Adam's

James Adam and Sons Ltd, trading as Adam's, is Ireland's leading Fine Art Auctioneers and Valuers. Founded in 1887, it is situated in the heart of Dublin on St Stephen's Green.

Over the last century the company has developed its expertise in many fields and currently offer specialist sales ranging from Important Irish Art, Fine Period Furniture, Silver & Object's Of Vertu, Contemporary & Modern Art, Militaria & Memorabilia as well as Vintage Wine Sales and are adept at the appraisal and sale of private collections.

Adam's also off er a comprehensive valuation service for the purposes of insurance, probate, family division etc. Adam's is proud of its relationship with its clientele and as a privately held company, can off er flexible and competitive terms. Numerous world records have been achieved in these salerooms, particularly in the sale of Irish art. Today, James Adam & Sons, is one of the fastest growing companies in its field, offering a service of distinction as Ireland's principal auction house.

Countries
  • Ireland
Objects "Adam's"

Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974)

Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974), The Garden, Oil on board, 46 x 60cm (18 x 23½''), Inscribed with title verso, Provenance: Purchased c.1970/71 from the Victor Waddington Galleries, London by current owner, a cousin of the renowned gallerist. Daniel O, Neill has often included twinned female figures in his work, usually placing them in the immediate foreground, close to the picture plane, as seen Lot 54 in this sale. On this occasion his two figures are set within the bright and extensive landscape of a walled garden. The tranquility of the setting, filled with colourful flowers creates a calm atmosphere. The title of the work, makes explicit the suggestion of recovery after an illness and presumably refers to the figure who is lying down in the background of the painting covered in a blanket, despite the warm sunshine. She is watched over by another figure standing to the left of the foreground, facing out to the viewer. O, Neill leaves the figures faceless, their identity and emotions anonymous to us. The walled garden, while offering a place of sanctuary and peacefulness could also be read as a barrier between the figures and the what lies beyond the enclosure. O, Neill has arranged the composition around the central square flower bed, the perimeter line of the garden wall continues into the physical boundary that exists between the viewer and the painted canvas. We are on the threshold, the figure in the foreground is removed from us standing at the top of steps. We do not get the impression that we could enter into this space. O, Neill often juxtaposed elements within his paintings and in the case of this work the abundance of colour and variety of plants on the right hand side of the garden are contrasted with the dark, lifeless bushes to the left. This side of the garden is cast in shade, while the figure lying on the chair is bathed in sunlight. The shift in light and atmosphere is incredibly subtle, delineated by the slight difference in tone of the flagstones. There is a tendency to describe the atmosphere of O, Neill, s paintings as isolating yet it seems here the sense of distance between the figures and the viewer functions only to intrigue us further into the nature of the scene. Niamh Corcoran, August 2018Read more

  • IRLIreland
  • 5d 3h

Patrick Scott HRHA (1921-2014)

Patrick Scott HRHA (1921-2014), Silver Painting (10/90), Tempera and silver leaf on canvas, 122 x 122cm (48 x 48''), Signed and inscribed verso, Provenance: The collection of Brian and Anne Friel, Patrick Scott began his trademark Silver and Gold paintings on unprimed canvas as long ago as the early 1970s. The great orbs in silver or gold emerged from similar painted forms that were assumed to refer to the sun and the moon. This was especially the case when planet earth seemed to be threatened by destruction through nuclear activity following the bombings at the end of World War II, and in Ireland, proposals to build a nuclear reactor in County Wexford. Scott though, despite a consistent interest in the environment, was even more psychically connected to the basic forms of circles, squares, cubes and combinations of these architectural and geometric elements. Self-taught as a painter, his professional training was in architecture and design and led straight to an appointment in the offices of Michael Scott and Robin Walker, where his design skills were immediately put to effective and varied use in projects such as Bus Aras, theatre designs for the Abbey Theatre, uniforms for Coras Iompar Eireann, and Christmas lighting for Grafton Street. Scott was an idealist. His art has been dedicated to the sublime and the elemental, the perfect geometric forms that he, like Plato, believed to lie beneath every aspect of our world. For Scott, that also meant the materials used to embody those forms. Looking to the Italians of the Early Renaissance on the one hand and Japanese Zen design on the other, he magicked landscapes out of elemental forms, using real gold, silver or palladium leaf which he attached to pure, unprimed canvases so firmly that he could take the garden hose to them without damaging their glittering surfaces. Silver painting 10/90, was made in 1990, the same year in which he painted, Sun Window, and, Moon Window, . All three share the same square format, the same dimensions and the simple combination of an orb hovering seductively above an architectural element. Everything is in its proper place. Nothing remains to be said. Scott won numerous awards during his long career, was elected Saoi of Aosdana and his work can be found in all Irish major collections as well as in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Joseph H. Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, the European Parliament, Strasbourg, the Mitsubishi Bank, Tokyo and many national and international private and corporate collections. Catherine Marshall, August 2018Read more

