribution to the art of horology is of great importance. He began learning the trade working for his uncle Dieudonné Sarton in 1762, where he demonstrated a remarkable talent for the mechanical sciences. After completing a four-year apprenticeship in Paris at the workshop of Pierre Leroy, eldest son of Julien and brother of Jean-Baptiste Leroy, he returned to Liège in 1772 as Master Clockmaker. Soon after he was appointed ‘Court Clockmaker’ to Duke Charles Alexander of Lorraine, Governor General of Austrian Netherlands, then, as ‘First Mechanic’ to Prince Bishop François-Charles de Velbrück, he enjoyed the benefits of a privileged position which extended his reputation well beyond the Principality of Liège. He also played a civic role being appointed Commissioner and Treasurer of the city of Liège in 1783. In a report published in 1789, the workshop of Hubert Sarton is described in terms that reflect the diversity and quality of his work, as well as his concern for innovation: “At HUBERT SARTON in Liège and Spa, one finds a most comprehensive assortment of clocks and watches, in the latest styles, like gold and silver watches of all kinds […]. One also finds a beautiful assortment of clocks from the most simple to the most complex.” Eleven years later, the French Revolutionary troops stormed Liège putting an end to Austrian rule. It is hard to ascertain exactly what consequences this historic event had on Hubert Sarton’s career. It appears from that time forward he concentrated on the production of skeleton clocks in a variety of models. The number of clocks produced suggests that Sarton certainly managed a large workshop with numerous employees – although no documentation has survived to either confirm or contradict this. Famous for inventing the automatic watch based on a rotor principle, for which he filed a patent at the French Academy of Sciences in 1778, Hubert Sarton created a variety of timepieces throughout his career – Louis XV cartels, Louis XVI mantle clocks, lyre mantle clocks, pendules de compagnie (company clock or waiting-room clock) skeleton clocks and regulators – all equally remarkable for their extraordinary quality and diversity. At once a devoted horologist, mechanic and inventor, Hubert Sarton was one of the major figures of horology in late eighteenth-century Liège. An enlightened man of his time, keen on progress and innovation, his considerable career unfolds as a long series of developments. Having successfully advanced all branches of his trade, this able mechanic dedicated to the art of horology became a master of his art, as witnessed in the exceptional quality and great refinement of his production. Tardy Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972; Jean-Dominique Augarde Les Ouvriers du Temps, La Pendule à Paris de Louis XIV à Napoléon Ier, Genève 1996; Florent Pholien L'Horlogerie et ses Artistes au Pays de Liége, 1933; Ann Chevalier et André Thiry L'Age d'Or de l'Horlogerie Liégeoise, 2003; Jacques Nève Les pendules d'Hubert Sarton, 1748-1828, Horloger-Mécanicien, Inventeur, mémoire présenté en 2009 à la Chambre Nationale des Experts Spécialisés en Meubles, Estampes, Livres, Objets d'Art et de Collection, Paris, 2009. Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Les Ouvriers du Temps, La Pendule à Paris de Louis XIV à Napoléon Ier, L'Horlogerie et ses Artistes au Pays de Liége, L'Age d'Or de l'Horlogerie Liégeoise, Les pendules d'Hubert Sarton, 1748-1828, Horloger-Mécanicien, Inventeur, Brussels, Musées Royaux d’Art et d’Histoire ; Mons, Musée François Duesberg ; Liège, Musée Curtius et Musée d’Ansembourg ; Vienna, Uhrenmuseum. € 14,500Read more