  • IRLIreland
  • 5d 3h

Walter Frederick Osborne RHA ROI (1859-1903)

Walter Frederick Osborne RHA ROI (1859-1903), Moonrise, Oil on canvas, 50 x 68cm (19¾ x 26¾''), Signed and dated (18)'93, Provenance: Adam's, Important Irish Art, 14th December 1994, Lot No.28. Exhibited: Dublin, Royal Hibernian Academy Annual Exhibition 1894, No.113; London, Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, 1894, No.451. Literature: Jeanne Sheehy, 'Walter Osborne', Ballycotton 1974, Catalogue No.402, p.137; Thomas Bodkin, 'Four Irish Landscape Painters', Dublin and London 1920, Appendix XI, p.124, 137;, Irish Independent, , 12th March 1894 - "Well treated picture of the Impressionist type.", is an interesting painting in Walter Osborne, s oeuvre, in that it is a, pure, landscape, including sheep grazing, but lacking in human figures, and in the presence of a vivid moon rising in a clear blue sky, a contrast to the subdued palette of the earth. There is a reflective feeling for nature, reminiscent of the Barbizon school, particularly Charles Daubigny, s crepuscular scenes of shepherds with sheep and moons rising above the land(1) and Nathaniel Hone, s pastoral landscapes. The 1890s was an intensely busy but fulfilling period in Osborne, s career, when he was undertaking official portraits of dignitaries and society ladies; painting more informal portraits of his family, such as, At the Breakfast Table, , 1894, and friends; representing genre scenes in the Dublin streets; painting landscapes around Dublin; making visits to Co. Galway; as well as helping to look after his family. He thus found solace in nature, painting in the open air in north Co. Dublin, where his friend, Hone, was depicting cattle or sheep in pastures near Malahide and Raheny and Joseph M. Kavanagh was painting sheep grazing in Fingal and in Foxrock, a few miles south of Dublin, where fellow landscapist J.B.S. McIllwain lived. may be set near Foxrock, with its mixture of farmland and scrubby landscape. It is contemporary with some of Osborne, s major Irish landscapes of the period, for example, The Thornbush, 1893 and, Milking Time, , c.1893. Being the son of animal painter William Osborne, Walter had a real empathy for animals, both pets and farm animals, and he seemed to capture something of their true spirit. During the 1880s, he had painted a number of pictures of shepherds with their flocks of black-faced sheep in England, including, The Sheepfold, , 1885 and, Counting the Flock, , 1885 (sold in Adam, s, Important Irish Art, May 2018, Lot 32)(2). In England, the sheep were guarded by a shepherd, but in, they are untended, grazing freely in the rougher Irish landscape. With its pastures, hedges, trees, horizon line and large sky, its earthy tones of olive greens and browns and its free, buttery, brushstrokes, is reminiscent of Hone, s scenes of pastures with cattle. With their dun-coloured fleeces, Osborne, s sheep are carefully observed, but well integrated into the landscape. A notable feature of his sheep, and indeed animal paintings in general, is the way that one or two of the animals in the foreground might look out at the viewer with curiosity, thus engaging our interest, as if caught in a photograph, or based on a preparatory drawing by the artist. Some of Osborne, s paintings show his interest in moonlight and starlight, for example in scenes observed in Rush, Galway and Roundstone. During the early 1890s, he observed the atmospheric scene of, Rising Moon, Galway Harbour, (Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane). Here, in, , he was moved by the sight of the moon rising in daylight, in a clear blue sky, and by the lit-up cloud beyond the horizon. The painting is contemporary with the early Celtic Twilight poems of W.B. Yeats and, although Osborne, s emphasis was naturalistic rather than symbolic, his image of a bright, three-quarter, lozenge-shaped moon rising above the tranquil landscape and grazing sheep, is a romantic one, symbolising the seasonal regeneration of nature. was exhibited at the Royal Hibernian Academy, Dublin in 1894 and then at the Institute of Painters in Oil Colours, London in the same year. Julian Campbell, August 2018, 1. Eg. Daubigny, s, Return of the Flock, , 1877 (Montreal Museum of Fine Arts). 2. , c.1885, illustrated in J. Sheehy, Walter Osborne, , 1983, p.74, Catalogue No.22;, , 1885, Important Irish Art, , Adam, s, May 2018, Lot 32. See also, The Return of the Flock, A Shepherd and His Flock, , 1887 (, s, 3rd December 2002, Lot 78)Read more

  • IRLIreland
  • 5d 3h

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012)

Louis le Brocquy HRHA (1916-2012), Image of James Joyce (Opus 424), Oil on canvas, 70 x 70cm (27½ x 27½''), Signed verso and dated (19)'79-88, Provenance: With Galerie Jeanne Bucher, Paris; Taylor Galleries, Dublin, where purchased by current owner. In Dorothy Walker's monograph on the artist le Brocquy she describes the spiritual and technical problems with his images of Joyce. ''It is said that no Dubliner can quite escape from the microcosmic world of Dublin, and in this I am certainly no exception. James Joyce is the apotheosis, the archetype of our kind and it seems to me than in him-behind the volatile arrangement of his features-lies his unique evocation of that small city, large as life and therefore poignant everywhere. But to a Dublin man, peering at Joyce, a particular nostalgia is added to the universal ''epiphany'', and this perhaps enables me to grope for something of my own experience within the ever-changing landscape of his face, within the various and contradictory photographs of his head which surround me, within my bronze death-mask of him and, I suppose, within the recesses of my own mind. Indeed I think that this preoccupation of mine is not altogether unlike that of the Celts of prehistory, with their oracular cult of the human head, the mysterious box which holds the spirit prisoner. To attempt today a portrait, a single static image of a great artist such as Joyce, appears to me to be futile as well as impertinent. Long conditioned by photography, the cinema and psychology, we now perceive the human individual as facetted, kinetic. And so I have tried as objectively as possible to draw from the depths of paper or canvas these changing and even contradictory traces of the man. In this fragmentary search I have seemed at times to encroach on archaeological ground. Is there archaeology of the spirit? Certainly neither my will nor my skill has played any essential part in these studies. For the fact is that many of them emerged entirely under my ignorant left hand-my right hand being for some months immobilized in plaster. So it would appear that no dexterity whatever was involved in forming these images, which tended to emerge automatically, so to speak, jerked into coherence by a series of scrutinized accidents, impelled by my curiosity to discover something of the man and, within him, the inverted mirror-room of my own experience."Read more

  • IRLIreland
  • 5d 3h

Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016)

Basil Blackshaw HRHA RUA (1932-2016), Lurcher (1997), Oil on canvas, 51 x 41cm (20 x 16¼''), Literature:, Blackshaw, edited by Eamonn Mallie, Full page illustration Plate 126, Page 291. Provenance: The collection of Brian and Anne Friel, This work by Basil Blackshaw has all the power of a Paul Gauguin or a Roderic O Conor - the only difference being, it is better!, I am declaring my hand. I consider this painting of 1997 to be one of Blackshaw, s masterpieces. It has got everything, the power and the glory of an artist at his height - I suspect the figure portrayed here is Basil himself. This man adopts a similar stance to other figures who have appeared in several Blackshaw paintings down the years. In a work, A Dog and Two Men, (2001) Basil originally titled it, The Vet, the Dog and the Humpy Hoor and I, m the Humpy Hoor, . What we witness here, in this 1997 creation, is an owner and his dog moving in absolute harmony. They are like a happy couple lost in an ideal landscape. Interestingly Basil does not obsess with physical details. He is pursuing the, spirit, of his subjects. This is a feature of Blackshaw, s work which developed around the late Seventies, early Eighties, partially influenced by a conversation between Basil and Sligo artist Patrick Collins who adjudged Basil, s work to be too forensic. Go for the spirit of your subject, he advised. Basil took that advice seriously. This is a gem from Blackshaw. Eamonn Mallie, August 2018Read more

  • IRLIreland
  • 5d 3h

Oisin Kelly RHA (1915-1981)