  • BELBelgium
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16 500 USD

Satyr and Bacchante, after Pradier

Ed. Detalle, an important mantel clock, "Satyr and Bacchante" after James Pradier (1790-1852), made in Paris c. 1870. Inscribed ‘Pradier’ in cursive script on front of base; no foundry mark. Signed on the dial: Ed. Detalle, Rue St Antoine 180, Près la Rue de Rivoli. Bronze group with light brown patination; reduction of the original marble by James Pradier, now in the Louvre (R.F. 3475); it rests on a black Mazy marble pedestal flanked by two volute-shaped capitals, the corners decorated with fluted pilasters in vert-de-mer marble. Half-man, half-goat, the satyr is depicted with horns, hoofs and a tail. With one knee on the ground, the satyr supports on his thigh a swooning female figure and with his free hand removes the light garment that covered her. In a state of rapture, she seems to both push him away and draw him close. Depicted in a posture of sensual surrender, the Bacchante has abandoned her attributes: the thyrsus and drinking cup; on the base the discarded thyrsus rests alongside a tambourine. French movement with two spring barrels; the time train on the right side with spring suspension adjustable from the front of the dial and self-levelling escapement, both patents from Achille Brocot, visible anchor and escape wheel, with jewel half-rollers; the strike train on the left side for every half hour on a silvered bell, countwheel. Enamel dial on two levels, separated by an ormolu circle, the outer with Roman numerals for the hours and fine graduation for the minutes, the inner with the visible escapement, the two Breguet-style blued steel hands, and the signature Ed. Detalle, Rue St Antoine 180, Près la Rue de Rivoli. All the visible metallic parts in either polished steel or ormolu, the escape wheel in brass. Front and rear bevelled flat glass. (more on the sculpture in the Pdf file below), H: 51cm (20"), W: 48cm (19"), D: 28cm (11¼") Bronze sculpture: H: 30cm (12"), W: 34cm (13½"), D: 19cm (8"), Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972 ; Statues de Chair, sculptures de James Pradier, Musée d’Art et d’Histoire, Genève 1985 ; Claude Lapaire, James Pradier et la sculpture française de la génération romantique, catalogue raisonné, SIK-ISEA Institut Suisse pour l’Etude de l’Art, 2010. Louvre Museum, Paris; Musée d'Orsay, Paris; Montpellier Fine Arts Museum; Geneva Fine Arts Museum, and many more. € 6.500,-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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Fixed price
7 400 USD

Enout a Amfreville

IRON WALL CLOCK with three unique features, dated 1768 on the dial and signed ʺPar Enout à amfrevilleʺ, Iron cage-type Normandy region movement, with all the wheels moving between three vertical iron pillars. The movement is at the front, and the hourly rack strike at the rear. Daily winding, with weights and counterweights hanging by ropes. Three characteristics make this clock remarkable: - Pinwheel escapement, the pins in the plane of the wheel, thus placing the anchor and the pendulum on the right-hand side at a 90° angle, with the pendulum bob moving back to forth. - Fast hourly strike with heavy flywheel fitted with a click wheel, in the manner usually seen only on turret clocks. - One eleven-leaves steel pinion, a highly unusual prime number ever used on clocks. (giving the motion to the hour cannon pinion). Painted iron vertical rectangular dial, with two round protuberances for the chapter ring, one single finely-cut iron hour hand, with indications of the creation date, the creator’s name and the Latin motto “ULTIMA LATET”. This motto is similar to those found on ancient wall painted sundials, such as "Última necat" (the last one kills, it defines the last hour on this Earth that will await the onlooker one day). These mottos remind us of the brevity of time (such as “it is later than you think”), they remind us of our destiny."Última latet" litteraly means « the last one is hiding, the last one is hidden from you…” and it can be interpreted as saying that this dial won’t tell you about your last hour, but it is there, hiding…, Height 13ʺ (33cm) , Width 8 ¼ʺ (21cm) , Depth 8 ¼ʺ (21cm), Nothing is known about this maker, however the Enout family is still established in Amfreville, Normandy. (North of Caen, 1383 souls), € 12.000,-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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13 700 USD

Exceptional carved walnut wall clock – Rossigneux

Exceptional carved walnut wall clock by Charles-François Rossigneux, Paris, circa 1870. The clock dial in waxed and polished walnut, with gothic-style Roman hour chapters painted in white, chased gilt-brass hands; the case, in the form of a heraldic crest resting on a small gadrooned base finished with an acanthus leaf motif; the whole entirely decorated with Neo-Renaissance motifs loosely inspired from Antiquity, flanked on either side by two inverted winged-dragons with reptile-like tails coiled around a chimera mascaron placed in the centre; above, branches of laurel leaves and a horn-shaped vase filled with a pomegranate bouquet surmount the clock. Self-starting movement with horizontal balance wheel, autonomy eight days. Impressive in scale, this clock case is a real tour de force of wood carving, superimposing a proliferation of ornaments that blends naturalistic plant forms with an imaginary universe composed of hybrid creatures and a grotesque mascaron. Graceful yet spirited, with outlandish and powerful accents, its design recalls the decorative vocabulary of the architect and designer Charles-François Rossigneux. This becomes evident when comparing its lines and motifs to a certain number of his original drawings housed at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, in which we see the same motifs: some imaginary, like the open-mouthed dragons, terrifying chimera mascarons and the form of the central crest with emerging serpent-tails; some taken from plant forms, like the clusters of fruit sprays; others inspired from ornamental book illustrations, with compartments and arabesques, for which Rossigneux was well-known. It is precisely in Rossigneux’s hand-drawn illustrations, depicting vignettes, foliage scrolls, tailpieces and ornamental lettering destined for fine-edition publications, that we discovered the source of inspiration for the present clock, notably in the magnificent folio of the Gospels (Les Saints Evangiles) published by Hachette in 1873 (fig.1-2-3): printed in two volumes, the set contains 128 large etchings after original drawings by Alexandre Bida, and 290 steel engravings featuring decorative titles, chapter heads, tailpieces and initials by L. Gaucherel after drawings by Ch. Rossigneux. H 147 cm (58"), W 102 cm (40"), D 26 cm (10"), (Paris, 1818 – 1907). A prolific artist, Rossigneux also designed fine-edition bindings and contributed, from 1860 to 1875, to the major decorating and furnishing projects in Paris. His practice was to supply a highly finished drawing to a sculptor, who, under his direction and close supervision, created a full-scale relief model that would then be reproduced in wood or precious metal. Rossigneux began his career working for the Gruel bookbinding firm, where he was in charge of designing bindings, endeavouring to introduce new elements inspired from nature. His early designs, noted at the 1844 Exposition des produits de l’industrie (French Industrial Exhibition) in Paris, enabled him to go to Cairo, chosen to decorate the apartments of the ‘Abbas’s palace, which the viceroy of Egypt ‘Abbas Pasha had just finished building. He spent three years in the Orient, from 1848-1851, and became friends with the painters Alexandre Bida and Maxime du Camp. While on mission in Egypt, he was able to develop relationships with the most prominent furniture and decorative-arts firms in France, which, upon his return, kept him occupied with important construction and decorating projects. In 1855, Rossigneux was appointed architect and assistant curator at the Exposition universelle (World Fair) in Paris. In the same year he established a privileged working relationship with Christofle, winning a silver medal for a silver cup made after his designs, and undertaking a project for a centrepiece with three winged infants for the Empress’ personal dining table. As of 1860, he worked under the direction of the architect Alfred Normand for several years, decorating Prince Napoleon’s Pompeii-style home, notably designing lamps and large candelabra, as well as bronze work for the Atrium doors. While he was creating designs for silver, Rossigneux was asked, in 1862, to take over as creative director of MM. Hache et Pepin-Lehalleur, the porcelain manufacture located in Vierzon – a collaboration that lasted until 1870. His influence was no less important at the Manufacture des Gobelins, where for over twenty years he acted as member of the Commission de perfectionnement (Committee for advancement). In 1868, the critic Edmond About described him in these terms: ‘M. Charles Rossigneux, an architect of all stripes, constructs homes, decorates apartments, designs furniture, sketches stained-glass windows, and has tableware, crystal, silverware and even Madame’s jewellery, made after his designs […].’ The following pieces date from the most active period of his career, lasting from 1860 to 1875: a Pompeii-style centrepiece for Prince Napoleon (now lost), a Neo-Grec tea service (exhibited in 1867), an ebony jewellery cabinet with inlay and enamel work (1873), a complete silverware service with the Nemean Lion hide as its principal ornamental motif (exhibited in 1875), a salon table with a gold and silver-inlaid top for Mme de Païva’s hôtel particulier on the Champs-Elysées, bronze work for M. Fouret’s private mansion, and marble vases with bronze mounts and Louis XIV chandeliers for M. Armand Templier. While working simultaneously on these numerous pieces, Rossigneux also designed fine jewellery for the goldsmiths Froment-Meurice; designed furniture for Count Henkel von Donnersmark’s castle in the province of Silesia (1887); and lastly, decorated the entire Hachette family’s hôtel particulier, where everything including chandeliers, torchères and bronze mounts were executed after his designs. The striking similarities between the present clock and the designs for the initials and tailpieces for the 1873 edition of Les Evangiles, leads us to believe that the present clock, exceptional in every respect, could have originated from the prestigious Hachette decorative ensemble now lost. Rossigneux, like Feuchère, Vechte and Klagmann, belonged to the same prestigious school, one that has earned a unique place in the decorative arts of the nineteenth century. During an exhibition of Rossigneux’s work at the Pavillon de Marsan (formerly part of the Tuileries Palace), F. de Ribes-Christofle liked to highlight the effects of his style, of which ‘the characteristic lies in the harmony of his compositional variety, the coherence of his design, and, above all, in the distinctive elegance that acts like a hallmark.’ A multi-talented artist, Rossigneux can be counted, along with Constant-Sevin and the furniture designer Fourdinois, as one of the most prominent representatives of the French decorative arts. Countless designs left his workshop to guide the hands of sculptors and goldsmiths who brought to life splendid bindings, tapestries, jewellery, delicate ceramic work, and furniture made for the sole purpose of obtaining prestigious prizes at the World’s Fairs. Bulletin Bibliographique, Gazette des Beaux Arts, 1873, 2e période, p. 564; Léon Deshairs, Charles Rossigneux, architecte décorateur (1818-1907), Gazette des Beaux-Arts, 1908; Jules Guiffrey, Charles-François Rossigneux, architecte et dessinateur (1818-1907), s.n. 1908; M. de Ribes-Christofle, Notice nécrologique sur M. Ch. Rossigneux, Société d’encouragement pour l’industrie nationale, Paris, Extrait du Bulletin de Mars 1908. Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, On requestRead more