Oisin Kelly RHA (1915-1981), Kilcorban Madonna, Terracotta, 62cm high (24½''), Sculptor Oisín Kelly (1915-81) is best known for his large public bronzes, such as, Two Working Men, at the County Hall, Cork (1969), The Children of Lir, at the Garden of Remembrance, Parnell Square, Dublin (1971), Jim Larkin, in O, Connell Street, Dublin (1977), and, The Chariot of Life, at the Irish Life Centre, Dublin (1982). But he also made a great many smaller pieces, in various media. Many of these deal with devotional themes, and his religious works are to be seen in churches throughout the country. The statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary with the Infant Christ illustrated here has an interesting history. Oisín was greatly influenced by medieval Irish art, and this piece was inspired by the Kilcorban Madonna, an oak carving which dates from around the year 1200. It is currently on display in the Clonfert Diocesan Museum, Co. Galway. Oisín was commissioned by the Reverend Thomas Hogan to carve a similar piece for the restored Ballintubber Abbey, Co. Mayo, and it was completed in 1966. It was often his practice to treat the same theme in different media, and he decided to make this stoneware version of the statue, of which six copies were kiln-fired. During boyhood visits to the Conamara Gaeltacht, Oisín developed a love for traditional Irish céilí dancing. From the beginning of his career as a sculptor he was fascinated by the challenge of convincingly representing céilí dancers in movement. One of his earliest works was a male dancer in stained wood, and he also modelled a popular, Dancing Couple, which was included in the Kilkenny Design Workshops ceramic range. Another lively piece comprises a group of three dancers, carved in wood. The bronze figure illustrated here is one of an issue of seven: it is a smaller version of, Dancing Girl, on permanent display at Fitzgerald Park, Cork. Fergus S. Kelly, (Son of Oisín Kelly, and author of, The Life and Work of Oisín Kelly, , with photography by Hugh McElveen, Derreen Books, 2015)Read more

  • IRLIreland
  • 5d 3h

Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974)

Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974), Mother and Daughters (c.1958), Oil on board, 52 x 72cm (20½ x 28¼''), Signed; inscribed with title verso, Provenance: With Agnew's London, stock label verso. As the sky gradually darkens over the mountaintops, three female figures, a mother and her two daughters, pose side by side dressed in almost identical blue dresses and black shawls. The work is filled with an intense stillness, the surface of the sea like glass behind them, the mother, s hands joined in silent reverence. By placing them in the immediate foreground of the painting, slightly off center and turning away from the viewer, O, Neill gives the impression that they have paused momentarily on the road, before continuing on their journey. We wonder about this trinity of females, where they might be travelling to, if that is their home, the whitewashed cottage in the background. The handling of the paint on the clothes and faces of the figures, quick coarse brushstrokes mirrors the treatment of grasses in the field behind them. O, Neill often employed palette knives or sponges to embolden the surface quality, and in this work he uses hatched brushstrokes, particularly on the mother, s forehead and neck to demonstrate the play of light on her face. This technique heightens the texture of the flesh, adding to the sensual quality of the work. Similarly the dashes of orange and green pigment running through the grasses, makes them appear as if they are swaying gently in the breeze. The three figures seem to almost merge with the landscape surrounding them, creating a harmonious balance between them and the natural world they inhabit. This might have been to suggest the clear and lasting affinity that existed between island folk and the land. Despite this the worlds that Dillon created through his painting always contained an certain strangeness, populated by recognisable figural elements but maintaining a distance from the viewer who cannot enter these timeless landscapes. Niamh Corcoran, August 2018Read more

  • IRLIreland
  • 5d 3h

Realized prices "Adam's "

A Lalique clear glass decanter and six lacquer glasses of tapered
A Lalique clear glass decanter and six lacquer glasses of tapered form, 20th Century, decorated with a moulded continuous band of turquoise stained fish in relief, each on circular foot. The decanter 29cm high, the glasses 7cm high. Adam's
A PAIR OF 19TH CENTURY MAHOGANY SIX PANEL DOORS. 208 x 86cm
A PAIR OF 19TH CENTURY MAHOGANY SIX PANEL DOORS. 208 x 86cm Adam's
Mainie Jellett (1897-1944) Pieta Oil on board, 55 x 56cm (21.5 x 22'')
Mainie Jellett (1897-1944) Pieta Oil on board, 55 x 56cm (21.5 x 22'') Provenance: From the Estate of Hon. Robert Fermor-Hesketh and his sale of Jelletts, Sotheby's May 1999, catalogue no. 324, where purchased by the current owner. Adam's
ANTON WINDMAIER (1840-1896) Figures in the Snow by a Village Oil on
ANTON WINDMAIER (1840-1896) Figures in the Snow by a Village Oil on board, 14 x 25.5cm Signed, lower right Provenance: Bell Gallery; from the estate of the late James Gibson Adam's
AN IRISH GEORGE II HANOVERIAN AND RAT-TAIL PATTERN SILVER TABLE SPOON
AN IRISH GEORGE II HANOVERIAN AND RAT-TAIL PATTERN SILVER TABLE SPOON, Dublin 1732, mark of Joseph Teafe, initialed to the reverse of the handle terminal ''R'' over ''R*B'' (c.2.5ozs). 19.5cm long Adam's

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Adam's
26 St Stephen's Green
Dublin 2, Ireland
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