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Pratt Comptoir Général

Important mystery clock of large-scale with torsion pendulum, signed J. Pratt, Comptoir General, Paris. Circa 1890. J. Pratt, Comptoir General, Paris. Large Paris-type movement with Brocot half-rollers escapement of exceptional size interacting with a 9-teeth escape wheel (!) The swing from left to right is through a thin rod placed inside the larger vertical nickel-plated rod suspended by the arm of the statue. The black painted sphere-shaped dial is hollow and contains the clock’s movement. The whole swings from left to right at about a 30° angle, the assembly hanging through two long and thin suspension blades. Countwheel strike every half-hour on a silvered bell. Autonomy 8 days. The dial has twelve applied chased gilt-brass Roman hour numerals surrounding a central star and two finely chased gilt-brass half-moon hands. The two-tone patinated spelter support, in the form of a draped female figure inspired from celebrated Italian Renaissance models; the sculpture in contrapposto, brings movement and lightness to the composition. The dial, gracefully suspended from the figure’s hand at the end of a long embellished shaft, terminates in a fine point. The latter highlights the impression of mystery emanating from the sphere, which moves around itself instead of swinging to-and-fro: the figure’s hand remains stationary and, yet, the sphere continues to move with no obvious impulse to keep it going!, Genuine tours de force and triumphs of ingenuity, mystery clocks are designed to hide their workings, creating the kind of illusion we see here: a contrast between the figure’s perceived movement and the sphere’s static horological precision. H.123 cm (48 ½"), W. 35 cm (13 ¾"), D. 40 cm (15 ¾"). According to an advertisement in the 1896 issue of Didot-Bottin (directory and almanac for commerce, industry, judicial and civil services) the Comptoir Général, a retailer, was one of ‘the most well-stocked shops for everything from: jewellery, bronze art objects, timepieces & furniture, precious stones, marble sculptures, silverware, ceiling lights & white metal, chandeliers, cutlery, lamps & diamond-facetted fireplaces, travel clocks, “fine-stone” pearls.’ It boasted ‘factory prices’ and ‘retail stores in Paris with no other branches, representatives, or offices in any other city, French or foreign.’ The Comptoir Général was represented by Maison H. Riondet & J. Pratt, Succ., located at 9, boulevard Poissonnière and 45, rue du Sentier in Paris. The 1911 Annuaire de la Curiosité et des Beaux-Arts, a directory of curiosities and fine art, shows that the retailer was a member of the bronze manufacturing trade union. Didot-Bottin, Comptoir Général, Annuaire de la Curiosité et des Beaux-Arts, Intersecting the grand Parisian boulevards, the Comptoir Général was located on the royal route, which under the Second Empire already connected the Madeleine to the Gymnase Theatre. The retailer figured among the great Parisian stores of the late nineteenth-century, providing “free entry” to customers. Strolling from the Place de la Madeleine to the Café des Variétés on Boulevard Montmartre, elegant crowds stopped to admire the store’s display windows, stocked in an abundant and spectacular manner. The Comptoir Général was contemporary with other great department stores of the period, like the Grands Magasins du Louvre, Bon Marché, and La Samaritaine, and attested to the new forms of commerce developing during the second half of the nineteenth century. These stores became showcases; advertising in newspapers, they offered the consumer a diverse and varied product, displayed in a way that was elaborate and often luxurious. Grands Magasins du Louvre, Bon Marché, La Samaritaine, On requestRead more

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Precision table regulator, masterpiece from Francis Breyne

Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics And Electricity, precision table regulator, masterpiece from Francis Breyne in 1931. Extremely robust construction movement with thick plates and four large turned pillars screwed on both sides, Graham escapement, steel suspension powered by a mainspring in a barrel allowing for a three-week autonomy. Pine wood rod pendulum with micrometric crutch adjustment, graduated adjustment on the heavy brass bob.The plates nicely machined patterned. Large silvered dial with Roman numerals for the hours, bearing the signature ECOLE PROFELLE DE MÉCANIQUE DE PRÉCISION ET D'ELECTRICITÉ DE BRUXELLES, FRANCIS BREYNE 1931. Two blued steel hands, with polished conical washer at the center. It was traditionally left to the student cabinet-makers of that same prestigious school to make the case, using the best materials and assembly methods of the time. It is made in a very fine manner, using quarter-sawn oak and glasses on four sides, to emphasize the geometrical shapes and to show the movement in its best possible view. Its trapeze shape with stepped decorations and slightly triangular hood, is directly inspired from the clocks cases made by Gustave Serrurier-Bovy (1858-1910), the famous Liège architect and decorator who was a major player in interior designs in Belgium. The detailed plans of most parts for these masterpieces still exist and are reproduced in the PDF files with links below. Height 52 cm, Width 35 cm, Depth 16 cm. that was to become later the Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, held the reputation of being one of the finest clock-making school in the World in the 20th Century years preceding the Second World War. As an end of school project, the students had to entirely manufacture a precision regulator of a given design. They were left with some liberties for some of the execution details, and these finished works were to become their masterpiece, that were to stay with them for the rest of their career, so as to demonstrate their skill, but also to regulate all the other time instruments that they would work on. € 5400.-Read more

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6 100 USD

Albert Haute Precision Table Regulator and Galvanometer

Precision Table Regulator and Galvanometer, Masterpiece from Albert Haute In 1933 And 1934, Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics and Electricity. Extremely robust construction movement with thick plates and four large turned pillars screwed on both sides, Graham escapement, steel suspension powered by a mainspring in a barrel allowing for a two-week autonomy. Pine wood rod pendulum with micrometric crutch adjustment, graduated adjustment on the heavy brass bob.The plates nicely machined and marble patterned. Large silvered dial with Roman numerals for the hours, bearing the signature ECOLE PROFESSIONELLE DE MÉCANIQUE DE PRÉCISION ET D'ELECTRICITÉ DE BRUXELLES, ALBERT HAUTE 1933. Two blued steel hands, with polished conical washer at the center;, The galvanometer accompanying the clock is also entirely made by the scholar, and signed ALBERT HAUTE 1934, which seems to indicate that the scholar followed an extra specialisation course on the manufacture of instruments for one year. It is extremely rare to find a clock and a scientific instrument (and in this case also a winding key with initials) all bearing the same signature. Only one other example is known to us, that of André De Jonghe 1922 (on the clock) and 1923 (on the galvanometer). A galvanometer is an electromechanical instrument for detecting and measuring electric current. H. 20" (51 cm), W. 14" (36 cm), D. 6 ¼" (16cm), The Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics and Electricity, that was to become later the Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, held the reputation of being one of the finest clock-making school in the World in the 20th Century years preceding the Second World War. As an end of school project, the students had to entirely manufacture a precision regulator of a given design. They were left with some liberties for some of the execution details, and these finished works were to become their masterpiece, that were to stay with them for the rest of their career, so as to demonstrate their skill, but also to regulate all the other time instruments that they would work on. Brussels Professional School of Precision Mechanics and Electricity, Arts and Crafts School of Brussels, € 6500.-Read more

  • BELBelgium
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7 400 USD

Constantin Detouche

Precision Table Regulator with perpetual calendar, circa 1850, signed on the dial and on the rear movement plate C. DETOUCHE, FSEUR DE L’EMPEREUR, RUE ST MARTIN 228 & 230, PARIS. C. DETOUCHE, FSEUR DE L’EMPEREUR, SEUR, RUE ST MARTIN 228 & 230, PARIS. T, The base and the top of the case in white marble, the four sides with bevelled glass allowing for a good view of the complete dial and movement through the sides and rear. Two doors, front and rear, allow for easy access to all controls and parts. The top dial with external ring for hour Roman numerals and outer division for minutes and seconds, the centre with the visible Brocot cornaline half-roller pallets, above the signature. Three concentric blued steel hands for the hours, minutes and center-sweeping half-seconds, following the beat of the pendulum. Brocot, The lower dial with the full perpetual calendar showing the months, the days of the week, the day of the month and the moonphases. The day of the month automatically corrects for the shorter months and thus takes the correct action on 28-, 29- (for leap years), 30-, or 31-days months. Both movements of remarkable quality, as expected of any work coming from Constantin Detouche’s workshop, and the perpetual calendar is of his own design, not wanting to pay for the Brocot perpetual calendar patents. Some bridges carry the initilas “GH” stamped on the reverse, possibly the mark of the clockmaker who made the calendar. Steel suspension adjustable from the front, the hands very unusually being set through a handle from the rear, the calendar settings ditto, the front door thus never needs opening. Compensated temperature Ellicott – type pendulum. Two-weeks autonomy. ditto, Ellicott, 19½ʺ (50cm) , W. 12½ʺ (32cm), D. 9½ʺ (24cm), (1810-1889) was an extraordinarily gifted and prolific clockmaker, and he designed and produced numerous complicated clocks. His shop and workshop were set up in the Rue Saint-Martin in Paris, and he is recognized as one of the great 19th C. French clockmakers. th, Tardy, Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Paris, 1972 ; Derek Roberts, Continental and American Skeleton Clocks, Schiffer, 1989. Dictionnaire des horlogers français, Continental and American Skeleton Clocks, € 14,000.-Read more

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15 900 USD

Parkinson & Frodsham

Bracket clock with precision visible deadbeat escapement, signed Parkinson & Frodsham, LONDON. George III Period, circa 1810. Movement with two fusees and gutline transmission, Graham-type precision deadbeat escapement visible from the rear, spring suspended pendulum with adjustment above the bob, the rod made of pine wood for minimizing the temperature disturbance. Hourly rack strike on a vertical bronze bell at the rear, with pull-repeat on the right-hand side. Finely engraved rear plate. Autonomy 8 days. Painted dial with black Roman numerals for the hours, on white background. Subsidiary dial for the seconds below the numeral XII. Finely cut blued steel hands. Oak case with ebonized pear tree veneer with varnished applied bronze lining and accessories. Front and side panels finely cut in the fish scales fashion, with red silk back lining, allowing for the sound to go through while keeping the dust outside. Ormolu feet, handle and bezel. Height 41 cm (16”), Width 28 cm (11”), Depth 19 cm (7 ½”), William PARKINSON and William James FRODSHAM were associated for fifty years, between the years 1800 and 1850. First established in Liverpool, then in London, they had an excellent reputation as clockmakers, as well as marine chronometer makers. Their workshop continued to produce fine timepieces right up to 1947. Richard Barder, The Georgian Bracket Clock 1714-1830, 1993; G.H.Baillie, Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 1925; F.J.Britten, Old Clocks and Watches & Their Makers, 1904; Tony Mercer, Chronometer Makers of the World, revised edition 2004. € 9.500,-Read more

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10 800 USD

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Jacques Nève
Rue des Fonds 2
1440 Braine-le-Château
+32 477 27 19 08
jneve@horloger.net
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